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  • 1.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. Åbo Akademi, Finland.
    Digital wellness services' servicescape for young elderly2018In: 31th Bled eConference Digital Transformation - Meeting the Challanges,Conference Proceedings / [ed] Pucihar, Andreja Kljajic Borstnar, Mirjana Kittl, Christian Ravensteijn, Pascal Clarke, Roger Bons, Roger, Bled, Slovenia: University of Maribor Press , 2018, p. 159-170Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital devices reshape the servicescape of wellness, helping people, e.g. young elderly, to benefit from digital wellness services (henceforth DWSs) provided in a digital servicescape. This paper builds on five prior studies and explores: (i) what requirements young elderly have, in order to benefit from DWSs, and (ii) what service providers should consider, and pay regard to, when they develop and offer DWSs to young elderly. Hence, this paper argues for DWSs to be subsets of a digital servicescape. This research developed a model for how different parties, e.g. young elderly, their friends and relatives, developers, providers, but also the society per se, could gain from the DWSs. The DWSs create opportunities for a win-win-win situation. Important for the young elderly are motivation, trust, and credibility. Important for developers and providers are to motivate the users, to create trustworthiness, to provide user guidance, and to develop through co-creation.

  • 2.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    E-servicescape is Plausible2014In: IRIS Selected Papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: Issue nr 5 (2014) / [ed] Jacob Nørbjerg, Jan Pries-Heje, Harald Holone, IRIS Association , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customers have over the years been used to buying products and services in shops or by ordering over the phone. By the end of the last century shopping over the Internet was added as a new important channel for commerce. As a result, it has become more and more important for organizations to attract customers and their site on the Internet; the interface, is one part of this. In the discourse of marketing there is a field named servicescape and a related field named e-servicescape. For the providers of information systems the different views of service, servicescape and e-servicescape can be confusing. Hence it has to be considered   interesting if the intention is to build not only reliable and trustable systems but also information systems that are in accordance with what the e-servicescape user needs and demands. The question raised in this paper is whether there is a need for further research on the relation and connection between the terms servicescape and e-servicescape. To determine if e-servicescape is fully possible, plausible or not possible in comparison with servicescape the Conceptual model of servicescape by Harris and Ezeh (2008, p. 393) is used. 

  • 3.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Marknadsföring i företag: Låtsaskunder2013In: Marknadsföring: Teori, strategi och praktik, Harlow, England: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2013, p. 343-343Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Marknadsföring i företag: Mystery Shopping2013In: Marknadsföring: Teori, strategi och praktik, Harlow, England: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2013, p. 338-338Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Mystery shopping2011In: Principles of Marketing: Swedish edition, Harlow, England: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2011, p. 350-351Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Allmér, Hans
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Phantom shoppers2011In: Principles of Marketing: Swedish Edition, Harlow, England: Pearson Education Academic Publisher, 2011, p. 360-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Allmér, Hans
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Servicescape for Digital Wellness Services for Young Elderly2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis digital wellness services (DWSs) are in focus. The DWSs are services provided through digital devices, such as smartphones, bracelets, and tablets, by using digital environments such as Internet, cloud services, and websites. They can provide users with information that has an impact on their wellness, such as pulse, nutrition, and training guidance. The focus for this work on DWSs is on the age group of young elderly (60 – 75 years old). They belong to a group who were born long before digital devices and environments emerged and this factor may affect their motivation and willingness to use and benefit from DWSs.

    This thesis offers a framework for a digital servicescape that enables young elderly to benefit from DWSs. DWSs are produced and offered in digital servicescapes, where the interaction between the service providers and the service users occurs. The interaction can take place in different spaces like fitness studios, shopping malls or banks. DWSs for large groups of young elderly will require an ecosystem of stakeholders to develop, distribute, maintain, support, and further develop these services. An ecosystem builds on policies, strategies, processes, information, technologies, applications and stakeholders, and includes people who build, sell, manage and use the system. In order to understand the ecosystem, it is necessary to have a holistic approach to work out how its context, technology, stakeholders, and use interact with each other. A digital servicescape offers the conceptual basis for the ecosystem to form, evolve, and survive and produces platforms on which it is easy, effective, and productive to access and use DWSs.

    The described interaction between digital servicescape and DWSs for improved health leads to the research question: How can a digital servicescape enhance young elderly’s use of Digital Wellness Services (DWSs)?

    In order to answer the research question, the thesis presents different approaches that influence the young elderly’s capabilities and willingness to use and benefit from DWSs. If the young elderly follow recommendations to apply DWSs they will benefit in terms of healthier aging, reduced ill health, and a better quality of life. For developers and providers of DWSs development work will open up business opportunities if they understand the needs and demands of the young elderly. In addition, DWSs can contribute to significant health, social, and economic benefits for society in general. Proactive wellness programs for young elderly will have cumulative effects on the conditions for good health. The digital servicescape is a conceptual framework for future work on actually building the necessary platforms for DWSs.

