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  • 1.
    Alvarez, Claudio
    et al.
    Universidad de Los Andes.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Nussbaum, Miguel
    Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Collboard: Fostering new media literacies in the classroom through collaborative problem solving supported by digital pens and interactive whiteboards2013In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 63, p. 368-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education systems worldwide must strive to support the teaching of a set of New Media Literacies (NMLs). These literacies respond to the need for educating human capital within participatory cultures in a highly technologized world. In this paper, we present Collboard, a constructivist problem solving activity for fostering the development of specific NMLs in classrooms: collective intelligence, distributed cognition and transmedia navigation. Collboard encompasses successive individual and collaborative work phases that prompt active student participation and engagement. It integrates digitally augmented appliances, namely, digital pens as a means to support individual work, and interactive whiteboards as a collaborative knowledge construction space. We report on the conceptual design of Collboard, its different technological and software components, as well as our findings from experiences we conducted in a Swedish school with 12 students from a 7th grade maths class. Findings from the experience provide an indication that Collboard can be well integrated in classroom teaching, and that it can foster the development of collective intelligence, distributed cognition and transmedia navigation in different knowledge domains. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    et al.
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    University for Business and Technology University Libraries and Knowledge Center: A Concept Paper2017In: 8th International Conference Information Systems and Technology Innovations, Tirana, Albania, June 23-24, 2017.: Fostering the As-A-Service Economy / [ed] Sevrani, Kozeta, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most significant innovation enables the realization of far greater human potential. The catalyst of such creativity in higher education is the acquisition of new knowledge and the living of new experiences. Then, within innovation and incubation environments, new thinking enriches knowledge handed down from previous generations, enlivens contemporary lives and informs future growth. Emergent knowledge encourages recognition of the limitations of traditional academic disciplines, exploration of new interdisciplinary frontiers, and, from this, novel transdisciplinary insights that unlock human potential and improve human conditions.

    In response, the University for Business and Technology intends to build collaboration environments to enable discovery and access, interpretation and analysis, creation and sharing of knowledge. These aspirations recognize the synergies possible when individual discovery is reinforced by collective inquiry with the shared purpose of using information to learn to create knowledge together. Further, this UBT planning initiative acknowledges that societal progress, whether local or global, ultimately depends on catalyzing, fortifying, and affirming human inquiry. So enabling environments will place humans at the center of the knowledge creation spaces and places that aim to advance participant capabilities to meet the demands of working in a global marketplace and living in a global society.

  • 3.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Making Local Knowledge Visible: The Case of the University for Business and Technology in Kosovo2018In: Systems research and behavioral science, ISSN 1092-7026, E-ISSN 1099-1743, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 588-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A vision to further national development through higher education now informs planning for the University for Business and Technology Knowledge Center. At its essence, the Center aims to make local knowledge visible through furthering discovery of and access to research content produced by academic students and university professors on institu- tional, local and international levels. This paper reports on conceptual exploration of this in- stitutional idea during spring semester 2017 in a graduate course on systems thinking and methodology. Using active learning pedagogy to improve local situations, an international teaching team facilitated student and stakeholder engagement in participatory design activ- ities using soft systems methodology tools and techniques. Course evaluation outcomes re- vealed students’ improved levels of knowledge and development of insights. In addition, their course work demonstrated their advanced understanding of systems thinking and its application. Furthermore, students expressed high motivation to learn more about other human-centred theories and participatory design tools. In considering the value of the University’s knowledge vision, they were especially enthusiastic about its implications for furthering national democratic development in Kosovo and regional economic growth in south-eastern Europe.

  • 4.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Hajrizi, Edmond
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    University for Business and Technology Knowledge Center: Making Local Knowledge Visible2017In: Paper presented at the Vienna 2017 International Society for System Sciences, The 61st ISSS World Conference, Vienna, July 9-14, 2017, International Society for the Systems Sciences , 2017, no 1, article id 3108 (3238)Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our paper draws together conceptual innovations emerging from the work of a group of researchers focussed on the relational approach to information literacy, more recently labelled ‘informed learning’. Team members have been working together in various configurations for periods ranging from seven to seventeen years. Our collaborative approach continues to yield new concepts and constructs which we believe to be of value to ongoing research and practice. Some of the ideas discussed have been previouly published, while others are being put forward for the first time. All are significant in that they together form new constructs that have emerged from a focus on the relational approach to information literacy. In this paper, Christine Bruce introduces the background to this work and the contributing researchers. Then the individual authors present the key directions which they have developed and are leading, typically working with one or more of the wider network. The key ideas presented are: The expressive window for information literacy (Mandy Lupton); information experience design (Elham Sayyad Abdi); cross-contextuality and experienced identity (Andrew Demasson); informed learning design (Clarence Maybee); spaces for inclusive informed learning (Hilary Hughes); and informed systems (Mary Somerville and Anita Mirjamdotter).  In each piece, authors reflect on what the idea is about, where it came from and what it might mean for research and practice.

