lnu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 44 of 44
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM).
    Reski, Nico
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM).
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM).
    Visualizing dynamic text corpora using Virtual Reality2018Inngår i: ICAME 39 : Tampere, 30 May – 3 June, 2018: Corpus Linguistics and Changing Society : Book of Abstracts, Tampere: University of Tampere , 2018, s. 205-205Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, data visualization has become a major area in Digital Humanities research, and the same holds true also in linguistics. The rapidly increasing size of corpora, the emergence of dynamic real-time streams, and the availability of complex and enriched metadata have made it increasingly important to facilitate new and innovative approaches to presenting and exploring primary data. This demonstration showcases the uses of Virtual Reality (VR) in the visualization of geospatial linguistic data using data from the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS) project (see Laitinen et al 2017). The NTS data for this demonstration comprises a full year of geotagged tweets (12,443,696 tweets from 273,648 user accounts) posted within the Nordic region (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). The dataset includes over 50 metadata parameters in addition to the tweets themselves.

    We demonstrate the potential of using VR to efficiently find meaningful patterns in vast streams of data. The VR environment allows an easy overview of any of the features (textual or metadata) in a text corpus. Our focus will be on the language identification data, which provides a previously unexplored perspective into the use of English and other non-indigenous languages in the Nordic countries alongside the native languages of the region.

    Our VR prototype utilizes the HTC Vive headset for a room-scale VR scenario, and it is being developed using the Unity3D game development engine. Each node in the VR space is displayed as a stacked cuboid, the equivalent of a bar chart in a three-dimensional space, summarizing all tweets at one geographic location for a given point in time (see: https://tinyurl.com/nts-vr). Each stacked cuboid represents information of the three most frequently used languages, appropriately color coded, enabling the user to get an overview of the language distribution at each location. The VR prototype further encourages users to move between different locations and inspect points of interest in more detail (overall location-related information, a detailed list of all languages detected, the most frequently used hashtags). An underlying map outlines country borders and facilitates orientation. In addition to spatial movement through the Nordic areas, the VR system provides an interface to explore the Twitter data based on time (days, weeks, months, or time of predefined special events), which enables users to explore data over time (see: https://tinyurl.com/nts-vr-time).

    In addition to demonstrating how the VR methods aid data visualization and exploration, we will also briefly discuss the pedagogical implications of using VR to showcase linguistic diversity.

  • 2.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, MikkoLinnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Mobility, Variability and Changing Literacies in Modern Times2018Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). DISA.
    Mobility, variability and changing literacies in Modern times (Preface)2018Inngår i: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0028-3754, Vol. 119, nr 1, s. 13-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, MikkoLinnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Mobility, Variability and Changing Literacies in Modern Times: Special issue of Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, Bulletin of the Modern Language Society, volume 1192018Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Auer, Anita
    et al.
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Gordon, Moragh
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Fairman, Tony
    An Electronic Corpus of Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (England, c. 1750‐1835): Compilation Principles and Coding Conventions2014Inngår i: RECENT ADVANCES IN CORPUS LINGUISTICS: DEVELOPING AND EXPLOITING CORPORA / [ed] Vandelanotte, L; Davidse, K; Gentens, C; Kimps, D, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2014, s. 9-29Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a collaborative project that focuses on letters of artisans and the labouring poor in England, c. 1750-1835 (LALP). The project's objective is to create a corpus that allows for new research perspectives regarding the diachronic development of the English language by adding data representing language of the lower classes. An opportunity for an insight into the language use of the labouring poor has been provided by the laws for poor relief which permitted people in need to apply for out-relief from parish funds during the period 1795-1834. For the last 18 years, the independent scholar Tony Fairman has collected and transcribed more than 2000 poor relief application letters and other letters by artisans and the labouring poor. In this project Fairman's letter collection is being converted into an electronic corpus. Apart from converting the material into electronic form, the transcribed texts will be supplemented with contextual information and manuscript images. This paper presents the letter material, it describes the conversion of the letter collection into a corpus and discusses some of the problems and challenges in the conversion process.(1)

