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  • 1.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Marknadsföring.
    Bengt, Johannisson
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Lena, Olaison
    Contextualizing the focus group interview:: Revealing hidden agendas through role playing2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Jansson, Andreas
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    The nomadisation of society: A three-stop journey towards understanding the pseudo city2008In: SCOS, Manchester, 1-4 juli, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Jansson, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School.
    The spectacle of entrepreneurship: a duality of flamboyance and activity2010In: (De)mobilizing the entrepreneurship discourse: Exploring entrepreneural thinking and action / [ed] Bill, F., Bjerke, B. and Johansson, A.W., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2010, p. 158-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Marknadsföring.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    The Incubus paradox: attempts at foundational rethinking of the 'SME support genre'2008In: Bridiging the Functional and Territorial Views on Regional Entrepreneurship and Development, FSF Publishing, Stockholm , 2008, p. 19-Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    The Incubus Paradox: Attempts at Foundational Rethinking of the “SME Support Genre”2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1135-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the lacking scientific support regarding efficiency, public authorities launch and owner-managers' participate in public support programmes. Previous research has failed to address this enigma and dissolve the underlying paradox. Drawing on mythical inspiration, this article offers a framework grounded on the medieval demonic character of incubus/subbuci, by means of which this incubus paradox is analytically treated. Empirically, an indirect approach based on inserting a fictive case into a general focus-group method is adopted, thus avoiding leading questions. Two images of the small-business support syndrome emerge from the proposed mythical framework: The first one, which could be named just “incubus” ascribes malevolence to the helpers and a good deal of naivety on the part of the support programme participants. The second one, the paradox, suggests that there will be no measurable growth effect of support measures since none of the stakeholders identified in this discourse intend to actually foster development and growth in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The field material indicates that these two images jointly provide a comprehensive understanding, that there is not an incubus and a victim but rather several incubuses operating within the confines of a support programme. Thus, instead of claiming that the support agents are malevolent, the conclusion is that they have their own agenda. Since our inquiry, in addition indicates that this is true also for the participating SME representatives, they can hardly be seen as victims in the traditional sense. They rather exploit an arena where it is possible to strengthen one's own identity as responsible business persons bringing financial support to their region.

  • 6.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Marknadsföring.
    Lena, Olaison
    The Enigma of the Incubus paradox:: Upsetting the SME support practice?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    A freudian challenge of accounting standards; a deleuzian take on the standard setting process2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    En essä vilken erbjuder endast några personligt hållna betraktelser2007In: Den lekande farbrorn: Vänbok med anledning av Bengt Johannisson 65 år, Entreprenörskapsprofilen, Växjö , 2007, p. 107-110Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Limits of the gift: Exploring interaction in Antiquarian Bookshops2011In: Tamara Journal, ISSN 1532-5555, E-ISSN 1545-6420, Vol. 9, no 3-4, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Recovering from the Spectacle of Entrepreneurship2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Rejoice! We are haunted. Towards a deleuzian understanding of the standard setting process2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    The Indirect Approach of Semi-Focused Groups: Expanding Focus Group Research through Role-Playing.2012In: Focus Group Research / [ed] Graham R. Walden., Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    The indirect approach of semi-focused groups: Expanding focus group research through role-playing2009In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    The ‘practices-of-thought’ of used-bookstore owner-managers: A ‘narrative collage’ approach2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO.
    The used book-store: A haven for prosaic creativity2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bill, Frederic
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    The Ghost of Accounting: The standard setting process and the ontology of becoming2012In: 30th SCOS (The Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism), Barcelona, Spain, July 10-14, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Breit, Eric
    et al.
    Work Research Institute, Norway ; Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Lennerfors, Thomas Taro
    Uppsala University ; Meiji University, Japan.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Critiquing corruption: a turn to theory: editorial2015In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 319-336Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18. Butler, Nick
    et al.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Śliwa, Martyna
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Spoelstra, Sverre
    Work, play and boredom: editorial2011In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 329-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Garmann Johnsen, Christian
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Grønbæk Pors, Justine
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Landscapes of political action2018In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 417-426Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hjorth, Daniel
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Lärande som entreprenöriell process2008In: Tværfaglighed & entrepreneurship: en antologi om tværfaglighed i entrepreneurshipundervisningen / [ed] Jakob Stolt & Christian Vintergaard, Köpenhamn: IDEA København og Øresund Entrepreneurship Academy , 2008, 1, p. 40-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Emergency Entrepreneurship: Creative Organising in the Eye of the Storm2006In: RENT XX, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Johannisson, Bengt
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark ; University of Essex, UK.
    Emergency entrepreneurship: creative organizing in the eye of the storm2008In: Entrepreneurship, sustainable growth and performance: frontiers in European research / [ed] Hans Landström, Hans Crijns, Eddy Laveren & David Smallbone, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, 1, p. 243-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Johnsen, Christian G.
    et al.
    Sørensen, Bent M.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    ‘This Phone Would Be Even Fairer If...’: Micro-political Struggles over Sustainability and Entrepreneurship in a Contemporary Organization2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers an analysis of the Dutch start-up Fairphone that have tried to produce a smartphone that reconciles economic values and green values. Tapping into discussions on the company’s large and interactive webpage over the problems facing corporations working in the contested terrain of sustainability and entrepreneurship, the paper shows how the organization itself becomes a site in which contradictory political views clash. Drawing on Deleuze and Guattari’s machinic ontology, we show how Fairphone’s online community takes the form of a social plane that produces structures of desire that foster conflicting modes of subjectivity. As a result, we see the emergence – understood as ‘openness, undecidedness and multiple potentialities’ – of micro-political tactics for coping with the problem of reconciling economic values and green values. Rather than shifting the perspective to political economy, we argue that the debate around sustainability and entrepreneurship in organization studies should pay more attention to the micro-political struggles that takes place in the boundary space between the contemporary organization and its surroundings. We conclude that Deleuze and Guattari provide a fruitful framework for exploring the lines of flights but also the fantasies that are produced within the micro-political struggles over sustainability and entrepreneurship taking place within contemporary organizations. The paper also reflects on utopian ideas that emerge in the attempt to transgress the divide between economic values and green values.

