lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Evans, Susan
    et al.
    Tongij University, Kina.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can design education support designers in their visionary work towards sustainability?2016In: Open Design for E-very-thing: exploring new design purposes, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this workshop is to create a space for synthesis and to build on the paper sessions on sustainability, with a focus on design education. What roles can designers play in the vision towards sustainability? What is required of design curricula, pedagogies, educators, academic institutions and wider partnerships to support students adopting these new or modi ed roles? The workshop aims to set an agenda for years to come and to create an ongoing ‘think and do-tank’. This interactive and action orientated workshop is led by an interdisciplinary group from the Cumulus network and the Cumulus working group for sustainability, representing European and Asian perspectives, and both theory and practice.

    This will be a three hour-long workshop with practical outcomes. Max: 30 participants.

    The workshop is structured in three consecutive sessions.

    1. The synthesis of insights from paper sessions & shared examples of best practices.

    2. The new designer roles at the intersection of curriculum, tradition and emerging socio-cultural, economic and ecological systems.

    3. Designing: prototypes for integrating relevant and applicable sustainability learning into the design curriculum and academic institutions.

    Outcome:

    Exhibits: 1. prototypes for sustainability learning in academic institutions and in our wider partnerships; and 2. an agenda proposal for a ‘think and do-tank’ for ongoing Cumulus conferences.

  • 2. Fletcher, Kate
    et al.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Clothing Lives!2003In: Product Life and the Throwaway Society / [ed] Tim Cooper, Sheffield: Centre for Sustainable Consumption, Sheffield Hallam University , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Fletcher, Kate
    et al.
    London College of Fashion, University of the Arts.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Clothing rhythms2004In: Eternally yours: time in design : product, value, sustenance / [ed] Ed van Hinte, Rotterdam: 010 Publishers , 2004, 1, p. 254-274Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    If you imagine how numerous we are and multiply that by the number of outfits we have, that makes many billion garments… and yet how much do we know about our clothes? What can we say about the relationships we have with the contents of our wardrobe? What do we know about the principles embodied by our garments or their longevity? Is there a garment that promotes an ecological awareness that transforms our relationships with materials and our experience of the world? In this short paper, we introduce new ideas about the lifetimes of fashion clothing that question not only the status quo in mainstream industry but also that in the eco-clothing sector.

     

    We think the connection between fashion clothes and rhythms of time is crucial because of its implications for ecological thinking and sustainability. For too long the chief response of environmentalists to questions of fashion obsolescence of clothes has been simply that it is unnecessary and that it should not happen. But this neglects the power and influence of fashion and the complexity and subtlety of the relationship between fashion, clothing and consumers over time.

     

    From a time-based perspective, different users, different patterns of use and different fashion levels inform the design. The result is a more diverse, more rhythmic, more ecological response. Our approach proposes that we acknowledge that fashion and clothes are not identical, although their use and looks sometimes coincide. It engages with consumer-garment interaction as an important part of the fashion cycle - both in terms of driving the fashion cycle and in terms of environmental impact. We believe that in order to achieve more ecological practices in the fashion and clothing industry, we must understand and use the rhythm of fashion, the dialogue between our clothing, ourselves and the zeitgeist.

  • 4.
    Fletcher, Kate
    et al.
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Introduction2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fletcher, Kate
    et al.
    London College of Fashion, UK.
    Tham, MathildaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The clothing industry employs 25 million people globally contributing to many livelihoods and the prosperity of communities, to women’s independence, and the establishment of significant infrastructures in poorer countries. Yet the fashion industry is also a significant contributor to the degradation of natural systems, with the associated environmental footprint of clothing high in comparison with other products.Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion recognizes the complexity of aligning fashion with sustainability. It explores fashion and sustainability at the levels of products, processes, and paradigms and takes a truly multi-disciplinary approach to critically question and suggest creative responses to issues of:• Fashion in a post-growth society• Fashion, diversity and equity• Fashion, fluidity and balance across natural, social and economic systemsThis handbook is a unique resource for a wide range of scholars and students in the social sciences, arts and humanities interested in sustainability and fashion.