  • 6.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för samhällsvetenskap (FSV), Institutionen för samhällsstudier (SS).
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM), Institutionen för datavetenskap (DV).
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för medicin och optometri (MEO).
    Big Data in Cross-Disciplinary Research: J.UCS Focused Topic2017Inngår i: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 23, nr 11, s. 1035-1037Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    630 kilometers by bicycle: observations of English in urban and rural Finland2014Inngår i: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, nr 228, s. 55-77Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses selected observations of English usage in signage in Finland, a Nordic nation in which the significance of English has become more pronounced in recent decades. The background for this study comes from a large quantitative survey, carried out in 2007, charting the role of English in the Finnish society. One of the topic areas in this survey deals with people’s encounters with English and its visibility in their daily life, and this article aims to add a qualitative angle to these results. The observations discussed here were collected in 2009 during a six-day bicycle trip from Helsinki to the regional centre of Oulu. The analysis moves from mere quantitative recording of signs to a more nuanced analysis of interpretations of their situated meanings in public spaces. These observations show that the presence of English in both urban and rural areas of the country is far from a simple phenomenon, and illustrate how charting signs in space provide valuable information on language contact situations.

  • 8.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    A historical linguist exploring ELF2015Inngår i: The Eighth International Conference of English as a Lingua Franca, August 25-27, 2015, Beijing, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 9.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Research Unit for Variation, Contacts and Change in English, University of Helsinki.
    Contacts and variability in international Englishes: Compiling and using the Corpus of English in Finland2011Inngår i: Studies in Variation, Contacts and Change in English, ISSN 1797-4453, E-ISSN 1797-4453, Vol. 6, nr 1Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The past few decades have witnessed a substantial spread of English as the language of international communication. One of the consequences of this growth of English world-wide is that there is a need to develop new corpora that make it possible to describe these expanded uses of English. To illustrate the expansion of English, this article first presents an overview of the linguistic situation of present-day Finland, a country in which English has for long been used as a foreign language with no institutional status. The various uses of English in Finland are illustrated drawing from the results of the recent large-scale survey of English in Finland, carried out at the Research Unit for Variation, Contacts and Change in English (VARIENG). These survey results provide useful background information for an on-going corpus compilation process of the Corpus of English in Finland. The article then presents the results of three case studies that explore morphological and grammatical variability in this material.

  • 10.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Demythologizing generic expressions and common-number pronouns in English2008Inngår i: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0028-3754, Vol. 108, nr 5, s. 703-707Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 11.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Describing ‘orderly differentiation’: compiling the corpus of English in Finland2010Inngår i: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, E-ISSN 1474-0567, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 26-33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Reporting on a new research project describing and analysing English in Finland in the early twenty-first century.

    In a recent article, Taavitsainen and Pahta (2008) conclude that English in today's Finland has entered a new phase in which it is increasingly used alongside the country's national languages (also McArthur, 2002; Graddol, 2006). The new uses, they suggest, constitute a new form of second language in which English is used (a) as a lingua franca, and (b) as a language serving ‘glocalized’ needs to express local meanings in a global setting. Their evidence consists of various forms of language mixing in public discourse. Other forms of evidence, with similar conclusions, come from the recent national survey on Finns' uses of and attitudes to English, carried out at the University of Jyväskylä in 2007 (Leppänen et al. 2009). This survey provides evidence on the changing role of English in Finland, and attempts to answer questions such as where, how and by whom English is used alongside the other languages in the country.