  • 24.
    Johnsen, Christian Garmann
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Nelund, Mette
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Organizing for the Post-growth Economy2017In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Johnsen, Christian Garmann
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Conceptual activism: entrepreneurship education as a philosophical project2018In: Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: adopting a critical approach in the classroom / [ed] Karin Berglund, Karen Verduijn, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 119-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johnsen, Christian Garmann
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Put your style at stake: a new use of sustainable entrepreneurship2018In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 39, no 2-3, p. 397-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses the concept of style to rethink sustainable entrepreneurship. Our point of departure is the conceptual distinction between organization as style made durable and entrepreneurship as the disruption of style. We show that style is not simply an aesthetic category, but rather what ties different social practices together. While organization makes the connections between social practices durable, entrepreneurship disrupts such patterns. We further elucidate how organization and entrepreneurship are two intermingled processes – those of durability and disruption – that together enable the creation of new styles. In order to conceptualize this creative process, we explore how play can create disharmonies within the organization, but we also maintain that any new practice will remain marginal without a collective assemblage capable of adopting it. On this basis, we argue that sustainable entrepreneurship consists of making an environmentally friendly and socially conscious style durable, but also of disrupting such a style. In order to illustrate our argument, we use the example of the sustainable smartphone producer Fairphone. In conclusion, we argue that the concept of style may strengthen the dialogue between entrepreneurship studies and organization studies. 

  • 27.
    Johnsen, Christian Garmann
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Sørensen, Bent Meier
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Sustainable entrepreneurship: in-between ecology and economy2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Kenny, Kate
    et al.
    National University of Ireland, Ireland.
    Muhr, Sara Louise
    Lund University.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    The effect of affect: desire and politics in modern organizations: editorial2011In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 235-242Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Klintman, Mikael
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    ‘The mad, the stupid and the morally degenerate’: stodge food vegans and sustainable food consumption revisited2017In: SCOS 2017: Carne - flesh and organization: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 60-61Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark ; University of Essex, UK.
    An emerging legend of a Kosovar heroine: narrating female entrepreneurs2008In: Organizational olympians: heroes and heroines of organizational myths / [ed] Monika Kostera, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008, 1, p. 92-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Entrepreneurship as practice: the ‘how’ of entrepreneurship: using diaries to study entreprenurial processes2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Entrepreneurship at the limits2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This PhD dissertation is based on four published articles. It operates within the processual view of entrepreneurship studies (Steyaert, 1997), which draws on process philosophy to develop research strategies (Sørensen, 2005). The research has been guided by two strategies for understanding entrepreneurship: ‘moving’ (e.g. Steyaert and Hjorth, 2003) and ‘unveiling’ (e.g. Jones and Spicer, 2009). These strategies have so far been pursued largely in the conceptual domain, and this doctoral dissertation is an effort to take them a step further by combining empirical investigation and philosophical reflection. The aim is to investigate how a processual study of entrepreneurship ‘should be worked out’ in practice (Kristensen, Lopdrup-Hjorth and Sørensen, 2014).

    The first two studies contribute an empirically informed conceptualisation of entrepreneurship, the first focused on how organisations are created, the second providing stories of emerging practices of female entrepreneurs. Though they aim to provide alternative conceptualisations, they remain firmly rooted in ‘traditional’ social science, offering alternative approaches to the dominant understandings of entrepreneurship, and utilizing accepted and traditional methodologies and theories. The last two papers are more experimental in their design. The aim is still to problematize discursive or practical aspects of entrepreneurship and processes around entrepreneurship, but also to investigate alternative methods for creating knowledge. The third study explores the somewhat paradoxical results of SME support schemes and develops a role-play-enhanced focus group technique. The fourth study is based on an organisational ethnography in antiquarian bookshops and experiments with fictional accounts and literary techniques as methods to generate knowledge.

    The contribution of this dissertation to processual studies in entrepreneurship research is twofold. The first two papers are illustrations of an application of process concepts, while the last two papers illustrate the attempt to create process concepts. Taken together, the studies demonstrate how a processual study of entrepreneurship might be worked out in practice. 

  • 33.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Moving beyond economic growth in management research, education and policy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Olaison, Lena
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. LEO (Ledning, Entreprenörskap och Organisering).
    The Moment of Truth: Reconstructing Entrepreneurship and Social Capital in the Eye of the Storm2007In: Review of Social Economy, ISSN 0034-6764, Vol. LXV, no No. 1, p. 55-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Editorial2013In: International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, ISSN 1478-1484, E-ISSN 1741-8135, Vol. 7, no 3/4, p. 165-173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    The abject of entrepreneurship: failure, fiasco, fraud2014In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 193-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– Failure as an integral part of the entrepreneurial process has recently become a hot topic. The purpose of this paper is to review this debate as expressed both in research on entrepreneurship and in the public discourse, in order to understand what kind of failure is being incorporated into the entrepreneurship discourse and what is being repressed.

    Design/methodology/approach– The research design is twofold: an empirical investigation modelled as a discourse analysis is followed by a psychoanalytically inspired deconstruction of the identified hegemony. Where the discourse analysis treats what is omitted, the purpose of the psychoanalytic analysis is to point out more concretely what is being repressed from the hegemonic discourses that the first part of the paper identified.

    Findings– The paper identifies a discursive shift from focusing on entrepreneurial success while at the same time negating failure, to embracing failure as a “learning experience”. Second, we trace this “fail better”-movement and identify a distinction between the “good failure” from which the entrepreneur learns, and the “bad failure” which may also imply a moral breakdown. Finally, the paper attempts to deconstruct this discourse deploying Kristeva's idea of the abject. The paper argues that the entrepreneurship discourse seeks closure through abjecting its own, real kernel, namely: the everyday, common, entrepreneurial failure. This image comprises the abject of entrepreneurship, and abject which does becomes visible, however, rarely: Bernie Madoff, Jeff Skilling, Stein Bagger.

    Originality/value– This paper fulfils an identified need to study the darker and unwanted sides of entrepreneurship and extends our understanding of failure in entrepreneurial processes.

  • 37.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael
    Meier Sørensen, Bent
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    ‘No we can’t’. Crisis as chance: editorial2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Anxiety and Trust in Systemic Forms of Entrepreneurship: The Case of the 'Sharing Economy'2015In: Paper presented at the 6th Australasian Caucus of the Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism, Sydney, Australia, November 30-December 2, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Game of gamification: marketing, consumer resistance and digital play2016In: The business of gamification: a critical analysis / [ed] Mikolaj Dymek, Peter Zackariasson, New York: Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 59-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Sköld, David
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Excessive value vreation: under the tyranny of a new imaginary2012In: Managing dynamic technology-oriented businesses: high tech organizations and workplaces / [ed] Dariusz Jemielniak & Abigail Marks, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2012, 1, p. 192-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter demonstrates how contemporary imaginary structures, which urge us to move up in life by making the most of the possibilities we are faced with, may operate in an industrial setting where users are involved in the production of heavy duty vehicles. Opening up new domains for value creation, devoid of established norms and regulations, this appeal to elevate ourselves arguably provides little guidance for how to do so. Demanding ever more from those subjected to its call, this appealing power, the chapter suggests, follows the logic of the Lacanian superego, which according to Salecl (2004, p. 51) “commands the subject to enjoy yet at the same time mockingly predicts that he or she will fail in this pursuit of enjoyment.” As such, it makes out a central component in a creative force that feeds excessive outgrowths, which perpetually contribute to pervert, displace, and fragment established grounds for value creating activities within this industrial domain.

  • 41.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    The liminal space of gamification: interrupted rituals of failed online marketing campaigns2015In: Paper presented at the APROS/EGOS Conference, Sydney, Australia, December 9-11, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
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