  • 5.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Beyond Innovation in Technology Enhanced Learning2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Technology has become a part of our everyday life. Everywhere we turn, we see adults and children walking around with their mp3 players and mobile phones; making phone calls, listening to music, taking pictures and videos and constantly sending text messages and surfing the web. These different technologies have opened new opportunities and creative ways for supporting teaching and learning. The downside is the fact that most of these technologies and applications developed have not had the teaching or the learning perspective in mind. In this paper, some initial thoughts and problematic issues concerning some of the changes we are observing in the educational sector and learning environments will be raised and discussed. These ideas are based on observations and interviews conducted as part of our on ongoing projects with schools in the Växjö region in Sweden in which we are exploring different ways to support novel ways of teaching and learning with mobile technologies and social media.

     

  • 6.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Dilemmas in Teachers’ Use of Digital Technologies in Everyday School Practice2017In: Dilemmas 2015 Papers from the 18th Annual International Conference Dilemmas for Human Services: Organizing, Designing and Managing / [ed] Sisse Finken, Christina Mörtberg, Anita Mirijamdotter, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major investments in Sweden have equipped schools with digital technologies. However, the digital technologies are, reportedly, not being used to support eve- ryday teaching and learning practices. Rather, the digital technologies are mainly used as administrative tools. In order to enable teachers to adopt and use digital technologies, it is crucial to understand their worldviews and their everyday prac- tice, as well as external influences and underlying perspectives.

    In response, this paper discusses dilemmas associated with teachers’ everyday practice using digital technologies. The research methodologies included a Fo- cused Ethnographic approach complemented by Soft Systems Methodology, es- pecially Rich Pictures. Results provide rich context for appreciating the complex dilemmas experienced by four teachers, two school leaders, three representatives from the Department of Education and the head of the municipal IT unit, who together constituted the informants for this research. 

  • 7.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Novel Use of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Everyday Teaching and Learning Practices: A Complex Picture2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As of autumn 2011, all schools in Sweden have adopted and applied the latest curriculum for the compulsory school system. The following is written in concern to technology:

    "The school is responsible for ensuring that each pupil on completing compulsory school: [...] can use modern technology as a tool in the search for knowledge, communication, creativity and learning." (Skolverket, 2011, pp.13-14)

    With this said, there are no guidelines or manuals on how this is to be conducted. In a report from the Swedish Schools Inspectorate it was concluded that the investment in technology is not being used for school education. The education systems keep investing in technology in the belief that schools and teachers will sooner or later adopt and benefit from the use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies.

    The aim of this study is to “create an understanding of the aspects that have an impact on adopting novel use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in everyday teaching and learning practices in compulsory schools.”

    The empirical foundation will be based upon three projects: Geometry Mobile (GeM); Learning Ecology with Technologies from Science for Global Outcomes (LETS GO); and Collaborative Learning Using Digital Pens and Interactive Whiteboards (Collboard). All were conducted at local compulsory schools in Växjö municipality, Sweden, in collaboration with teachers, students and fellow researchers from the CeLeKT research group at Linnaeus University.

    Two Thematic Analyses have been conducted: the first, an inductive analysis exploring the Students’ and Teachers’ Experience of using Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in their learning and teaching environment. The second analysis is deductive and uses themes from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology models with the aim of understanding the Perception and Acceptance of Teachers’ use of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies. In the results from the two analyses there are clear indicators on the added value that mobile and ubiquitous technology brings to the classrooms: students are able to actively participate, collaborate and discuss in different learning settings, which enhances their understanding of the subject at hand. The challenges are mainly to be found in the lack of training and education in use of the technology as a supporting tool for teaching and learning. Further factors influencing the teachers and the students are ease of use and reliability of the technology and societal changes.

    The results of the analysis and the theoretical base of Technology Enhanced Learning have been illustrated with Soft Systems Methodologies Rich Picture, providing a holistic view of the problematic situation and making it possible to discuss the various parts as well as the situation as a whole. This study indicates that there are several factors influencing the adoption of the novel use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in everyday teaching and learning within a complex situation on different levels. 