  • 12.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Early nineteenth-century pauper letters2014Inngår i: Letter Writing and Language Change / [ed] Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, Richard J. Watts, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 13.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Englannin käyttöä ja väärinkäyttöä : Kielentutkija ja oikeakielisyys: Use and abuse of English2015Inngår i: Englannin aika: Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English : Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingfors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, s. 172-190Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    English on the move: What’s beyond modernity and internationalism?2015Inngår i: Dimensions of Sociolinguistic Landscapes in Europe: Materials and Methodological Solutions / [ed] Mikko Laitinen, Anastassia Zabrdoskaja, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, s. 105-124Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    From diachrony to typology: testing typological profiling on advanced non-native data2015Inngår i: Changing English 2015: Integrating cognitive, social & typological perspectives, 8-10 June, 2015, Helsinki, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study, I have suggested that advanced L2 English data collected from naturalistic non-instructional settings and traditional learner essays are statistically significantly different when it comes to writers adopting various ongoing grammatical changes. In this paper I will test whether these quantitative and qualitative differences in the nature of the data can be attested through typological profiling which has previously been used to analyze learner varieties and indigenized world English varieties. This paper tests the typological profiling methods elaborated in Szmrecsanyi (2009) and Szmrecsanyi & Kortmann (2011) on advanced L2 English as represented in spoken ELF interactions in VOICE and in a written corpus of advanced L2 English that contains texts from a variety of text types on the informational-interactional continuum. This method measures grammatical analyticity, defined by the presence of free grammatical markers, and grammatical syntheticity, the presence of bound markers. It is expected that the results could shed light on the typological status of advanced L2 English and provide empirical evidence on possible qualitative and quantitative differences between traditional learner data and global English material collected from naturalistic settings.

  • 16.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Indefinite pronouns with singular human reference: Recessive and ongoing2018Inngår i: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 137-158Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 17.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes and advanced L2 use of English: Evidence from new corpus resources2016Inngår i: Corpus Linguistics on the Move: Exploring and Understanding English through Corpora / [ed] María José López-Couso, Belén Méndez-Naya, Paloma Núñez-Pertejo, Ignacio M. Palacios-Martínez, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, s. 59-84Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the global spread of English by charting new ways of studying the expansion and diversification of English to non-native contexts. The research builds on the idea that the ongoing globalization of English calls for new empirical approaches to contact, variability, and the interplay of the established varieties andnew forms of English. It tests the methods of recent and ongoing grammatical change in investigating advanced non-native use. This methodology, combining historical linguistics and variationist sociolinguistics in a statistically sensitive corpus-based framework, has previously been used in the study of native varieties, but not in non-nativecontexts. The chapter first presents the compilation of a new multi-genre corpus ofadvanced English texts in non-instructional settings in Sweden and Finland, and then provides three case studies which examine how various lexico-grammatical variablescurrently undergoing change are adopted in non-native contexts. The results show substantial differences between traditional learner evidence and advanced non-native English in use, and indicate that the non-native evidence lands somewhere in betweenthe most advanced variety, standard American English, but ahead of other native and non-native inner and outer circle varieties. The findings therefore suggest that the processes and mechanisms of variability emerging in the globalization of English are more complex than previously thought.

  • 18.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Ongoing changes and global Englishes: Exploring new corpus resources2013Inngår i: ICAME 34, English corpus linguistics on the move: Applications and implications, Santiago de Compostela, Book of Abstracts, 22-26 May 2013, 2013, s. 193-194Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    There has recently been plenty of interest in recent and ongoing grammatical changes in English(e.g. Leech et al. 2009). Using evidence of a range of structures, these studies have identifiedvarious long-term trends, such as colloquialization and ‘Americanization’ in the writtenstandard English of the late twentieth century. Digital resources in the form of the Browncorpora have provided a sound empirical basis for this kind of work because they free anobserver from impressionistic and anecdotal data and enable taking the stylistic variation intoaccount (Mair 2008).Most of this work on recent changes has focused only on American and British English. Thispresentation shifts the focus to global Englishes, viz. English as a lingua franca (ELF) and otherL2-varieties of English (Seidlhofer 2011, Mauranen 2012), and asks how these currentgrammatical changes are reflected and adopted in use in the present-day global Englishes. Suchan approach is motivated because the number of speakers of English globally far exceeds thenumber of native speakers. There has recently been emerging interest in the changes in the othervarieties (cf. Filppula (2012) on the auxiliaries in the outer circle varieties; Laitinen (2011) onpatterns of verbal complementation in lingua franca Englishes).This presentation approaches recent grammatical changes in global Englishes through the existing corpus resources. It highlights the need for developing and collecting new materialsthat reflect the global spread of English. The existing (global) English corpora are, for variousreasons, not suitable for investigating recent and ongoing changes. For instance, the existinglearner corpora are limited to few text types, and the corpus design in the ICE corpora requiresheavy modifications for the global context. The two ELF corpora only contain spoken language,and relying solely on spoken evidence may lead to incomplete conclusions on variabilitybecause it is often necessary to compare spoken and written data side-by-side for determiningthe direction of change (cf. Mair 2007). This presentation discusses the corpus design andcompilation principles of today’s written ELF corpora. The guiding principle in this work is thatthe corpus design should be suitable for a range of geographic contexts in which English isemerging or has emerged as a communicative medium. I will discuss the collection process oftwo databases that represent English uses in Sweden and in Finland. These databases arecurrently in compilation, with the aim that they would provide good practices for developing anew generation of global English text corpora. I will then use these two databases to provideevidence of adverbial connectives of ANY/EACH/EVERY TIME in the sense of ‘whenever’. Theseconnectives have undergone grammaticalization in the native varieties (Brinton 2007), and I will illustrate how this development is reflected in global Englishes.

  • 19.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Ongoing changes in English modals: On the developments in ELF2016Inngår i: New Approaches in English Linguistics: Building Bridges / [ed] Olga Timofeeva, Sarah Chevalier, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, s. 175-196Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates how ongoing grammatical change, widely documented in various native varieties, is adopted in advanced lingua franca use of English (ELF). It incorporates a broader perspective on ELF than previously, seeing it as one stage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emerging in spoken interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genre corpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in lingua franca use. It is followed with a case study investigating quantitative patterns in a set of core and emergent modal auxiliaries. The results suggest that in cases of substantial recent changes in the core varieties of English, lingua franca uses polarize the diffusion of change. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angle to lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to ELF but also to ongoing grammatical variability.

  • 20.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Ongoing grammatical changes and global Englishes2013Inngår i: Changing English: Contact & variation, 2013, 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks into how current grammatical changes in English are reflected and adopted in use in the present-day global Englishes, i.e. in lingua franca and in other L2-varieties of today. The study of ongoing changes in English has emerged as a lively field recently, and the studies of lexico-grammatical variability have identified a range of patterns of contemporary change (Leech et al. 2009; Mair & Leech 2006). Much of this research has focused on the inner core varieties of English, and only recently have we seen investigations targeting changes in the new Englishes (see Filppula 2012; Laitinen 2011). The main argument is that more emphasis should be placed on exploring the diachronic embedding of variability in today's global Englishes. This paper presents evidence on two current and ongoing changes: (a) variability in the modals of will/shall (Leech 2003) and (b) changes in the adverbial connectives of every/each/any time (Brinton 2007). I will draw evidence from two databases that represent English uses in Sweden and in Finland. These databases are currently in compilation, with the aim that they would provide good practices for developing a new generation of global English text corpora.

  • 21.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Placing ELF among the varieties of English: Observations from typological profiling2018Inngår i: Modelling World Englishes in the 21st century: Assessing the interplay of emancipation and globalization of ESL varieties / [ed] Sandra C. Deshors, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 109-131Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how (dis)similar ELF is structurally from the core nativevarieties of English, indigenized L2 varieties, and learner English. ELF is understoodas second language use of English in settings where the interactants do notnecessarily share a first language. The empirical part makes use of the method oftypological profiling based on aggregate structural features. This method measuresthree indices (i.e. grammaticity, analyticity, and syntheticity), and it hasbeen used previously to analyze a range of variety types but has not been appliedto the assessment of ELF. The results provide quantitative evidence that placesELF on the map and shows that, on purely structural grounds, ELF is a distinctvariety type among English varieties. Moreover, the observations show that ELFis structurally different from second language acquisition, and there is a quantitativebasis for drawing a distinction between ELF and traditional learner data.

