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  • 1.
    Björn, Marianne
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Universitetsstudier – Ger kompenserande hjälpmedel likvärdiga villkor?2008In: Handikappforskningens dag, Utbildning, miljö och funktionshinder. 26 november, HAREC, Malmö, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Björn, Marianne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Frithiof, Elisabet
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Att nå fram: Informerat samtycke från personer med kognitiv funktionsnedsättning2011In: Etiska  dilemman i kvalitativ forskning. Workshop i Umeå, 16-17 juni, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björn, Marianne
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Gillberg, Claudia
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Democracy and Diversity in Swedish Higher Education2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, a new national policy document was issued by the Swedish government, mainly dealing with questions on how to increase diversity of the student body with regard to social background, ethnicity, gender and disability. To varying degrees, methods such as validation of informally acquired competencies were introduced to boost heterogeneity in higher education (HE), as this would reflect a genuinely democratic society. In the latest policy document (2004/05:162), internationalisation is focused, yet a number of critical questions regarding democracy and diversity in HE remain to be discussed. In this paper we intend to address some of them, such as diversity and accessibility concerning postgraduate studies. Our key question is: How do students perceive their possibility to pursue an academic career by means of applying for entrance to PhD studies? Findings from interviews conducted with one female PhD student and another woman who had applied for entrance to a PhD programme but was not accepted, and students with reading/writing disabilities in undergraduate courses show that these students are highly motivated to study but are uncertain about their possibility to pursue an academic career. However, the picture is far more complicated than that as we would like to illustrate in this paper.

  • 4.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Facing dilemmas - introducing assistive technology for pupils to use in the classroom2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Funktionsmöjligheter inom högre utbildning2011In: Handikappforskningens dag. Forskning om funktionsmöjligheter, 22 november, HAREC, Växjö, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Studenter med läs- och skrivsvårigheter som deltagare i högre utbildning2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emphasis on higher education (HE) in today’s knowledge society has increasedthe amount of students enrolled in universities in Sweden. Two percentof these students are people with disabilities, of whom more than half are studentswith dyslexia. Dyslexia is a disability that involves difficulty with writtentext which is the essence of HE. The disability affects these students’ readingand my assumption was therefore that their possibility to complete their educationon an equal footing with their peers was limited.The overall aim of this thesis is to illuminate the prerequisites for participationfor Swedish students with dyslexia in higher education, and to analyse if support,and information about support, offered by higher-education institutionsare accessible to them. Due to lack of previous research, this is a descriptivestudy using the theoretical framework of cultural-historical activity theory(CHAT), a theory that can be summarized in five principles: an activity systemis the unit of analysis, it has historicity, multi-voicedness, it views contradictionsas sources of change, and it has the potential for expansive transformation.To orient myself within the large field of HE and dyslexia, the following questionshave guided my work: What HE measures are taken to ensure accessibilityand participation for Swedish students with dyslexia? What tensions, as definedwithin CHAT, may be found in the HE activities in relation to studentswith dyslexia? How do students with dyslexia regard the support offered? Inorder to answer these questions, I have listened to some of the voices withinHE, by collecting data through a questionnaire sent to all coordinators for studentswith disabilities; by having focus group interviews with university teachers,as well as having individual interviews with students with dyslexia. Thedata were collected and analysed within a CHAT activity system, which depictedHE activities by coordinators and teachers in relation to students withdyslexia. The graph was used in the final discussion to formulate some ideas forexpansive transformation.

  • 7.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Students with Reading and Writing difficulties and Their Possibility for Participation in Higher Education in Sweden2012In: ECER 2012, The Need for Educational Research to Champion Freedom, Education and Development for All: Network: 22. Research in Higher Education, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Using mobile assistive technologies to promote classroom participation and inclusion of pupils with dyslexia2014In: Paper presented at International Society for Cultural and Activity Research Congress 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Frithiof, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Björn, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Access to literacy - Glimpses from two different parts of the world2009In: NERA's 37th Congress, Trondheim, 5-7 March, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be literate can be defined as being able to develop ones potential and to participate in democracy, thus contributing to society. Literacy and education are closely connected. Historically, children with learning disabilities (LD) have been treated as non-educational and been neglected. By LD we here refer to cognitive disabilities such as mental retardation (MR) or dyslexia. Today, children with dyslexia go to mainstream school but are often submitted to special training outside the classroom. For children with mild MR, special schools were 1954 established by law in Sweden, but not until fourteen years later children with severe MR went to school, special schools as well. In Sweden and even internationally, it seems to be a wide consensus that children with disabilities should be included in a school for all, as reflected in the 1994 Salamanca declaration. However, as we can see in Sweden inclusion is not always the case. An unanswered question is how this affects the children’s access to literacy. We can see a problem if teachers and other professionals from their point of view of man and knowledge put the frameworks around pupil’s possibilities for literacy development. This study will explore and discuss the educational possibilities for some of these children. We have directed the searchlight towards two countries that have adopted the Salamanca declaration, namely Sweden and Argentina.

  • 10.
    Jacobson, Christer
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Björn, Marianne
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Svensson, Idor
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Dyslexi och kompensatoriska hjälpmedel2009In: Dyslexi och andra svårigheter med språket / [ed] Stefan Samuelsson m fl, Stockholm: Natur och Kultur , 2009, 1:1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Kraus, Anja
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    On the Field of Tension of Media-Related Visual Cultures and the Demands of School: Empowering Teenage Pupils (in Sweden), and the Seeing Glasses as a Development of Camera Ethnography2016In: Presented at: 25th Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Erziehungswissenschaft (DGfE) at the University of Kassel: „Spaces for Education. Spaces of Education“, Kassel, 13-16 March, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital media and adolescents is an emotive issue of pedagogy and Youth Studies. However, there is a lack of empirical studies on the impacts of imaginaries of pupils respectively the way how they visualize being in a technology enhanced classroom and research on the ethical dilemma connected to it (cp. Livingstone 2009). We investigate such impacts in terms of the effects of gazes, creating pedagogically desirable or undesirable relations.

    The ideal of a childhood and youth free from the influences of digital media is still alive, though it is deeply thwarted by reality, as adolescents are surrounded by media right from the birth and they extensively use it in many different ways. (Cp. http://www.soi2014.se/) As a rather short-circuited consequence they are widely regarded as “competent” users of, and even as pioneers in using digital media. (Cp. Carlsson 2010, Livingstone & Bovill 2001, et al.) This “competence” is extensively used in school by using PCs as a source of information and for ICT-enhanced learning (evaluation of the Swedish campaign “one PC per pupil” see: Fleischer 2013).

    At the same time, the fast technological development of new digital means and applications leads to a successively reduced control of the contacts of the kids with digital media. There is thus a rather fragile pedagogical frame of the indication of emancipative potentials of digital media. (Cp. Ofcom 2012) This is a problem as there is some evidence that the inventiveness and creativity of the use of digital media by young people is rather restricted; we meet a strong merchandised way of consuming media applications (Livingstone 2009). Furthermore, adolescents easily expose or unmask a person or themselves e.g. in terms of cyberbullying. Beside the competent, routinized and creative use of digital media, there is thus a certain amount of misuse or uncontrolled use of it.

    In cooperation with the project “Global Perspectives on Learning and Development with Digital Video Editing Media” (see: digitmed.wordpress.com), our qualitative empirical analyses focus the course and interchange of the gazes of pupils in school creating “visual cultures”, in which social in- and exclusions take place and narratives and learning unfold. These “visual cultures” get a digital dimension by being edited as a film. Theoretically, we stick to the growing interest for the “gaze” in digital contexts (Vlieghe 2011, Friesen et al. 2009 et al.) translating the consciously as well as unconsciously experienced field of tension real “gazes” generate (cp. Sartre 2003, Lacan 1981, Foucault 1999) to virtual contexts.

    In her “camera-ethnographic” approach Mohn (2006) examines possible interactional patterns, interdependencies and entanglements etc. of the gazes within video-graphical social research. 

    Methods and Aims

    The Seeing Glasses are spectacles with an inbuilt digital, video and audio recording camera. It is a new way of collecting data within Youth Studies about the contexts on which the wearers of the glasses set their gazes, as well as about reciprocating gazes. During one week pupils of a 9th grade wear the Seeing Glasses during the school lessons (in Sweden). Then, the pupils edit the film material in order to create films about `our life at school´. A stationary camera and participating observations document the classroom context.

    In our studies we will analyze the course of attention of the youngsters, captured by the Seeing Glasses and investigate their visualizations of eye contacts in editing the film material, recorded by the stationery camera and by participating observation in terms of the mis-én-scenes, and on the educational work connected to it. By doing this, the analytical tools of Camera Ethnography will be used, put at stake and further developed.

  • 12.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Björn, Marianne
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Jackson, Michele H.
    Designing networked learning environments to support intercultural communication and collaboration in science learning2005In: International Journal of Web Based Communities, ISSN 1477-8394, E-ISSN 1741-8216, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 308-319Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Björn, Marianne
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Education.
    Karlsson, Marine
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    The Collaborative Learning and Distributed Experimentation (COLDEX) EU Project: An Innovative Approach to Integrate Teacher Education into Formal and Informal Learning Supported by ICT 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Silander, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Björn Milrad, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Evidences learning online2014In: NGL 2014, Next Generation Learning Conference, Falun, Dalarna University, March 19-20, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we identify and classify research on online education in relation to learning by conducting an overview of existing research in the area of online learning presented in academic articles in ISI listed journals.

  • 15.
    Svensson, Idor
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordström, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindeblad, Emma
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Björn, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Sand, Christina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Almgren Bäck, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Effects of assistive technology for students with reading and writing disabilities2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assistive technology has been used to mitigate reading disabilities for almost three decades, and tablets with text-to-speech and speech-to-text apps have been introduced in recent years to scaffold reading and writing. Few scientifically rigorous studies, however, have investigated the benefits of this technology.

    Purpose: The aim was to explore the effects of assistive technology for students with severe reading disabilities.

    Method: This study included 149 participants. The intervention group received 24 sessions of assistive technology training, and the control group received treatment as usual.

    Results: Both the intervention and control groups improved as much in 1 year as the normed population did. However, gains did not differ between the groups directly after the intervention or at 1 year of follow-up.

    Conclusions: The use of assistive technology seems to have transfer effects on reading ability and to be supportive, especially for students with the most severe difficulties. In addition, it increases motivation for overall schoolwork. Our experience also highlights the obstacles involved in measuring the ability to assimilate and communicate text.

1 - 15 of 15
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