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  • 1.
    Cassinger, Cecilia
    et al.
    University of Essex, UK.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Vazques, Consuelo
    Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
    Branded space-times: narrative production of organisational identity and image2011In: 7th Global Brand Conference of the Academy of Marketing’s Brand Corporate Identity and Reputation Special Interest Group, Oxford, April 6-9, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore what branding strategy constructs socially in an organisational setting. To this end we approach brands from a geographical perspective as epistemic objects that organise the spatial relationship between brand strategy and everyday work-life. Through an empirical case of discussions and contradictions related to branding in a university research centre, we explore how branded space-times are constituted through stories-so-far, individual and collective narratives that intersect in an online discussion mail list concerning the possible need for formulating a proper branding strategy. Our narrative analysis reveals that the vague boundary conditions of these space-times, allowing for multiple inclusions and exclusions, turns branding into an effective mode of governance that is met with very little resistance. However, our case suggests that branding gives rise to branded space-times of faith in and through which the organisation’s academic identity and image are negotiated. In this context branding emerges as a possible source for alignment in a deeply disjointed try to simultaneously find something in common and to set apart.

  • 2.
    Häkkinen, Lotta
    et al.
    Turku University, Finland.
    Nummela, Niina
    Turku University, Finland.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Turku University, Finland.
    Motives and boundary conditions of mergers and acquisitions in media: a Nordic perspective2010In: Media mergers and the defence of pluralism / [ed] Olof Hultén, Sune Tjernström, Stefan Melesko, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2010, 1, p. 21-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In accordance with this strong tradition, acquisitions have generally been considered as conscious acts that are driven by rational choice. Meanwhile, alternative and especially critical perspectives have not gained much ground in acquisition research (e.g. Vaara & Tienari 2002, Vaara 2004). Researchers do admit that multiple processes are involved in M&A (Shimizu et al. 2004) and that many questions related to acquisition process are intertwined (Haspeslagh & Jemison 1991). However, the complexity of these processes and particularly the role of the context-related factors in terms of the taken actions are not revealed. This applies also to literature on acquisition motives (Angwin 2007b). According to the common assumption, the acquisition process is initiated by the careful analysis of company needs, scanning potential partners and evaluating them carefully (e.g. Bagchi & Rao 1992). The prime actor in this process is acquiring firm management whose sole (legitimate) motivation is to increase economic value for acquiring shareholders (Angwin 2007b). However, the prevailing assumptions of this notion may be challenged.

  • 3.
    Häkkinen, Lotta
    et al.
    Turku University.
    Nummela, Niina
    Turku University.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Turku University.
    On motives for acquisition activity in the media sector: understanding actions through contextualization2009In: The media as a driver of the information society / [ed] Alan Albarran, Paulo Faustino and Rogério Santos, Lisbon: MediaXXI , 2009, 1, p. 157-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media sector is a prime example of an industry where deregulation and rapid technological development have been accompanied by surges of merger and acquisition (M&A) activity during the past decade or so. Though media M&A have been examined quite extensively, research has largely concentrated on aspects such as economic success, competition policy and the impact of consolidated ownership of media content. Overall, though acquisitions have raised interest among several scientific disciplines, the most established paradigms continue to dominate discussions. In accordance with this tradition, acquisitions are generally considered as conscious, planned acts that are driven by rational choice. Meanwhile, alternative perspectives have not gained much ground.

