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  • 1. Andersson Burnett, Linda
    A Colonial Model for the Scottish Highlands: The Dissemination of Linnaeus’s Expedition to Sápmi in Eighteenth-Century Britain2014In: Colonizing the North and Meeting the ‘Other’ in the Early Modern and Modern Period, Lund University, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    University of Edinburgh.
    Abode of Satan: the Appeal of the Magical and Superstitious North in Eighteenth-Century Britain2010In: Northern Studies: The Journal of the Scottish Society for Northern Studies, ISSN 0305-506X, Vol. 41, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    An eighteenth-century ecology of knowledge: patronage and natural history2014In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 6, p. 1275-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the construction and dissemination of natural-history knowledge in the eighteenth century.  It takes the mapping and narration of Orkney as a case study, focusing on the local minister and amateur natural-historian George Low and his network of patron-client relationships with such prominent natural historians as Joseph Banks and Thomas Pennant.  It focuses too on Low’s network of informants and assistants among local island farmers, and argues that canonical natural-history texts were the products of collaborative and interdependent processes that included a large number of actors from all strata of society. To conceptualise how natural-history knowledge was created in this period, the article applies the metaphoric description ‘an ecology of knowledge’. This approach enables a focus on a large number of actors, their collaboration and influence on each other, while also paying attention to asymmetrical power relationships in which competition and appropriation took place. 

  • 4.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archipelagos: poems from Writing the North2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Carl Linnaeus’s expedition to Sápmi in 17322018In: Viewpoint: Magazine of the British Society for the History of Science, ISSN 1751-8261, no 115, p. 13-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Exploring and Romanticising the ‘North’: The impact of Carl Linnaeus’s Lapland Narratives on Eighteenth-Century British Primitivism2014In: British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference, St Hugh’s College Oxford, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Linnaean Natural History, Scottish Moral Philosophy and the Colonial Implications of Enlightenment Thought2015In: Concurrences in postcolonial research – perspectives, methodologies, engagements, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Natural History, Stadial Theory and Race2014In: The Empire of Enlightenment, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    University of Edinburgh.
    Northern Noble Savages?: Edward Daniel Clarke and British Primitivist Narratives on Scotland and Scandinavia, c. 1760-18222012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    University of Edinburgh.
    Review of Gerard Carruther's Robert Burns2008In: International Review of Scottish Studies, ISSN 1923-5755, E-ISSN 1923-5763, Vol. 33Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Silvia Sebastiani's The Scottish Enlightenment: Race, Gender, and the Limits of Progress2015In: Social history (London), ISSN 0307-1022, E-ISSN 1470-1200, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 140-141Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of The Literature of Shetland by Mark Ryan Smith2015In: Scottish Literary Review, ISSN 1756-5634, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 149-151Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13. Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Selling Sami Stereotypes: The Exhibition of Sami people in Georgian Britain2014In: Scandinavian and Baltic Studies Conference, Yale University, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Selling the Sami: Nordic Stereotypes and Participatory Media in Georgian Britain2013In: Communicating the North: Media Structures and Images in the Making of the Nordic Region / [ed] Jonas Harvard, Peter Stadius, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 171-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Edinburgh Connection: Linnaean Natural History, Scottish Moral Philosophy and the Colonial Implications of Enlightenment Thought2014In: Nature’s Empire: A Global History of Linnaean Sciences in the Long Eighteenth Century, European University, Florence, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The ‘Lapland Giantess’ in Britain: Reading Concurrences in a Victorian Ethnographic Exhibition2017In: Concurrent Imaginaries, Postcolonial Worlds: Toward Revised Histories / [ed] Diana Brydon, Peter Forsgren, Gunlög Fur, Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 123-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    “The more Northern are the most barbarous”: The Sami in Early Modern British Narratives2015In: Concurrences in Postcolonial Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, Engagements, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The “race” to exhibit: Evolutionary debates in Victorian displays of Sami people2014In: Svenska Historikermötet, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Translating Swedish colonialism: Johannes Schefferus’s Lapponia in Britain c. 1674-18002019In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 91, no 1-2, p. 134-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Buchan, Bruce
    Knowing Savagery: Special Issue of History of the Human Sciences 32:42019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Buchan, Bruce
    Griffith University, Australia.
    The Edinburgh connection: Linnaean natural history, Scottish moral philosophy and the colonial implications of enlightenment thought2018In: Linnaeus, natural history and the circulation of knowledge / [ed] Hanna Hodacs, Kenneth Nyberg and Stéphane Van Damme, Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2018, 1, p. 161-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Höglund, JohanLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Exploring Nordic Colonialisms: Special Issue for Scandinavian Studies2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Newby, Andrew
    ‘Between Empire and "The North": Scottish Identity in the Nineteenth Century'2008In: Parting the Mists:  Views on Scotland as a part of Britain and Europe / [ed] S. Litonius et al, Helsinki: Historicus , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Newby, Andrew
    '"Unionist Nationalism” and The National Museum of Scotland, c. 1847-1866’2007In: NaMu, Making National Museums / [ed] Peter Aronsson and Magdalena Hillström, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Buchan, Bruce
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Knowing Savagery: Australia and the Anatomy of Race2019In: History of the Human Sciences, ISSN 0952-6951, E-ISSN 1461-720XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When Australia was circumnavigated by Europeans in 1801–02, French and British natural historians were unsure how to describe the Indigenous peoples who inhabited the land they charted and catalogued. Ideas of race and of savagery were freely deployed by both British and French, but a discursive shift was underway. While the concept of savagery had long been understood to apply to categories of human populations deemed to be in want of more historically advanced ‘civilisation’, the application of this term in the late 18th and early 19th centuries was increasingly being correlated with the emerging terminology of racial characteristics. The terminology of race was still remarkably fluid, and did not always imply fixed physical or mental endowments or racial hierarchies. Nonetheless, by means of this concept, natural historians began to conceptualise humanity as subject not only to historical gradations, but also to the environmental and climatic variations thought to determine race. This in turn meant that the degree of savagery or civilisation of different peoples could be understood through new criteria that enabled physical classification, in particular by reference to skin colour, hair, facial characteristics, skull morphology, or physical stature: the archetypal criteria of race. While race did not replace the language of savagery, in the early years of the 19th century savagery was re-inscribed by race.

  • 26.
    Buchan, Bruce
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Knowing savagery: Humanity in the circuits of colonial knowledge2019In: History of the Human Sciences, ISSN 0952-6951, E-ISSN 1461-720XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How was 'savagery' constituted as a field of colonial knowledge? As Europe's empires expanded, their reach was marked not only by the colonisation of new territories but by the colonisation of knowledge. Path-breaking scholarship since the 1990s has shown how European knowledge of colonised territories and peoples developed from diverse travel writings, missionary texts, and exploration narratives from the 16th century onwards (Abulafia, 2008; Armitage, 2000; De Campos Francozo, 2017; Pratt, 1992). Of prime importance in this work has been the investigation of the pre-positioning of colonised peoples within categories derived from European traditions of historical, religious, legal, and political thought as either 'savages' or 'barbarians' (Richardson, 2018; Sebastiani, 2013).

  • 27.
    Höglund, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Introduction: Nordic Colonialisms and Scandinavian Studies2019In: Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5637, E-ISSN 2163-8195, Vol. 91, no 1-2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Macpherson, James
    et al.
    Burnett, Allan
    Andersson Burnett, Linda
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Blind Ossian’s Fingal: Fragments and Controversy2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 28 of 28
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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