  • 8.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices using Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Each time era has its’ own specific features. This time era is online, mobile and available. Everywhere we turn we will come in contact with some sort of digital technology, computer or mobile device. For each era there is need for some new skills complementing the previous ones

  • 9.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The complex picture of novel use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in every teaching and learning practices2014In: EDULEARN14 Proceedings, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2014, p. 4293-4302Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective autumn 2011, all Swedish schools adopted the latest compulsory school system curriculum, including required technology learning outcomes. However, this mandate provided no instructional guidelines. Rather, the education systems continued to make technology investments in the hope that teachers will adopt and students will benefit from mobile and ubiquitous technologies.

    This paper aims to present the complex problematic situation impacting adoption of novel use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in everyday teaching and learning practices. Findings are based upon three projects conducted at local compulsory schools in Växjö municipality, Sweden: Geometry Mobile (GeM); Learning Ecology with Technologies from Science for Global Outcomes (LETS GO); and Collaborative Learning Using Digital Pens and Interactive Whiteboards (Collboard). Research studies reflect collaboration with teachers, students and fellow researchers from the CeLeKT research group at Linnaeus University.

    Two Thematic Analyses have been conducted. The first employs an inductive approach to explore the students’ and teachers’ experience of using mobile and ubiquitous technologies in their learning and teaching environment based on themes from the empirical data. The second analysis was deductive as the themes were generated from the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology models, with the aim of understanding the perception and acceptance of teachers’ use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies.

    Results are illustrated in a Soft Systems Methodology Rich Picture, providing a holistic view of the problematic situation. Clear indicators suggest the added value of mobile and ubiquitous technology in classrooms: students are able to actively participate, collaborate and discuss in different learning settings, activities that enhance their understanding. At the same time, challenges influence adoption and usage, including ease of use and reliability of technology, as well as availability of training to use technology as a supporting teaching and learning tool. 

  • 10.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The Complexity of Teachers’ Everyday Practice Using Digital Technologies2016In: Proceedings of 7th International Conference Information Systems and Technology Innovations: the New Paradigm for a Smarter Economy / [ed] Kozeta Sevrani, Tirana: University , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 2008 and 2012 the number of interactive whiteboards in Swedishcompulsory school classrooms trebled. Tablet-devices in school education increased with 10percent, and 65 percent of all student computers were laptops in 2012. For 2015 thesenumbers continued to rise, where of 20 percept of compulsory school children having tabletdevices in 2012, now 40 percent have access to tablet devices. All teachers on compulsorylevel and high school level have their own computers. The importance of adoption and use ofdigital technology in education has been addressed on regional, national and European levels.The daily education practice, however, show differently. The schools indicate technologiesnot being used to their full potential, but only very limited and rarely to support pedagogicalpractices. The digital technology in schools have been provided and brought to the schools aspolitical decisions. Related research indicate to change the use of digital technology tobecome more than using it asmodern and shiny tools, the change needs to come from theinside of the organization.The complex, dynamic, and context bound nature of teachers’ everyday practice needsto be illuminated in order to enable potential change. Various aspects and underlyingperspectives need to be investigated in order to gain understanding of the situation as awhole. This research therefore aims to illuminate and by that add to the understanding of compulsoryschoolteachers’ complex practice using digital technologies.Theempirical basis of this research is two compulsory schools including teachers andschool leaders, as well as representatives from the municipal Department of Education andthe IT-unit within a municipality in south of Sweden. A focused ethnographic approach hasbeen followed applying observations and interviews. Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) hasbeen used to analyze the empirical material and further have theoretical frameworks beenconsidered Conference Proceedings BookISTI-201687as a frame for discussing the outcome of the analysis. The frameworks include theUse and Perception of Ubiquitous Technology model (UPUT), the Technological,Pedagogical and Content Knowledge framework (TPACK) and the Replacement,Amplification and Transformation (RAT) model; addressing the perception and use oftechnology, the balance between technology, pedagogy and content knowledge, and the levelsof technology use and adoption.The outcome of this research illustrates the complexity of teachers’ everyday practices, aswell as indicates issues of concern that addto the complexity and that are relevant to furtheraddress and investigate. Among the issues emerging throughout the study and as part of thisdissertation, differences in understandings of the problematic situation can be identified.Different stakeholders have many times multiple, and sometimes conflicting worldviews. Inspecific situations same issues are spoken by different actors, however the meaning behind thewords differs. There is an ambiguity in central objectives and concepts of relevance. Thereisa lack of understanding of the reality of the daily education and teaching practice and thevariation of the different worldviews as well as the underlying mindset and foundationscontributing to these differences. This in direct relation to the use ofdigital technologies butalso disregarding the role of technologies, digital or traditional.

