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  • 1.
    Almerud, Sofia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Närhet och distans: teknik och vårdande i harmoni2008In: Vårdvetenskapliga vägskäl / [ed] Berglund, M., Johansson Sundler, A. & Roxberg, Å., Växjö: Växjö University Press. , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Almerud, Sofia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Technology and nursing - Practice, concepts and issues.2008In: Nursing philosophy, no 9, p. 143-144Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Almerud, Sofia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    The meaning of technology in intensive care: 2008In: CONNECT: The World of Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 1748-6254, E-ISSN 1748-6254, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 39-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Almerud, Sofia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Vigilance & Invisibility: Care in technologically intense environments2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the relationship between technology and caring in technologically intense environments. The overall aim was to uncover the meaning of care in those environments as experienced by patients and caregivers. Moreover, the study aimed at finding a deeper understanding for the almost total dominance of technology in care in intensive care.

    The thesis includes three empirical studies and one theoretical, philosophical study. The research was guided by a phenomenological and lifeworld theoretical approach. Research data consist of quantitative parameters and qualitative interviews with caregivers and patients. Data was analysed and synthesised with aim of seeking meaning through openness, sensitivity and a reflective attitude. The goal was to reach the general structure of the phenomenon and its meaning constituents.

    The result shows that an intensive care unit is a cognitive and emotionally complex environment where caregivers are juggling a precarious handful of cards. Despite being constantly monitored and observed, intensive care patients express that they feel invisible. The patient and the apparatus easily meld into a unit, one item to be regulated and read. From the patients’ perspective, caregivers demonstrate keen vigilance over technological devices and measured parameters, but pay scant attention to their stories and experiences. Technology, with its exciting captive lure and challenging character, seduces the caregivers and lulls them into a fictive sense of security and safety. Technical tasks take precedence or have more urgency than caring behaviour.

    A malaise settles on caregivers as they strive for garnering the security that technology promises. Yet simultaneously, insecurity creeps in as they read the patient’s biological data. Technical tasks take precedence over and seemingly are more urgent than showing care. Listening, inspiring trust, and promoting confidence no longer have high priority. Trying to communicate ‘through’ technology is so complex, that it is a difficult challenge to keep in perspective what or who is the focus; ‘seeing’ or caring. Technology should be like a catalyst; do its ‘thing’ and withdraw ‘unnoticed’.

    This thesis has contributed in gaining deeper knowledge about care in technologically intense environments and the impact of technology. The main contribution is that caregivers need to be aware that the roar of technology silences the subtle attempts of the critically ill or injured person to give voice to his or her needs. In conclusion, the challenges for caregivers are to distinguish when to heighten the importance of the objective and measurable dimensions provided by technology and when to reduce their importance. In order to magnify the patients’ lived experiences. It is a question of balancing state-of-the-art technology with integrative and comprehensive care, of harmonizing the demands of subjectivity with objective signs.

  • 5.
    Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Alapack, R.J
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Beleuguered by technology - Care in technologically intense environments2008In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, no 9, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Alapack, RJ
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Caught in an artificial split: A phenomenological study of beinf a caregiver in the technologically intense environment2007In: Intensive Crit Care Nurs.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Alapack, RJ
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Of vigilance and invisibility - being a patient in technologically intense environments.2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Almerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Baigi, Amir
    Bering, Catrine
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Knowledge of heart disease risk in patients declining rehabilitation2010In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 288-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Akut omhändertagande ur ett omvårdnadsperspektiv2014In: Omvårdnadens grunder: hälsa och ohälsa / [ed] Anna-Karin Edberg & Helle Wijk, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 687-704Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Visualism and technification - the patient behind the screen2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-6, article id 5223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At stake in this study is the patient's credibility. The Cartesian philosophical standpoint, which holds sway in western thinking, questions with scepticism whether the reported symptoms are “real.” Do they reside in the body, or are they mentally concocted. However, from the caring perspective any symptom must be both listened and attended to in its own right, not just scrutinized as evidence for an accurate diagnosis.

