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  • 1.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Purposeful Learning Across Collaborative Educational Spaces2014In: Learning and becoming in practice: The International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2014 : Proceedings, Volume 3, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2014, Vol. 3, p. 1597-1598Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the overall goals and preliminary results of an on-going research project that aims at: understanding the intricacies and complexities of introducing mobile technologies into schools’ curriculum and accepted teaching practices; analyzing actual transformations that the use of mobile technologies in schools brings to contemporary forms of learning. The results of the project will contribute to a better understanding of new media literacies and their implications for curriculum design and everyday educational practices.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pargman, Teresa Cerratto
    Stockholm University.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University.
    Mobile Devices as Support Rather than Distraction for Mobile Learners: Evaluating Guidelines for Design2011In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article questions the design of mobile learning activities that lead students to spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the environment. This problem is approached from an interaction design perspective, designing and analysing geometry-learning activities. The authors present six guidelines for designing mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. The guidelines are developed through video analysis of groups of middle school students doing learning activities outdoors and evaluated using the task model. The guidelines suggest that students (1) assume roles based on a different functionality of each device, (2) use devices as contextual tools, that the activities, (3) include physical interaction with the environment, (4) let teachers assume roles, (5) encourage face-to-face communication, and (6) introduce students to the mobile devices.

  • 3. Karlsson, Mia
    et al.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    A Mobile Game as a Tool to Support Learning among Teenage Girls: An Explorative Study conducted from a Community of Practice Perspective2008In: Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference 2008: SITE2008, 2008, p. 2636-2643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the use of mobile games to support informal learning. The results presented in this paper are based on interviews conducted with five Swedish teenage girls out of a total of thirty who participated in a summer course on technology and game design. Together with the researchers and in collaboration with the local orienteering club, the girls have been co-designing a game about local history. The game includes the combination of physical and intellectual activities together with the use of mobile and GPS devices. The goal of this study is to gain insights for the continuous evolvement of the mobile game based on the interaction with the players. The findings are more in the line of formulating relevant questions rather than providing answers in order to gain insights about how to use mobile games to support novel ways of learning. This study is the first out of three we plan to conduct during the spring 2008; including trials with teacher educators and teacher students.

  • 4.
    Kurti, Arianit
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Medieteknik.
    Designing Innovative Learning Activities Using Ubiquitous Computing2007In: Proceedings of the 7th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, USA , 2007, p. 386-390Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kurti, Arianit
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. ISMT.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. ISMT.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. ISMT.
    Bridging Outdoors and Indoors Educational Activities in Schools with the Support of Mobile and Positioning Technologies2008In: International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organization: Special Issue on Current Mobile Learning Technologies and Applications, ISSN 1746-7268, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 166-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kurti, Arianit
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Informatik.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknologi.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknologi.
    Flensburg, Per
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Informatik.
    Increasing the value of information: Putting content in context: is that enough?2006In: Proceedings of Information System Research Seminar, IRIS 29, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Kurti, Arianit
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Martin, Svensson
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Exploring How Pervasive Technologies Can Support Situated Learning2007In: Proceedings of “Pervasive Learning 2007”, An International Workshop on Pervasive Learning, in conjunction with Pervasive 2007, May 13th, 2007, Toronto, Canada, Centre for Mobile Computing, Massey University, New Zealand , 2007, p. 19-26Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Chryssafidou, E.
    Sotiriou, S.
    Koulouris, P.
    Stratakis, M.
    Miliarakis, A.
    Barajas, M.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Developing Tools that Support Effective Mobile and Game Based Learning: The COLLAGE Platform2010In: Architectures for Distributed and Complex M-Learning Systems: Applying Intelligent Technologies / [ed] Caballe, S., Xhafa, F., Daradoumis, T., & Juan, A., Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global, 2010, 1, p. 1-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Anytime, Anywhere Learning Supported by Smart Phones: Experiences and Results from the MUSIS Project2007In: Journal of Educational Technology & Society, ISSN 1176-3647, E-ISSN 1436-4522, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Medieteknik.
    Sotirou, Sofoklis
    Evi, Chryssafidou
    Owen, Martin
    Mario, Barajas Frutos
    Elizabeth, Zistler
    Manfred, Lohr
    Menelaos, Stratakis
    Antonis, Miliarakis
    The COLLAGE project: Guide of Good Practice for Mobile and Game Based Learning2008Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Winter, Simon
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Persson, Magnus E
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Multicasting Services and Information in Sweden II – Final project report submitted to VINNOVA.2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mathematical learning processes supported by augmented reality2010In: Proceedings of the 34th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education: Mathematics in different settings : PME 34, Belo Horizonte, Brazil / [ed] Márcia Pínto & Teresinha Kawasaki, Belo Horizonte, Brazil: PME , 2010, p. 337-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of this paper are involved in an ongoing project with the aim of investigating ICT-supported activities for the learning of mathematics where real-world images are mixed with computer-generated 3D images. The present paper explores the ways in which four students (15 years old) try to make sense of a task that calls for reflection on the concept of scale. The analysis shows how this specific kind of learning activity can challenge students to vary and coordinate among representations offered within the activity, thereby creating opportunities to extend and strengthen their networks of knowledge elements associated with the current learning object.

