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  • 1.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Aktuell kurslitteratur för högskolan: Från fabler till manga, Lärande genom skönlitteratur och Skönlitteratur för barn och unga2017In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 40, p. 1-5, article id 836Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Engelsforstrilogin och skönlitteraturens didaktiska potential: Värdegrundsfrågor2017In: Unga läser: Läsning, normer och demokrati / [ed] Åse Hedemark, Maria Karlsson, Örlinge: Gidlunds förlag, 2017, p. 29-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Fantasylitterära genredrag och retoriska strategier2018In: Titel ej fastställd / [ed] Anna Arnman, Helene Ehriander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Lund University.
    Magiska möjligheter: Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl och Cirkeln i skolans värdegrundsarbete2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fantasy literature has the power to explore the real world in a magical guise. By creating magical realms where reality’s natural laws are challenged, subverted, and ultimately broken, this literary genre can help us to look at our own world in a new light. The thesis examines how the distancing perspective of fantasy literature makes this genre an ideal vehicle for discussing democracy, human rights, and multiculturalism in the classroom. The British Harry Potter series, the Irish Artemis Fowl series, and the Swedish Engelsfors Trilogy are analysed. 

    In the first chapter, the thesis’ theoretical framework is presented. The second chapter, ‘Democracy’, explores two examples of the righteous rebellion of the young in the Harry Potter series and the Engelsfors Trilogy. In both cases, the adolescents rebel in order to defend democratic values and democratic rights, when they are threatened by corrupt adults and institutions. At the same time, the rebellions problematise the distribution of power according to age.

    The third chapter, ‘Human rights’, explores in depth one of the most important genre characteristics of fantasy literature—the existence of magic. Three young fantasy characters’ use of magical powers, for the purpose of challenging the restrictions that intersections impose on them, are investigated and related to questions concerning human rights.

    The fourth chapter, ‘Multiculturalism’, investigates two culture clashes found in fantasy literature: a body switch between five teenage witches in the Engelsfors trilogy, and a confrontation between the human world and the fairy world in the Artemis Fowl series. In both cases, questions are raised about how a confrontation with “the Other” can enrich our lives and help us realise what type of person we want to be. Thus, the possible gains of multiculturalism are highlighted.

    Finally, the fifth chapter, ‘Magical possibilities’, summarises the conclusions of the thesis and suggests some guidelines for how teachers can best work with fantasy literature in the classroom.

  • 5.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    "Nineteen Years Later": Maktrelationen mellan barn och vuxna i Harry Potter-böckerna och Harry Potter and the Cursed Child2017In: HumaNetten, E-ISSN 1403-2279, Vol. 39, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Ola Wikander2017In: En lundensisk litteraturhistoria: Lunds universitet som litterärt kraftfält / [ed] Katarina Bernhardsson, Göran Bexell, Daniel Möller, Johan Stenström, Göteborg & Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2017, p. 451-451Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Lund University.
    Righteous rebellion in fantasy and science fiction for the young: The Example of Harry Potter2014In: Hype: Bestsellers and Literary Culture / [ed] Jon Helgason, Sara Kärrholm, Ann Steiner, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 109-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Walking in Someone Else's Shoes: The Body Switch in the Engelsfors Trilogy2017In: Barnboken, ISSN 0347-772X, E-ISSN 2000-4389, Vol. 40, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the second book in the Swedish fantasy series about the town Engelsfors, Fire (2013), a dysfunctional group of witches is forced to unite and work together in order to hide that they have switched bodies with each other. This version of the body-switching motif is different from the more common body switch between two characters in that five people who are all focalised throughout the experience take part in it. The body switch is closely tied to a learning process about the need for cooperation and understanding for other people’s life situations, which in turn emphasises the different girls’ intersectional power positions (cf. Crenshaw "Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex"). Through the process of walking in someone else’s shoes, the girls get to experience how it feels to watch their own body and life from a distance. Simultaneously, they get to play the part of someone else. As a consequence, they learn about both their own life situation and intersectional power position, and about the girl whose body they temporarily reside in. Thus, the literalisation of the figure of speech “to walk in someone else’s shoes” becomes a learning process. By positioning each individual young woman as the active subject in another girl’s life and the passive object in their own life, the body switch functions as a fantasy literary equivalent to the photograph motif, which according to Roberta Seelinger Trites often is deployed as a vehicle for illuminating how people are simultaneously the subject and the object in their own lives in realistic adolescent literature (123). The article is based on the concept of intersectionality, photograph theory, Mikhail Bakhtin’s carnival theory, and Tzvetan Todorov’s theory on how fantastic literature can turn figures of speech into literalised facts. These theories are all used to investigate how the body switch problematises and changes the witches’ ability to influence their respective life situation.

  • 9.
    Alkestrand, Malin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Owen, Christopher
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, UK.
    A Cognitive Analysis of Characters in Swedish and Anglophone Children's Fantasy Literature2018In: International Research in Children's Literature (IRCL), ISSN 1755-6198, E-ISSN 1755-6201, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 65-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Justice in Young Adult Speculative Fiction, Marek C. Oziewicz argues, 'it is possible to study scripts through the lens of the author's cognition, through the reader's cognition, or as a textual matter with an implied author and reader' (9-10). Here we propose a fourth method for studying scripts in children's literature: as a textual matter. Unlike previous research in the field, we argue that neither the implied author nor the implied or real reader's cognition is necessary for a cognitive analysis to offer insights about a literary text. A cognitive analysis of characters can demonstrate how each character's cognitive embodiment of their intersectional subject position contributes to the progression of a text's plot and themes. By analysing the mimetic, synthetic and thematic dimensions of character (Phelan), we maintain an ontological distinction between humans and characters - a prerequisite for applying cognitive theories to characters. In order to demonstrate the broad applicability of our approach, we analyse the cognitive scripts of the protagonists in two portal-quest fantasies form two different countries. Taliah Pollack's Saga Sward: Omskakare och varldsresenar [Saga Sword: world shaker and traveller] was published in Sweden in 2012; Tahereh Mafi's Furthermore dates from 2016 and was published in the US.

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