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  • 1. Ahmed, Maaheen
    et al.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Apocalypse Why? The Neutralisation of the Antichrist in Three Comics Adaptations2012In: Scan: Journal of Media Arts Culture, ISSN 1449-1818, E-ISSN 1449-1818, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ahmed, Maaheen
    et al.
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Graduate Center CUNY, USA.
    ‘We’re all Avengers now’: Community-building, civil religion and nominal multiculturalism in Marvel Comics’ Fear Itself2016In: European Journal of American Culture, ISSN 1466-0407, E-ISSN 1758-9118, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 77-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Marvel Comics’ 2011 crossover ‘event’ ‘Fear Itself’. It suggests that the event argues for national unity in a time of crisis by mobilizing America’s self-definition as a multicultural nation as well as civil religion. The article discusses ‘Fear Itself’s’ attempted construction of national myth through looking at the way it represents the media, US multiculturalism (in a generalized form that nominally includes non-white groups while frequently failing to account for them) and ‘sacralized’ civil religious aspects of US history. Especially salient in this connection is the event’s engagement with the Roosevelt years. In doing so, it is argued, ‘Fear Itself’ presents an Americanness that relies on an idealized and nostalgic notion of the so-called ‘Greatest Generation’, a tightly knit, self-sacrificing civil society that supposedly came into being during that period.

  • 3. Kontturi, Katja
    et al.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Romu, Leena
    Strömberg, Fredrik
    Editorial: From the Land of the Midnight Sun: Nordic History and Cultural Memory in Comics2015In: SJoCA Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art, ISSN 2001-3620, E-ISSN 2001-3620, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    “[A] matter of SAVED or LOST”: difference, salvation, and subjection in Chick tracts2015In: Comics and power: representing and questioning culture, subjects and communities / [ed] Rikke Platz Cortsen, Erin La Cour and Anne Magnussen, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, 1, p. 173-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    American Golem: Reading America through Super-New Dealers and the “Melting Pot”2012In: Comic Books and American Cultural History: an anthology / [ed] Pustz, Matthew, New York: Continuum, 2012, p. 79-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Antisemitism till salu - igen2013In: Sydsvenska Dagbladet, no 8 DecemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. The Gotham Center for New York History.
    Book Review: Mariah Adin, The Brooklyn Thrill-Kill Gang and the Great Comic Book Scare of the 1950s2016Other (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lund, Martin
    Lund University.
    Christensen, Charlie: Arne Anka - Rapport från kriget2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 187, p. 104-105Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Climbing the Hill: Will Eisner's Heritage Fabrication and Comics Identity Politics In and Beyond The Dreamer (1986)2017In: Le status culturel de la bande dessinée - ambiguïtés ete évolutions: [ The cultural standing of comics - Ambiguities and changes ] / [ed] Maahen Ahmed, Stéphanie Delneste, Jean-Louis Tilleuil, Louvain-la-Neuve: L'Harmattan, 2017, p. 119-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Det är hög tid för inventering2013In: Sydsvenskan, ISSN 1652-814X, no 14 DecemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ett seriemecka i Columbus, Ohio: the Ohio State University Billy Ireland2014In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 201, p. 102-105Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    ‘Every day is 9/11!’: Re-constructing Ground Zero in three US comics2017In: Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, ISSN 2050-9790, E-ISSN 2050-9804, Vol. 4, no 1-2, p. 241-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses three comics series: writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Tony Harris’ Ex Machina (August 2004–August 2010); writer Brian Wood and artist Riccardo Burchielli’s DMZ (November 2005–February 2012); and writer Garth Ennis and artist Darick Robertson’s The Boys (October 2006–November 2012). Taking literary critic Laura Frost’s concept of ‘archifictions’ as its starting point, the article discusses how these series frame the September 11 attacks on New York and their aftermath, but its primary concern is with their engagement with the larger social ramifications of 9/11 and with the War on Terror, and with how this engagement is rooted in and centred on Ground Zero. It argues that this rooting allows these comics’ creators to critique post-9/11 US culture and foreign policy, but that it also, ultimately, serves to disarm the critique that each series voices in favour of closure through recourse to recuperative architecture.