    In cognitively and emotionally complex high-tech units caregivers are juggling a precarious handful of cards. Technical tasks take precedence or have more urgency than caring behaviour. Assuming an irremediable tension between object–subject and care–cure in nursing is futile dualism. By addressing the essence of technology—the non-neutral and highly visual technology—this paper aims to find, from a philosophical point of view, a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance visualism and technification within intensive care.

    Screens give us access to vital signs. Screens record numbers and lines that relate to a graph and afford superfine spiked “readings.” However, the most relevant vital signs may be missing.

  • 11.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, CarinaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Kliniska examinationer: Handbok för sjuksköterskestudenter på grund- och avancerad nivå2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en guide till kliniska examinationer som syftar till att du,som student, ska vara väl förberedd och genomföra examinationen på bästa sätt. Innehållet i boken är tänkt att ge en överskådlig och intresseväckande bild av de olika kliniska examinationsformerna.

    Boken är lätt att bära med sig i kliniska undervisningssituationer,den ger konkreta tips kring olika moment i examinationerna.  Författarna till boken är sjuksköterskor, specialistsjuksköterskor  och universitetslärare med mångårig erfarenhet av kliniska examinationer och kliniska slutexaminationer på olika nivåer och i olika utbildningsprogram.

    Målgruppen är studenter i sjuksköterske- och specialistsjuksköterskeprogrammen där kliniska examinationer är en del av utbildningen. Den kan också läsas av lärare vid universitet eller högskolor som inspiration och stöd i arbetet med kliniska examinationer. Liknande böcker finns på den brittiska och amerikanska marknaden men detta är den första i Sverige.

  • 12.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nordgren, LenaMälardalen University.
    Akut vård ur ett patientperspektiv2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nordgren, Lena
    Mälardalen University.
    Att vara patient inom intensivvården2012In: Akut vård ur ett patientperspektiv / [ed] Sofia Almerud Österberg & Lena Nordgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andersson, Lisbet
    et al.
    Central Hospital, Växjö.
    Johansson, Ingrid
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Parents' experiences of their child's first anaesthetic in day surgery2012In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 21, no 20, p. 1204-1210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parents play an important part in their child’s anaesthesia. When a child has to receive anaesthesia, it is of great importance that parents are there by his/her side as children depend on them for support. Many parents worry and experience fear before their child’s anaesthesia and studies show that there is a correlation between a worried parent and a worried child. Aim: The purpose of this study was to illustrate the meaning of being a parent at one’s child’s first anaesthesia in day surgery. Method: Six parents were interviewed and data were analysed using a descriptive qualitative approach inspired by phenomenology.Result: The phenomenon, ‘a child’s first anaesthesia in day surgery as experienced by parents’ is based on the following components: ambivalence between worry and relief, a feeling of losing control, needing to be prepared, being able to be present and a need of emotional support. Conclusion: Specific individually-adapted information with a compulsory preoperative visit, presence and participation from, if possible, both parents at their child’s anaesthesia but also designated staff from the anaesthetic team to focus solely on supporting the parents at their child’s anaesthesia induction can improve the conditions for security.

