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  • 1.
    Cernea, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Kaiserslautern.
    Mora, Simone
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Perez, Alfredo
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Ebert, Achim
    University of Kaiserslautern.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Divitini, Monica
    Norwegian University of Science.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics. University of Minho, Portugal.
    Tangible and Wearable User Interfaces for Supporting Collaboration among Emergency Workers2012In: Collaboration and Technology: 18th International Conference, CRIWG 2012 Raesfeld, Germany, September 16-19, 2012 Proceedings / [ed] Valeria Herskovic, H. Ulrich Hoppe, Marc Jansen, Jürgen Ziegler, Springer, 2012, Vol. 7493, p. 192-199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ensuring a constant flow of information is essential for offeringquick help in different types of disasters. In the following, we report on a workin-progress distributed, collaborative and tangible system for supporting crisismanagement. On one hand, field operators need devices that collect information—personal notes and sensor data—without interrupting their work. Onthe other hand, a disaster management system must operate in different scenariosand be available to people with different preferences, backgrounds and roles.Our work addresses these issues by introducing a multi-level collaborative systemthat manages real-time data flow and analysis for various rescue operators.

  • 2.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    A Formal Approach for Designing Distributed Self-Adaptive Systems2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering contemporary distributed software applications is a challenging task due to the dynamic operating conditions in which these systems have to function. Examples are dynamic availability of resources, errors that are difficult to predict, and changing user requirements. These dynamics can affect a number of quality concerns of a system, such as robustness, openness, and performance. The challenges of engineering software systems with such dynamics have motivated the need for self-adaptation. Self-adaptation is based on the principle of separation of concerns, distinguishing two well defined systems: a managed system that deals with domain specific concerns and a managing system that deals with particular quality concerns of the managed system through adaptation with a feedback loop. State of the art in self- adaptation advocates the use of formal methods to specify and verify the system's behavior in order to provide evidence that the system's goals are satisfied. However, little work has been done on the consolidation of design knowledge to model and verify self-adaptation behaviors.

    To support designers, this thesis contributes with a set of formally specified templates for the specification and verification of self-adaptive behaviors of a family of distributed self-adaptive systems. The templates are based on the MAPE-K reference model (Monitor-Analyze-Plan-Execute plus Knowledge). The templates comprise: (1) behavior specification patterns for modeling the different MAPE components of a feedback loop, and (2) property specification patterns that support verification of the correctness of the adaptation behaviors. The target domain are distributed applications in which self-adaptation is used for managing resources for robustness and openness requirements. The templates are derived from expertise with developing several self-adaptive systems, including a collaborative mobile learning application in which we have applied self-adaptation to make the system robust to degrading GPS accuracy, and a robotic system in which we apply self-adaptation to support different types of openness requirements. We demonstrate the reusability of the templates in a number of case studies. 

  • 3.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Designing a Decentralized Distributed Self-Adaptive System in M-Learning Activities2012In: Proceedings 2012 17th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, WMUTE 2012, IEEE, 2012, p. 296-300Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of mobile technologies in education has increased the amount of tools that can be used for pedagogical purposes. However, the introduction of these technologies comes with challenges that require from attention. The first of them is concerning with the limitations that these devices have in features when compared with laptop and desktop computers, naming the screen size, performance and memory space among others. A mechanism to address this limitation can be the combination of multiple devices in groups and share the resources within these groups. The second limitation that this paper addresses is with regard to these devices being prone to failures in relation with their availability, due to its battery life, connectivity, etc. This paper presents a decentralized distributed self-adaptive system that attempts to cover both the limitations in features of these devices, by combining the devices in organizations, named MVD, and the weakness in availability by providing a self-adaptation mechanism. Moreover, the paper presents the identified required components for the creation of a system that provides such benefits and illustrates the internal functionality of the system to provide the self-adaptive quality.

  • 4.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Exploring New Ways to Support Mobile Collaboration Through Mobile Virtual Devices2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of mobile technologies to support novel ways of teaching and learning has been an opening door for carrying out more free educational scenarios during the last years. The imposed restrictions of traditional learning settings have been partially overcome in the field of mobile learning. However, some restrictions still remain by the constrains and limitations of mobile devices and wireless technologies. Many of these restrictions are related to issues connected to mobile performance, but the limited amount of resources one mobile device can offer is also a boundary the learning activities have met. In the scope of this paper, the concept of Mobile Virtual Device (MVD) is presented and discussed. A MVD is an organization wherein several mobile devices form a membership in order to share their individual resources and services for creating a more powerful instance. A MVD, with the aggregation of several resources from multiple devices, enables to provide support for new learning activities that were not possible before. In this article, we present the benefits of this conceptualization and two examples where this concept has been applied. We envision a high potential offered by these enhanced virtual devices, although some challenges arise in its use, both technical and social, which should be discussed and addressed.

  • 5.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Uncertainties in Mobile Learning applications: Software Architecture Challenges2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of computer technologies in our daily life is growing by leaps and bounds. One of the recent trends is the use of mobile technologies and cloud services for supporting everyday tasks and the sharing of information between users. The field of education is not absent from these developments and many organizations are adopting Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in various ways for supporting teaching and learning. The field of Mobile Learning (M-Learning) offers new opportunities for carrying out collaborative educational activities in a variety of settings and situations. The use of mobile technologies for enhancing collaboration provides new opportunities but at the same time new challenges emerge.

    One of those challenges is discussed in this thesis and it con- cerns with uncertainties related to the dynamic aspects that characterized outdoor M-Learning activities. The existence of these uncertainties force software developers to make assumptions in their developments. However, these uncertainties are the cause of risks that may affect the required outcomes for M-Learning activities. Mitigations mechanisms can be developed and included to reduce the risks’ impact during the different phases of development. However, uncertainties which are present at runtime require adaptation mechanisms to mitigate the resulting risks.

    This thesis analyzes the current state of the art in self-adaptation in Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) and M-Learning. The results of an extensive literature survey in the field and the outcomes of the Geometry Mobile (GEM) research project are reported. A list of uncertainties in collaborative M-Learning activities and the associated risks that threaten the critical QoS outcomes for collaboration are identified and discussed. A detailed elaboration addressing mitigation mechanisms to cope with these problems is elaborated and presented. The results of these efforts provide valuable insights and the basis towards the design of a multi-agent self-adaptive architecture for multiple concerns that is illustrated with a prototype implementation. The proposed conceptual architecture is an initial cornerstone towards the creation of a decentralized distributed self-adaptive system for multiple concerns to guarantee collaboration in M-Learning. 

  • 6.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Enhancing Mobile Learning Activities by the Use of Mobile Virtual Devices: Some Design and Implementation Issues2010In: 2010 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems (INCOS), IEEE Press, 2010, p. 137-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of multiple mobile devices is increasing in mobile learning, bringing a need for collaboration and resource sharing among participating pupils. This paper presents an approach that addresses information and resource sharing for mobile devices in indoors and outdoors settings. Our solution consists of aggregated mobile devices, forming organizations. These Mobile Virtual Devices (MVDs) provide a new mechanism that facilitates design of mobile learning activities offering a virtual complex device that combines the features of several mobile devices.

  • 7.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mobile Virtual Devices for Collaborative M-Learning2010In: Workshop Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Computers in Education, Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing use of mobile devices to support collaborative activities creates a need for developing new methods and perspectives to facilitate information sharing. In this paper, we present an approach for information sharing in mobile collaborative settings through the use of Mobile Virtual Devices (MVD). MVD emerges as a new conceptualization of an organization of mobile devices that supports collaborative tasks. The use of MVD allows designers and users to interact with and through mobile devices in novel ways, considering the aggregation of mobile devices as a single entity. The notion of MVD has been conceptualized on the idea of multirole devices, using components to provide and consume resources.

  • 8.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Towards a Decentralized and Self-Adaptive System for M-Learning Applications2012In: Seventh IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education: Takamatsu, Kagawa, Japan, 27-30 March 2012, IEEE, 2012, p. 162-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the analysis of the different iterations of the Geometry Mobile (GEM) project, a mobile learning effort in the field of mathematics, we have identified a major architectural issue to be addressed in the design and implementation of m-learning applications. Due to the dynamic nature of the field many challenging requirements are continuously emerging. One of them relates to the possibility to support collaborative activities that demand sharing resources between students and their mobile devices in constantly changing conditions. These situations generate the need of using decentralized distributed architectures in which mobile devices can share resources to carry out the activity covering the concerns defined by the different stakeholders. This paper describes our current efforts connected to identifying a set of requirements for M-Learning activities. Thereafter, we elaborate on why a decentralized distributed system (DDS) can be used to provide a novel solution to tackle the mentioned above problems. Moreover, initial aspects related to the design of a DDS, including a self-adaptation mechanism are presented.

  • 9.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Calderón, Juan Felipe
    Pontificia Universidad de Chile, Chile.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Nussbaum Voehl, Miguel
    Pontificia Universidad de Chile, Chile.
    A Self-Adaptive Multi-Agent System Approach for Collaborative Mobile Learning2015In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, ISSN 1939-1382, E-ISSN 1939-1382, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 158-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies have emerged as facilitators in the learning process, extending traditional classroom activities. However, engineering mobile learning applications for outdoor usage poses severe challenges. The requirements of these applications are challenging, as many different aspects need to be catered, such as resource access and sharing, communication between peers, group management, activity flow, etc. Robustness is particularly important for learning scenarios to guarantee undisturbed and smooth user experiences, pushing the technological aspects in the background. Despite significant research in the field of mobile learning, very few efforts have focused on collaborative mobile learning requirements from a software engineering perspective. This paper focuses on aspects of the software architecture, aiming to address the challenges related to resource sharing in collaborative mobile learning activities. This includes elements such as autonomy for personal interactive learning, richness for large group collaborative learning (indoor and outdoor), as well as robustness of the learning system. Additionally, we present self-adaptation as a solution to mitigate risks of resource unavailability and organization failures that arise from environment and system dynamism. Our evaluation provides indications regarding the system correctness with respect to resource sharing and collaboration concerns, and offers qualitative evidence of self-adaptation benefits for collaborative mobile learning applications.

  • 10.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Software Requirements to Support QoS in Collaborative M-Learning Activities2012In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 7493, p. 176-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of collaborative activities in education has proven to be an effective way to enhance students’ learning outcomes by in- creasing their engagement and motivating discussions on the learning topics under exploration. In the field of Technology Enhanced Learn- ing (TEL), the use of information and communication technologies has been extensively studied to provide alternative methods to support col- laborative learning activities, combining different applications and tools. Mobile learning, a subset of TEL, has become a prominent area of re- search as it offers promising tools to enhance students’ collaboration and it provides alternative views for teaching and learning subject matter in relevant and authentic scenarios. While many studies have focused on the pedagogical opportunities provided by mobile technologies, fewer are the efforts looking at technological related aspects. Hardware and software issues in this field still remain as challenges that require a deeper level of study and analysis. This paper presents and discusses the findings of a deep analysis based on the outcomes of three mobile collaborative learning activities and their requirements. These results have helped us to identify a number of arising challenges that need to be addressed in order to warranty Quality of Service (QoS) in these collaborative M- learning activities. Moreover, the paper offers a view on current practices in M-learning activities, which evidences the lack of research addressing software engineering aspects in mobile collaborative learning. 

  • 11.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Providing Flexibility in Learning Activities Systems by Exploiting the Multiple Roles of Mobile Devices2010In: Proceedings of 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education, IEEE, 2010, p. 166-170Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wide adoption of mobile and wireless technologies allow for users to have access to learning resources and generate digital content at any location and time. An immediate implication of this latest trend is the need to create and deploy learning activity systems that offer a high level of flexibility. This flexibility can allow for the creation of adaptive activities, something highly required in dynamic learning environments such as those in the field of M-learning. Mobile devices can provide flexibility to activity systems by adapting their behavior on a context basis. To give an example of flexibility in the mobile device behavior, we present the FLexible Activity Client (FLAC). FLAC is a mobile application that allows the mobile device to switch from client-role to service-provider-role behavior. We describe our proposed architecture and its implementation and present the results of our initial tests.

  • 12.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Delgado, Yeray Real
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Mazarico, Carlos Sirvent
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Combining web and mobile technologies to support sustainable activity design in education2015In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Aachen: CEUR-WS.org , 2015, Vol. 1411, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe an approach for designing and developing technological solutions to support teachers in creating their own outdoor teaching activities. We elaborate on one particular case, TriGO, in which primary school students perform outdoor tasks to experience concepts and constructions in the field of mathematics. The application designs and an initial evaluation of the developed technological solutions is provided based on the results obtained from school activities performed with more than 10 teachers and 50 students.

  • 13.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Enhancing Software Qualities in Multi-Agent Systems using Self-Adaptation2012In: Proceedings of European Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems EUMAS 2012, Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2012, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering multi-agent systems (MAS) is known to be a complex task. One of the reasons lays in the complexity to combine multiple concerns that a MAS is expected to address, such as system functionality, coordination, robustness, etc. A well-recognized approach to manage system complexity is the use of self-adaptive (SA) mechanisms. Self-adaptation allows to adjust the system behavior in order to achieve certain software qualities (optimization, fault-tolerance, etc.). The key idea behind self-adaptation is complexity management through separation of concerns. In this paper we introduce SA-MAS, an architectural approach that integrates the functionalities provided by a MAS with software qualities oered by a SA solution. The paper presents a reference model for SA-MAS and applies it to a Mobile learning case, in which we deal with robustness properties. In addition, we apply formal verication techniques as an approach to guarantee the requirements of the SA-MAS application.

  • 14.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Guaranteeing Robustness in a Mobile Learning Application using Formally Verified MAPE Loops2013In: Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Software Engineering for Adaptive and Self-Managing Systems, New York: IEEE Press, 2013, , p. 10p. 83-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile learning applications support traditional indoor lectures with outdoor activities using mobile devices. An example scenario is a team of students that use triangulation techniques to learn properties of geometrical figures. In previous work, we developed an agent-based mobile learning application in which students use GPS-enabled phones to calculate distances between them. From practical experience, we learned that the required level of GPS accuracy is not always guaranteed, which undermines the use of the application. In this paper, we explain how we have extended the existing application with a selfadaptation layer, making the system robust to degrading GPS accuracy. The self-adaptive layer is conceived as a set of interacting MAPE loops (Monitor-Analysis-Plan-Execute), distributed over the phones. To guarantee the robustness requirements, we formally specify the self-adaptive behaviors using timed automata, and the required properties using timed computation tree logic. We use the Uppaal tool to model the self-adaptive system and verify the robustness requirements. Finally, we discuss how the formal design supported the implementation of the selfadaptive layer on top of the existing application.

  • 15.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    MAPE-K Formal Templates to Rigorously Design Behaviors for Self-Adaptive Systems2015In: ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems, ISSN 1556-4665, E-ISSN 1556-4703, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing software systems that have to deal with dynamic operating conditions, such as changing availability of resources and faults that are dificult to predict, is complex. A promising approach to handle such dynamics is self-adaptation that can be realized by a MAPE-K feedback loop (Monitor-Analyze-Plan-Execute plus Knowledge). To provide evidence that the system goals are satisfied, given the changing conditions, the state of the art advocates the use of formal methods. However, little research has been done on consolidating design knowledge of self-adaptive systems. To support designers, this paper contributes with a set of formally specified MAPE-K templates that encode design expertise for a family of self-adaptive systems. The templates comprise: (1) behavior specification templates for modeling the different components of a MAPE-K feedback loop (based on networks of timed automata), and (2) property specification templates that support verification of the correctness of the adaptation behaviors (based on timed computation tree logic). To demonstrate the reusability of the formal templates, we performed four case studies in which final-year Masters students used the templates to design di↵erent self-adaptive systems.

  • 16.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    SA-MAS: Self-Adaptation to Enhance Software Qualities in Multi-Agent Systems2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 international conference on Autonomous agents and multi-agent systems (AAMAS 2013) / [ed] Ito, Jonker, Gini, Shehory, The International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (IFAAMAS), 2013, , p. 2p. 1159-1160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering multi-agent systems (MAS) is known to be a complex task. One of the reasons lays in the complexity to combine multiple concerns that a MAS has to address, such as system functionality, coordination, robustness, etc. A well-recognized approach to manage system complexity is the use of self-adaptation (SA). Self-adaptation extends a system with support to monitor and adapt itself to realize a concern of interest (optimization, fault-tolerance, etc.). We present SA-MAS, an architectural approach that integrates MAS with SA. We present a reference model for SA-MAS and illustrate it with an excerpt from our research.

  • 17.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    On the Issue of Reusability and Adaptability in M-learning Systems2010In: Proceedings of the 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Press, 2010, p. 161-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a brief overview over some of the conceptual and technical issues associated with reusability and adaptability. The specific orientation of our efforts is oriented towards systems supporting Mobile Learning. The field of M-learning domain has during recent years been suffering from severe configuration problems caused by the plethora of mobile devices present on the market. This paper presents a conceptual architecture that has been conceived to remedy some of these issues. Furthermore, a possible instantiation of this architecture with self-adaptivity features is discussed and a first prototype implementation is presented. The notion of ecosystems is introduced, as we believe it is an important building block towards increasing the reusability of components and content in this field where composition is one of the major issues to be addressed.

  • 18.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Svensson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    On the Role of Software Process Modeling in Software Ecosystem Design2010In: Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Software Architecture: Companion Volume, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2010, p. 103-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software Ecosystems (SECOs) have in recent years emerged as a promising approach for improved inter and intra organizational reuse and for reusability involving end-users in the software development process. Understanding the software's role in a larger perspective and how it interconnects with stakeholders is key for progress in those directions. However, for SECOs, several theoretical and methodological gaps remain to be charted. This paper identifies one such gap, the need for precise process modeling. It elaborates on experiences gained from the analysis of a SECO for mobile learning and brings up several aspects and insights for this particular domain. The main contributions are an initial reference model for the mobile learning domain and an outline for an analysis method for domain specific SECOs.

  • 19.
    Real-Delgado, Yeray
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring the potential of mobile technology for creating music collaboratively2014In: Proceedings of V Workshop on Ubiquitous Music, Publishing and art , 2014, p. 15-16Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. Malmö University.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Designing a didactical situation with mobile and web technologies2015In: 9th Congress of European Research in Mathematics Education (CERME 9), 4-5 February, 2015, Prague, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have designed, implemented and evaluated a didactical situation where 27 students in grade 4 created large triangular constructions in an outdoor environment by involving a customized GPS-based mobile application. The students’ strategies for construction were reflected upon during a teacher-led discussion involving web technologies and aiming at the formulation of principles for construction. The effective communication of underpinning theories and possible learning objectives, in combination with user-friendly mobile and web technologies, served to scaffold the teacher’s successful orchestration of a logos-oriented mathematical discourse.

  • 21.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Peng, Aihui
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Yau, Jane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Designing with mobile technologies for enacting the learning of geometry2011In: Workshop Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] Mohd Ayub A. F. et al., Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 305-312Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Peng, Aihui
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Yau, Jane
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Trade-offs between pedagogical and technological design requirements affecting the robustness of a mobile learning activity2011In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] T. Hirashima et al., Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 381-385Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Supporting teachers' orchestration of mobile learning activities2018In: Using Mobile Technologies in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics / [ed] Nigel Calder, Kevin Larkin, Nathalie Sinclair, Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we explore how an innovative mobile learning activity, designed by the authors can be implemented by mathematics classroom teachers. The focal part of the activity involves spatial orientation tasks that are executed with the support of customized mobile technologies in an outdoor setting. In this chapter, we present a comprehensive account of our research efforts spanning a five-year period and focus on providing didactical and technological support for teachers’ informed orchestration of the technology enabled learning activity.

  • 24.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Conceptual Architecture for mobile content sharing environments in Context-Aware Applications2009In: Sharing Experiences with Social Mobile Media: Proceedings of the International Workshop in conjunction with MobileHCI 2009, 2009, p. 33-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we introduce a conceptual architecture in ubiquitous computing as a solution for social mobile object-sharing. The architecture provides a solution for both on purpose and on demand sensor data acquisition as an improvement to context- aware services, through the use of wireless sensor devices, mobile web server technologies for indirect information gathering and cascading web services for information spread and visualisation. Finally, we present our current development in a learning setting and a scenario in the context of sport activities where the conceptual architecture is tested.

  • 25.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Iftikhar, Muhammad Usman
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ahmad, Tanvir
    A survey of formal methods in self-adaptive systems2012In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, ACM Press, 2012, p. 67-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One major challenge in self-adaptive systems is to assure the required quality properties. Formal methods provide the means torigorously specify and reason about the behaviors of self-adaptivesystems, both at design time and runtime. To the best of our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed on the use of formalmethods in self-adaptive systems. As a result, there is no clearview on what methods have been used to verify self-adaptive systems, and what support these methods offer to software developers. As such insight is important for researchers and engineers,we performed a systematic literature review covering 12 main software engineering venues and 4 journals, resulting in 75 papers usedfor data collection. The study shows that the attention for selfadaptive software systems is gradually increasing, but the numberof studies that employ formal methods remains low. The main focus of formalization is on modeling and reasoning. Model checking and theorem proving have gained limited attention. The mainconcerns of interest in formalization of self-adaptation are effi-ciency/performance and reliability. Important adaptation concerns,such as security and scalability, are hardly considered. To verify theconcerns of interest, a set of new properties are defined, such as interference freedom, responsiveness, mismatch, and loss-tolerance.A relevant part of the studies use formal methods at runtime, butthe use is limited to modeling and analysis. Formal methods can beapplied to other runtime activities of self-adaptation, and the

  • 26.
    Yau, Jane
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Salavati, Sadaf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Identifying the potential needs to provide mobile context-aware hints to support students' learning2011In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] T. Hirashima et al., Chiang Mai, Thailand: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2011, p. 365-372Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, mobile and context-aware technologies have been used in an attempt to enhance students‟ formal and informal learning experiences both in the classroom and outdoor settings. Such technologies have supported teaching and learning in a variety of subjects. In this paper, we present the ongoing research efforts in our Geometry Mobile (GeM) project, where we conducted a number of trials in the last two years with primary and secondary school students in Sweden. The current trial of our GeM project (April 2011) is discussed together with the data collection method we have used for exploring how Context-Aware learning hints (CA hints) can be utilized to support the different stages of the learning activity. Insights and preliminary results from this trial are described. We also present the motivation of our proposed CA hints, the definition of the requirements of those, and the formulation of a classification thereof.

1 - 26 of 26
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