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  • 1. Cinner, J. E.
    et al.
    Daw, T. M.
    McClanahan, T. R.
    Muthiga, N.
    Abunge, C.
    Hamed, S.
    Mwaka, B.
    Rabearisoa, A.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Fisher, E.
    Jiddawi, N.
    Transitions toward co-management: The process of marine resource management devolution in three east African countries2012In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 651-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communities are increasingly empowered with the ability and responsibility of working with national governments to make decisions about marine resources in decentralized co-management arrangements. This transition toward decentralized management represents a changing governance landscape. This paper explores the transition to decentralisation in marine resource management systems in three East African countries. The paper draws upon expert opinion and literature from both political science and linked social-ecological systems fields to guide exploration of five key governance transition concepts in each country: (1) drivers of change; (2) institutional arrangements; (3) institutional fit; (4) actor interactions; and (5) adaptive management. Key findings are that decentralized management in the region was largely donor-driven and only partly transferred power to local stakeholders. However, increased accountability created a degree of democracy in regards to natural resource governance that was not previously present. Additionally, increased local-level adaptive management has emerged in most systems and, to date, this experimental management has helped to change resource user's views from metaphysical to more scientific cause-and-effect attribution of changes to resource conditions. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved,

  • 2.
    Cinner, Joshua E.
    et al.
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    Daw, Tim
    Univ E Anglia / Stockholm Univ..
    Huchery, Cindy
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    Thoya, Pascal
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, Mombasa, Kenya.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Cedras, Maria
    Seychelles Fishing Author, Victoria, Seychelles.
    Abunge, Caroline
    Wildlife Conservat Soc, Coral Reef Conservat Program, Mombasa, Kenya.
    Winners and Losers in Marine Conservation: Fishers' Displacement and Livelihood Benefits from Marine Reserves2014In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 994-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine reserves can create both benefits and costs to fishers. This article explores the perceptions of fishers in Kenya and Seychelles about displacement, spillover, and overall impacts of local marine reserves on their livelihoods. We test whether these perceptions are different among fishers from different geographic and socioeconomic conditions. Sixty-six percent of fishers had been displaced from marine reserves or coastal development and 90% believed they had caught fishes that spilled over from marine reserves. Poorer fishers in Kenya were both displaced from, and also felt like they benefited from, marine reserves. This highlights how people's experiences with marine reserves, both positive and negative, are affected by a range of social considerations that may not be incorporated in typical evaluations of ecological and economic marine reserve success.

  • 3.
    Cinner, Joshua E.
    et al.
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    McClanahan, Tim R.
    Wildlife Conservat Soc, USA.
    MacNeil, M. Aaron
    Australian Inst Marine Sci, Australia.
    Graham, Nicholas A. J.
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    Daw, Tim M.
    Univ E Anglia, UK;Stockholm University.
    Mukminin, Ahmad
    Wildlife Conservat Soc, Indonesia.
    Feary, David A.
    Univ Technol Sydney, Australia.
    Rabearisoa, Ando L.
    Conservat Int, Madagascar.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Coral Reef Conservat Program, Kenya.
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Campbell, Stuart J.
    Wildlife Conservat Soc, Indonesia.
    Baird, Andrew H.
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A.
    James Cook Univ, Australia.
    Hamed, Salum
    Lahari, Rachael
    Wildlife Conservat Soc Papua New Guinea Program, Papua N Guinea.
    Morove, Tau
    Wildlife Conservat Soc Papua New Guinea Program, Papua N Guinea.
    Kuange, John
    Wildlife Conservat Soc Papua New Guinea Program, Papua N Guinea.
    Comanagement of coral reef social-ecological systems2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 14, p. 5219-5222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an effort to deliver better outcomes for people and the ecosystems they depend on, many governments and civil society groups are engaging natural resource users in collaborative management arrangements (frequently called comanagement). However, there are few empirical studies demonstrating the social and institutional conditions conducive to successful comanagement outcomes, especially in small-scale fisheries. Here, we evaluate 42 comanagement arrangements across five countries and show that: (i) comanagement is largely successful at meeting social and ecological goals; (ii) comanagement tends to benefit wealthier resource users; (iii) resource overexploitation is most strongly influenced by market access and users' dependence on resources; and (iv) institutional characteristics strongly influence livelihood and compliance outcomes, yet have little effect on ecological conditions.

  • 4.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Brewer, T. D.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia ; Arafura Timor Research Facility, Australia.
    Crona, B.
    Stockholm University ; The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Market integration and its relation to income distribution and inequality among fishers and traders: The case of two small-scale Kenyan reef fisheries2014In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 48, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, carried out in five fishing communities along the Kenyan coast, examined fisheries-derived income of fishers and traders in two different invertebrate fisheries (octopus and sea cucumber) and tested if differences in global market integration of these two products could explain differences in income inequalities among actors involved in the two fisheries. The structure of the value chains was mapped, differences in income between fishers and traders tested, and income inequalities among actors in each fishery examined. Although the octopus fishery included a greater diversity of actors and thereby provides income to a larger group of people, income inequality in this fishery was higher among fishers and traders than in the sea cucumber fishery. Thus, the often cited relationship between increasing market integration and income inequality may require a re-evaluation and a more nuanced treatment.

  • 5.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Crona, B.
    Stockholm University.
    Osuka, K.
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium;CORDIO East Africa, Kenya.
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholm University;Univ E Anglia, UK.
    The Importance of Selected Individual Characteristics in Determining Market Prices for Fishers and Traders in Keny an Small-Scale Fisheries2015In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 959-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how selected socioeconomic characteristics of fishers and traders shape market prices at five coastal communities in Kenya. Focus groups elicited perceived factors affecting market prices, which were then tested using quantitative analysis. Ownership of fishing gear by fishers negatively influenced the prices taken. Fish traders who bought larger quantities paid a higher price. There was no significant relation between the choice of fish market by traders and fish price due to the diffused nature of the fish market. Although fish traders had relatively high income than fishers, the link between individual characteristics, market prices, and the outcomes of such interactions is more complicated than commonly perceived. The complexity is enhanced by the heterogeneity in different fisheries and of the prices at different markets and underlines the importance of continued documentation and exploration of the relationships between social and economic status and market prices for fishers and traders.

  • 6.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Wildlife Conservation Society - Coral Reef Conservation Project, Kenya ; Pwani University, Kenya.
    McClanahan, T. R.
    Wildlife Conservation Society - Marine Program, USA.
    Global Fish Trade, Prices, and Food Security in an African Coral Reef Fishery2017In: Coastal Management, ISSN 0892-0753, E-ISSN 1521-0421, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the potential impact of global fish trade on local food prices by analyzing a 16-year locally collected time series of disaggregated coral reef fish products and prices that differed in their market chain linkages-ranging from local to international markets. We were primarily interested in evaluating how local and global markets interacted with the local prices of beef, fish, and maize. There was no cointegration between the prices of exported octopus and that of maize and beef over this study period. Further, the three types of fish and associated markets responded in different ways to various price changes. For internationally traded octopus, we found a positive association between price and catch rates but no evidence that the global trade in octopus markets created local inflation, particularly the prices of the fish eaten by the poor. In general, there was no evidence for price transmission from export to nonexport fish products even though fishers appeared to focus on octopus when prices were high. Consequently, fishers' behaviors and trade policies that promote adjusting fishing effort to internationally traded fish did not appear to promote poverty or food insecurity in this fishery.

  • 7.
    Wanyonyi, Innocent Ngao
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. CORDIO EA, Kenya.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    Pwani Univ, Kenya.
    Mesaki, Simeon
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Guissamulo, Almeida Tomas
    Univ Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique.
    Ochiewo, Jacob
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, Kenya.
    Artisanal fisher migration patterns in coastal East Africa2016In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 119, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration is a feature of most small-scale fisheries across the world and has previously been described in spatial and temporal terms. This study assessed spatial and temporal migration patterns of fishers in Kenya, Tanzania, and Mozambique from October 2009 to March 2010 covering important migrant fishers destinations on the coast The concentrations, fishing destinations, routes, frequency as well as seasonality of migrant fishers in each of the countries were assessed using 192 surveys at 9 sites and 127 semi-structured interviews at 25 sites. Migrations in Kenya and Tanzania were mainly seasonal while in Mozambique circular migrations were common and lasted far longer. Fishers from Pemba, Unguja and Nampula were the most experienced migrant fishers in terms of the numbers involved and their ability to migrate to distant destinations. The region is likely to experience increasing influxes of migrant fishers due to increasing fisher numbers, fisheries governance, and other factors that provide an environment conducive to migration. The small scales of operation of the local co-management structures, the lack of monitoring ability and the limited knowledge about activities of migrant fishers requires a shared regional approach in terms of fisheries management with specific attention to issues concerning migrant fishers. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Wanyonyi, Innocent Ngao
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wamukota, Andrew
    Pwani University, Kenya.
    Tuda, Paul
    Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT), Germany.
    Mwakha, Victor Alati
    Kenya Marine and Research Institute, Kenya.
    Nguti, Lydia Mukii
    CDC-Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kenya.
    Migrant fishers of Pemba: Drivers, impacts and mediating factors2016In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 71, p. 242-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the fishers of coastal East Africa particularly among the Bajuni, Kojani, Macua and Vezo ethnic communities have historically practiced migration. This study explores the strategies used by migrant fishers' of Pemba in the Western Indian Ocean region. By adopting a modified sustainable livelihoods framework (SLF), the study uses in-depth interviews and questionnaires to explore the life histories of the fishers in migrant communities, their motivations to migrate, and their associated socioeconomic and ecological implications. Results point out to a complexity of factors contributing to migration including natural, to economic and social factors. Interaction of such factors is instrumental in shaping fisher migration as an activity into an important livelihood strategy. The study concludes that SLF provides holistic understanding of migration. However the incorporation of the 'livelihood spaces' extends this knowledge by integrating the spectrum of spatial aspects. This understanding is critical in the design of policies and interventions necessary to ensure resource sustainability and secure fishers livelihoods. This multi-method approach is critical in empirical study of fisher migration.

1 - 8 of 8
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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