  • 15.
    Asp, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    ”Samvetsstress och dåliga villkor bakom sjuksköterskeflykten”2017In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2017-05-04Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, SofiaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Akut omhändertagande av trauma: på skadeplats och akutmottagning2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. 641006.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Utvärdering av projekt Första InsatsPerson (FIP)2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Region Kronoberg County Council.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University ; Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde.
    Manoeuvring between anxiety and control: Patients' experience of learning to live with diabetes : A lifeworld phenomenological study2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with diabetes want their lives to proceed as normally as possible, but some patients experience difficulty in reaching their desired goals with treatment. The learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven into every facet of life. Patients and healthcare providers often have different perspectives in care which gives different expectations on what the patients need to learn and cope with. The aim of this study, therefore, is to describe the experience of learning to live with diabetes. Interviews were conducted with 12 patients afflicted with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were then analysed with reference to the reflective lifeworld research approach. The analysis shows that when the afflicted realize that their bodies undergo changes and that blood sugar levels are not always balanced as earlier in life, they can adjust to their new conditions early. The afflicted must take responsibility for balancing their blood sugar levels and incorporating the illness into their lives. Achieving such goals necessitates knowledge. The search for knowledge and sensitivity to changes are constant requirements for people with diabetes. Learning is driven by the tension caused by the need for and dependence on safe blood sugar control, the fear of losing such control, and the fear of future complications. The most important responsibilities for these patients are aspiring to understand their bodies as lived bodies, ensuring safety and security, and acquiring the knowledge essential to making conscious choices.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Kronoberg Cty Council, Dept Adm, Vaxjo, Sweden.;Reg Kronoberg Cty Council, Primary Care, Växjö.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    University of Dalarna ; Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde.
    Patients' experiences of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being: A lifeworld phenomenological study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 31330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to live with diabetes in such a way that the new conditions will be a normal and natural part of life imposes requirements on the person living with diabetes. Previous studies have shown that there is no clear picture of what and how the learning that would allow persons to incorporate the illness into their everyday life will be supported. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being, from the patient's perspective. Data were collected by interviews with patients living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were analysed using a reflective lifeworld approach. The results show that reflection plays a central role for patients with diabetes in achieving a new understanding of the health process, and awareness of their own responsibility was found to be the key factor for such a reflection. The constituents are responsibility creating curiosity and willpower, openness enabling support, technology verifying bodily feelings, a permissive climate providing for participation and exchanging experiences with others. The study concludes that the challenge for caregivers is to create interactions in an open learning climate that initiates and supports reflection to promote health and well-being.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, Sweden;Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Supporting patients learning to live with diabetes: a phenomenological study2018In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a study of the phenomenon of supporting patients who are learning to live with diabetes, from a diabetes specialist nurse (DSN) perspective. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, data from six interviews (four in groups and two individual) with 16 DSNs were analysed. The results show that, in order to support learning, DSNs use a self-critical approach with the insight that they should not take over responsibility for their patients' diabetes. The DSNs support, encourage and challenge the patients to self-reflect and take responsibility based on patients' own goals and needs. To provide support, DSNs need to assume a tactful, critically challenging approach, dare to confront patients' fears and other emotions and have the insight to know that the responsibility for learning and integration of the condition lies with the patient. To be able to support patients in this way, it is necessary that the DSN is mentored and supported in this role.

  • 21.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    An intraoperative caring model: the 'awake' patient's need for a genuine caring encounter2013In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 23-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaesthesia nursing care during regional anaesthesia is characterized by the encounter between the ‘awake’ patient’s own lifeworld and the nurse anaesthetist’s knowledge in theory and in practice. This study aims to present an intraoperative caring model from the patient’s perspective that will facilitate nurse anaesthetists’ (NA) practice to enhance and support the ‘awake’ patient’s intraoperative well-being during surgery under regional anaesthesia. The model is underpinned by a synthesis based on interviews with patients, a philosophical reflection using Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and video recordings from orthopaedic surgeries under regional anaesthesia. The model can be used as a tool to encounter awake patients’ existential needs in the intraoperative situation and to further enlighten NAs about the possible impact of their proximity, interaction and communication behaviour in the delivery of intraoperative nursing care. The model can help NAs to access, understand and learn through lived experiences, thereby deepening their professional caring skills. The model is a way to get research knowledge ready for use by NAs to reflect on what gaps need to be filled between what nurses know (research) and do (practice).

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    "Is that my leg?" patients' experiences of being awake during regional anesthesia and surgery.2012In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most knee or hip replacement surgery is performed under regional anesthesia, when patients are awake. Previous research has primarily focused on patients' experiences during general anesthesia. The aim of this study was to uncover the meaning of being awake during regional anesthesia and surgery. Nine interviews with patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery comprise the data. The phenomenological analysis shows that being awake during surgery can be compared with walking a tightrope because of ambiguous feelings. Four interrelated constituents further elucidated the patients' experiences: balancing between proximity and distance in the operating theater, balancing between having control and being left out, my partly inaccessible body handled by others, and the significant role of the carer. Anesthesia providers and perioperative nurses need to understand the awake patients' intraoperative experiences to support and confirm them when they can no longer experience or have full access to their body.

  • 23.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery2012In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mindbodyworld continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience.

  • 24.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patient-Nurse Anesthetist Interaction During Regional Anesthesia and Surgery Based on Video Recordings2013In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to interpret and describe the patient-nurse anesthetist (NA) interaction during regional anesthesia. Design: Video recordings conducted during orthopedic surgery at a surgical clinic in Sweden formed the basis for the study, in which three patients and three NAs participated. Methods: A hermeneutic analysis was conducted on the data. Finding: The findings of the analysis demonstrated that the NA was in either "present" presence or "absent" presence in the awake patient's visual field during surgery. The NA's professional actions at times dominated the patient's existential being in the intraoperative situation. The findings conveyed insights about the patient-NA interaction that open up possibilities for nurses to understand and reflect upon their own practice in an expanded way. Conclusions: Using video recordings for reflections enables development of professional skills that positively influence the care quality for patients during regional anesthesia.

  • 25.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Methodological support for the further abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings in the context of caring science2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena in caring science are often complex and laden with meanings. Empirical research with the aim of capturing lived experiences is one way of revealing the complexity. Sometimes, however, results from empirical research need to be further discussed. One way is to further abstract the result and/or philosophically examine it. This has previously been performed and presented in scientific journals and doctoral theses, contributing to a greater understanding of phenomena in caring science. Although the intentions in many of these publications are laudable, the lack of methodological descriptions as well as a theoretical and systematic foundation can contribute to an ambiguity concerning how the results have emerged during the analysis. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodological support for the further abstraction of and/orphilosophical examination of empirical findings. When trying to systematize the support procedures, we have used a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Based on the assumptions in RLR, this article will present methodological support for a theoretical examination that can include two stages. In the first stage, data from several (two or more) empirical results on an essential level are synthesized into a general structure. Sometimes the analysis ends with the general structure, but sometimes there is a need to proceed further. The second stage can then be a philosophical examination, in which the general structure is discussed in relation to a philosophical text, theory, or concept. It is important that the theories are brought in as the final stage after the completion of the analysis. Core dimensions of the described methodological support are, in accordance with RLR, openness, bridling, and reflection. The methodological support cannot be understood as fixed stages, but rather as a guiding light in the search for further meanings.

  • 26.
    Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Almerud Österberg, SofiaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Att bli specialistsjuksköterska eller barnmorska2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nurses' lived experiences of intensive care unit bed spaces as a place of care: a phenomenological study2014In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 126-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe environment of an intensive care unit (ICU) is, in general, stressful and has an impact on quality of care in terms of patient outcomes and safety. Little is known about nurses' experiences, however, from a phenomenological perspective with regard to the critical care settings as a place for the provision of care for the most critically ill patients and their families. AimThe aim of this study was to explore nurses' lived experiences of ICU bed spaces as a place of care for the critically ill. Design and methodsA combination of qualitative lifeworld interviews and photos-photovoice methodology-was used when collecting data. Fourteen nurses from three different ICUs participated. Data were analysed using a phenomenological reflective lifeworld approach. FindingsAn outer spatial dimension and an inner existential dimension constitute ICU bed spaces. Caring here means being uncompromisingly on call and a commitment to promoting recovery and well-being. The meanings of ICU bed spaces as a place of care comprise observing and being observed, a broken promise, cherishing life, ethical predicament and creating a caring atmosphere. Conclusions and relevance to clinical practiceThe architectural design of the ICU has a great impact on nurses' well-being, work satisfaction and the provision of humanistic care. Nurses need to be involved in the process of planning and building new ICU settings. There is a need for further research to highlight the quality of physical environment and its impact on caring practice.