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a more nuanced understanding of how contemporary acquisitions in the media sector take place and how the examined context and chains of events embedded therein relate to prevailing thoughts regarding acquisition motives. The paper builds on two recent cases from the media sector. In the examined cases “motivation” for the acquisitions rises from the internal and external context of the companies as well as simultaneous moves made by other actors. Such aspects are largely missed from existing models of acquisition motives. The findings point to extending current understanding on acquisitions from viewing them exclusively as bold acts to seeing them also as reluctant moves. This notion opens ups new areas for research and for the reinterpretation of existing research in order to increase understanding on acquisitions outcomes as well as acquisitions as outcomes.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Social Entrepreneurship Breaking Bad: Reflexive creative subjectivity of 'Friendly Rebels'2015In: Paper presented at the 10th OS Summer Workshop 2015: Organizational Creativity, Play and Entrepreneurship, Chania, Crete, Greece, May 21–23, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Klintman, Mikael
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Olaison, Lena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    ‘The mad, the stupid and the morally degenerate’: stodge food vegans and sustainable food consumption revisited2017In: SCOS 2017: Carne - flesh and organization: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 60-61Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Anxiety and Trust in Systemic Forms of Entrepreneurship: The Case of the 'Sharing Economy'2015In: Paper presented at the 6th Australasian Caucus of the Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism, Sydney, Australia, November 30-December 2, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Olaison, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Game of gamification: marketing, consumer resistance and digital play2016In: The business of gamification: a critical analysis / [ed] Mikolaj Dymek, Peter Zackariasson, New York: Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 59-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Ropo, Arja
    et al.
    Taalas, Saara L.Turku School of Economics.Mäenpää, Marjo
    Creative economy and beyond: conference proceedings2010Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discussion on creative economy has been one of the most prominent ones in the renegotiation of the relationship between the culture and the economy over the first decade of the new millennium. The economic turbulence and shifts in the market systems to post-industrial era have lead to re-thinking of the role of individual, processual, and systemic forms of creativity. By now, it has to be acknowledged that there is no longer just any one definition or empirical site for creative economy to enfold, rather it touches upon an ever growing part of the society and policy making. The dynamics reflected by the academic discussion on creative economy have given rise to explorations of immaterial work and knowledge in forms of intellectual capital, organising processes, the nature of work and creative content in many ways that are emphasising multiple focus areas and several ideological and scholarly starting points. This leads to enfolding of several possibilities for futures in the parallel realms of creative economy.   In   this   sense   we   have   already   moved   “beyond”   and   “after”   the   initiation   of   creative   economy   concept.

    It was from this pivotal point in time and place that the Creative Economy and Beyond conference took its cue. The purpose was to take stock of the evolving economic activities and creative landscapes, make note of the trends and driving forces in multiple sites and levels of creative fields. The focal point was not to end the discussion or amalgam one definite answer but to open the windows and look for the signs of changes; the ways into the multiple futures that lie ahead are enfolding. For this end the conference was built on broad themes in three tracks that all had their separate identity and starting point but a joint purpose to look beyond and bring the signals of what is happening to our present discussion in the field. The joint purpose was to push the boundaries and move beyond with eyes open.

  • 9.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Creativity and the post-original: Maritime Centre Vellamo and Kotka-Hamina Region2013In: The Value of Arts and Culture for Regional Development: A Scandinavian Perspective / [ed] Lisbeth Lindeborg & Lars Lindqvist, Oxford, UK: Routledge, 2013, 1, p. 147-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chapter focuses on the Kotka-Hamina Region in Finland as a case for exploration of creativity connected to industrial production processes and sites that have become to some degree redundant. The analysis suggests an alternative reading to creativity that is not focused on the original and novel but on the reinterpretation of production setups and industrial sites for the future, and creativity being explored extending to the post-original production and the afterlife of cultural sites.

  • 10.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Turku Univeristy, Finland.
    Kohti hybriditalouden haastetta: keskustelua luovasta taloudesta Suomessa 2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [fi]

    Raportti jäsentää keskustelua luovasta taloudesta sekä kulttuurin ja talouden suhteesta markkinoiden käsitteen kautta. Tieteellisessä keskustelussa käsite ei ole koskaan rajoittunut ainoastaan markkinataloudelliseen järjestelmään, vaan käsit-tää myös vaihdantataloudelliset markkinoiden muodot, sekä näiden yhdistelmät. Tälläinen näkökulma tarjoaa dynaamisen tavan lähestyä luovan talouden keskusteluita Suomessa.Luovasta taloudesta puhuttaessa erottuu kolme tapaa lähestyä kulttuurin ja talouden suhdetta:I.luovan kentän vaihdantatalous markkinataloudesta erillisenä järjestelmänäII.luovien sisältöjen talousIII.luova hybriditalousKaikki kolme luovan talouden keskustelua ovat relevantteja, eikä voida todeta niiden johtavan lineaarisesti tai historiallisesti yhdestä toiseen. Sen sijaan keskusteluilla on osin päällekkäisiä alueita, joissa tapahtuu jatkuvaa siirtymää tulkintojen välillä. Nämä siirtymien alueet ovat kehittämisen kannalta dynaamisimpia. Luovan talouden kehittämisessä on tärkeää nähdä keskustelujen moninaisuus ja niiden erilaiset painotukset. Keskusteluja rinnakkain tarkastelemalla pyritään hah-mottamaan sitä, minkälaisiin tulevaisuuden näköaloihin perustuen kehittämisen tie tulisi valita.Tulevaisuuden haasteet ovat mittavia ja niihin kaivataan laajasti uusia ratkaisuja, jotka tähtäävät elinkeinorakenteen, liiketoiminnan- ja työelämän sekä ympäristösuhteemme uudistamiseen. Tämä on välttämätöntä Suomen elinvoimaisuuden säilyttämiseksi ja sen roolin näkemiseksi osana globaalia taloutta, kansainvälistä yhteisöä, sekä pohjoismaisen elämänta-van perustaa. Luova talous on osa laajaa kollektiivisen ja ihmislähtöisen innovaatioverkostomme ydintä. Hybriditalouden tapa lähestyä luovaa taloutta vaatii ennen kaikkea ajattelutavan muutosta segmentoituvasta holistisempaan. Osa luovan kentän yritystoimintaa elää jo hybriditalouden murroksessa ja on kohdannut sen tuomat haasteet. Esimerkkeinä tästä ovat mediatalouden hybridiekologia ja muotoiluajattelu. Hybriditalouden haaste koskee koko talouttamme. Luovassa hybri-ditaloudessa menestyminen edellyttää uudenlaista ajattelun ja toiminnan kulttuuria, jonka varassa on myös mahdollista rakentaa yhdessä luomisen politiikoita tulevaisuutta varten. Tämän raportin ydinkysymys on kuinka näille toimintatavoille voidaan luoda hedelmälliset edellytykset

  • 11.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Management and Economics. Turku Univeristy.
    Notes on Fan Organization: Organization of Consumption in Copyrighted Economy2009In: What about Cultural Policy?: Interdisciplinary perspectives on culture and politics, Helsinki & Jyväskylä: Minerva Kustannus, 2009, 1, p. 233-249Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The beginning of this century has witnessed a growing interest in the immaterial resources of organization, and more particularly, in immaterial property as a source of future wealth, employment, and prosperity in economy. The discussion on creative economy has moved creative works from the fringes of economy – from the fields of cultural practices and media audiences – to one of the main areas of theorizing knowledge work, organising activity, and innovation. The user generated innovation of not only the content, but the organization of the production and the means for it, offers interesting points of departures to these developments. It also proposes challenges to the policy discussion on cultural and media production, the primacy of formal and professional organization for innovation on creative content and work, and the role of copyright and related rights ownership to the creation of wealth in the creative economy of the future.

  • 12.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Notes on the materiality of the immaterial2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Situating life at home in management studies: from Mrs. Beeton to fan innovation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics. Turku University.
    Bakker, Piet
    Il business dell’adult content: Una rilettura del concetto di innovazione2011In: Il porno espanso: Dal cinema ai nuovi media / [ed] Di E. Biasin, G. Maina, F. Zecca, Milano: Mimesis edizioni, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Il volume riunisce una serie di contributi dedicati alla pornografia audiovisiva contemporanea, intesa come "forma culturale" veicolata attraverso molteplici piattaforme tecnologiche (cinema, televisione, Internet). Nella prima parte, il volume analizza i meccanismi economici, sociali e linguistici che sottendono l'attuale produzione pornografica, soffermandosi in particolare sulle modalità di produzione/ rappresentazione e sulle pratiche di fruizione/partecipazione. Nella seconda parte, il volume esamina i processi di migrazione che portano la pornografia audiovisiva a disseminarsi all'interno di altri sistemi espressivi (cinema d'autore e di genere, arti visive, video-clip, fiction televisiva, fashion design).

  • 15.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Hirsjärvi, Irma
    Tampere University.
    Fandom as a mode of second production: Active audienceship of the rising shadow2013In: International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, ISSN 1478-1484, E-ISSN 1741-8135, Vol. 7, no 3/4, p. 245-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Looking and visuality imply an audience. The aim of this paper is to open audience’s passive role as a communicative receiver for discussion. The paper will focus on the productive practices of a digital fandom network of science fiction and fantasy genre literature. It connects Walter Benjamin’s notions of the afterlife of texts and the translator’s task (1924, 1936) to fandom as a productive network (Fiske, 1992; Jenkins, 1992). The empirical analysis draws from an ethnographic study of a Finnish science fiction and fantasy literature fandom Rising Shadow digital network, www.risingshadow.net. The analysis illuminates how networked exchanges produce translation zones and loving closeness as a form of afterlife of genre texts facilitating learning, accumulation of expertise within fandom network, and even professional development that is linked to commercial publishing and fan production in media.

  • 16.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Korhonen, Eero
    Google: Ruotsalaisilla rohkeampi asenne vientiin kuin suomalaisilla2014In: Suomen Kuvalehti, ISSN 0039-5552Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Korhonen, Eero
    Suomalaiset yritykset ovat verkkokaupassa alakynnessä2013In: Helsingin Sanomat, ISSN 0355-2047, Vol. July 10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Olaison, Lena
    Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    The liminal space of gamification: interrupted rituals of failed online marketing campaigns2015In: Paper presented at the APROS/EGOS Conference, Sydney, Australia, December 9-11, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Turku University.
    Rehn, Alf
    On Wittgenstein and Management At Rest: Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Problems2009In: Philosophy of Management, ISSN 1740-3812, E-ISSN 2052-9597, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay proposes that management is too often seen as problem solving, and that the equally important art of ignoring problems has not received enough attention. With reference to the thinking of Ludwig Wittgenstein, the essay argues for letting go, and attempting to leave thoughts at rest.

  • 20.
    Taalas, Saara L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Sandberg, Dick
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Bridging life at home and sustainable production.2011In: Rediscovering Wood: The Key to a Sustainable Future, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dr Saara Taalas and Dr Dick Sandberg presented the relevance of looking in more detail the consumption patterns that will influence relationships with material culture. The consumption patterns change over time suiting to everyday life of that time at a locality. For instance, in Nordic countries, the same forests that served livelihood of people in the past are now important centres for recreation- a change of dimension from livelihood to sports. Thus, the relations with forests have dramatically changed. Many people are now secondary stakeholders (using its products) than directly depending on it for livelihood as people did 100 years ago. The same happened to the relation with the material originating from the forests. For instance, in Sweden firewood dominated harvest from forests (40%) in 1900, but is less than 8 % now. On the contrary, pulpwood that was just 5 % of the harvest in 1900 constitutes now 44 %. Only sawmilling remained relatively the same. Visions for Finnish bio economy business levels reflect the increasing relevance of living trees and bio-energy in future. The wood products will be there but the requirements will change- from volume to specific requirements on properties (e.g. shape stability). The tactile of part of wood see more money but the traditional paper and pulp products are likely to lose its relevance in Northern Europe because of high prices, changing markets and long rotation of forest trees.

    Thus, the pulp mills diversify with new products (e.g. textiles). Innovation in new processes will drive ways for new wood use in future (e.g. polymers and chemicals, bioenergy etc). Prioritising purpose will determine wood’s value. For example, using wood for bioenergy (which gains relevance in Northern Europe) might negatively influence many other business levels. Increasing business value should be given emphasis as trees could be sold 100 times through process innovations.

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