  • 13.
    Pea, Roy
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Maldonado, Heidy
    Stanford University, USA.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Learning and Technological Designs for Mobile Science Inquiry Collaboratories2011In: Orchestrating Inquiry Learning / [ed] Littleton, K., Scanlon, E., & Sharples. M., London, Uniteed Kingdom: Routledge, 2011, 1, p. 105-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University.
    Hokstad, Leif M.
    Stockholm University.
    Exploring Design Methods for Mobile Learning2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - MobileHCI '11, New York, New York, USA: ACM Press, 2011, p. 741-743Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the workshop “Exploring DesignMethods for Mobile Learning” to be held at MobileHCI2011, in Stockholm, Sweden.

  • 15.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    A Design Toolkit for Emerging Learning Landscapes Supported by Ubiquitous Computing2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of mobile devices and their integration in our everyday ac- tivities is changing the way we communicate, share information, and learn. The rapid adoption of powerful mobile devices also offers new opportunities to sup- port teaching and learning. For many users, mobile devices along with different types of computers are always connected, providing a constant stream of digital content to and from people and thereby adding new layers to the everyday in- formation landscape. These emergent trends are changing communication and collaboration patterns, but they have not yet been effectively leveraged for the field of education. Nearly 20 years ago, it was argued that the limitations of computer use for education in the coming decades would likely be less a result of technological limitations than a result of limited human imagination and the constraints of old habits and social structures. These two latest behaviors are still observable in many of today's classrooms. Therefore, different strategies are needed to explore and promote innovative educational practices supported by mobile and ubiquitous technologies, and this thesis will argue that design can be the catalyst for such a change.The main research question to be addressed in this thesis relates to what new approaches can be developed to design emerging learning landscapes supported by ubiquitous computing. In order to investigate this question, different design approaches are used to bring together the perspectives of technology- enhanced learning, ubiquitous computing, and interaction design. The empirical work presented in this dissertation is based on the activities and outcomes that emerged from three projects that included informal learning activities, inquiry-based science learning, and mathematics learning inside and outside the formal classroom. The most salient design approaches were identified from a comparative analysis of the projects, and this provided the foundations of a design toolkit. The intention of creating and using such a design toolkit is to provide a set of guidelines for researchers, designers, teachers, and other stakeholders to tackle the challenges of designing innovative learning activities supported by ubiquitous technologies.

  • 16.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Design Strategies for Developing Mobile Collaborative Learning Platforms2010In: Digital Content Creation: Creativity, Competence, Critique / [ed] Kristen Drotner and Kim Christian Schrøder, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2010, p. 227-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Computer Science.
    Designing Mobile Games that Explore Novel Learning Practices with Co-Design2007In: Research Methods in Informal and Mobile Learning, Institute of Education, University of London, London , 2007, p. 41-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-design practices have been the focus of current research efforts in the field of educational technologies but not as prevalent in mobile games to support learning. By focusing on the entire experience of game based learning including the design process richer opportunities for data collection and evaluation can be gathered. The flow of mobile activities can be “caught” by using techniques like automatic and collaborative tagging technology that combine users’ active contributions, reflections with the exchange of data between devices and systems. This paper presents how co-design offered insight to the design and evaluation of a mobile game called Skattjakt (Treasure Hunt in Swedish) and the benefits it can have for future learning activities. The outcome of our activities over the last year with 2 completed trials and 3rd in progress has provided us with valuable results that can help us to bridge the gap between learning in informal and formal settings. Moreover, we believe that involving children in the design process of mobile games may give us new insights regarding the nature of their learning practices while learning with these games.

