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  • 1.
    Agevall Gross, Lotta
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Denvall, Verner
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Skillmark, Mikael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brottsoffer i indikatorland: Öpnna jämförelser inom socialtjänstens brottsofferstödjande arbete2015In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 341-358Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Social Work.
    A six year follow-up of a clinical sample of sexually offending adolescents. Exploring the outcome on health, sexuality, social adjustment, and sexual reoffending.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Risk assessment protocols have been taken into practice during the last fifteen years. Further research is needed to validate the assessment practice. Some follow up studies have used solely data from registers as outcome variables. Individual follow up of clinical samples may contribute further to our knowledge.

    Method: A sample of previously risk assessed males aged 12-18 years was used for this study. ERASOR (Worling & Curwen, 2001) was used to support the structured clinical assessments.

    To explore outcome on health, sexual reoffending and social adjustment among assessed males, 78 young adults were invited to participate in the follow-up study, at least four years past assessment. Their mean age by assessment was 14.9 years (SD 1.6) and by follow-up 21.59 years (SD 2.4). Respondents were seen for a face-to-face interview and for completing six questionnaires.

    Result: Thirty-nine males (50%) agreed to participate. As index-offence the majority sexually targeted children. Twelve young males were assessed being of high risk of sexual reoffending. The remaining 27 were assessed being of moderate or low risk.

    One-fifth of the sample (n=8) had sexually reoffended by follow-up. Those who had sexually reoffended by follow up were significantly more likely by index offense to be assessed in high risk of sexual reoffending. Four of the suggested risk factors of ERASOR were significantly associated with sexual reoffending. The total of correct predictions was 62.0%. Those who sexually reoffended were significantly more likely to have learning disabilities, to self rate a risk of sexual reoffending by follow-up, and to report being a victim of sexual abuse than the non-reoffenders. The reoffenders vs non-reoffenders did not differ on the extent of received specialized treatment interventions.

    Discussion: We examined the validity of using a structured risk assessment (ERASOR) and identified 62% correct predictions by follow up, which confirms previous promising results. Further learning disabilities emerged as a risk factor for sexual reoffending together with previously suggested risk factors. Those who sexually reoffended received specialized treatment to the same extent as non-reoffenders of the sample. The findings underline the importance of adjusted interventions for the group of young people with impairment.

    Results on a number of variables will be presented and discussed as well as clinical implications. 

  • 3.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Outcomes for Treatment of Hypersexual Behavior Provided by Specialized Social Welfare Units2019In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explores outcomes of treatment provided by specialized units within the social welfare sector in Sweden to clients seeking help with hypersexual behavior.  Method: The participants were 27 males and 1 female (M . 40.3 years) who sought help from one of the three specialized units within social welfare in Sweden. A pretest–posttest group design was used to assess changes after treatment. Quantitative data were collected through interviews and self-report forms.  Results: At posttreatment stage (on average a 10-month follow-up), mental health was significantly improved and hypersexual behavior reportedly reduced. The treatment at the specialized units appeared to help the clients.  Conclusions: The specialized units seemed to deliver favorable service without shaming and stigmatizing participants. As this study can be considered a pilot study, it needs to be replicated.

  • 4.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Perspectives of young adult males who displayed harmful sexual behaviour during adolescence on motive and treatment2019In: Journal of Sexual Aggression, ISSN 1355-2600, E-ISSN 1742-6545, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 116-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have examined the subjective experiences of young people following interventions for sexually abusive behaviour. To learn more about how this population experienced these interventions and how these interventions, affect their adult life, 22 adult males (m = 22 years) who were assessed as teenagers (m = 15 years) for sexually abusing children or peers were interviewed, on average six years after the assessment of their offence. Three main themes were identified: something sexual happened (recalling memories of the sexual acts and motives of the behaviour), societal actions (interventions offered), and life has been affected (memories and feelings associated with the abuse still being present). Seven respondents (32%), who all had a cognitive disability, had sexually reoffended by follow-up. If the respondents received interventions that focused on their abusive behaviour, they were likely to find the interventions helpful. Interventions that did not address abusive behaviour, were perceived as less helpful for dealing with their behaviour, and the short- and long-term consequences associated with this behaviour. Respondents reported feelings of sadness and guilt associated with their sexually abusive behaviour and these feelings remained into adulthood. These findings suggest that interventions for this population need to address the individual needs of the adolescent as well as sexual behaviour problems. In addition, interventions should include opportunities for follow-up.

  • 5.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Abelsson, Jonna
    Ungdomsmottagningen, Haninge.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University.
    Intervjuer med personer som tidigare fått samtalsbehandling vid FAST: Delrapport 7 ur Prostitution i Sverige: Kartläggning och utvärdering av prostitutionsgruppernas insatser samt erfarenheter och attityder i befolkningen2012Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University.
    Thulin, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Implementering av en strukturerad behandlingsmodell vid barnmisshandel  – ett tioårsperspektiv2017In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 457-466, 476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    För tio år sedan introducerades en evidensbaserad behandlingsmodell vid barnmisshandel i Sverige och en omfattande implementeringsprocess inleddes. Behandlingsmodellen KIBB (CPC-CBT, Combined Parent Child-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) introducerades som ett bottom-up initiativ från socialt arbete. Implementeringen kan beskrivas utifrån faserna behovsinventering, installation av metoden, metoden börjar användas och vidmakthållande av metoden. Fyra team utbildades inledningsvis och lovande resultat av behandlingen identifierades i en pilotstudie. Fortsatt implementering pågår och ytterligare ett hundratal behandlare har utbildats i metoden. Mer än tusen familjer har hittills fått del av behandlingen. I pågående studier undersöks behandlingseffekter och barns upplevelser av behandlingsinterventionen. Erfarenheter från implementeringsprocessen liksom remitterande socialsekreterares uppfattningar om behandlingsprogrammet presenteras i artikeln. Erfarenheterna från tio års implementering diskuteras, där såväl hinder som framgångsfaktorer i implementeringsprocessen identifierats.

  • 7.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lunds universitet.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University.
    Utvärdering av samtalsbehandling med försäljare av sexuella tjänster (FAST): Delrapport 5 ur Prostitution i Sverige – Kartläggning och utvärdering av prostitutionsgruppernas insatser samt erfarenheter och attityder i befolkningen2012Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lund university.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University.
    Mossige, Svein
    NOVA—Norwegian Social Research, Norway.
    Långström, Niklas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Female youth who sexually coerce: prevalence, risk and protective factors in two national high school surveys2011In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 3354-3362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction.  Sexual coercion is recognized as a serious societal problem. Correlates and risk factors of sexually abusive behavior in females are not well known.

    Aim.  Etiological theory and empirical study of female perpetrators of sexual coercion are usually based on small or highly selected samples. Specifically, population-based data are needed to elucidate risk/protective factors.

    Main Outcome Measures.  Main outcome measures include a self-report questionnaire containing 65 items tapping socio-demographic and health conditions, social relations, sexual victimization, conduct problems and a set of normative and deviant sexual cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors.

    Methods.  We used a 2003–2004 survey of sexual attitudes and experiences among high school students in Norway and Sweden to identify risk factors and correlates to sexually coercive behavior (response rate 80%); 4,363 females participated (Mean = 18.1 years).

    Results.  Thirty-seven women (0.8%) reported sexual coercion (ever talked someone into, used pressure, or forced somebody to have sex). Sexually coercive compared with non-coercive women were similar on socio-demographic variables, but reported less parental care and more parental overprotection, aggression, depressive symptoms, and substance misuse. Also, sexually coercive females reported more sexual lust, sex partners, penetrative sexual victimization, rape myths, use of violent porn, and friends more likely to use porn. When using the Swedish subsample to differentiate risk factors specific for sexual coercion from those for antisocial behavior in general, we found less cannabis use, but more sexual preoccupation, pro-rape attitudes, and friends using violent porn in sexually coercive compared with non-sex conduct problem females.

    Conclusions.  Sexually coercive behavior in high school women was associated with general risk/needs factors for antisocial behavior, but also with specific sexuality-related risk factors. This differential effect has previously been overlooked, agrees with similar findings in men, and should have substantial etiological importance.

  • 9.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, IKE, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linköping University.
    Långström, Niklas
    Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet.
    Sexually coercive behavior in male youth: Population survey of general and specific risk factors2010In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, ISSN 0004-0002, E-ISSN 1573-2800, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 1161-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about risk/protective factors for sexually coercive behavior in general population youth. We used a Swedish school-based population survey of sexual attitudes and experiences (response rate 77%) and investigated literature-based variables across sexually coercive (SEX), nonsexual conduct problem(CP), and normal control (NC) participants to identify general and specific risk/protective factors for sexual coercion. Among 1,933male youth, 101 (5.2%) reported sexual coercion (ever talked or forced somebody into genital, oral, or anal sex) (SEX), 132 (6.8%) were classified as CP, and the remaining 1,700 (87.9%) as NC. Of 29 tested variables, 25 were more common in both SEX and CP compared to NC youth, including minority ethnicity, separated parents, vocational study program, risk-taking, aggressiveness, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, sexual victimization, extensive sexual experiences, and sexual preoccupation. When compared to CP youth only, SEX youth more often followed academic study programs, used less drugs and were less risk-taking. Further, SEX more frequently than CP youth reported gender stereotypic and pro-rape attitudes, sexual preoccupation, prostitution, and friends using violent porn. Finally, in a multivariate logistic regression, academic study program, pro-rape attitudes, sexual preoccupation, and less risk-taking independently remained more strongly associated with SEX compared to CP offending. In conclusion, several sociodemographic, family, and individual risk/protective factors were common to non-sexual and sexually coercive antisocial behavior in late adolescence. However, pro-rape cognitions, and sexual preoccupation, were sexuality-related, specific risk factors. The findings could inform preventive efforts and the assessment and treatment of sexually coercive male youth.

  • 10.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköpings universitet.
    Utvärdering av samtalsbehandling med köpare av sexuella tjänster (KAST): Delrapport 6 ur Prostitution i Sverige: Kartläggning och utvärdering av prostitutionsgruppernas insatser samt erfarenheter och attityder i befolkningen2012Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköpings universitet.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Child Physical Abuse—Experiences of Combined Treatment for Children and their Parents: A Pilot Study2013In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 275-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the results of treatment for families where child physical abuse has occurred. The Combined Parent Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Families at Risk for Child Physical Abuse (CPC-CBT) model includes parent and child interventions. Four teams (within child protection and child and adolescent psychiatry services, based in Sweden) were trained to run the treatment. CPC-CBT is a 16-session programme where children and parents receive treatment in parallel groups and joint family sessions. A pilot study, with pre and post measures for both children and parents, was carried out to evaluate the treatment effects (18 families, 26 adults and 25 children). Significantly decreased symptoms of depression among parents, less use of violent parenting strategies and less inconsistent parenting were reported after treatment. Children initially reported high levels of traumatic experiences and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. After treatment, trauma symptoms and depression among children were significantly reduced. Children also reported that parents used significantly less violence and increased positive parenting strategies after completion of the treatment. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 12.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wassberg, Annika
    Off-clinic, Kristianstad.
    Carlberg, Margareta
    Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work Practice, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Långström, Niklas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Svedin, Carl-Göran
    Lunds Universitet.
    Adolescent sexual offenders: a total survey of referrals to Social Services in Sweden and subgroup characteristics2006In: Sexual abuse. A Journal of Research and Treatment, ISSN 1079-0632, E-ISSN 1573-286X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 357-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sampling methodology (e.g. population-based vs. clinical samples, anonymous self-reports vs. data collected as part of mandated treatment) affects the validity of conclusions drawn from research addressing the etiology of adolescent sexual offending. Studies of unselected samples allow testing of the generalizability of etiological models suggested from investigation of selected clinical or forensic populations. Further, representative epidemiological data on adolescent sexual offending is needed for policy-making and the planning of services. We conducted a national survey of all adolescent sexual offenders (ASOs, 12–17 years) referred to Social Services during 2000. Social workers at all child and adolescent units in Social Service authorities throughout Sweden (N=285, 99% response rate) completed a questionnaire about new ASO referrals in 2000. The National Board of Health and Welfare commissioned the survey and questionnaire items tapped offender, offence, and victim characteristics. A total of 197 boys and 2 girls aged 12–17 years were referred to Social Services because of sexually abusive behavior in 2000. Focusing specifically on males, this yielded a one-year incidence of .060% (95% confidence interval = .052–.068). Forty-six percent of male ASOs abused at least one child younger than age 12 years (child offenders) whereas the rest had abused peer or adult victims (peer offenders). Forty-two percent of male ASOs had ever committed sexual offences together with at least one other offender (group offenders). Child- vs. peer offenders and group vs. single offenders, suggested typologies in the literature, were compared to explore potential subtype-specific risk factors and correlates. The results suggested a higher proportion of group ASOs than previously reported and stronger support for subdividing ASOs into child vs. peer offenders than into group vs. single ASOs.

  • 13.
    Seto, Michael C.
    et al.
    Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Canada.
    Hermann, Chantal A.
    Carleton University, Canada.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Lund University.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University.
    Långström, Niklas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Viewing Child Pornography: Prevalence and Correlates in a Representative Community Sample of Young Swedish Men2015In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, ISSN 0004-0002, E-ISSN 1573-2800, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 67-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on child pornography use has been based on selected clinical or criminal justice samples; risk factors for child pornography use in the general population remain largely unexplored. In this study, we examined prevalence, risk factors, and correlates of viewing depictions of adult–child sex in a population-representative sample of 1,978 young Swedish men (17–20 years, Mdn = 18 years, overall response rate, 77 %). In an anonymous, school-based survey, participants self-reported sexual coercion experiences, attitudes and beliefs about sex, perceived peer attitudes, and sexual interests and behaviors; including pornography use, sexual interest in children, and sexually coercive behavior. A total of 84 (4.2 %) young men reported they had ever viewed child pornography. Most theory-based variables were moderately and significantly associated with child pornography viewing and were consistent with models of sexual offending implicating both antisociality and sexual deviance. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, 7 of 15 tested factors independently predicted child pornography viewing and explained 42 % of the variance: ever had sex with a male, likely to have sex with a child aged 12–14, likely to have sex with a child 12 or less, perception of children as seductive, having friends who have watched child pornography, frequent pornography use, and ever viewed violent pornography. From these, a 6-item Child Pornography Correlates Scale was constructed and then cross-validated in a similar but independent Norwegian sample.

  • 14.
    Seto, Michael C.
    et al.
    Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Brockville, Canada.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Lund university.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lund university.
    Mossige, Svein
    Norwegian Social Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Lund university.
    Långström, Niklas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sexual coercion experience and sexually coercive behavior: a population study of swedish and norwegian male youth2010In: Child Maltreatment, ISSN 1077-5595, E-ISSN 1552-6119, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors tested the hypothesis that experiencing sexual coercion and engaging in sexually coercive behavior are positivelyassociated in a representative sample totaling almost 4,000 Swedish or Norwegian male high school students (estimatedresponse rate 80%). In both surveys, youths who had experienced sexual coercion were approximately three times morelikely to engage in sexually coercive behavior than those without such experience (10%–12% vs. 4%). The association betweensexual coercion experience and sexually coercive behavior was attenuated but remained significant and moderately strong inboth surveys when controlling for nonsexual antisocial behavior, substance use, and noncoercive sexual behavior inmultivariate logistic regression models. The population attributable fraction (proportion of sexually coercive behavior that canbe explained by sexual coercion experience) was 18%–25%. The findings support a robust link between having been sexuallycoerced and engaging in coercive sexual behavior in the general population.

  • 15.
    Skillmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Agevall Gross, Lotta
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Denvall, Verner
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The pursuit of standardization in domestic violence social work: A multiple case study of how the idea of using risk assessment tools is manifested and processed in the Swedish social services2019In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 458-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This multiple case study examines how the idea of using risk assessment tools is manifested and processed in Swedish social services. Based on the analysis of interviews with different stakeholders and of organizational documents in two social service organizations, we investigate the actors who control local risk assessment practices. The findings illustrate that a relatively small group of social workers in the organizations have been able to forward their claims and decide how risk assessment work should be carried out without much intrusion from local managers or politicians. The findings also validate other studies that found that increased standardization can strengthen social workers’ ability to perform their professional task rather than lead to de-professionalization. This article ends with a discussion of what risk assessment practices might mean for domestic violence victims.

  • 16.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköpings universitet.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Lunds universitet.
    Priebe, Gisela
    Lunds universitet.
    Åkerman, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet.
    Prostitution i Sverige - Huvudrapport: Kartläggning och utvärdering av prostitutionsgruppernas insatser samt erfarenheter och attityder i befolkningen2012Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Barnmisshandel och sexuella övergrepp på barn2015In: Barn- och ungdomspsykiatri / [ed] Christopher Gillberg, Maria Råstam, Elisabeth Fernell, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2015, 3, p. 376-395Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköpings universitet.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Thulin, Johanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Lotta
    BUP Elefanten, Linköping.
    Söderlind Göthner, Ylva
    Stiftelsen Allmänna Barnhuset.
    SLUTRAPPORT: KIBB projektet Kognitiv Integrerad Behandling vid Barnmisshandel 2013 – 20152015Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Treatment in Barnahus: Implementing Combined Treatment for Children and Parents in Physical Abuse Cases.2017In: Collaborating Against Child Abuse: Exploring the Nordic Barnahus Model / [ed] Johansson S., Stefansen K., Bakketeig E., Kaldal A., Cham: Palgrave Macmillan , 2017, p. 75-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter addresses the psychological treatment for children who have experienced parental physical abuse, as reported to child welfare services. For children, physical abuse can increase the risk of both internal and external behavioural problems. Since abused children often continue to live with their parents‚ it is important to offer interventions to prevent further abuse and to improve the child´s well-being. In this chapter‚ we describe a specialised intervention, Combined Parent – Child Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CPC-CBT), for families at risk for child physical abuse, which has been implemented in several Swedish Barnahus over the last 9 years. We report the results from an ongoing research study into the effects of the intervention on the risk of victimisation, parenting strategies and child well-being. The results suggest that Barnahus is a suitable context for providing support for families and that CPC-CBT is an effective intervention.

  • 20.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Children's disclosure of physical abuse – the process of disclosing and the responses from social welfare workers2019In: Child care in practice, ISSN 1357-5279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children experiencing physical abuse by their parents are left with several difficult decisions. The present study aims at exploring the process of disclosing the abuse and the responses from social welfare workers from a child perspective, in a Swedish context. Data was obtained from in depth interviews with 15 children with a history of child physical abuse. A qualitative content analysis was conducted in order to capture the children's experiences. Disclosing abuse was described as a process including several judgements from the child. Children describe their everyday life before disclosing, with an escalation of violence making them think they have to act in order to prevent further abuse. They made several well-thought decisions and selected a trustworthy recipient. The decision to disclose was often made out of fear, but the fear could remain after the disclosure, not knowing what will happen next. Children seem to lose control over how their abuse narratives are handled after disclosing. The recipient and social welfare worker was acting but not informing or consulting the child. Children emphasize the importance of trustworthy and competent adults when disclosing physical abuse. Ethical issues and implications for practice are discussed.

    Practitioner messages

    • Disclosure is to be seen as a process, including several judgements by the child.

    • Children emphasize the importance of trustworthy and competent adults when choosing to disclose physical abuse.

    • Social welfare workers should inform and include children in their decision making.

  • 21.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping university.
    Children's experiences with an intervention aimed to prevent further physical abuse2019In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many children across cultures are victims of physical abuse, few treatment models target these children and their parents. In Sweden, Combined Parent-Child Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for families at risk for child physical abuse has been successfully used according topretreatment and posttreatment studies. However, few studies have explored how physically abused children experience treatment. This study includes 20 physically abused children aged 9-17 who completed Combined Parent-Child Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. Children had a positive overall impression of the treatment and highlighted addressing the abuse, as well as processing their experiences as particularly essential. Children described a positive transformation in their family life as a result of treatment, including violence cessation and bonding among family members. Children experienced the intervention as inclusive and child-friendly. The implications of the promising findings are discussed.

  • 22.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Youth Reports of Parental Strategies and Sense of Coherence: Are Experiences of Being Victim of Physical Abuse Reflected?2018In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores adolescent’s reports of parental strategies and sense of coherence (SOC). Building on the suggested impact of child physical abuse, this study compares reports from a group of physically abused youth and a group of non-abused youth. Independent t-test, correlations and hierarchical linear regression analysis were computed. Findings indicate that parents’ use of corporal punishment could affect how youth report their parent’s parental strategies. Physically abused youth report less parental involvement and positive parenting as well as more inconsistent parenting than non-abused youth. Furthermore, physically abused youth report a significant lower SOC than non-abused youth. Being a victim of physical abuse had a unique contribution on SOC, even after controlling for other parental strategies. Taken together, the results suggest that child physical abuse affects both the youth’s inner SOC as well as their reports of parental strategies in several ways. Implications for practice are discussed in this article.

  • 23.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Outcomes of CPC-CBT in Sweden Concerning Psychosocial Well-Being and Parenting Practice: Children’s Perspectives2019In: Research on social work practice, ISSN 1049-7315, E-ISSN 1552-7581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the outcome of the intervention combined parent child–cognitive behavioral therapy (CPC-CBT) for physically abused children. This study includes a clinical sample of children (n = 62) referred to Child Welfare Service due to reports of child physical abuse who completed CPC-CBT. A pretest/posttest design was applied to assess changes on the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC) after treatment and was compared with normative values. In addition, the occurrence of corporal punishment from pre to posttest was explored.

    Children reported a significant decrease in parental use of corporal punishment after treatment and a significant reduction in symptoms associated with trauma (decreased to normal values for TSCC). The positive changes remained at the 6-month follow-up.

    The CPC-CBT intervention seemed to decrease parental use of corporal punishment and increase the well-being of children. Clinical implications are discussed.

1 - 23 of 23
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