  • 28.
    Qvistgaard, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Thorén, Ann-Britt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lovebo, Jenny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patients’ experiences with at-home preoperative skin disinfection before elective hip replacement surgery2017In: Journal of Perioperative Practice, ISSN 1750-4589, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. 162-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe patients' experiences with preoperative skin disinfection carried out in their home before elective hip replacement surgery with the aim of lowering the microbial burden and avoiding surgical site infections. The literature was reviewed for relevant studies. Optimal preparations before surgery depend on patients being able to assimilate preoperative information and instructions. The study was based on 14 interviews with patients who had undergone elective hip replacement surgery. Data were analysed with qualitative manifest content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman (2004). The main categories of findings were: patients' experience of obstacles and limitations, the importance of supportive surroundings, and personal resources as strength when performing preoperative skin disinfection. The findings of this study agree with earlier studies showing a lack of compliance to preoperative skin disinfection. The findings also suggest reasons for non-compliance. Preoperative skin disinfection involves many important steps that need to be accomplished to ensure the maximum effect on microbial burden on skin surface. These steps can be difficult for some patient groups. Perioperative dialogue is one way to identify patients' individual needs and to help patients participate in the process. The study concludes that patients who carried out skin disinfection at home before surgery have a great responsibility to prepare themselves. The challenge for perioperative nurses who work with preoperative information is to identify and individually guide those patients who need extended support so that all patients with elective hip replacement surgery receive the same quality of care. Further research should focus on how caregivers discover individuals with extended needs and on identifying the kind of support that is effective to achieve optimal conditions for hip replacement surgery.

  • 29.
    Qvistgaard, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lovebo, Jenny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Intraoperative prevention of Surgical Site Infections as experienced by operating room nurses2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 1632109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examines how OR nurses experience intraoperative prevention of SSIs. Introduction: Infections related to surgical procedures create both great patient suffering and high costs for society. Therefore, prevention of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) should be a high priority for all surgical settings. All details of intraoperative care need to be investigated and evaluated to ensure best practices are evidence-based. Methods: This study uses the Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, which is grounded in phenomenology. Participants were OR nurses with at least one year of clinical experience. In total, 15 participants from seven hospitals made contact and were included in this interview study. Results: Prevention of SSIs takes both head and hand. It requires long-term, continuous, and systematic work in several parallel processes, both intellectually and organisationally. The hierarchical tradition of the operating room is often ambiguous, shielded by its safe structures but still restricted by traditional patterns. Confident relations and resolute communication within the team generate favorable conditions for preventing SSIs. Conclusions: By setting up mutual platforms and forums for quality development, increasing legitimacy for OR nurses and establishing fixed teams, prevention of SSIs will continue to improve, ensuring the patients' safety during intraoperative care.

  • 30.
    Svensson, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stening, Kent
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Firefighters as First Incident Persons: breaking the chain of events and becoming a new link in the chain of survival2018In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose In order to shorten the response time, two part-time fire departments (FDs) in Sweden initialize a first incident person (FIP) assignment. This is done by alarming the crew manager as an FIP, responding in a separate emergency vehicle, and by arriving at the scene before rest of the crew. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe experiences of the FIP assignment within an FD. Design/methodology/approach A multimethod design was used, influenced by Creswell and Plano Clark's (2011) explanatory sequential mixed method design including emergency reports, a questionnaire and interviews. Findings The results show that the FIP assignment was a function that secured an early presence at the scene of an accident or emergency situations, which is beneficial for society in the form of a safety factor, for the firefighters in the form of early prior information on what to expect at the scene and for the patient in the form of early existential support and increased chances of survival. Originality/value In order to prevent full scenarios to happen and get the chance to save lives, an early response must be ensured. Hence, studies must be made in different settings, based on its unique conditions. This study indicates that by implementing FIP in FDs placed in a rural area, the FIP can break the chain of events and becoming a new link in the chain of survival.

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