  • 18.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Expanding the role of design to support CSCL2011In: 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference / [ed] H. Spada, G. Stahl, N. Miyake, & N. Law, Hong Kong: International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2011, p. 942-943Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues for the need of different strategies to explore and promote innovative educational practices supported by collaborative technologies. By expanding the role for design in the research process can acts as a catalyst for this change. By using a design process that guides research and the realization of products for CSCL can help balance the different needs of researchers and practitioners. An improved process is presented that suggests a design approach to tackle this social challenge.

  • 19.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Exploring Novel Learning Practices Through Co-Designing Mobile Games2009In: Researching mobile learning: frameworks, tools, and research designs / [ed] Vavoula, Giasemi Pachler, Norbert Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes, Bern, Oxford: Peter Lang , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-design practices have been the focus of current research efforts in the field of educational technologies but not as prevalent in mobile games to support learning. Setting the design focus on the entire learning experience including game based activities can provide richer opportunities for evaluation for informal activities. The flow of mobile activities can be captured by using techniques such as tagging technology that combine users’ active contributions and reflections with the exchange of data between devices and systems. This chapter presents how co-design offered insights to the design and evaluation of a mobile game called Skattjakt (Treasure Hunt in Swedish) and the benefits it can have for future learning activities. Two completed trials over the last year and a third trial in progress have provided us with valuable results that can help us to bridge learning in informal and formal settings. Moreover, we believe that involving children in the design process for mobile games may give us new perspectives regarding the nature of their learning practices while learning with these games.

  • 20.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Playing and Learning Across Locations:: Indentifying Factors for the Design of Collaborative Mobile Learning2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this thesis investigates the design challenges associated with the development and use of mobile applications and tools for supporting collaboration in educational activities. These technologies provide new opportunities to promote and enhance collaboration by engaging learners in a variety of activities across different places and contexts. A basic challenge is to identify how to design and deploy mobile tools and services that could be used to support collaboration in different kinds of settings. There is a need to investigate how to design collaborative learning processes and to support flexible educational activities that take advantage of mobility. The main research question that I focus on is the identification of factors that influence the design of mobile collaborative learning.

    The theoretical foundations that guide my work rely on the concepts behind computer supported collaborative learning and design-based research. These ideas are presented at the beginning of this thesis and provide the basis for developing an initial framework for understanding mobile collaboration. The empirical results from three different projects conducted as part of my efforts at the Center for Learning and Knowledge Technologies at Växjö University are presented and analyzed. These results are based on a collection of papers that have been published in two refereed international conference proceedings, a journal paper, and a book chapter. The educational activities and technological support have been developed in accordance with a grounded theoretical framework. The thesis ends by discussing those factors, which have been identified as having a significant influence when it comes to the design and support of mobile collaborative learning.

    The findings presented in this thesis indicate that mobility changes the contexts of learning and modes of collaboration, requiring different design approaches than those used in traditional system development to support teaching and learning. The major conclusion of these efforts is that the learners’ creations, actions, sharing of experiences and reflections are key factors to consider when designing mobile collaborative activities in learning. The results additionally point to the benefit of directly involving the learners in the design process by connecting them to the iterative cycles of interaction design and research.

  • 21.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ehrenberg, Nils
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Cuartielles, David
    Arduino Verkstad, Sweden.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Design Strategies for developing a Visual Platform for Physical Computing with Mobile Tools for Project Documentation and Reflection2015In: Proceedings of the Workshops at the 17th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education AIED 2015, Madrid, Spain, June 22 - 26, 2015 / [ed] Jesus Boticario, Kaisa Muldner, CEUR-WS.org , 2015, p. 57-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster discusses work on the design of a visual-based programming language for physical computing and mobile tools for the learners to actively document and reflect on their projects. These are parts of a European project that is investigating how to generate, analyze, use and provide feedback from analytics derived from hands-on learning activities. Our aim is to raise a discussion about how learning analytics, intelligence, and the role of learners’ documenting their work can provide richer opportunities for supporting learning and teaching.

  • 22.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University.
    Lessons from Designing Geometry Learning Activities that Combine Mobile and 3D Tools2010In: Proceedings of the 6th IEEE WMUTE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education / [ed] Tak-Wai Chan, Demetrios G. Sampson, Ulrich Hoppe, Roy Pea, & Chen-Chung Liu, Kaohsiung, Taiwan: IEEE, 2010, p. 137-141Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of low-cost and powerful mobile devices and 3D modeling and visualization tools provides new opportunities for bringing innovation into mathematics education. This paper reports on the findings from a mobile geometry project pilot for middle school students designed together with teachers that consisted of outdoors and indoors activities. The aim of the project has been to design and implement a prototype that combines mobile and 3D technologies that allow students to collaboratively, explore, and discuss geometrical concepts. The focus of this paper is to present and reflect on the lessons we have learned after experimenting with novel pedagogical activities that rely on mobile applications, 3D modeling and visualization to support learning in the field of geometry. Finding a balance between team goals and expectations while focusing on the learning activity flow can lead to more innovative solutions.

  • 23.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Collaboration in Context as a Framework for Designing Innovative Mobile Learning Activities2008In: Innovative Mobile Learning: Techniques and Technologies, Information Science Reference, IGI Global, Hershey , 2008, p. 172-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we describe our continuing efforts related to the design, implementation and evaluation of innovative educational activities supported by ubiquitous computing in the AMULETS (Advanced Mobile and Ubiquitous Learning Environments for Teachers and Students) project. We argue that the design of innovative mobile learning activities should be guided by collaborative learning scenarios in context supported by mobile and ubiquitous technologies in authentic settings. To support this claim, we propose a conceptual framework of collaboration in context that can be used when designing novel mobile learning scenarios. This framework provides the designer with opportunities to tackle the challenges of designing for innovative mobile learning activities. To illustrate our ideas, we present the results of three trials we have conducted with children and adult students since the spring 2006. These mobile learning activities have been designed and implemented using our proposed framework. Working together with the teachers and students gave us the opportunity to design learning activities at authentic locations using meaningful content that has relevance for the school curriculum. The outcome of our efforts suggests that outdoors learning experiences supported by ubiquitous technologies should be combined with learning activities in the classroom to provide learners with meaningful activities.

  • 24.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Co-Designing Mobile Collaborative and Tangible Math Activities2009In: MLearn2009: 8th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, Orlando, Fl.: University of Central Florida , 2009, p. 131-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present the design challenges that mobile technologies raise for supporting collaboration across different locations using mobile devices and PCs for middle schools in the field of mathematics. Learning geometry presents interesting opportunities for integrating traditional and digital learning tools (manipulatives) that bring together mobile, web, and 3D tools. We want to promote and enhance collaboration by enabling learners to engage in mathematical activities across diverse settings inside and outside the classroom. Our goal is to design and implement meaningful learning tasks supported by mobile and ubiquitous technologies that help students collaborative explore, learn and visualize math together with teachers.

  • 25.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Media Technology.
    Combining Physical Activities and Mobile Games to Promote Novel Learning Practices2008In: Fifth IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education: WMUTE, 2008, p. 31-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile outdoor games can be seen as fertile ground for conducting novel learning activities that involve children in different tasks including physical motion, problem solving, inquiry and collaboration; all those are activities that support different cognitive and social aspects of learning. Co-design and human centric design practices have been the focus of current research efforts in the field of educational technologies but not as prevalent in mobile games to support learning. In our current research we are exploring which design methods are appropriate for developing innovative ways of learning supported by mobile games. This paper presents all those aspects related to the design and implementation of a mobile game called Skattjakt (Treasure Hunt in Swedish). The outcome of our activities has provided us with valuable results that can help us to bridge the gap between learning in informal and formal settings. Moreover, we believe that involving children in the design process of mobile games may give us new insights regarding the nature of their learning practices while learning with games.

  • 26.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Physical Activities and Playful Learning Using Mobile Games2008In: Research and Practice of Technology Enhanced Learning, ISSN 1793-2068, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 275-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile outdoor games can be seen as fertile ground for conducting novel learning activities that involve children in different tasks including physical motion, problem solving, inquiry and collaboration; all those are activities that support different cognitive and social aspects of learning. Co-design and human centric design practices have been the focus of current research efforts in the field of educational technologies but not as prevalent in mobile games to support learning. In our current research we are exploring which design methods are appropriate for developing innovative ways of learning supported by mobile games. This paper presents all those aspects related to the design and implementation of a mobile game called Skattjakt (Treasure Hunt in Swedish). The outcome of our activities has provided us with valuable results that can help us to bridge the gap between learning in informal and formal settings. Moreover, we believe that involving children in the design process of mobile games may give us new insights regarding the nature of their learning practices while learning with games

  • 27.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Maldonado, Heidy
    Stanford University.
    Pea, Roy
    Stanford University.
    Co-Design Practices for the Development of Mobile Open Inquiry-Based Learning for Ecology2009In: MLearn2009: 8th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, Orlando: University of Central Florida , 2009, p. 132-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile devices are well suited for supporting science education since learners can pervasively collect, visualize, and analyze data in the field. Learners also have access via these devices to a variety of educational resources, as they develop new ways to participate in collaborative learning activities.  In this paper we present the initial phase of our LET´S GO! an international project (Learning Ecology with Technologies from Science for Global Outcomes). In the coming three years, the project will develop the notion of “open inquiry” in the field of ecology for K-12 students, through the design of engaging collaborative learning activities supported by mobile and sensor technologies to take place in Sweden and the United States.

  • 28.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Pea, Roy
    Standford University.
    Maldonado, Maldonado, Heidi
    Stanford University.
    Integrating Co-design Practices into the Development of Mobile Science Collaboratories2009In: ICALT '09: Proceedings of the 2009 Ninth IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, Riga, Latvia: IEEE Press, 2009, p. 393-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific practices increasingly incorporate sensors for data capture, information visualization for data analysis, and low-cost mobile devices for field-based inquiries  incorporating open web standards. While a broad range of design approaches for developing technology-enhanced learning has been used by researchers and practitioners for the last 15 years, significant challenges for educational use remain as new technologies and user experiences continually evolve outside the classroom. We focus on the specific design challenge of how to initiate the co-design process together with teachers, researchers, scientists, designers, and developers in order to devise and develop mobile science collaboratories that support open inquiry-based learning in ecology education. The outcomes presented in this paper point towards the need for additional methods to support co-design that take into consideration future user experiences needed for developing and implementing these types of learning activities.

  • 29.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Svensson, Martin
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Petersson, Oskar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Media Technology.
    Mobile Collaboration Tools and Systems to Support Ubiquitous Learning2008In: Fourth Annual Conference on Collaboration Technologies, 2008, p. 104-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current developments in mobile, wireless and positioning technologies combined with contextual computing are contributing to the advance of new mobile applications and services. Educational environments are being subject to these changes providing an opportunity for curriculum development that can use these socially based mobile devices for supporting different aspects of learning and teaching. But these new technologies raise crucial questions about what features and capabilities collaborative mobile tools and systems should provide to support different learning activities. In this paper we present our current work related to the development of a system that use web and mobile technologies to support collaborative and ubiquitous learning. We also illustrate three specific collaborative learning scenarios supported by our tools. The results of our activities provide us with valuable insights that can help us to identify future challenges related to the design and implementation of this kind of collaborative systems.

  • 30.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wichmann, Astrid
    Hoppe, Ulrich
    Engler, Jan
    De Jong, Ton
    Pea, Roy
    Maldonado, Heidy
    Scanlon, Eileen
    Blake, Canan
    O'Malley, Claire
    Anastopoulou, Stamatina
    Discussing and Synthesizing Three Positions in Computer-supported Inquiry Learning from a Design Perspective: Mobile Collaboratories, Emerging Learning Objects, and Personal Inquiry2011In: 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference / [ed] Spada, Hans Stahl, Gerry Miyake, Naomi Law, Nancy, Hong Kong: International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2011, p. 1202-1204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop compares and seeks to synthesize different design approaches for exploring and promoting innovative educational practices supported by collaborative technologies. Bringing the design process to the forefront to support research and the realization of products for CSCL can help to balance the different needs of researchers and practitioners. The goal of the workshop is to examine different collaborative inquiry-learning based projects to determine what key themes can be further developed to address the use of design to improve research and implementation. While science inquiry is the focus of these three approaches, the comparative and synthesis activities should be of use for workshop participants concerned with synthesizing multiple design approaches for other CSCL domains as well, such as new literacies.

  • 31.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Designing better mobile collaborative laboratories for ecology field work for upper secondary schools2012In: Proceedings 2012 17th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, WMUTE 2012, IEEE, 2012, p. 77-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the next step in the iterative design process of a four-year project that explores how to use technology in the everyday ecology classroom for fieldwork. In order to proceed in making mobile science inquiries more accessible to the everyday teacher and to better understand how to design the final phases of the project we investigate how small groups of students' use new media tools to conceptualize science. The findings point to design implications that include the need to provide skills concerning the utilization of new media for small group teamwork along with more comprehensive inquiry tools for the learners to support mobile fieldwork

  • 32.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Gerestrand, Anders
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Designing Pervasive Games to Support University Studies in Media Technology2009In: ICALT '09: Proceedings of the 2009 Ninth IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, IEEE Press, 2009, p. 261-263Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New media technology students at university face many challenges from social to pedagogical when they start academic studies. One of the programs initial goals for these new students is to introduce them to some of the key social web services that they will need to use for their schoolwork. The use of pervasive games to reach this specific purpose may help new students acclimate to these challenges. This paper presents a pervasive game that helps teams of students work together with new technologies to solve a mystery about a missing fictional professor. Our particular research interest relates to how pervasive games can be used to introduce social web technologies and support team building for a university courses. The game presented in this paper show promise as a tool to get new university students in media technology actively involved in exploring social media web services.

  • 33.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Zapico, Jorge Luis
    KTH.
    Designing Mobile Persuasion: Using Pervasive Applications to Change Attitudes and Behaviours2009In: Proceedings of the International Workshop in conjunction with MobileHCI 2009 / [ed] Milrad, Marcelo and Multisilta, Jari, Bonn, Germany: Tampere University of Technology , 2009, p. 18-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have a personal relationship with mobile phones, since they are closer to us than any other technological device. They are ubiquitous (60% of the world population owns one), individual, and pervasive in our lifestyle (we have them with us all the time and everywhere). These modern devices are nearly as powerful as personal computers, always connected to the Internet, and loaded with sensors like GPS and accelerometers. These mobile devices offer opportunities for persuading users to change attitudes and behaviors towards personal and societal issues. For this paper we focus on the design of a mobile application for reducing in carbon dioxide emissions in personal transportation choices that can change attitudes and behaviors. The paper presents design practices that have resulted in a prototype social mobile application.

  • 34.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Exploring the benefits of open standard initiatives for supporting inquiry-based science learning2010In: Sustaining TEL: From Innovation to Learning and Practice: 5th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2010, Barcelona, Spain, September 28 - October 1, 2010. Proceedings / [ed] Martin Wolpers, Paul A. Kirschner, Maren Scheffel, Stefanie Lindstaedt and Vania Dimitrova, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer, 2010, p. 596-601Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile devices combined with sensor technologies provide new possibilitiesfor embedding inquiry-based science learning activities in authenticsettings. These technologies rely on various standards for data exchange whatmakes the development of interoperable mobile and sensor-based applications achallenging task. In this paper, we present our technical efforts related to how toleverage data interoperability using open standards. To validate the potentialbenefits of this approach, we developed a prototype implementation and conducteda trial with high school students in the field of environmental science.The initial results indicate the potential benefits of using open standards for dataexchange in order to support the integration of various technological resourcesand applications.

  • 35.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Integrating Mobile, Web and Sensory Technologies to Support Inquiry-Based Science Learning2010In: IEEE WMUTE (International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education), IEEE Press, 2010, p. 65-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in mobile, wireless, and sensor technologies provide new possibilities for supporting learning activities that can be spatially distributed and incorporate different physical and environmental sensory data. In this paper, we present our technical efforts in relation to the design and implementation of mobile and web applications that integrate sensory data used to support inquiry-based science learning. In order to test the validity of our solution and its functionality and novelty, we conducted a prototype experiment with high school students in the field of environmental sciences. The initial outcomes presented in this paper point towards the potential benefits of using sensor and mobile technologies with real-time geo-positioned data and visualizations, which may increase students’ engagement, enabling them to conduct scientific inquiries and analyses in new ways.

  • 36.
    Zbick, Janosch
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    Malmö University.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Malmö University.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Toward an Adaptive and Adaptable Architecture to Support Ubiquitous Learning Activities2016In: Mobile, Ubiquitous, and Pervasive Learning: Fundaments, Applications, and Trends / [ed] Alejandro Peña-Ayala, Springer, 2016, p. 193-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuous evolution of learning technologies combined with the changes within ubiquitous learning environments in which they operate result in dynamic and complex requirements that are challenging to meet. The fact that these systems evolve over time makes it difficult to adapt to the constant changing requirements. Existing approaches in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) are generally not addressing those issues and they fail to adapt to those dynamic situations. In this chapter, we investigate the notion of an adaptive and adaptable architecture as a possible solution to address these challenges. We conduct a literature survey upon the state of the art and state of practice in this area. The outcomes of those efforts result in an initial model of a Domain-specific architecture to tackle the issues of adaptability and adaptiveness. To illustrate these ideas, we provide a number of scenarios where this architecture can be applied or is already applied. Our proposed approach serves as a foundation for addressing future ubiquitous learning applications where new technologies constantly emerge and new requirements evolve.

1 - 36 of 36
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