  • 13.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Fantomen - Från lila vålnad till blågul hjälte2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 187, p. 108-109Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Graven Images – A Commanding Read2012In: SJoCA Scandinavian Journal of Comic Art, ISSN 2001-3620, E-ISSN 2001-3620, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 123-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Gud i fyrfärgstryck. Om tecknade serier, moral och teologi2012In: Religionsvetenskaplig internettidskrift, no 13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Hart, D.G. From Billy Graham to Sarah Palin: Evangelicals and the Betrayal of American Conservatism2012In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 35-36Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Holocaust i tegneserier2011In: Goldberg: magasin om jødisk kunst, kultur, religion, samfund, no 25, p. 28-31Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    ‘Introducing the Sensational Black Panther!’: Fantastic Four #52–53, the Cold War, and Marvel’s Imagined Africa2016In: Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship, ISSN 1560-5892, E-ISSN 2048-0792, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Fantastic Four #52–53 (July–August 1966), in which Black Panther, Marvel’s first black superhero, premiered. It argues that the character as he appeared in these issues is best read as an example of ‘white on black’ representation, or white images of blacks centered on white interests, filtered through Marvel’s then-prevalent Cold War focus. The article first looks at the Fantastic Four as Cold Warriors to contextualize Black Panther. It then goes on to look at how Wakanda, Black Panther’s tribe, and Klaw, the storyline’s villain, are configured in relation to this context, in order to highlight the importance in the story of Cold War conceptions of and fears about the process of decolonization that was taking place on the African continent. Finally, it argues that Black Panther is rhetorically ‘Americanized,’ to better fit with US self-conceptions and to alleviate worries about what Africa’s then-recent decolonization might mean for United States of America.

  • 19.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    J. Michael Straczynski’s Highway to Hell: Voyages into the Midnight Nation2015In: Sixth International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference / Ninth International Bande Dessinée Society Conference, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Jonsson, Mats: Mats kamp2012In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 191, p. 108-109Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindström, Hans: Tuppjuck2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 187, p. 106-107Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Lundkvist, Pontus: Full sysselsättning2012In: Bild & Bubbla, no 191, p. 102-103Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Martin Luther: munken som gjorde uppror2011In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 186-Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Mattias Martinson: Katedralen mitt i staden: om ateism och teologi (Lund: Arcus förlag, 2010). 304 s.2010In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 145-146Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Nessle, David: Den maskerade proggarens stora röda : samlade serier.2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 187, p. 110-111Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    "NY 101": New York City According to Brian Wood2015In: Popular Culture Association / American Culture Association 2015 Conference, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often asserted that New York City and comics enjoy a special relationship and that the city’s appearance in comics makes the real-world city legible to readers.  Such claims, which are rarely supported with critical examples, generally disregard that different cultural meanings are inscribed upon the city in different representations. This paper argues that to consider in what ways comics make the city legible, it is not enough to note that New York appears in them, but we must also ask what and whose New York is being presented. It does so by presenting a case study of several New York-set comics scripted by Brian Wood. Wood’s bibliography arguably provides one of contemporary comicdom’s most striking illustrations of the generic, thematic, and narrative range of possible comics New York mappings. This paper presents comparative social semiotic readings of Wood’s dystopian activist comics Channel Zero (1997) and DMZ (2005–2012), his action film-style Couscous Express (2001) and The Couriers (2003–2005), and his college tales New York Four (2008) and New York Five (2011). The purpose is to illustrate, through the radically different versions of New York presented in these Wood-penned series, how genre, theme, mood, intended audience, and, to a lesser extent, authorial intention help shape the image and legibility of the city in comics. This will show how representation of New York in comics provides not only a setting, but also a backdrop on which can be inscribed meanings to be read that range from major socio-political critiques to intimate personal reflections.

  • 27.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    "NY 101": New York City According to Brian Wood2015In: International Journal of Comic Art, ISSN 1531-6793, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 1-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Our Exodus: Leon Uris and the Americanization of Israel’s Founding Story, by M. M. Silver2011In: Shofar (West Lafayette, Ind.), ISSN 0882-8539, E-ISSN 1534-5165, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 156-158Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Peder Thalén, Ateismens fall: den moderna religionskritikens kris (Skellefteå: Artos, 2007). 153 s.2011In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 135-136Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. CUNY Graduate Center, USA.
    Persons of Mass Destruction: The War on Terror in Mark Millar's Ultimates Comic Books2016In: Americana : The Journal of American Popular Culture, ISSN 1553-8931, E-ISSN 1553-8931, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a reading of how the comic book series Ultimates represented and critiqued the War on Terror.

    At the beginning of the millennium, Marvel Comics launched its Ultimate Marvel line with Ultimate Spider-Man, the first of many reimagined versions of their most popular superheroes. The publisher’s intention was to update its characters for the new millennium and to win new readers, who might be intimidated by the dense continuity that Marvel’s comics were mired in, after decades of continuous publication. Among the revitalized properties was The Avengers, a superhero team originally introduced by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, a legendary Marvel duo, in September 1963. The new Avengers series was  handed to Scottish writer Mark Millar who would shepherd it through over half a decade and turn it into a highly political warning through allegory, concerning American foreign policy.

    This development did not come from nowhere. Shortly after the Ultimate line launched, the terrorist attacks on 9/11 occurred. As a result, three important changes in American society emerged: America entered a War on Terror, the government implemented policies and passed bills that were designed to institutionalize the calamity and state of emergency, and political rhetoric and media representation helped inspire a culture of fear and securitization (see Rozario). A new foreign policy was also introduced, which quickly became known as the “Bush Doctrine”; it centered on the US “prevent[ing] any nation or combination of nations from challenging its military preeminence” and stressed preemptive strikes, noting that the US would not wait until it had “absolute proof” of danger from weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) before striking (Herring 943-944). Millar used Ultimates to speak out against these ideas.

  • 31.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Ranta, Ville: Kajana2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 189, p. 106-107Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. CUNY Graduate Center, USA.
    Re-Constructing the Man of Steel: Superman 1938–1941, Jewish American History, and the Invention of the Jewish–Comics Connection2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Re-Constructing the Man of Steel, Martin Lund challenges contemporary claims about the original Superman’s supposed Jewishness and offers a critical re-reading of the earliest Superman comics. Engaging in critical dialogue with extant writing on the subject, Lund argues that much of recent popular and scholarly writing on Superman as a Jewish character is a product of the ethnic revival, rather than critical investigations of the past, and as such does not stand up to historical scrutiny. In place of these readings, this book offers a new understanding of the Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in the mid-1930s, presenting him as an authentically Jewish American character in his own time, for good and ill.

    On the way to this conclusion, this book questions many popular claims about Superman, including that he is a golem, a Moses-figure, or has a Hebrew name. In place of such notions, Lund offers contextual readings of Superman as he first appeared, touching on, among other ideas, Jewish American affinities with the Roosevelt White House, the whitening effects of popular culture, Jewish gender stereotypes, and the struggles faced by Jewish Americans during the historical peak of American anti-Semitism.

    In this book, Lund makes a call to stem the diffusion of myth into accepted truth, stressing the importance of contextualizing the Jewish heritage of the creators of Superman. By critically taking into account historical understandings of Jewishness and the comics’ creative contexts, this book challenges reigning assumptions about Superman and other superheroes’ cultural roles, not only for the benefit of Jewish studies, but for American, Cultural, and Comics studies as a whole.

  • 33.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Religion och serier - från Fattigmans bibel till Battle Pope2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 186, p. 94-105Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Rethinking the Jewish-comics connection2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The publication of Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer-prize winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000) brought the Jewish–comics connection to popular attention. The novel illuminated the fact that many of the pioneers of American mainstream comics were Jewish. Owing to this history, and to the fact that there today exists a large and growing library of self-consciously Jewish comic books and graphic novels, much has been written about the meaning of the connection. Engaging in a critical dialogue with extant writing on the subject, this thesis argues that much of the popular and scholarly writing on the subject of Jews and comics is historical in the sense that it is a product of its own time, rather than in the sense that it critically investigates the past. Rethinking the Jewish¬–Comics Connection presents three studies of commonly cited mainstream comics texts written by Jewish Americans: the character Superman from his first appearance in June 1938 until America’s entry in the Second World War in December 1941; comics writer, artist, and advocate Will Eisner’s The Spirit (1940–1952) and long-form comics (1978–2005); and the first and second series of X-Men comic books (1963–1970 and 1975–1991). Situating these texts in their respective contexts and offering alternative interpretations, the thesis suggests that the historical Jewish–comics connection most clearly emerges as an expression of what it meant, for the writers, to be Jewish Americans in relation to their own time.

  • 35.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Return and repair: Jewish approaches to comics as edifying literature2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Sture Packalén, Tyska minnesgemenskaper; nazism, krig, förföljelse och folkmord i tyskspråkig litteratur efter 1945 (Stockholm: Carlsson 2010). 327 s.2011In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 4, p. 818-819Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds Universitet.
    Stålmannen då och nu: Tecknade serier som en ingång till amerikansk-judisk kulturhistoria2012In: Religion och populärkultur: Föreningen lärare i religionskunskap årsbok 44, Föreningen lärare i religionskunskap , 2012, p. 59-68Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Svenska MAD fyller 50!2011In: Bild & Bubbla, ISSN 0347-7096, no 186, p. 110-111Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Gotham Center for New York City History, USA.
    The Mutant Problem: X-Men, Confirmation Bias, and the Methodology of Comics and Identity2015In: European Journal of American Studies, ISSN 1991-9336, E-ISSN 1991-9336, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 1-16, article id UNSP 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests that scholarship on comics and identity is vulnerable to strong confirmation bias. Engaging with a few common assumptions presented in writing on X-Men comics (1963–1970, 1975–1991) and identity, it offers alternative interpretations on the series’ engagement with the Cold War, civil rights, individual authenticity, persecution, and the Holocaust. Based on these discussions, the article then offers a few methodological suggestions that might help reduce bias in future studies of comics and identity.

  • 40.
    Lund, Martin
    CUNY Graduate Center, USA.
    'The Roaring 30s': Style, intertextuality, space and history in Marvel Noir2015In: Studies in Comics, ISSN 2040-3232, E-ISSN 2040-3240, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 5-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses Marvel Comics’ Marvel Noir franchise, published between 2009 and 2011. Taking as its starting point the promise in a 2008 press release that in the comics, Marvel superheroes would ‘meet’ film noir in a new continuity set in the ‘roaring 30s’, the article considers the advertised ‘meeting’ from three different angles: (1) Marvel Noir’s relationship to ‘classic’ film noir; (2) intertextuality in Marvel Noir; and (3), the franchise’s engagement with space and history. In the first instance, drawing on recent film noir scholarship, the article argues that for historical reasons, Marvel Noir manages only to evoke a pastiched ‘image’ of noir drawn from a popular conception of what noir is. Second, it highlights how the heterogeneity of the franchise’s intertextual orbit further defers the ‘meeting’ and that, ultimately, because it builds upon and anticipates the seriality of regular superhero fictions, the real content of the stories is neither film noir nor other historical popular culture, but rather earlier Marvel stories. Third, it looks at how space and history are figured. Although a few exceptions that deal with racial formation are discussed, space appears as largely anonymous ‘images’ that deepen the image of noir while history is generally connoted through a vague sense of ‘pastness’. By way of concluding, the article notes that the postmodern depthlessness of the franchise’s ‘meeting’ with film noir is to be expected, given the style’s historical progresses. Rather, while Marvel Noir perhaps represents an attempt to escape the present through a postmodern play with nostalgia, intertextuality and surfaces, the choice of setting and the recurrent confirmation of the superhero genre’s primacy betrays a return of the repressed, in which the past becomes an unuttered hope for the future.

  • 41.
    Lund, Martin
    Lund University.
    Turn the other chick - religious stereotyping in fundamentalist propaganda comics tracts2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The word "stereotype" generally carries negative connotations; when we hear it we think of bigotry, intolerance, chauvinism, small-mindedness. There are, however, positive stereotypes as well. In some cases stereotypes are even necessary. The medium of comics is a prime example – comics creators often have to use simplified representations to convey an idea or character trait, use stereotypes as a form of cultural “short-hand.” This sometimes leads to regrettable results; the jingoistic superhero comics of World War II, like many from the Cold War era, provide ample examples of this. Will Eisner, in his weekly comic The Spirit from the 1940s, represented the character Ebony in tune with the times; to wit as a big-lipped, bug-eyed, and somewhat dim-witted black youth. An older Eisner, writing in 2003, expressed regret for this treatment. He wrote that he’d realized that there were “good” and “bad” stereotypes – intention, for him, was the key: “Since stereotype is an essential tool in the language of graphic storytelling, it is incumbent on cartoonists to recognize its impact on social judgment.” This presentation will look at how cartoonist and evangelist Jack Chick uses stereotyped representations, exemplified with his narratives of Catholicism, Islam, and Judaism, to motivate a particular evangelizing narrative and construction of a binary difference between the in-group and an Other.

  • 42.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    Will Eisner’s “Will Eisner”: Self-Creation and Heritage Construction in The Dreamer This page in English2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Lund, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. CUNY Graduate Center, USA.
    'X marks the spot': Urban dystopia, slum voyeurism and failures of identity in District X2015In: Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, ISSN 2050-9790, Vol. 2, no 1-2, p. 34-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the ‘imaginative mapping’ of a real-world neighbourhood in one comic book series: lower Manhattan’s Alphabet City in writer David Hine and artists David Yardin and Lan Medina’s District X (July 2004–January 2006). In contrast to a long-standing claim to ‘realism’ in Marvel’s use of New York City, this article argues that the real Alphabet City – at the time a contested and rapidly gentrifying neighbourhood – is nowhere to be found in District X, replaced by a voyeuristic fabrication, a sensationalistic node of concentration for middle-class fears about urban decline and blight amid prosperity and contemporary discourses about drugs, crime and homelessness that reproduces long-standing cultural representations of the neighbourhood as different and inferior. In doing so, the series polices a boundary of identity, empathy and imagination and tells readers that force in favour of clearing out radical difference in the neighbourhood and making it into a space fit for ‘normal’ people is natural, rational and logical and in the best interest even of those who might be displaced by gentrification, disproportionately incarcerated in the name of ‘law and order’, or put at risk of their lives in dangerous shelters.

  • 44.
    Lund, Martin
    Lunds universitet.
    "Yassuh, Mr. Spirit, boss!": Ethnoracial Insecurity and Representation in Will Eisner’s Prewar The Spirit2013Conference paper (Other academic)
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