  • 11.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    The Complexity of Teachers’ Use of Digital Technologies in Everyday School Practice2017In: Dilemmas 2015 Papers from the 18th Annual International Conference Dilemmas for Human Services: Organizing, Designing and Managing, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The doctoral research, briefly presented in this paper1, include four teachers, two school leaders, three representatives from the Department of Education and head of the municipal IT-unit. The research followed a focused ethnographic approach, and has applied Systems Thinking, specifically Soft Systems Methodology in combination with Cognitive Mapping with the aim to illuminate and advance the understanding of the complexity of teachers’ everyday practice using digital tech- nologies.

    Major investments have been done in Sweden providing and equipping schools with digital technologies. However, the digital technologies are reported not being fully used to support teaching and learning, but are mainly used as ad- ministrative tools. In order to enable teachers to fully adopt and use of digital technologies it is crucial to understand their worldviews, their everyday practice, as well as external influences and underlying perspectives. 

  • 12.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Use of Digital Technologies in Education: The Complexity of Teachers' Everyday Practice2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation the complex, dynamic, contextual and multi-dimensional practice of teachers’ use of digital technologies in their everyday work has been illustrated and presented. The research draws upon the experience of teachers and school leaders from two compulsory schools as well as representatives from the municipal Department of Education and IT-unit within a municipality in the south of Sweden.

    A focused ethnographic approach has been undertaken and applied observations and interviews. Systems Thinking, specifically Soft Systems Methodology in combination with Cognitive Mapping have been applied to analyze the empirical material.

    The theoretical foundation builds upon teachers’ worldview towards digital technologies, because it is noted that teachers more easily adopt and use innovations that are in accordance with their personal thoughts and beliefs about teaching and learning. Further, teachers’ attitude and perception towards use of digital technologies are addressed as well as the role of school leadership. Additionally, importance of context, teachers’ knowledge and pedagogics have been discussed referring to various frameworks.

    The dissertation aims to illuminate the complex nature of teachers’ everyday practice. To gain understanding of the situation as a whole, there is also need to shed light on various aspects and underlying perspectives. Thus, this research aims to illuminate and advance the understanding of the complexity of compulsory school teachers’ everyday work practices using digital technologies.

    The outcome of this dissertation illustrates the complexity of teachers’ everyday practices as well as additional issues adding to the complexity, and shows that these complex issues are worthy of further study. Among the issues emerged from this dissertation are differences in regard to how the complex situation is understood because different actors have multiple and sometimes conflicting worldviews. Ambiguities in core objectives and relevant concepts were found. Additionally, a pervasive lack of understanding about the realities of daily education and teaching practices, including variances in worldviews and mindsets was found adding to the complexity of teachers’ everyday practice using digital technologies.

  • 13.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices: Use of up-to-date digital technology for exploring implications on educational settings.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Soft Systems Methodology and Cognitive Mapping: A Linkage between the Initial Phases of SSM2017In: Paper presented at the Vienna 2017 International Society for System Sciences, The 61st ISSS World Conference, Vienna, July 9-14, 2017, International Society for the Systems Sciences , 2017, no 1, article id 3069 (3069)Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems Thinking enables to simplify our thinking about and management of complex realities and messes. Throughout the existence of the Systems Thinking philosophy several systems approaches have been developed with varying perspectives and purposes. This paper focus on the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) which emerged from the Hard Systems approaches, such as Systems Engineering. The aim was to use systems principles for unstructured, ill-defined problematical situations. The main system concepts that SSM build on are emerging properties, hierarchy, and feedback communication. Through its use the notion of worldview for meaningful actions has evolved as crucial. This paper builds on this notion and include Cognitive Mapping to make plain different worldviews and their relation to meaningful action in a hierarchical approach. Cognitive Mapping also has its roots in Systems Thinking approaches. Its origins in psychology and have been included in Operational Research applications with the aim of mapping and representing how a person thinks about a particular situation, issue or problem.

    The paper discusses the features of Soft Systems Methodology and Cognitive Mapping including the interrelation. The combination of these approaches is demonstrated in a case which investigates thecomplexity of compulsory school teachers’ use of digital technologies in their everyday practice. The research followed a focused ethnographic approach, based on observations and interviews, which allowed the researcher to collect rich empirical data that related to various stakeholder perspectives. These perspectives affect the everyday practice of the school teachers and their possibilities to combine use of digital technology in education and own teaching philosophy.