  • 22.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Päivitys 20142015Inngår i: Englannin aika : Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English : Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, s. 190-192Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Sociolinguistic patterns in grammaticalisation: he, they, and those in human indefinite reference2008Inngår i: Language Variation and Change, ISSN 0954-3945, E-ISSN 1469-8021, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 155-185Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociolinguistic patterns in language change are largely based on generalizations from linguistic variables consisting of lexemes or morphemes. This article takes a diachronic, corpus-based approach to the diffusion of a change in a more extensive morphosemantic function consisting of several linguistic subsystems. It focuses on the pronoun variants he, they, and those used for human indefiniteness in two contexts: (a) epicene anaphoric uses with indefinite pronouns and (b) cataphoric personal references. The quantitative corpus analyses show that the pronoun selection in Early and Late Modern English developed a greater tendency to use one pronoun type over the other in both contexts. The main data come from the Corpus of Early English Correspondence and its Extension. Statistical analyses compare the observed correlations of the pronouns with a set of social, external variables and language-internal factors. This article concludes that it is possible to establish sociolinguistic patterns in larger shifts if we account for the closely related internal developments in the language.

  • 24.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Sociolinguistics in Finland: A brief overview of the discipline2013Inngår i: Sociolinguistica: Internationales Jahrbuch fuer Europaeische Soziolinguistik, ISSN 0933-1883, E-ISSN 1865-939X, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 187-203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 25.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    The Oxford English Dictionary2015Inngår i: Englannin aika. Elävän kielen kartoitusta: The Time of English. Charting a Living Language / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen & Matti Rissanen, Helsingors: Helsingfors universitet, 2015, s. 194-194Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Typological hierarchies and frequency drifts in the history of English2012Inngår i: The Oxford Handbook of the History of English / [ed] Nevalainen, Terttu & Elizabeth Closs Traugott, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, s. 633-642Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    “Tyranny of writing” and English corpus linguistics: What to do with the new mediated and vernacular genres?2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation discusses ongoing research that focuses on exploring grammatical variability in advanced L2 uses of English in the expanding circle, i.e. in countries in which English does not have an official role but where it is widely used as a linguistic resource in today’s globalized world. This research is corpus-based, and my presentation focuses on the sources of evidence using the notion of “tyranny of writing”. For instance, up to today, most of the existing corpus materials from the expanding circle consist of learner corpora which are collections of short written essays collected from institutional settings. They are excellent tools but exclude a wide range of new mediated and vernacular genres. Similarly, the corpora from the inner core varieties of English, i.e. American and British English, contain materials from a variety of formal written genres, covering texts types of news, academic and fiction, etc. This presentation discusses how to make use of these best practices in English corpus linguistics to create a set of corpora of English use in the expanding circle. These new corpora should ideally represent not only formal written genres but also a wide range of vernacular genres, such as blogs, news-letters, Twitter messages, where English is used, but at the same time, these new sources of evidence should be comparable with the existing corpora in order to ensure diachronic comparisons.

  • 28.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    What happens to ongoing change in multilingual settings?: A corpus compiler’s perspective on new data and new research prospects2017Inngår i: Challenging the Myth of Monolingual Corpora / [ed] Arja Nurmi, Päivi Pahta, Tanja Rütten, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, s. 58-79Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    You was/were variation and English normative grammars in the eighteenth century2009Inngår i: The language of daily life in England (1400-1800) / [ed] Minna Nevala, Arja Nurmi and Minna Palander-Collin, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009, s. 199-217Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 30.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Auer, Anita
    Utrecht University.
    Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (England, c. 1750–1835): Approaching Linguistic Diversity in Late Modern English2014Inngår i: Contact, Variation, and Change in the History of English / [ed] Simone E. Pfenninger, Olga Timofeeva, Anne-Christine Gardner, Alpo Honkapohja, Marianne Hundt and Daniel Schreier, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, s. 187-212Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Histories of linguistic variability and language standardization in Late Modern England have predominantly focused on the well-educated layers of society. This paper aims at providing a more complete overview of language use during that period by focusing on the lower social ranks. The discussion will be based on the corpus Letters of Artisans and the Labouring Poor (LALP), which contains more than 2,000 letters of application for poor relief from the period c.1750−1835. The first part of the paper describes the corpus in some detail. The second part discusses new research questions that the lower-class material raises; this will be illustrated by two case studies. In the first study, the material will be viewed from the point of view of spelling acquisition and fossilization. The second case study focuses on providing diachronic time depth to some of the current issues discussed in the sociolinguistics of globalization (Blommaert 2010), such as mobility and developing literacies.

  • 31.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    On the globalization of English: Observations of subjective progressives in present-day Englishes2016Inngår i: World Englishes: New theoretical and methodological considerations / [ed] Elena Seoane, Cristina Suárez-Gómez, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, s. 229-252Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the globalization of English and suggests that the changingrole and nature of English in the expanding circle requires new methodologicalapproaches and new empirical materials which better represent non-nativeglobal English(es), that is, when English is used as an additional linguisticresource alongside L1s. Our case study investigates how ongoing grammaticalchanges are adapted in global use, and focuses on a specific use of the progressive:the subjective sense with an intervening adverbial. Our findings corroboratethose of Hundt & Vogel (2011) on the progressive in general, but also showthat stretched, special uses of progressives are fully established in non-nativeglobal usage. We conclude that as the globalization of English continues toblur the neat division of the English varieties, better data is needed to take intoaccount the diversity of texts emerging in the expanding circle and to representa variety of text types from natural, non-instructional settings.

  • 32.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Advanced non-native English on a continuum of Englishes: Charting new data sources2015Inngår i: From data to evidence : big data, rich data, uncharted data: 19-22 October 2015, Helsinki, Varieng , 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation discusses research in which the objective is to find new empirical and theoretical ways of approaching the ongoing globalization of English. A particular angle is to test the usability of corpus-based diachronic methods for studying advanced non-native Englishes and to investigate present-day non-native use as one stage in the long continuum of Englishes. Such an approach is motivated by calls from the English as a lingua franca (ELF) domain to provide diachronically-informed evidence of English in multilingual settings (Seildhofer 2011) and by recent attempts in the study of indigenized World Englishes to take into account diachronic processes in shaping the outer circle Englishes (Noël, van Rooy & van der Auwera 2014). In particular, we investigate how ongoing grammatical variability, which is widely documented in many native varieties, is adapted in advanced non-native use. A key question is to investigate to what extent multilingual settings contribute to ongoing variability. The presentation discusses requirements for sources of material and evidence, and its starting point is the fact that the ELF research has so far focused on meaning making in interaction, which is also reflected in the scope of corpus resources. We zoom into ongoing corpus compilation work in which the aim is to collect a representative multi-genre sample of English texts in multilingual settings. The objective is that the sampling frame should enable diachronic and diatopic analyses of advanced nonnative use and make possible quantitative comparisons between our evidence and some of the existing English corpora, both native and non-native. The presentation discusses the diverse nature of our data and presents how we turn the data into evidence. We will introduce the set of grammatical structures, stemming from the corpus material, which have so far been investigated, and discuss a set of broader research questions to which this type of multi-genre corpus material of English texts in multilingual settings could shed more light.

  • 33.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). DISA.
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). DISA.
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). DISA.
    Charting New Sources of elf Data: A Multi-Genre Corpus Approach2019Inngår i: From Data to Evidence in English Language Research / [ed] Carla Suhr, Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, s. 326-350Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses research that charts new lingua franca English data and broadensthe scope of written elf corpora. We illustrate that, apart from the academic domain,there exist various written genres in non-native contexts in which English is used as asecond language resource alongside native languages. These uncharted data can provideus with new ways of approaching the ongoing globalization of English. The newapproach incorporates a broader perspective on elf than previously, seeing it as onestage in the long diachronic continuum of Englishes rather than as an entity emergingin interaction. The first part details a corpus project that produces written multi-genrecorpora suitable for real-time studies of how ongoing variability is reflected in linguafranca use. It is followed by three case studies investigating quantitative patterns ofongoing change in elf. The conclusions suggest that a diachronically-informed angleto lingua franca use offers a new vantage point not only to elf but also to ongoinggrammatical variability. It shows that the traditional and canonized way of seeing nonnativespeakers/writers is not sufficient, nor is the simplified view of norm dependency of non-native individuals.

  • 34.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Ongoing grammatical change and the new Englishes: Towards a set of corpora of English uses in the expanding circle2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap (DV).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Lakaw, Alexander
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Revisiting weak ties: Using present-day social media data in variationist studies2017Inngår i: Exploring Future Paths for Historical Sociolinguistics / [ed] Tanja Säily, Minna Palander-Collin, Arja Nurmi, Anita Auer, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, s. 303-325Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article makes use of big and rich present-day data to revisit the social network model in sociolinguistics. This model predicts that mobile individuals with ties outside a home community and subsequent loose-knit networks tend to promote the diffusion of linguistic innovations. The model has been applied to a range of small ethnographic networks. We use a database of nearly 200,000 informants who send micro-blog messages in Twitter. We operationalize networks using two ratio variables; one of them is a truly weak tie and the other one a slightly stronger one. The results show that there is a straightforward increase of innovative behavior in the truly weak tie network, but the data indicate that innovations also spread under conditions of stronger networks, given that the network size is large enough. On the methodological level, our approach opens up new horizons in using big and often freely available data in sociolinguistics, both past and present.

  • 36.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR). Univ Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM), Institutionen för datavetenskap (DV).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Lakaw, Alexander
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Utilizing Multilingual Language Data in (Nearly) Real Time: The Case of the Nordic Tweet Stream2017Inngår i: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 23, nr 11, s. 1038-1056Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the Nordic Tweet Stream, a cross-disciplinary digital humanities project that downloads Twitter messages from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The paper first introduces some of the technical aspects in creating a real-time monitor corpus that grows every day, and then two case studies illustrate how the corpus could be used as empirical evidence in studies focusing on the global spread of English. Our approach in the case studies is sociolinguistic, and we are interested in how widespread multilingualism which involves English is in the region, and what happens to ongoing grammatical change in digital environments. The results are based on 6.6 million tweets collected during the first four months of data streaming. They show that English was the most frequently used language, accounting for almost a third. This indicates that Nordic Twitter users choose English as a means of reaching wider audiences. The preference for English is the strongest in Denmark and the weakest in Finland. Tweeting mostly occurs late in the evening, and high-profile media events such as the Eurovision Song Contest produce considerable peaks in Twitter activity. The prevalent use of informal features such as univerbated verb forms (e.g., gotta for (HAVE) got to) supports previous findings of the speech-like nature of written Twitter data, but the results indicate that tweeters are pushing the limits even further.

  • 37. Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM).
    Levin, Magnus
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för datavetenskap och medieteknik (DM).
    The Nordic Tweet Stream: A Dynamic Real-Time Monitor Corpus of Big and Rich Language Data2018Inngår i: DHN 2018 Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference: Proceedings of the Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 3rd Conference Helsinki, Finland, March 7-9, 2018 / [ed] Eetu Mäkelä, Mikko Tolonen, Jouni Tuominen, CEUR-WS.org , 2018, s. 349-362Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the Nordic Tweet Stream (NTS), a cross-disciplinarycorpus project of computer scientists and a group of sociolinguists interestedin language variability and in the global spread of English. Our research integratestwo types of empirical data: We not only rely on traditional structured corpusdata but also use unstructured data sources that are often big and rich inmetadata, such as Twitter streams. The NTS downloads tweets and associatedmetadata from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. We first introducesome technical aspects in creating a dynamic real-time monitor corpus, andthe following case study illustrates how the corpus could be used as empiricalevidence in sociolinguistic studies focusing on the global spread of English tomultilingual settings. The results show that English is the most frequently usedlanguage, accounting for almost a third. These results can be used to assess howwidespread English use is in the Nordic region and offer a big data perspectivethat complement previous small-scale studies. The future objectives include annotatingthe material, making it available for the scholarly community, and expandingthe geographic scope of the data stream outside Nordic region.

  • 38.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Google Books: A shortcut to studying language variability?2018Inngår i: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 225-235Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 39.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Zabrodskaja, Anastassia
    Tallinn University, Estonia.
    Dimensions and dynamics of sociolinguistic landscapes in Europe2015Inngår i: Dimensions of Sociolinguistic Landscapes in Europe : Materials and Methodological Solutions / [ed] Mikko Laitinen, Anastassia Zabrdoskaja, Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, s. 11-25Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för konst och humaniora (FKH), Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Zabrodskaja, AnastassiaTallinn university, Estonia.
    Dimensions of Sociolinguistic Landscapes in Europe: Materials and Methodological Solutions2015Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles in this volume investigate everyday textual material of sociolinguistic landscapes in the early 21st century. Sociolinguistic landscapes reflect societal change, and they enable observers to map what linguistic resources are used in various contexts and to study how these resources interact and are interpreted. The articles present not only quantitative results of the presence of languages in signs but also look into how authors and designers make use of an endless pool of linguistic resources, how visible semiotic items contribute to create a sense of space, what types of mental processes are involved in the production, and how various audiences (residents, occasional passers-by, and language regulators) interpret and construct signs and sociolinguistic landscapes to form their own understanding of semiotic space.

  • 41.
    Leppänen, Sirpa
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Pitkänen-Huhta, Anne
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Nikula, Tarja
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Kytölä, Samu
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Törmäkangas, Timo
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Nissinen, Kari
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Kääntä, Leila
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Räisänen, Tiina
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för språk och litteratur, SOL.
    Pahta, Päivi
    University of Tampere.
    Koskela, Heidi
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Lähdesmäki, Salla
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Jousmäki, Henna
    University of Jyväskylä.
    National Survey on the English Language in Finland: Uses, Meanings and Attitudes2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    DISA.
    Nordqvist, Jonas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för teknik (FTK), Institutionen för matematik (MA). DISA.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Towards a language independent Twitter bot detector2019Inngår i: Proceedings of 4th Conference of The Association Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries: Copenhagen, March 6-8 2019 / [ed] Navarretta Costanza et al., Copenhagen: Digital Humanities in the Nordic countries , 2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes our work in developing an application that recognizes automatically generated tweets. The objective of this machine learning application is to increase data accuracy in sociolinguistic studies that utilize Twitter by reducing skewed sampling and inaccuracies in linguistic data. Most previous machine learning attempts to exclude bot material have been language dependent since they make use of monolingual Twitter text in their training phase. In this paper, we present a language independent approach which classifies each single tweet to be either autogenerated (AGT) or human-generated (HGT). We define an AGT as a tweet where all or parts of the natural language content is generated automatically by a bot or other type of program. In other words, while AGT/HGT refer to an individual message, the term bot refers to non-personal and automated accounts that post content to online social networks. Our approach classifies a tweet using only metadata that comes with every tweet, and we utilize those metadata parameters that are both language and country independent. The empirical part shows good success rates. Using a bilingual training set of Finnish and Swedish tweets, we correctly classified about 98.2% of all tweets in a test set using a third language (English).

  • 43.
    Nevalainen, Terttu
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Nevala, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Numi, Arja
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Changes in different stages: From nearing completion to completed2018Inngår i: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 251-256Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 44.
    Palander-Collin, Minna
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Laitinen, Mikko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Sairio, Anni
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Säily, Tanja
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    From incipient to mid-range and beyond2018Inngår i: Patterns of Change in 18th-century English: A sociolinguistic approach / [ed] Terttu Nevalainen, Minna Palander-Collin, Tanja Säily, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 246-252Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
1 - 44 of 44
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf