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  • 1. Berglund, M
    et al.
    Nilsson, C
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Nurses´ and nurse students´demands of functions and usability in a PDA2007In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, Vol. 76, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Klefsgård, Rosemarie
    Lunds universitet.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Experiences of group education: A qualitative study from the viewpoint of patients and peers, next of kin and healthcare professionals2011In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Group education is intended to strengthen the ability of patients with long-term illnesses to cope in everyday life.

    Aim:

    To describe how patients and peers, next of kin and healthcare professionals experienced group education sessions.

    Methods:

    A qualitative, critical incident technique was used. Thirty patients, 9 peers, 41 next of kin and 12 healthcare professionals were asked

    to describe in writing their experiences of group education, inspired by the Norwegian Vifladt & Hopen model. The answers were then analyzed

    and categorized.

    Findings:

    Three hundred and eleven critical incidents were identified and two main areas emerged in the analyses: Experiences related to the

    group education and Impact of the group education programs. Experiences related to the group education described The course, Knowledge

    and support, and Becoming closer. Impact of the group education programs described Output and Advice to the healthcare organizations.

    Conclusion: This kind of group education is valuable because the participants benefited from listening to and learning from each other.

    Patients and NoK had the opportunity to find new strategies for managing daily life. The study also showed that it is important to plan and

    implement the education and meetings in cooperation between healthcare professionals and experienced peers

  • 3. Ivarsson, Bodil
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice - The view of newly registered nurses2009In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 510-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses’ perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital.

    Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was “Pedagogical methods in theory” with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was “Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice” with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Lindquist, Anna
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Handdator för sjuksköterskor – en studie om innehåll, funktioner och användbarhet (Konferens abstrakt)2007In: Scandinavian Health Informatics and Terminology Conference 2007 Proceedings, Kalmar, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskestudenter testar ny teknik inom vården!2007In: Learning NetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    A mobile pharmaceutical decision support system – a useful tool for district nurses? (Conference, poster abstract)2009In: The 14th International Symposium for Health Information Management Research (ISHIMR 2009), Kalmar, Sweden: Högskolan i Kalmar , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    A mobile medicine decision support system for district nurses.2009In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics: Connecting Health and Humans - Proceedings of NI2009 - The 10th International Congress on Nursing Informatics / [ed] Saranto, K., Flatley Brennan, P., Park, H-A., Tallberg, M., & Ensio, A., IOS Press , 2009, p. 516-520Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inappropriate use of medicines increases the risk of hospital admissions for the elderly. Not only does this lead to unnecessary suffering for the patients but also incurs a great financial cost to the society. A medicine decision support system in a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), with a barcode reader, can provide an overview of the patients' complete medicine use, and detect unsuitable drugs and drug combinations. Focusing on the elderly, our aim was to evaluate if a mobile medicine decision support system with a barcode reader is useful and user-friendly for nurses in home care. The participants received a comprehensive overview from the patients' medicine use and noted drug-drug interactions, therapeutic duplications and warnings for drugs unsuitable for elderly people. The nurses regarded that the decision support system increased prevention and safety, was useful and user-friendly. Our findings suggest that most of the content and functions were regarded as important. Therefore, this decision support system might be a useful tool for district nurses.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    A mobile pharmaceutical decision support system – a useful tool for district nurses?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    A mobile pharmaceutical decision support system – a useful tool for district nurses? (Conferense abstract)2008In: Scandinavian Health Informatics and Terminology Conference 2008 Proceedings, Kalmar, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Experience of using a personal digital assistant in nursing practice – a single case study2011In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 855-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe one nurse’s experience of using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in nursing practice.

    Background Nurses handle large amounts of information and a PDA may contain valuable information that nurses need in their daily work.

    Methods In this qualitative single case study, data were collected through an open-ended interview with one registered nurse and were analysed by content analysis.

    Results The findings show that the PDA provides immediate access to information anywhere and at anytime, with advantages for both the nurse and for her patients. The PDA increased her confidence and efficiency in practice; it was easier to keep up-to-date and spend more time with the patient. Furthermore, the PDA was perceived as improving patient safety and patient participation.

    Conclusions The PDA requires improved content and more functions. Ease of use should also be improved. This study indicates that PDAs could be valuable and may inspire further research.

    Implications for nursing management The incorporation of a multifunctional PDA is an important issue for nursing management, as it could both change and provide new possibilities for nursing practice. The use of PDAs could also aid decision-making, improve patient safety and benefit patient outcomes.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Handdator för sjuksköterskestudenter – ett hjälpmedel inom verksamhetsförlagd utbildning2008In: Nätverk och utveckling (NU2008). Lärande i en ny tid - samtal om undervisning i högre utbildning. Proceedings NU2008, Kalmar, Sverige, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    LIF e-reader: Utvärderingsrapport slutversion 2009-02-032009Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nursing students' experience of using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical practice: an intervention study2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1246-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A personal digital assistant (PDA) is a multifunctional information and communication tool allowing nursing students to keep up to date with expanding health related knowledge.

    Objectives

    This study was aimed at exploring nursing students' experience of using a PDA in clinical practice.

    Method

    In this intervention study, nursing students (n=67) used PDAs during a period of 15weeks, replied to questionnaires, and participated in focus group interviews.

    Results

    The PDA was found to support nursing students in clinical practice and to have the potential to be a useful tool with benefits for both the patients and for the students. The PDA was regarded as useful, and was presumed to imply increased confidence and time savings, and contribute to improved patient safety and quality of care.

    Conclusions

    With available mobile technology, nursing students would be able to access necessary information, independent of time and place. Therefore, it is important that stakeholders and educators facilitate the use of PDAs to support nursing students during their clinical practice, in order to prepare them for their future work, and to continuously improve the safety and quality of healthcare.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Personal digital assistant with a barcode reader - a medical decision support system for nurses in home care.2010In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 232-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inappropriate medication among elderly people increases the risk of adverse drug–drug interactions, drug-related falls and hospital admissions. In order to prevent these effects it is necessary to obtain a profile of the patients’ medication. A personal digital assistant (PDA) can be used as a medical decision support system (MDSS) to obtain a profile of the patients’ medication and to check for inappropriate drugs and drug combinations, and to reduce medication errors.Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate nurses’ experiences of using a MDSS in a PDA with a barcode reader, in order to obtain profiles of the patients’ medication, regarding drug–drug interactions, therapeutic duplications, and warnings for drugs unsuitable for elderly in home care.Methods: The LIFe-reader® is a MDSS in a PDA with a barcode reader. By scanning the drug packages in the patients’ home, the LIFe-reader® obtained profiles of the patients’ medication and checked for drug–drug interactions, therapeutic duplications and warnings for drugs unsuitable for elderly people. The LIFe-reader® also contained, e.g. drug information and medical reference works. Nurses (n = 15) used the LIFe-reader® for five weeks during their nursing home care practice assignment. The nurses answered questionnaires about the content and functions of the LIFe-reader® before, during and after the nursing home care practice assignment, and were interviewed in focus groups. Descriptive statistics were used and content analysis was applied for qualitative data.Results: By using the LIFe-reader®, the majority of the nurses found it easy to obtain profiles of the patients’ medication and check for drug–drug interactions, therapeutic duplications and warnings for drugs unsuitable for elderly people. Most nurses regarded the LIFe-reader® to reduce drug-related risks of falling, and some thought it could reduce the drug-related admissions to hospitals. The scanning function was described as easy and time saving, although not always possible to use. The LIFe-reader® was regarded as a useful and user-friendly MDSS, but more content and functions were requested.Conclusions: We found that the LIFe-reader® has the potential to be a useful and user-friendly MDSS for nurses in home care when obtaining profiles of the patients’ medication regarding drug–drug interactions, therapeutic duplications and warnings for drugs unsuitable for elderly. A regular scanning of the patients’ drugs in their home might support nurses and general practitioners (GPs) in reducing the inappropriate use of drugs. If the LIFe-reader® should be used in a larger scale among nurses, more content and functions are necessary.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet .
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Experience of mobile devices in nursing practice2012In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 50-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In nursing care, the steady increase of healthrelated information implies that there is need for useful tools thateasily provide mobile access to accurate information.Aim: This study is aimed at exploring nurses’ and nursingstudents’ experience of using a mobile device in nursing practice,with the emphasis on usefulness, information retrieval, savingtime, patient safety, the quality of care, and confidence in thework performed.Methods: In this descriptive intervention study, registered nurses(RN) (n=14) and nursing students (NS) (n=7) used mobiledevices in nursing practice during a period of 15 weeks, andreplied to questionnaires prior to and after the intervention.Results and conclusion: We found that the mobile device wasperceived as useful and was presumed to imply increased confidenceand time savings, and to contribute to improved patientsafety and quality of care by enhancing access to necessaryinformation. To facilitate nursing practice, mobile devicesadjusted for technical, statutory, cultural, and language countryspecificconditions, should be further developed and implementedfor RNs and NSs. Furthermore, future research shouldinclude the end-users’ views.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå universitet.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice - the views of nurses and nursing students2014In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 220-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses’ and nursing students’ views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  • 17. Jöud, Anna
    et al.
    Sandholm, Anders
    Alseby, Lola
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Feasibility of a computerized male urethral catheterization simulator.2010In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 70-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catheterization of the male urethra might cause harm and discomfort for the patient. Computer-based simulator training might improve the skills of students as well as professional nurses. This study aims to study the feasibility of a new portable computer-based male urethral catheterization simulator, Urecath (Melerit Urecath Vision). The simulator consists of three software modules: teaching (explains the different procedures in the catheterization), learning (game settings with practice and self-assessments tests), and simulator module that is connected to a box with a model of a penis where syringes and the urinary catheter can be inserted. Registered nurses (n=23), nurse assistants (n=14), nurse students (n=12), and a nurse assistant student (n=1) participated in a simulation session and answered 30 questions about the feasibility of the simulator. The participants appreciated the different modules, particularly the teaching and learning modules. The simulator module was appreciated for its cross-sectional views and feedback but was found to lack a tactile component; there was too little and no varying resistance when inserting the catheter. The participants perceived the present prototype of Urecath as a valuable education tool. The male urethral catheterization simulator prototype Urecath has advantages in its present shape but to be an alternative to existing training options for practicing male urethral catheterization, it should be complemented with a tactile mode and degrees of difficulty.

  • 18. Korolija, D
    et al.
    Sauerland, S
    Wood-Dauphinée, S
    Abbou, C.C.
    Eypasch, E
    García Caballero, M
    Lumsden, M.A.
    Millat, B
    Monson, J.R.T.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Pointner, R
    Schwenk, W
    Shamiyeh, A
    Szold, A
    Targarona, E
    Ure, B
    Neugebauer, E
    Evaluation of quality of life after laparoscopic surgery: Evidence-based guidelines of the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (E.A.E.S).2004In: Surgical Endoscopy, Vol. 18, p. 879-897Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindquist, Anna
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Johansson, Pauline
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå Universitet.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    The Use of the Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) Among Personnel and Students in Health Care: a Review.2008In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 10, no 4, p. e31-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care personnel need access to updated information anywhere and at any time, and a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) has the potential to meet these requirements. A PDA is a mobile tool which has been employed widely for various purposes in health care practice, and the level of its use is expected to increase. Loaded with suitable functions and software applications, a PDA might qualify as the tool that personnel and students in health care need. In Sweden today, despite its leadership role in mobile technologies, PDAs are not commonly used, and there is a lack of suitable functions and software applications.Objective: The aim of the present review was to obtain an overview of existing research on the use of PDAs among personnel and students in health care.Methods: The literature search included original peer-reviewed research articles written in English and published from 1996 to 2008. All study designs were considered for inclusion. We excluded reviews and studies focusing on the use of PDAs in classroom situations. From March 2006 to the last update in May 2008, we searched PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, IngentaConnect, and a local search engine (ELIN@Kalmar). We conducted a content analysis, using Nielsen’s Model of System Acceptability as a theoretical framework in structuring and presenting the results.Results: From the 900 references initially screened, 172 articles were selected and critically assessed until 48 articles remained. The majority originated in North-America (USA: n=24, Canada: n=11). The categories which emerged from our content analysis coincided to a certain extent to Nielsen’s Model of System Acceptability (social and practical acceptability), including usefulness (utility and usability) subcategories such as learnability, efficiency, errors, and satisfaction. The studies showed that health care personnel and students used PDAs in patient care with varied frequency. Most of the users were physicians. There is some evidence that the use of a PDA in health care settings might improve decision-making, reduce the numbers of medical errors, and enhance learning for both students and professionals, but the evidence is not strong, with most studies being descriptive, and only 6 randomized controlled trials. Several special software programs have been created and tested for PDAs, and a wide range of situations for their use have been reported for different patient groups. Drug and medical information were commonly accessed by PDA users, and the PDA was often viewed as the preferred tool when compared to paper-based documents. Some users regarded the PDA easy to operate, while others found it difficult in the beginning.Conclusions: This overview of the use of PDAs revealed a positive attitude towards the PDA, which was regarded as a feasible and convenient tool. The possibility of immediate access to medical information has the potential to improve patient care. The PDA seems to be a valuable tool for personnel and students in health care, but there is a need for further intervention studies, randomized controlled trials, action research, and studies with various health care groups in order to identify its appropriate functions and software applications.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Laparoscopic or Open Antireflux Surgery - A Comparative Study with Special Reference to the Patient´s Perspective2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to compare the effects of laparoscopic versus open antireflux surgery in a randomized clinical trial focusing the patients&apos; subjective and objective outcome postoperatively, from a short-term and a long-term perspective. A further aim was to describe GORD patients&apos; experiences of illness and surgical treatment and if possible to find striking characteristics relating to laparoscopic or open surgery. Sixty patients with Gastro Oesophageal Reflux Disease (GORD) were randomized to laparoscopic or open 360º fundoplication. Subjective evaluations according to disease-specific and generic questionnaires, postoperative protocol, structured interviews, questionnaire and narratives as well as objective evaluations according to endoscopy, oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH monitoring were performed preoperatively, postoperatively, 1 month, 6 months and 5 years after surgery. Five patients were converted to open surgery. Two patients in the laparoscopic group were reoperated on because of hiatal strictures, one patient in the open group was reoperated on because of an incisional hernia and one patient in each group was operated on for having an intestinal obstruction. Operating time was longer for laparoscopic surgery 148 versus 109 minutes for open surgery (P<0.001), analgesics was less 33.9 versus 67.5 mg per total hospital stay for open surgery (P<0.001). Respiratory function was better in the laparoscopic group, FEV 2.6 versus 2.0 litres (P=0.008) and FVC 3.2 versus 2.2 litres (P=0.004); postoperative hospital stay was shorter 3 (2-6) versus 3 (2-10) days (P=0.021) for open surgery. No difference was found in sick leave between the groups. No differences were found in short- or long-term subjective outcomes in diet, sleep, medication, patient satisfaction and symptoms of GORD. Nor were there any differences found in short- or long-term objective outcomes from endoscopy, manometry or 24-h pH monitoring. Dysphagia, flatulence and difficulties to belch were new side-effects independent of type of surgery. Reasons for having surgery were a wish to avoid medication and to rid themselves of troubles and symptoms. All patients suffered from decreased well-being preoperatively that after surgery independent of invasiveness was restored back to or above norm values. Seven patients (25%) in the open group had complaints regarding the scar. The experts, the GORD patients themselves, described human responses to illness, surgical treatment and the outcome. No matter the type of invasiveness; elimination of the GORD symptoms led to increased well-being and for the majority of patients no need for daily acid-suppression medication. These results appeared one month after the operation and were still valid, five years after surgery.

  • 21.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The patients´ perspective2006In: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Principles of Disease, Diagnosis, and Treatment / [ed] Frank A Granderath, Thomas Kamolz, Rudolph Pointner, Wien: Springer-Verlag , 2006, p. 299-308Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Larsson, Sylvia
    Johnsson, Folke
    Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open fundoplication: blind evaluation of recovery and discharge period.2000In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 873-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a widespread belief that introduction of the laparoscopic technique in antireflux surgery has led to easier postoperative recovery. To test this hypothesis a prospective randomized clinical trial with blind evaluation was conducted between laparoscopic and open fundoplication.

    Methods

    Sixty patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were randomized to open or laparoscopic 360° fundoplication. The type of operation was unknown to the patient and the evaluating nurses after operation.

    Results

    The operating time was longer in the laparoscopy group, median 148 versus 109 min (P < 0·0001). The need for analgesics was less in the laparoscopically operated patients, 33·9 versus 67·5 mg morphine per total hospital stay (P < 0·001). There was no significant difference in postoperative nausea and vomiting. On the first day after operation patients in the laparoscopy group had better respiratory function: forced vital capacity 3·2 versus 2·2 litres (P = 0·004) and forced expiratory volume 2·6 versus 2·0 litres (P = 0·008). Postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the laparoscopic group, median (range) 3 (2–6) versus 3 (2–10) days (P = 0·021). No difference was found in the duration of sick leave.

    Conclusion

    Laparoscopic fundoplication was associated with a longer operating time, better respiratory function, less need for analgesics and a shorter hospital stay, while no reduction in the duration of postoperative sick leave was found compared with open surgery. © 2000 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd

  • 23.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Larsson, Sylvia
    Johnsson, Folke
    Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open fundoplication: evaluation of psychological well-being and changes in everyday life from a patient perspective2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 385-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The laparoscopic approach in antireflux surgery might have an impact on the patient's daily activities and well-being. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to laparoscopic or open 360 degrees fundoplication. Data were collected by questionnaires and interviews preoperatively, 1 month and 6 months after operation. RESULTS: Five patients in the laparoscopic group were converted to open surgery. Psychological general well-being increased after surgery and reached norm values in both study groups. No significant differences were found between the two types of surgery in the per protocol analysis, while the domain self-control was significantly better after open surgery in the intention-to-treat analysis. There was improvement of diet and sleep in both study groups; after 6 months, disturbed sleep was significantly more uncommon after open surgery. Dysphagia and flatulence were new symptoms that were reported after surgery. Overall perception of the results of the operation did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological general well-being, diet and sleep improved after both laparoscopic and open surgery. There were only small differences between the groups, but in some respects the results were better after open surgery.

  • 24.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Larsson, Sylvia
    Johnsson, Folke
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Patients' experiences of illness, operation and outcome with reference to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 307-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Describing the illness-story from a patient perspective could increase understanding of living with a chronic disease for health professionals and others, facilitate decision-making about treatment and enhance information about the outcome from a patient perspective. AIM: To illuminate patients' illness experiences of having a gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), going through surgery and the outcome. METHODS: Twelve patients were interviewed 5 years after having had the operation; six patients had had fundoplication via laparoscopy and six via open surgery. Each patient was asked to talk openly about their experiences, thoughts, feelings and consequences of living with the illness, going through surgery and the period from surgery to the day of interview. A qualitative content analysis was performed concerning the context of the data and its meaning. FINDINGS: Three central categories were identified and nine subcategories: living with GORD- symptoms of the disease affecting daily living, taking medicines, work, family and social life; concerns related to surgery- decision-making about the operation, influence by physicians; life after the operation- outcomes and consequences, side-effects and complications of the operation, sick leave, information and sharing experiences with future patients. All patients were free from symptoms of the illness after surgery independent of type of surgery, but side-effects from surgical treatment varied individually. Interviewees would have liked information concerning side-effects after surgery from previous patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to knowledge about patients' long-term suffering, their control of symptoms and how they have tried to cure themselves, but also about their concerns about surgery and the importance of surgical treatment to their quality of life. They wanted information about treatment, outcome and consequences, not only from a health care perspective but also from previous patients having had the same treatment.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Wenner, Jörgen
    Larsson, Sylvia
    Johnsson, Folke
    Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux.2004In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 552-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the long-term results of laparoscopic and open antireflux surgery in a randomized clinical trial by investigating subjective and objective outcomes. METHODS: Sixty patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) were randomized to laparoscopic or open 360 degrees fundoplication. Subjective evaluation using disease-specific and generic questionnaires and structured interviews, and objective evaluation by endoscopy, oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH monitoring, were performed before operation and 1 month, 6 months and 5 years after surgery. RESULTS: Two patients in the laparoscopic group had reoperations for hiatal stricture; one patient in the open group had repair of an incisional hernia, and one patient in each group had surgery for intestinal obstruction. There were no differences in the subjective outcomes of diet, sleep, medication, patient satisfaction and symptoms of GORD after 5 years. Nor were there any differences in objective outcomes determined by endoscopy, manometry or 24-h pH monitoring. Well-being was decreased in all patients before operation but was restored to normal or above-normal values after fundoplication, regardless of the type of surgery. Seven of 28 patients in the open group had complaints regarding the scar. CONCLUSION: Elimination of GORD symptoms improved well-being and eliminated the need for daily acid suppression in most patients, no matter which procedure was employed. These results were apparent 1 month after the operation and were still valid 5 years later.

  • 26. Sandholm, A
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences. University of Kalmar, eHealth Institute, School of Human Sciences, University of Kalmar,.
    Fritzson, P
    Towards a flexible general training simulator platform based on Modelica2006In: 7th Conference on Simulation and Modelling of the Scandinavian Simulation Society SIMS2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköpings Universitetssjukhus.
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Linköpings Universitet.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Strengths and weaknesses of working with the Global Trigger Tool method for retrospective record review: focus group interviews2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, p. e003131-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim was to describe the strengths and weaknesses, from team member perspectives, of working with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) method of retrospective record review to identify adverse events causing patient harm.

    Design A qualitative, descriptive approach with focus group interviews using content analysis.

    Setting 5 Swedish hospitals in 2011.

    Participants 5 GTT teams, with 5 physicians and 11 registered nurses.

    Intervention 5 focus group interviews were carried out with the five teams. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim.

    Results 8 categories emerged relating to the strengths and weaknesses of the GTT method. The categories found were: Usefulness of the GTT, Application of the GTT, Triggers, Preventability of harm, Team composition, Team tasks, Team members’ knowledge development and Documentation. Gradually, changes in the methodology were made by the teams, for example, the teams reported how the registered nurses divided up the charts into two sets, each being read respectively. The teams described the method as important and well functioning. Not only the most important, but also the most difficult, was the task of bringing the results back to the clinic. The teams found it easier to discuss findings at their own clinics.

    Conclusions The GTT method functions well for identifying adverse events and is strengthened by its adaptability to different specialties. However, small, gradual methodological changes together with continuingly developed expertise and adaption to looking at harm from a patient's perspective may contribute to large differences in assessment over time.

  • 28.
    Semark, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Engström, Sven
    Arvidsson, Eva
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Participation in decision making when starting long-term medication: patients´ experiences2014In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 282-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aim and objective

    To achieve the beneficial effect of drug treatment and reduce unnecessary health care costs, patients must be involved in shared decision making. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of participation in decision making when starting long-term medication.

    Method

    Nine patients at two health care centers were semi-structured interviewed about their experiences, beliefs and feelings about their participation in the decision to start long-term medication. Data was analyzed by a qualitative content method.

    Results

    Respondents stated that participating in decision making in drug treatment requires knowledge of the relevant area and requiring trusting the physician. The respondent’s responsibility and motivation facilitate adherence to drug treatment. 

    Conclusion

    Patients sought participation in the decision making of long-term medication and wished for adequate time needed for this dialogue. If they lacked sufficient knowledge, they wanted relevant and useful information from the physician. To experience trust in the physician through a good encounter increases the possibility for participation and enhancement of medication adherence. In order to participate in decision making, the patient needs the physician’s encouragement.

     

  • 29.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Israelsson, J.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, P. A.
    Variable documentation of vital signs in an electronic health record in patients at risk of in-hospital cardiac arrest could pose a threat to patient safety2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, p. S55-S56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Sheffield.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Documentation of vital signs in electronic records: the development of workarounds2015In: Health informatics for enhancing health and well-being: Proceedings of the seventeenth International Symposium for Health Information Management Research, York, UK 24-26 June 2015 / [ed] P. Bath, H. Spring, &, B Sen, B, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workarounds are commonplace in health care settings. An increase in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has led to an escalation of workarounds as health care professionals cope with systems which are inadequate for their needs. Closely related to this, the documentation of vital signs in EHR has been problematic. The accuracy and completeness of vital sign documentation has a direct impact on the recognition of deterioration in a patient’s condition. We examined work flow processes to identify workarounds related to vital signs in a 372-bed hospital in Sweden. In three clinical areas, a qualitative study was performed with data collected during observations and interviews and analysed through thematic content analysis. We identified paper workarounds in the form of hand-written notes and a total of eight pre-printed paper observation charts. Our results suggested that nurses created workarounds to allow a smooth workflow and to ensure patients safety.

  • 31.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Dokumentation av vitalparametrar i datorjournaler: En risk för patientsäkerheten?2014In: VITALIS - Nordens ledande eHälsomöte: Vetenskapliga papers presenterade vid Vitalis konferens, Svenska Mässan, Göteborg, 8-10 april 2014, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidig upptäckt och snabb hantering av riskpatienter har betraktats som det ’första steget i kedjan till överlevnad’ i hjärtlungräddning (HLR)[1]. Patienter uppvisar ofta tecken på försämring av kliniskt tillstånd under perioden före oväntad hjärtstopp [2]. För att förbättra identifieringen av försämring i kliniskt tillstånd hos patienter har många varianter på system för snabb respons införts med fokus på mätning, rapportering och hantering av patienter med avvikande vitalparametrar [3]. Datorjournaler journaler används allt mer inom vården för i stort sett all dokumentation. Däremot är kunskapen begränsad kring betydelsen av dokumentationen i datorjournalen för att upptäcka försämring av patienternas kliniska tillstånd. Syftet med denna studie var att undersöka dokumentationen av vitala parametrar i datorjournalen för sjukhusvårdade patienter, som efter inläggning drabbats av oväntat hjärtstopp.

  • 32.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Electronic patient record and documentation of deterioration in patients at risk of in-hospital cardiac arrest: pilot study2011In: ISHIMR 2011: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium for Health Information Management Research, 8-9 September 2011, Zurich, Switzerland / [ed] Peter A. Bath, J R Collis Publications , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early recognition of patients whose condition is deteriorating is essential to prevent cardiac arrest. To detect signs of deterioration, a patient’s vital signs, such as temperature, pulse, respiratory rate and blood pressure, are monitored. Poor design of vital sign charts is given as one of the reasons for deficiency in recognising patient deterioration. Little is known about the impact of documenting vital signs in electronic patient record (EPR) systems. The aim of this study is to examine to which extent the EPR supports the documentation of deterioration in patients at risk of in-hospital cardiac arrest. The poster reports on the pilot study which was performed to test the adequacy and appropriateness of the data collection tool and to examine the appropriateness of the data collected for statistical analyses.

  • 33.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest2016In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPACTM Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. 

  • 34.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Israelsson, Johan
    Kalmar County Hospital.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Bath, Peter A.
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Vital sign documentation in electronic records: the development of workarounds2018In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 2061-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workarounds are commonplace in health care settings. An increase in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has led to an escalation of workarounds as health care professionals cope with systems which are inadequate for their needs. Closely related to this, the documentation of vital signs in EHR has been problematic. The accuracy and completeness of vital sign documentation has a direct impact on the recognition of deterioration in a patient’s condition. We examined work flow processes to identify workarounds related to vital signs in a 372-bed hospital in Sweden. In three clinical areas a qualitative study was performed with data collected during observations and interviews and analysed through thematic content analysis. We identified paper workarounds in the form of hand-written notes and a total of eight pre-printed paper observation charts. Our results suggested that nurses created workarounds to allow a smooth workflow and to ensure patients safety.

  • 35.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nurses’ perceptions of an electronic patient record from a patient safety perspective: A qualitative study.2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 667-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The overall aim of this study was to explore nurses’ perceptions of using an electronic patient record in everyday practice, in general ward settings. This paper reports on the patient safety aspects revealed in the study.

    Background: Electronic patient records (EPR) are widely used and becoming the main method of nursing documentation. Emerging evidence suggests that they fail to capture the essence of clinical practice and support the most frequent end-users: nurses. The impact of using EPR in general ward settings is under-explored.

    Method: In 2008, focus group interviews were conducted with 21 registered nurses (RNs). This was a qualitative study and the data were analysed by content analysis. At the time of data collection, the EPR system had been in use for approximately one year.

    Findings: The findings related to patient safety were clustered in one main category: ‘documentation in everyday practise’. There were three sub-categories: vital signs, overview and medication module. Nurses reported that the EPR did not support nursing practice when documenting crucial patient information, such as vital signs.

    Conclusions: Efforts should be made to include the views of nurses when designing an EPR to ensure it suits the needs of nursing practice and supports patient safety. Essential patient information needs to be easily accessible and provide support for decision-making. 

  • 36.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nurses' experience of using electronic patient records in everyday practice: a literature review2010In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic patient record (EPR) systems have a huge impact onnursing documentation. Although the largest group of end-usersof EPRs, nurses have had minimal input in their design. Thisstudy aimed to review current research on how nurses experienceusing the EPR for documentation. A literature search was conductedin Medline and Cinahl of original, peer-reviewed articles from2000 to 2009, focusing on nurses in acute/ inpatient ward settings.After critical assessment, two quantitative and three qualitativearticles were included in the study. Results showed that nursesexperience widespread dissatisfaction with systems. Currentsystems are not designed to meet the needs of clinical practiceas they are not user-friendly, resulting in a potentially negativeimpact on individualized care and patient safety. There is anurgent need for nurses to be directly involved in software designto ensure that the essence and complexity of nursing is notlost in the system.

  • 37.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bath, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Documentation of vital signs in electronic health records: issues for patient safety2013In: Proceedings of the sixteenth International Symposium for Health Information management Research, ISHIMR 2013: Exploiting Health Informatics for Connected, Collaborative and Customized Patient Care / [ed] Syed Sibte Raza Abidi, Peter A. Bath, Halifax: Dalhousie University & University of Sheffield , 2013, p. 153-154Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inadequate design and poor user-interface are given as reasons for unsuccessful implementation of electronic health records (EHR) [1,2]. However, rather than designing more suitable technology, the trend has been to 'muddle through' [2] and to urge health care workers to adapt to poorly designed systems [3]. This may work to some degree but little is known about the impact this could have on patient safety. The design of vital sign charts has an impact on the ability of clinicians to detect deterioration in patients' clinical status [4-6]. Changes in a patient's vital signs may indicate a lifethreatening event [7,8] so charts should be user-friendly to support clinicians in decision-making [9,10]. The aim of this study was to examine the documentation of physiological vital signs in an EHR. In this paper, we present the results regarding accessing information on a patient's physiological vital signs.

  • 38. Wenner, Jörgen
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    Lunds universitet, medicinska fakulteten.
    Öberg, Sven
    Melin, Tor
    Larsson, Sylvia
    Johnsson, Folke
    Short-term outcome after laparoscopic and open 360 degrees fundoplication. A prospective randomized trial.2001In: Surgical Endoscopy, ISSN 0930-2794, E-ISSN 1432-2218, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 1124-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the lack of randomized trials supporting the laparoscopic approach, laparoscopic antireflux surgery has gained widespread acceptance during the last decade. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term symptomatic and objective outcome after laparoscopic and open 360 degrees fundoplication in a prospective randomized clinical trial. METHODS: Sixty patients with GERD were randomized to undergo either laparoscopic (LF) or open 360 degrees fundoplication (OF). Endoscopy, esophageal manometry, 24-h pH monitoring, clinical symptom evaluation, and symptom scoring according to a validated questionnaire (the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale [GSRS]) was performed preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. RESULTS: Five patients randomized to the laparoscopic group were converted to open surgery. Esophageal acid exposure was restored to normal in all patients. Lower esophageal sphincter length and resting pressure were significantly increased after both laparoscopic and open fundoplication (p < 0.001); there were no differences between the groups. No significant differences were seen in symptomatic outcome, although there was a trend toward a higher rate of mild dysphagia (p = 0.051) after laparoscopic surgery. GSRS revealed a decrease in reflux score (p < 0.001) and abdominal pain score (p < 0.001) postoperatively. There were no significant differences in GSRS scores between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic 360 degrees fundoplication is as effective in treating reflux disease as open fundoplication. Six months postoperatively, no significant differences were seen in symptomatic or objective outcome. Long-term evaluation is needed.

  • 39.
    Åkesson, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunilla
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Health care consumers' experiences of information communication technology: A summary of litterature2007In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, Vol. 76, no 9, p. 633-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is an increasing interest in reaching consumers directly through the Internet and different telecommunication systems. The most important contacts in health care will always be the face-to-face meetings, but the tools of health informatics can be seen as a means to an end, which is to provide the best possible health care. A variety of applications have been described in different references. To our knowledge there has been no review of a research-based state of the art in the field of consumers’ experiences in using different applications in health informatics. According to the benefits in using information communication technology (ICT) as being cost-effective and timesaving it is of great importance to focus on and examine consumers’ experiences. It is important that it is user friendly and regarded as valuable and useful.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe consumers’ subjective experiences of using electronic resources with reference to health and illness.

    Design and/or method: A systematic literature search was performed in databases CINAHL, Medline and Cochrane, as well as a manual search. Retrieved references (n = 14) were appraised according to their scientific structure and quality. A broad search was performed in order to find as many different applications as possible. Our primary intention was to identify existing references describing consumers’ experiences with ICT.

    Results: In spite of this broad search few references were found. Twelve references remained and three themes were identified: support and help, education and information, and telecommunication instead of on-site visiting. Consumers felt more confident and empowered, their knowledge increased and their health status improved due to the ICT resources. Lack of face-to-face meetings or privacy did not appear to be a problem.

    Conclusion: ICT can improve the nurse–patient relationship and augment well-being for consumers. More research is needed to measure consumers’ experiences and factors that influence it.

1 - 39 of 39
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