    The work on this thesis follows an explorative approach. The data collection was carried out through surveys, literature review, and focus groups after which the data was sorted, analysed and interpreted. As the work progressed, a need arose to obtain insights from additional perspectives with the consequence that the additional data contributed to a deeper knowledge of the young elderly, DWSs and digital servicescape.

    The young elderly are, as a group, a very large market consisting of almost 100 million people in Europe alone. For the young elderly, digitalisation has been a part of their lives and its development has provided them with new opportunities to communicate. To them the interface on their digital device is where the interaction with a service provider occurs. Behind the interface, a digital servicescape and an ecosystem provide the necessary tools for the young elderly to achieve the wellness they seek. Nevertheless, to understand the target group it is important to consider four wellness dimensions: i) physical wellness, ii) social wellness, iii) emotional wellness, and iv) intellectual wellness. Together, the four dimensions form a holistic wellness approach to motivate young elderly to use DWSs. The research results show that the young elderly need to be motivated to adopt the services offered. Motivation that affects the young elderly is both intrinsic and extrinsic and this should be considered when developing and providing DWSs and digital servicescapes. Therefore, the service providers have to meet the expectations, needs, and demands of the young elderly and develop services that are suited for the target group. However, this is not enough, as this research shows that the young elderly want to be in a context where they feel safe.

    Information systems offer a basis for communication and interaction with and through digital devices such as smartphones, tablets, and bracelets. The Internet constitutes a platform for service and social interaction. Services offered on the Web, make it possible to do shopping, be entertained, entertain, and be involved in education, research, business and much more. The internet forms an important part of the infrastructure for DWSs and digital servicescapes.

    An efficient and well-designed DWS and its servicescape can create a win-win-win situation. The first part is the young elderly who can benefit from DWSs by increasing their chances of a longer, healthier, and happier life and thereby achieve wellness. The second win situation concerns the service developers and providers who can build a business by designing well-working DWSs aimed at the young elderly. Finally, the third win situation is about family, friends, and society. Well-designed DWSs can be beneficial for family and friends to help the young elderly to achieve wellness and require less support from family and friends. For society in general, there are financial benefits, as healthier and happier young elderly will reduce the demand for health care and support. Together the three win-win-win scenarios build an opportunity for a better tomorrow for all concerned.

     

    This thesis has created a foundation for continued research, testing, and development of DWSs and digital servicescapes. It has shown that there is a need for deeper understanding of the benefits a well-designed servicescape for DWSs can bring to people in general and to the group of young elderly in particular. Furthermore, there is a need for further research in the win-win-win situations when young elderly get access to digital wellness devices. A particularly interesting avenue of research would be to investigate how that digital servicescape could be designed and whether society should provide devices free of charge, at discount or with some other business model.

  • 8.
    Allmér, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Marcusson, Leif
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
    Altruistic young elderly in Sweden: a pilot study2018In: International Journal of Business and Management Invention (IJBMI), ISSN 2319-801X, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 66-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making it easier for Swedish young elderly (60-75 years) to live a rewarding life after retirement is an increasingly important issue in society. One way to achieve this is to give them a sense of purpose by helping other seniors, and to achieve that requires support systems. When developing an information system (IS) there is a need to know about the thoughts, demands and needs they (both those providing and receiving support) have about wellbeing and about use of IS. When designing IS and its interactive e-servicescape it is essential to identify consumer behavioural factors about wellbeing and the feeling of being needed. To do this, a pilot study with a survey was carried out and workshops conducted with a focus group. The conclusions are that expectancy, motivation, context, reward, and trust are the five key elements. These elements can be seen as a model for feeling needed when providing support to others and they also can provide important input to building an IS with its e-servicescape.

  • 9.
    Allmér, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Råberg, Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Young-elderly and digital services2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. In this paper we show what kind of services the group known as young-elderly (60-75 years old) using on Internet. To been able to develop more effective information systems (IS) we want to know more about the actual demands, needs and wants by the young-elderly target group. We will through an explorative study conducted through three focus group interviews show the importance of knowing behavioral factors when designing effective IS and setting up interactive virtual servicescapes. Our conclusions are that it is not just a need, when developing IS and setting up virtual servicescapes on Internet, to know the customers demands, needs and wants. The IS industry also need to create customer trust to the service provider and the services and also been able to set up guiding possibilities to helping the customers finding what they want and to letting the customer to customize the digital service interface. This will together overcome anxiety by the growing young-elderly target group.

  • 10.
    Allmér, Hans
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Råberg, Michael
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Young-elderly and digital use2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sometimes things are taken for granted. If people in general, and elderly people in particular are asked, they might have different views of what they need, demand and are interested in when it comes to services produced with computers and mobile devices, as compared to what the industry offers and assumes that they want, need and value. When Information Systems (IS) are designed it is important that they are developed in accordance with their target group. This explorative study investigates how the group known as young-elderly (60 – 75 years of age) in Sweden perceives services on the Internet and what is required in order to capture their interest. This study indicates that it is vital to build a servicescape in coherence with the customers’ demands, needs and interests as well as to establish credibility in order to gain their trust.

  • 11.
    Manniche, