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  • 1.
    Davidsson, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    A Mobile Application with Embodied Multimodal Interactions for Understanding Representations of Motion in Physics2012In: IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2012 Berlin, Germany11-13 March 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research in the Learning Sciences points out different methods and approaches to enhance and assist students in their learning and understanding of mathematical representations of the underlying physics of everyday situations. One of the aims of this paper is to address how mobile applications can be designed to support some of the pedagogical challenges associated with learners´ understanding of different graphical representations of motion – e.g. displacement as a function of time, velocity as a function of time, and how these couple to the actual motion, to each other, as well as to other mathematical representations of motion such as functions, equations and descriptive text. A prototype design is presented including a new type of application, or app, for mobile and in classroom use, using touch- and gesture based technology. One of the specific aims of this set of applications is to spur the learners exposure to, interaction with, as well as creation of multiple and multimodal representations of physical everyday phenomena involving motion, in a personal inquiry-based approach that could involve both informal as well as formal learning activities.  

  • 2.
    Davidsson, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Finger Velocity: A Multimodal Touch Based Tablet Application for Learning the Physics of Motion2014In: Mobile as Mainstream - Towards Future Challenges in Mobile Learning: 13th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, mLearn 2014, Istanbul, Turkey, November 3-5, 2014. Proceedings / [ed] Marco Kalz, Yasemin Bayyurt, Marcus Specht, Springer, 2014, Vol. 479, p. 238-249Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prototype multimodal tablet application for learning the physics of motion has been developed tested and evaluated. By moving their finger across the screen the application enables the user to map its position and velocity in real-time in terms of graphs. The learning outcome of those test subjects using the application was compared to a group that did not use the application but had it shown to them, at the same time as getting an explanation of all the physics involved. There was a small but not significant difference in performance between these groups on a post-test. However, a larger (arguably significant) difference was seen between the male and female test subjects for the sub-set of questions of a more analytical nature. These were the questions targeted in this paper.

  • 3.
    Davidsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Johansson, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lindwall, Katrin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Exploring the Use of Augmented Reality  to Support Science Education in Secondary Schools2012In: 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education - Proceedings / [ed] Bob Werner, Los Alamitos: IEEE Press, 2012, p. 218-220Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 2 years we have conducted several trials exploring how augmented reality and mobile technologies can be used to support learning and teaching in science education. In particular, we present the on-going efforts that are part of the EU funded project Science Center To Go. We provide an overview of the different activities, the lessons learned and what we propose as ways to forward making the technology, mobile, affordable and in the long term – ubiquitous available.

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