  • 6.
    Sadowska, Noemi
    et al.
    Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Minding the gap: using artefacts to navigate private, professional and academic selves in design2005In: Beginnings: experimental research in architecture and design / [ed] Katja Grillner, Per Glembrandt and Sven-Olov Wallenstein, Stockholm: Akademin för konstnärlig forskning inom arkitektur och design , 2005, 1, p. 46-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Stored Wisdom project (completed 2005), conducted by Sadowska and Tham (joint PI's), explored how artefacts may bridge the gap between personal and professional value positions, and between individuals within the field of design. In a series of workshops, everyday artefacts were used to create 'uncontaminated spaces' where discussions about sensitive issues could safely be initiated. This was found especially valuable when a topic may cause tension or guilt, such in the cases of sustainability and gender. The research was unique in methodological approach merging emerging design methods (such as the cultural probes) with particular value systems.

  • 7.
    Sadowska, Noemi
    et al.
    University of London, UK.
    Tham, Mathilda
    University of London, UK.
    The Stored Wisdom: Artefacts as gap minders between the “professional self”, the “personal self” and other individuals2004In: Working papers in art and design: The role of artefact in art and design research / [ed] University of Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire: University of Hertfordshire , 2004, Vol. 3, p. 1-3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1998 Jannet Jessel conducted a project exploring communication with designers. Her findings pointed to some observations including: (a) designers do not read (particularly lots of text), (b) designers don't always listen, (c) designers think with pictures, (d) designers think in “blobby” often unrelated thought patterns, (e) designers often have trouble translating imagery back into non-visual communication. At the same time, all designers engage in communication professionally and personally on a daily basis.The complex nature of communication within the design practice and design research, between these communities and with the outside world formulates the basis of this paper. How can we engineer communication that transcends language barriers and hierarchies?As design professionals and researchers we have dedicated our efforts to the exploration of gender and sustainability. The choice of subjects gives our investigations political connotations. Under these conditions, a space for unbiased, open interactions between researchers and practitioners can be difficult to create. We propose the artefact as a door to, or 'a cultural probe' for unleashing a wealth of narratives that we argue are a non-confrontational way to communicate. Through artefacts, the elicited narratives can simplify complex issues and give a human face to abstract knowledge. Within areas of sensitive nature, these characteristics make artefacts and resulting narratives excellent facilitators of communication.The current literature situates artefacts as metaphors for the self that create a point of autobiographic self-discovery. Through their application, artefacts are strong participants within socio-cultural practices of individuals that use language to attribute or explain meanings of artefacts. Our investigation of artefacts is inspired by co-operative inquiry methodologies, where the researcher's own experiences are a valid source of information, and where the research is carried out with rather than on people. Of special interest is the notion of an 'extended epistemology' and different ways of knowing. They reach beyond the conventional propositional knowing, through theories and ideas, into experiential knowing, practical knowing and presentational knowing. Acknowledging these wider spectra of learning and communication is especially relevant in the design context where inspiration, intuitive and tacit knowledge play an important role and where problem solving is often non-linear and heterarchical.Based on our research and additional experimental workshops we have begun to look for narrative frameworks as to how artefacts are used as mediators. As suggested by our investigations, situated within and embodying a variety of narratives, artefacts can function as a leverage point to unlock complex relationships often of sensitive nature. The fact that most of us have frequent experiences of the artefacts provides a collective starting point for 'uncontaminated' explorations. The artefacts become a commonly shared platform for design practitioners or design researchers to facilitate and validate their ability to communicate amongst themselves or those outside the discipline. The artefacts become carriers of narratives that mind the gap between the 'professional self' and the 'personal self' as well as between individuals.

  • 8.
    Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards a Post-Anthropocentric Speculative Archaeology (through Design): 2017In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As disciplines and practices archaeology and design stand in an interesting relationship to one another. Whereas it is the business of designers to construct material and, at times, immaterial universes that can sustain life (or, as we shall see, destroy life), it is the business of archaeologists, in the traditional sense of the word, to look at the remnants of those universes and the traces of those who populated them in order to understand the past and the ways in which it resonates in the present and in our conception of our possible futures.

    This leads us to pose the following question: If an intimate relationship can be located at the interstitial space between archaeology and design, what might happen if we were to construct transversal lines between and across these disciplines, and what concepts would be required for us to do so?

    Drawing upon the concept of the Anthropocene – a concept opening up to precisely such transdisciplinary and transversal approaches – this article explores the notion of a post-anthropocentric speculative archaeology interweaving a theoretical line of thought and a performative, fictive trajectory.

  • 9.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can we critically & creatively engage with power in relations in collaborative design research?2017In: design + power : NORDES 2017: 7th Nordic Design Research Conference, 15-17 June 2017, AHO, Oslo, Norway : Book of Abstracts, Nordic Design Research , 2017, p. 17-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop explores power relations in collaborative design research. As co-creation is becoming more established and even something of a holy grail, it is important to revisit and further understandings of, for example, the limits to democracy in collaborative research and conflicting agendas. The workshop draws on ongoing research that explores housing needs and solutions at the intersection of an ageing population, students and migrants, and that engages multiple stakeholder groups in collaborative processes. The proposed workshop will stage an enactment of the research design, from invitation to analysis, with the workshop participants playing the different roles in the process. This will enable us, collaboratively, to critically and creatively engage with some concrete interfaces to power negotiations as well as the meta level of power dynamics in collaborative research.

    We will enrich our understandings of power relations by engaging with indigenous thinking, expressed as decolonizing methodologies. 

  • 10.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can we critically & creatively engage with power relations in collaborative design research?2017In: Nordes 2017: Design + Power, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop explores power relations in collaborative design research. As co-creation is becoming more established and even something of a holy grail, it is important to revisit and further understandings of, for example, the limits to democracy in collaborative research and conflicting agendas. The workshop draws on ongoing research that explores housing needs and solutions at the intersection of an ageing population, students and migrants, and that engages multiple stakeholder groups in collaborative processes. The proposed workshop will stage an enactment of the research design, from invitation to analysis, with the workshop participants playing the different roles in the process. This will enable us, collaboratively, to critically and creatively engage with some concrete interfaces to power negotiations as well as the meta level of power dynamics in collaborative research. We will enrich our understandings of power relations by engaging with indigenous thinking, expressed as decolonizing methodologies. 

  • 11.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    A sustainability manifesto for Ann-Sofie Back2014In: Ann-Sofie Back: Torsten och Wanja Söderbergs pris 2014 / [ed] Andreas Kittel, Göteborg: Röhsska Museet , 2014, 1, p. 66-78Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This short text seeks to expand and problematise the definition of sustainability in fashion (and beyond), and simultaneously illuminate the work of Ann-Sofie Back, as a whole and in its aspects, in a way that gives it a kind of dignity that other lenses have perhaps not afforded. I write from the perspective of sustainability ‘expert’, and a long-time and keen wearer of Ann-Sofie Back’s clothes. 

  • 12.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Creative Resilience Thinking in Textiles and Fashion2015In: The Handbook of Textile Culture / [ed] Janis Jefferies, Diana Wood Conroy, Hazel Clark, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 1, p. 225-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The discourse on environmental improvement of textiles has, in the main, focused on the material realisation of a particular fabric or garment. The fashion industry is increasingly putting strategies into place to achieve cleaner and more efficient processes, and the specifications of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) work is becoming increasingly standardised. However, our relationship to textiles and fashion – in our roles as designers, makers and users, cannot be reduced to tick-box lists or explained by numbers, and in its rich diversity it defies streamlined models. The activities of designing, creating, crafting, styling, dressing and creating anew, harbour such a wealth of imagination, stored wisdom, complexity of judgement, connectedness – and pure enjoyment. Much of this is tacit knowledge and easily eludes the author of a CSR document. Yet, this chapter argues that these qualities, intrinsic to all textile work (and play), are imperative in the pursuit of truly sustainable textiles and fashion. Many opportunities are missed when all garments are treated alike, without consideration of fashion level or patterns of use. In recent years we have seen how a deep understanding of textiles and fashion can elegantly manifest itself in a series of activities and events: from hacking or customising workshops to knitting circles, from pop-up vintage shops to clothing libraries. Key to the ‘sustainability’ of these phenomena (some in themselves ‘vintage’) is that they shift the emphasis of our relationship with the textile or the garment – and thus with the world – from consuming to participating. Key is also their recognition of the importance of diversity, and their in-tuneness with both the material and symbolic dimensions of the complex fashion system. They work exactly because they embrace the cultures of textiles and fashion, instead of opposing them. This chapter explores how a systemic approach can enrich the detailed development of textiles, and how both material and symbolic notions have a place in resilience thinking. 

  • 13.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths University of London, UK ; Beckmans College of Design, Sweden.
    Förord2008In: Design för hållbar utveckling: ekologi - ekonomi - kultur / [ed] Ann Thorpe, Stockholm: Raster förlag, 2008, 1, p. 6-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can Designers Free Design?2017In: REDO Cumulus Conference Proceedings 2017 / [ed] Cumulus, Kolding: Design School Kolding , 2017, p. 27-27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sustainability imperative requires that we REDO the products, systems and paradigms we are part of, think and do. Yet, entangled habit and fear can stop us from engaging in profound processes of change. In this talk, I want to creatively critically explore the man-madeness of the systems we live by, and design’s agile dance with them. I will draw on experiences from education, research and play to discuss both the promise and responsibility of freeing design.

  • 15.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    How I-tunes became fashion: Enabling innovation through creative scenario work across professional boundaries2007In: Avantex 2007: 4th International Avantex Symposium, Frankfurt Am Main, 11-14 June 2007, Frankfurt am Main: Avantex , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fashion industry at mass-market level is highly specialised. Fashion designers work in teams with buyers but it is rare that they are in direct contact with for example a textile designer or an environmental officer. This paper argues that while specialisation may allow individuals to focus on and develop their particular interests and companies to operate efficiently, it may simultaneously constitute an obstacle to innovation that a more open and varied knowledge ecology might support.

    The wider context of this paper is an exploration into how a futures perspective may empower environmental improvement in the fashion industry at mass-market level.

    As part of this PhD project (to be completed in spring 2007) a series of creative workshops with mixed stakeholder groups from the fashion industry took place in the UK and Sweden during spring 2006. The workshops generated scenarios for mass-market fashion in year 2026 and explored aspects such as user experience, retail outlets, and products and services made possible by new technology.

    This paper presents some of the findings from these workshops. It shows how a mixed stakeholder working group can enable idea generation into new and rich territories and be empowering for professionals. An example of the more interesting concepts that emerged was how the participants used popular computer programs, such as I-tunes, and websites, such as My Space, as metaphors for new systems in fashion. Drawing upon these virtual spaces enabled new thinking and conversations, and concrete design ideas about what fashion might be in the future.

  • 16.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Integrating fashion and sustainability: How might futures approaches to change transcend a current paradigm of thinking, doing and communicating fashion?2011In: Dare Magazin für kunst und überdies, Vol. 6, no Apocalypse Green, p. 50-56Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the recent history of fashion’s adoption of sustainability, drawing out some key qualities of this process, and paying particular attention to how the culture of fashion itself has shaped it. Of particular importance is the question how long-lasting change can be embraced, sustained and (probably crucially) invigorated by a system that intrinsically favours novelty and thrives on the visual manifestation of change and the aestheticisation of politics. Some alternative readings of fashion and the fashion moment that may support a deeper and more holistic embracing of sustainability are suggested. The article takes a systemic perspective on fashion and sustainability. Yet, it tries to situate the discussion in everyday examples of the user, the designer and other stakeholders’ practices and experiences. The piece draws upon some relevant theory, and findings from my own research into fashion, sustainability, futures studies and metadesign.

  • 17.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Beckmans College of Design, Stockholm.
    Languaging fashion and sustainability: towards synergistic modes of thinking, wording, visualising and doing fashion and sustainability2010In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the ‘brands’ of sustainability and fashion respectively andtheir emerging shared identity and ‘brand’. It argues that the realisation of afashion industry that fundamentally respects humans beings and our planetis dependent on an integration process that takes place at a deeper culturallevel, as well as the – hitherto prioritised – product and organisational levels.While fashion has in recent years made significant environmental improvementsin its processes, benefits are easily eaten up by the astounding speedand scale of mass-market fashion. A next generation of approaches, holisticand systemic, are required to achieve joined up infrastructures, to include awealth of stakeholders, and to target the deeper motivations behind bothproduction and consumption.The paper points to the emerging area of metadesign as a promisingapproach to the auspicious integration of – seemingly paradoxical – systems,and the significance of the role of languaging in bringing fashion andsustainability together.Drawing upon a recent empirical study, Lucky People Forecast (2008), into howsustainability can be communicated to fashion industry stakeholders in proactiveways, the paper proposes that using experiential and design-led approachescan help unveil sustainability within fashion’s qualities and capabilities.

  • 18.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Languaging Fashion Moments: Method 212017In: Opening up the Wardrobe: A methods book / [ed] Kate Fletcher, Ingun Grimstad Klepp, Oslo: Novus Forlag, 2017, p. 75-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes a method of languaging fashion moments, designed to explore relationships with fashion at the level of paradigms and mindsets.

  • 19.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Lucky People Forecast: a systemic futures perspective on fashion and sustainability2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The detrimental environmental effects associated with fashion production and consumption are increasingly recognised, and strategies in place. However, these are production-focused, top-down strategies, which do not reach where the impact is highest - the user phase, or where the scope for improvement is utmost - the design phase. A growing body of academic research, and a niche representation of practitioners have responded by developing lifecycle and whole systems approaches. This PhD thesis seeks to expand on and bring this knowledge to the unexplored domain of the highest impact – the fashion industry’s mass-market segment.

    Trend-forecasting is integral to the fashion design process, and supports the organisation’s commercial endeavours. This thesis explores the potential of trend-forecasting as a positive agent of change for environmental improvement at systemic level in the fashion industry’s mass-market segment.

    The first empirical study, Stage 1, is diagnostic and exploratory, mapping the interactions that currently exist between trend-forecasting, fashion design and environmental work. The findings and emergent theories formed the basis for a novel methodology compatible with trend-forecasting methods, processes in fashion design, and the inclusive and transformative processes implicit in sustainability.

    Stage 2 applies this methodology in an experimental study - a series of creative workshops with mixed fashion industry stakeholder groups in the UK and Sweden. Set in 2026, the workshops explore how the underlying proposition “what if fashion and sustainability were compatible or even synergistic?” could affect attitudinal change, and what its generative potential could be.

    The study shows that a richer knowledge ecology can foster proactive discussions in the realm of sustainability and fashion. It also reveals how a futures perspective and creative approach can unleash the application of fashion professionals’ skills at strategic and systemic levels. The research resulted in recommendations for the application of the new trend-forecasting methodology on a larger scale.

  • 20.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Mending Fashion Futures: How can we use fore-casting to create inclusive and auspicious futures?2012In: Mendrs Mending Research Symposium, Docker, Cumbria: Mendrs , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the role of fashion forecasting as a means of addressing the challenges of currently unsustainable fashion systems, intervening at the level of products to paradigms.

  • 21.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Mode, tid och ekologi: system för hållbara modeögonblick2008In: Grön design / [ed] Cecilia Bertilsson och Mats Hellmark, Stockholm: Naturskyddsföreningen , 2008, 1, p. 72-75Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tid beskrivs i den västerländska samtiden ofta som lyx. Tid är också en viktig faktor i design. Som modedesigner kan man se tiden som ett slags meddesigner som hjälper till att slipa materialet och plaggets uttryck. Jag vill här visa hur förståelse av tid kan ge oss insikt i hållbarhetsstrategier för mode och på så sätt främja det riktigt långa tidsperspektivet – vår överlevnad.

  • 22.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Modets energi: symbolikens roll i hållbar design2008In: Energi: Hur design kan göra skillnad / [ed] Kerstin Sylwan, Johanna Stål, Göteborg: Camino , 2008, 1, p. 100-103Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ur kombinationen av kläder uppstår ibland mode, och modeögonblicket generar allt som oftast ’energi’ – det sprider ett kreativt uppsåt och firar en upplevelse av fullständig förening med tid och rum. Idag vilar modeögonblicket på en avancerad, energikrävande och materialintensiv produktionsapparat, och även konsumentledet av modet har en ansenlig miljökostnad. I den här texten vill jag undersöka inte bara det uppenbara och erkända behovet att minska en resursanvändning, som på flera vis dras till sin spets i modeögonblicket, utan också lyfta fram några av de positiva värden, den laddning som modet förkroppsligar, och som kan – vill jag föreslå - gagna ett bredare hållbarhetsperspektiv.

  • 23.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Of Mice, Lice and Wo/men: A seasoned fashion and sustainability activist’s attempt to negotiate the awkward space of real nature and real fashion2016In: Contributor, ISSN 2002-5343, Vol. 12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths, University of London.
    Off-centre – a call for humble lessons for design: how can metadesign perspectives support education in design for sustainability?2014In: Design with the other 90%: Cumulus Johannesburg Conference Proceedings / [ed] Amanda Breytenbach and Kathryn Pope, Johannesburg: Greenside Design Center and the University of Johannesburg , 2014, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses the notion of ‘off-centredness’ to highlight and critique a North Western conceit, hegemony and anthropocentric worldview, and an interwoven dominant construction of sustainability as ‘other’. It argues that while this generally is detrimental to social and natural systems, it also has repercussions on the specific context of education for design for sustainability. The paper proposes that pedagogy in this remit can be enriched by the positioning of ourselves - as educators and students - as humble co-learners. It offers a tentative pedagogical framework - ‘from me to we’ and from ‘product to paradigm’. This has the purpose of supporting co-learners to, from a deep understanding of, and connection with self and place, and engagement with design as physical object, form understandings of and meaningful relationships with the world as a whole. This should help enable co-learners to find agency as civilians and designers to contribute to futures of sustainability. The research has twinned applications. It informs the curricula of two new degree programmes in design at Linnaeus University, Sweden. It will result in a web-based learning resource open for general use.

  • 25.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Beckmans Designhögskola, Stockholm.
    Slow and fast fashion2012In: The sustainable fashion handbook / [ed] Sandy Black, London: Thames & Hudson, 2012, 1, p. 216-218Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This text describes the benefits of diversifying strategies for sustainability in fashion, and demonstrateshow design can be applied beyond the product level.

  • 26.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Talk: reflections on consumerism: Ann-Sofie Back, Yves Behar, Antonio Bertone, Tim Brown, Tom Dixon, Ed Gillespie, Sam Hecht, Johan Renck, Deyan Sudjic, Frank Trentmann. Moderated by Mathilda Tham2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Ten what ifs for fashion futures: How can we imagine new ways of being with fashion?2012In: WOW Talks: Style and Fashion / [ed] Stiglitz, London: WOW Talks , 2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation (available online) explores the potential of ten radical scenarios for fashion.

  • 28.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    The futures of futures studies in fashion2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher, Mathilda Tham, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 283-292Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the potential role of Futures Studies, as manifested in fashion forecasting, in the endeavour of creating sustainability in fashion. It argues that forecasting can be helpful in advancing sustainability in two key ways: 1) by offering a framework for systemic and systematic scenario building at the nested levels of products, systems and paradigms 2) by offering a zone in the fashion industry for much needed reflection, explorations of values, imagination and envisioning. The approaches can be described as metadesign, a design of design itself, seeds for change, a collaborative and inclusive design process.

  • 29.
    Tham, Mathilda
    University of London, UK.
    The Green Shades of Shame: How shame procrastinates engagement with the sustainability imperative in fashion2012In: Vestoj – The journal of Sartorial Matters, ISSN 2000-4036, no 3, p. 26-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the role of shame in procrastinating engagement with the need for more sustainable fashion practices. It argues that shame constitutes an important barrier to more pervasive changes, alongside more widely recognised obstacles relating to, for example, lack of knowledge, the complexity of the supply chain, limitations of legislation or financial incitements. 

  • 30.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Beckmans Designhögskola.
    The Lucky People Forecast Approach: how can education support engagement with systemic sustainable fashion futures?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    What is the potential of design and gender identity for futures of sustainability?2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation explored how gender identity is manifested at the level of the designed artefact, design disciplines, design itself, as well as a dominant understanding of the world.

    It was proposed that gender identity, and particularly unlocking a binary understanding of it, may have a pivotal role in creating futures of sustainability.

  • 32.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Arvidsson, Anna-Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Blomqvist, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Bonja, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Håkanson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Salinas, Miguel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Sterte, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Ståhl, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Svensén, Tobias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Metadesigning Design Research: How can designers collaboratively grow a research platform?2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference, Brighton: Design Research Society, 2016, p. 1412-1430, article id 275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘How can we design a meaningful and relevant research platform that will support futures of sustainability?’ was the question guiding the two-and-a-half-year- long, co-creative and emergent metadesign process of establishing a new research platform at the Department of Design, Linnaeus University, Sweden. The meta focus on developing a whole research environment, as a design practice and design research endeavour, should be valuable for the design research community. Findings concern the viability of co-creative approaches in such a remit, negotiations of artistic/scientific research conventions, and the design institution’s position in the multi-disciplined university. The research has identified tensions and conflicts between the academic institution and construct, and the application of ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies deemed auspicious for sustainability endeavours. The paper itself is a collaborative effort between eleven of the researchers involved in developing the research platform.

  • 33.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Conclusions2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 293-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 2 – Sustainability and fashion as seen from other places and disciplines2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 53-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 3 – Perspectives on refining fashion from within2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 147-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part 4 – Visions of sustainability from within the fashion space2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 221-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Fletcher, Kate
    University of the Arts, UK.
    Part I – Framing and expanding fashion and sustainability2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 13-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Akiyama, Hiroko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Thelin, Angelika
    Evaluating Impact of Co-creation2018In: OpenLivingLab Days (OLLD) 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing is an ambitious research project across Sweden and Japan, with the aim of improving the experience of ageing through social design and innovation. A core challenge is loneliness, which is addressed through interventions in the remit of work/occupation, housing, mobility. The Languaging Loneliness workshop has been developed to fast forward exploration of individual and collective experience of loneliness to inform development of policies, products and services. Tests to date in Sweden and Japan indicate that the workshop itself can reduce experience of loneliness.

    The overall aim of this research is to explore evaluative frameworks and approaches fitting for the living lab community that genuinely capture innovative and unconventional methods directed at stimulating innovation and improving well being – emotional and physical, as exemplified by the Languaging Loneliness workshop.

    Expected Outcomes:

    – A comparison and map of different evaluative frameworks in the specific context of an intervention to reduce experience of loneliness.

    – Brainstorming of new approaches to evaluation in the specific context of social design and wellbeing/quality of life.

    – We anticipate that this workshop will take us further in capturing and communicating elusive emotional benefits of living lab approaches.

    Opportunity to participate in a rich discussion and community around the dilemmas, opportunities, future pathways to evaluation in the living lab context. Participants will get hands-on experience from a workshop that synergises science and art, opportunity to share experiences, engage in critical and creative discussions, and design new pathways for evaluation of co-creation, ready for trial in the home context.

  • 39.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kivilehto, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Pavic, Eva
    Transdisciplinary and transnational co-creation for health and care in an ageing society2017In: OpenLivingLab Days 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this workshop is to share and further understandings of how tools for co-creation can be used to mobilise many ways of knowing and many different knowledge holders in the context of active ageing. Participants will experience the Five Levels of Story-telling tool, to create a shared map of understandings of active ageing, and engage in a fast process of social design and prototyping in this context. Together we will explore how tools for co-creation, developed in different contexts, for example industry and academia, can be synergised to meet the demands of a quadruple helix collaboration, in the context of health, care and ageing. The workshop draws on the project Transnational Living Lab for active ageing, a collaboration between Swedish and Japanese researchers, citizens, municipalities and industry partners. This 27-month long project aims to change the experience of ageing, by targeting issues of loneliness and segregation through social design. It is funded by Vinnova, Sweden and the Japan Science & Technology Agency, Japan.

    This workshop addresses the theme of healthcare in a wide sense. We define health as the physical and emotional well-being of individuals and communities as well as the interdependent health of other species and the long-term health of resources our societies depend upon. We define care as the respectful and health supportive relations between people, between people and other species, as well as the respect an individual shows herself.

    The specific focus of the workshop is active ageing and the particular project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing.

  • 40.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Kivilehto, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Pavic, Eva
    Johanneberg Science Park.
    Akiyama, Hiroko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Sekine, Chika
    UDIT Inc (Universal Design Institute for Information Technology), Japan.
    Kai-Yun Fan, Kyle
    Japan Research Institute Ltd, Japan.
    Transdisciplinary and transnational co-creation for health and care in an ageing society2017In: OpenLivingLab Days: Health / [ed] OpenLivingLab Days, OpenLivingLab Days , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this workshop is to share and further understandings of how tools for co-creation can be used to mobilise many ways of knowing and many different knowledge holders in the context of active ageing. Participants will experience the Five Levels of Story-telling tool, to create a shared map of understandings of active ageing, and engage in a fast process of social design and prototyping in this context. Together we will explore how tools for co-creation, developed in different contexts, for example industry and academia, can be synergised to meet the demands of a quadruple helix collaboration, in the context of health, care and ageing. The workshop draws on the project Transnational Living Lab for active ageing, a collaboration between Swedish and Japanese researchers, citizens, municipalities and industry partners. This 27-month long project aims to change the experience of ageing, by targeting issues of loneliness and segregation through social design. It is funded by Vinnova, Sweden and the Japan Science & Technology Agency, Japan.

    This workshop addresses the theme of healthcare in a wide sense. We define health as the physical and emotional well-being of individuals and communities as well as the interdependent health of other species and the long-term health of resources our societies depend upon. We define care as the respectful and health supportive relations between people, between people and other species, as well as the respect an individual shows herself.

    The specific focus of the workshop is active ageing and the particular project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing.

  • 41.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Jones, Hannah
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    Metadesign Tools: Designing the seeds for shared processes of change2008In: Changing the Change: Design, Visions, Proposals and Tools, Proceedings / [ed] Carlo Cipolla och Pier Paolo Peruccio, Turin: Allemandi Conference Press , 2008, p. 1491-1505Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces design tools and approaches developed to invite and support higher levels of synergy in collaborative practice. The tools that are introduced through three individual cases have been used to prompt a proactive and imaginative engagement with the sustainability imperative.

    These individual cases challenge the very boundaries of design. The idea of ‘metadesign’ is adopted to advocate design that operates at systemic levels, that invites interdisciplinary collaborations and that seeds or sets up the conditions for emergent processes of change.

    The cases represent the fashion industry at mass-market level in Sweden and the UK, the design, production and export of home furnishings in Indonesia, and an (AHRC) funded interdisciplinary design project in the UK entitled ‘Benchmarking Synergy levels within Metadesign’.

  • 42.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK ; Beckmans College of Design, Stockholm.
    Lundebye, Anette
    Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
    The Experience of Sustainability: Applying Metadesign to Invite Emotions to Further the Design of Sustainable Futures2008In: Design & Emotion, Hongkong / [ed] Design & Emotion Society, Hongkong: Design & Emotion Society , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the experience of a carbon neutral society? How does it feel to wear a cradle-to-cradle garment? This paper explores how the experiential dimension can enrich the development and communication of sustainability. The authors argue that such an approach can reach where quantitative and abstract language cannot, and foster a deeper relationship with ethical and environmental concerns, thus inviting designers and their colleagues into new and richer idea territories as regards sustainable futures. A series of methods and tools are proposed, designed to promote multi-sensory, and emotive engagement with the sustainability imperative and tested in recent empirical research taking the form of creative workshops. The rationale behind, the operation and benefits of the approaches are introduced through three cases, representing the fashion and automotive industries and a current AHRC funded research project ‘Bench-marking Synergy Levels within Metadesign’, (Goldsmiths, University of London.)

  • 43.
    Tham, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design. Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Lundebye, Anette
    Regent’s University London, UK.
    Lockheart, Julia
    University of Wales Trinity Saint David, UK;Goldsmiths University of London, UK.
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    How can we celebrate risk-taking in co-creative and transdisciplinary processes for change?2018In: Design Research Society International Conference: Limerick, Ireland. 25-28 Juni 2018, Limerick: Design Research Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design as catalyst for change entails working with uncertainty, venturing into new ways of knowing and complex transdisciplinary collaborations. This can be provocative, messy, awkward - even frightening, since it involves an element of risk-taking. The risks may concern asserting epistemological positions lower down a normative hierarchy, saying no to a conventionally termed strong financial proposition, or exploring a new visual language. 

    Using metadesign frameworks and tools, this workshop starts from concrete examples of risky moments to explore how design situations and cultures can be more allowing and supportive of risk-taking. Specifically, the workshop uses an approach of ‘languaging’, manifested through drawing, writing, film-making and embroidery, to probe and reimagine risk-taking. The workshop draws on insights into risk-taking from the Swedish-Japanese research project Transnational Living Lab for Active Ageing, the development project BOOST - proposals for housing at intersection of migrants, students and ageing population, and Design + Change - the development and implementation of visionary new degree programmes. The facilitators have long experience from setting up safe spaces for risky explorations across sectors, internationally. Workshop participants will leave with a framework and process to explore risk-taking co-creatively, new narratives of risk-taking in change work and a resource of examples of risk-taking.

1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf