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  • 1.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Lillehammer University College, Norway.
    A new sports manager does not make a better team.2011Ingår i: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 167-178Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article surveys the literature on the impact of managerial successions on team performance in professional sports and assesses ten studies on the effect of managerial succession. They cover 80 years (1920-2000) with data from four different sports and two countries. From these studies, three lessons emerge when teams perform poorly: (i) a change of coach or manager during the season is not helpful; (ii) if succession is deemed necessary, change the manager between seasons; and (iii) if the choice is between a manager from inside the organization and one from the outside, choose the former. What is critical is that whichever manager is replaced or for whatever reason, the performance of the team will most likely not improve for that reason alone. In short, a new manager does not make a better team.

  • 2.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    An organization called Harry2008Ingår i: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 21, nr 2, s. 174-187Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human characteristics to gods, plants, animals or inanimate objects (the wind, rocks, etc.). This paper sets out to disprove the association of anthropomorphic characteristics with individual organizations.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper discusses anthropomorphism in organization theory because many scholars argue that organizations are human or like human beings. Some examples of “An organization called Harry” in organization literature are presented.

    Findings – Three causes of anthropomorphism can be traced. The negative, rather than any positive, consequences of anthropomorphism in organization literature are discussed.

    Originality/value – A new agenda for organizational studies is suggested where anthropomorphism is avoided together with the fallacy of the human metaphor. Anthropomorphism creates confusion rather than advancing the field of organization theory.

  • 3.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Assessing Public Managers’ Change-Oriented Behavior: Are Private Managers Caught in the Doldrums?2010Ingår i: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 33, nr 6, s. 335-345Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV. LEO (Ledning, Entreprenörskap och Organisering).
    Barking up the wrong tree: On the fallacy of the transformational leadership theory2006Ingår i: Fifth International Conference on Leadership Research: Cranfield University, Cranfield, December 13-14, 2006, 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 5.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV. LEO (Ledning, Entreprenörskap och Organisering).
    Kyrkoherden - församlingens ledare och chef2006Ingår i: Församling - Här! Nu!, Växjö stift, Växjö , 2006, s. 267-272Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Leadership, personality and effectiveness2006Ingår i: The Journal of Socio-Economics, Vol. 35, nr 6, s. 1078-1091Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 7.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för organisation och entreprenörskap (OE).
    Leadership research: Where irrelevance prevails2013Ingår i: Dynamic relationships management journal, ISSN 2232-5867, E-ISSN 2350-367X, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. 3-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Is contemporary managerial leadership research relevant and helpful to managers? Arguably, managers’ main task and prime concern is to contribute to the attainment of organisational goals, i.e., to enhance organizational effectiveness. On the basis of this premise of relevance, a survey of 105 research articles published in two international journals year 2011 reveals that researchers did not address this question. In these articles the term ‘effectiveness’ occurred about one time for every 1000 words. In the 105 articles effectiveness was seldom defined and never measured. If managers‘ prime concern is to contribute to organizational effectiveness, then there is no surprise that several scholars have found that managers regard leadership research irrelevant and useless.

  • 8.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Leadership style2008Ingår i: Leadership: Key concepts, Routledge, London , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 9.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV. Ledarskap, Entreprenörskap, Organisation.
    Ny tränare - bättre lag?2006Ingår i: Inkast. Idrottsforskning vid Växjö universitet, Växjö University Press , 2006, s. 206-Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 10.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Lilllehammer University College.
    Public Managers: Their behavior, their change potential and the behavior of women and men in public organizations.2012Ingår i: Uprava / Administration, ISSN 1581-7555, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 25-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This survey article addresses three questions based on the assumption that significant differences exist between public and private organizations. If this assumption is correct managerial and leadership behavior will differ between public and private managers. Additionally, the propensity to change will also differ between public and private managers. Since a number of studies indicate that managers’ leadership behavior in public organizations differ from that of private managers, difference and similarities in leadership behavior between women and men in public organizations are examined. Three studies are presented here which show that public and private managers have different behavioral patterns of leadership. However, public managers turn out to be more change-oriented than business managers. In the public organizations investigated no differences in leadership behavior between women and men were found.

  • 11.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för ekonomi och design, Ekonomihögskolan, ELNU.
    Public vs. private managers.: How public and private managers differ in leadership behavior.2010Ingår i: PAR. Public Administration Review, ISSN 0033-3352, E-ISSN 1540-6210, Vol. 70, nr 1, s. 131-141Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to find out whether there are behavioral differences between public and private sector managers. Two groups of public managers (managers of social insurance agencies and public school principals) and a group of private managers (two samples) are investigated. Behavioral dimensions are investigated including leadership style (task, relationship, and change orientation), decision-making style (the functions of sensing, intuition, thinking, and feeling), and motivation profile (achievement, affiliation, and power motivation). An analysis of data from 459 managers in four organizations in Sweden reveal significant differences in behavior between public and private managers. However, no significant differences in leadership behavior are discovered among public managers. Possible explanations for such differences and similarities are explored.

  • 12.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för ekonomi och design, Ekonomihögskolan, ELNU.
    Reintroducing the Owner: On Corporate Governance, Goals, Organisation and Leadership Theories2012Ingår i: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 8TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE / [ed] Politis, J, NR READING: Academic Conferences Limited , 2012, s. 1-7Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates that contemporary literature on organisation and leadership attributes little attention to the topic of corporate governance. Textbooks on organisation and leadership theory yield no or few listings of corporate governance and owner (ownership). This paper does not deal with corporate governance and the agency theory as such, but rather the way in which these theories are linked to organisation and leadership theory. Additionally, several incidents from business and private organisations have shown the problems and dramatic consequences of inadequate corporate governance, which in itself call for more research on this topic. The main reason why corporate governance has been marginalised in the literature appears to be the prevalence of the open system theory, in which ownership and organisational goals are not essential theoretical concepts. According to this theory the owners are but one of many stakeholders. Some scholars even claim that organisations do not have any owners. Moreover, the organisational goals are not the goals of the owners, but the goals of the stakeholders or goals of the managers. In order to promote corporate governance a sound theoretical foundation is called for. The rationalistic organisation theory constitutes a sound theoretical foundation for the principal agency theory and thus for the study of corporate governance. In the rationalistic theory the owners and their goals are given as the reason for the establishment of an organisation. The chief execute officer is hired to run the organisation on behalf of the owners in order to achieve organisational goals as decided by the owners. The principal and agency theory is based on the rationalistic organisation theory in which owners play a central role in the formulation of goals and establishing as well as controlling the organisation and its managers. Both corporate governance and agency theory need to regain a dominant place in organisation theory textbooks and in organisation, management, and leadership research. In present-day literature on organisation, management and leadership theories - based on the open system theory - the owner has disappeared. The time has come to reinstate the owner.

  • 13.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för ekonomi och design, Ekonomihögskolan, ELNU.
    Seven pitfalls in organisation literature2012Ingår i: Dynamic relationships management journal, ISSN 2232-5867, E-ISSN 2350-367X, Vol. 1, nr 1, s. 48-59Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Current organisation literature is rife with several incorrect and confusing assertions which continually create problems for students and researchers alike. Seven of these unfortunate beliefs are presented here and provocatively called ‘pitfalls’. The aim of this article is to draw attention to some of these theoretically incorrect assertions and how they can be avoided in scholarly work. The implications for managers are also presented.

  • 14.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Trust in leadership2008Ingår i: Leadership: Key concepts, Routledge, London , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 15.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Lilllehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    When the servant-leader comes knocking …2009Ingår i: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347, Vol. 30, nr 1, s. 4-15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to scrutinise the concept of servant leadership from a business administration (management) point-of-view.

    Design/methodology/approach – A review of scholarly works on servant-leadership is presented.

    Findings – A generally accepted definition of servant-leadership is not available. There are no generally accepted instruments for measuring servant-leadership. It is unclear whether some leaders are servant-leaders while others are not, and whether leaders can be servant-leaders to different degrees. The positive effects of servant-leadership on organisational outcomes, a consideration highly relevant to management, have not been empirically established. Some studies have shown negative effects of servant-leadership on organisational effectiveness.

    Research limitations/implications – This literature review contains no empirical data.

    Practical implications – The argument that servant-leaders should be in charge of private companies and public organisations appears to be contrary to theoretical and empirical considerations. Servant-leaders, whose concerns are primarily focused on subordinates rather than customers (or citizens), are hardly able to attain organisational goals.

    Originality/value – The paper offers critical comments on the conceptual and empirically usefulness of servant-leadership when applied to business enterprises and public agencies.

  • 16.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway).
    Your favourite manager is an organisational disaster.2009Ingår i: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 5-16Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – When subordinates are asked what kind of manager they prefer, the answers are virtually the same. Subordinates have a different focus than managers, as the latter focus on organisational goal attainment. The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint the consequences of the subordinates' leadership preferences for organisational performance.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper draws conclusions based on previous research and empirical data collected to illustrate the likely outcome of subordinates having the managers they prefer.

    Findings – Subordinates favour the type of manager who has a relationship oriented style of leadership, and who is predominantly motivated by affiliation. Additionally, subordinates appear to prefer a servant leader to be their boss. Research has shown that relationship oriented and affiliation motivated managers, as well as servant leaders are detrimental to organisational effectiveness.

    Research limitations/implications – The data refer only to Swedish samples of private and public managers regarding leadership styles and motivation profiles. Data have not yet been published on the occurrence of popular managers and the prevalence of servant leaders.

    Practical implications – Both managers and subordinates need to acknowledge the conflicting issues in management. The manager that the subordinates want is precisely what they should not get.

    Originality/value – This paper supplies theoretical as well as empirical arguments needed to warn organisations against having managers whose behaviour is preferred by subordinates, but also impedes organisational effectiveness.

  • 17.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV. LEO (Ledning, Entreprenörskap och Organisering).
    Your favourite manager is an organisational disaster2006Ingår i: British Academy of Management, Research Conference Sept 13-15, 2006, 2006Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College, Norway.
    Hansson, Per
    Uppsala University.
    At the end of the road?: On differences between women and men in leadership behavior2011Ingår i: Leadership & Organization Development Journal, ISSN 0143-7739, E-ISSN 1472-5347, Vol. 32, nr 5, s. 328-341Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore behavioural differences between women and men in managerial positions and suggest explanations for differences and similarities.

    Design/methodology/approach – In order to eliminate any effects of organizational differences on leadership behaviour, this study had public managers responding to questionnaires that measured their leadership style, decision-making style, and motivation profile.

    Findings – Statistical analyses of data from three groups of Swedish public managers (n=385) revealed virtually no significant differences in behaviour between female and male managers. Regardless of whether there is a female or male majority of employees or a female or male majority of managers, no effect on leadership behaviour occurs.

    Originality/value – A number of studies indicate that managers' behaviour is different in different types of organizations. This study suggests, therefore, that, independent of gender, organizational and demographic characteristics modify leadership behaviours, thus explaining similarities in leadership behaviour.

  • 19.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV. LEO (Ledning, Entreprenörskap och Organisering).
    Jonsson, Patrik
    Does organization structure matter?: On the relationship between the structure, functioning and effectiveness2006Ingår i: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management, ISSN 0219-8770, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 1-27Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 20.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    et al.
    Lillehammer University College, Norway.
    Kovac, Jure
    University of Maribor, Slovenia.
    Why European subordinates trust their managers2012Ingår i: Organizacija, ISSN 1318-5454, E-ISSN 1581-1832, Vol. 45, nr 6, s. 300-309Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the problem of why subordinates trust their managers based on the responses from 108 subordinatesof seven Slovenian managers and from 138 subordinates of eight Swedish managers. The subordinates of these managersresponded to a 20-item instrument tested for reliability and validity. In both samples the managers enjoyed different degreesof trust. The level of trust vested in Slovenian managers was higher than in Swedish ones. The kinds of managers’ actions thatenhanced trust were similar amongst Swedish and Slovenian subordinates. Different socio-cultural contexts may theoreticallyexplain why some other kinds of actions had contrasting effects between the samples. On the whole, the actions of managersexplain trust in both countries. Subordinates’ trust in managers declines with the increasing hierarchical distance in bothnational samples. Managers need to show in action that they trust their subordinates, promote their interests, demonstrateappreciation of their subordinates, and solve problems.

  • 21. Hansson, Per H.
    et al.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Växjö universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Ekonomihögskolan, EHV.
    Vicars' change potential.: A comparative study2008Ingår i: Nordic Journal of Religion and Society, ISSN 0809-7291, E-ISSN 1890-7008, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 91-111Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibilities for Church of Sweden vicars to manage their parishes in change were explored in 2000. The results indicated that vicars had a low capacity for initiating and implementing organizational change. The aim of this investigation is to assess whether vicars have a managerial style that differ from other groups of civil servants. Using tested instruments, 240 Swedish vicars (response rate 64%), 300 school principals (66%) and 64 social insurance officers (95%) were asked about their leadership style, decision-making style, motivation profile and perceived operational demands. The vicars stand out as a special group of managers with a strong relationshiporientation. Headmasters and social officers are similar to each other in behaviour. The results are explained by that pastoral work is founded on relations, the pastoral training of the vicars and the «weight of history». A contributory cause may be that many priests are perceived as having a «helping approach» to leadership.

  • 22.
    Smith, Peter B.
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Cardiff.
    Peterson, Mark F.
    Thomason, Stephanie J.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för ekonomi och design, Ekonomihögskolan, ELNU.
    National Culture as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Managers' Use of Guidance Sources and How Well Work Events Are Handled2011Ingår i: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, ISSN 0022-0221, E-ISSN 1552-5422, Vol. 42, nr 6, s. 1101-1121Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Managerial leadership within 56 nations is examined in terms of the sources of guidance that managers use to handle work events. Correlations between the sources of guidance that managers use and the perceived effectiveness of how well these events are handled are employed to represent their schemas and attributional propensities for effectiveness. These correlations are predicted to vary in relation to dimensions of national culture. The hypotheses are tested using data from 7,701 managers. Reliance on one's own experience and training, on formal rules and procedures, and on one's subordinates are positively correlated with perceived effectiveness globally, whereas reliance on superiors, colleagues, and unwritten rules are negatively correlated with perceived effectiveness. Cross-level analyses revealed support for hypotheses specifying the ways in which each of these correlations is moderated by one or more of the dimensions of national culture first identified by Hofstede (1980). These results provide an advance on prior analyses that have tested only for main effect relationships between managerial leadership and national culture.

1 - 22 av 22
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