    Through the combination of Cognitive Mapping and one of the SSM modelling techniques we demonstrate an approach that bridges the richness of the real-world situation and the analytical phase of SSM. This approach advanced the understanding of underlying factors that contribute to the complexity of this particular situation and enabled insights which, if transferred to appropriate actions, may lead to an improved situation for involved stakeholders.

  • 15.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    University of Vienna.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices : Experiences of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies2012In: IRIS: selected papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia / [ed] C. Keller and M. Wiberg, Akademika forlag, 2012, p. 53-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies are influencing and challenging today’s education. These technologies change the nature of educational settings, requirements and skills as they create opportunities for students and teachers to advance learning and teaching in different ways. Nevertheless, there is a lack of innovative educational practices and mobile and ubiquitous technologies are still used to a limited extent. Based on three different projects, this paper explores teachers’ and students’ experiences use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in an educational setting. A number of themes were identified. Added values and challenges were two main themes that teachers and students experienced. 

  • 16.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researching Innovative Educational Practices: Exploring the Use of Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile and ubiquitous technologies are influencing and challenging today’s education. These technologies change the nature of educational settings, requirements and skills as they create opportunities for students and teachers to advance learning and teaching in a different ways. Nevertheless, there is a lack of innovative educational practices, mobile and ubiquitous technologies are still used in limited extent. Based on three different projects this paper explores teachers and students experiences use of mobile and ubiquitous technologies in an educational setting. A number of themes were identified. Added values and challenges were two main themes teachers and students experienced. 

  • 17.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Tyrberg, Barbro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Perez, Miguel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Maker tour – Mot nya höjder: En rapport om projektet och dess utveckling2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Peng, Aihui
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Yau, Jane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Designing with mobile technologies for enacting the learning of geometry2011In: Workshop Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] Mohd Ayub A. F. et al., Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 305-312Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Peng, Aihui
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Yau, Jane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Trade-offs between pedagogical and technological design requirements affecting the robustness of a mobile learning activity2011In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] T. Hirashima et al., Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 381-385Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    et al.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Bruce, Christine S.
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Chaudhary, Niraj
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Informed Systems: To Advance Organizational Capacity and Co-Worker Capability2018In: Proceedings of the 51st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Honolulu, HI 96822: ScholarSpace, Hamilton Library, the University of Hawaii at Manoa , 2018, p. 5327-5334Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its introduction at HICSS-39, Informed Systems has evolved both through and as a process of organizational design for -˜learning in action.’ Fortified by Bruce’s informed learning theory and fostered by Checkland’s soft systems methodology, the approach is catalysed by participatory design, elaborated by action research, and expressed as information experience. The aim throughout is information exchange for knowledge creation through -˜working together.’ Organizational capacity builds as colleagues use information to learn in ever expanding professional contexts. This paper explores aspects of the -˜bridge’ between individual and collective learning through enabling organizational systems and associated professional practices. An Informed Systems Capability Bridge Model and Information Curation and Knowledge Management Map detail processes and elements of a prototype system, generated from original research on co-workers’ information experience. Concluding reflections explore value added synergies from information-centered, action-oriented, technology-enabled, and learning-focused systems design.

  • 21.
    Yau, Jane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Identifying the potential needs to provide mobile context-aware hints to support students' learning2011In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] T. Hirashima et al., Chiang Mai, Thailand: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 365-372Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, mobile and context-aware technologies have been used in an attempt to enhance students‟ formal and informal learning experiences both in the classroom and outdoor settings. Such technologies have supported teaching and learning in a variety of subjects. In this paper, we present the ongoing research efforts in our Geometry Mobile (GeM) project, where we conducted a number of trials in the last two years with primary and secondary school students in Sweden. The current trial of our GeM project (April 2011) is discussed together with the data collection method we have used for exploring how Context-Aware learning hints (CA hints) can be utilized to support the different stages of the learning activity. Insights and preliminary results from this trial are described. We also present the motivation of our proposed CA hints, the definition of the requirements of those, and the formulation of a classification thereof.

  • 22.
    Yau, Jane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Researchers' and teachers' perspectives on the use of mobile technologies for inquiry-based learning2011In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Mobile Learning / [ed] Inmaculada Arnedillo Sánchez and Pedro Isaías, IADIS Press, 2011, p. 136-143Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 22 of 22
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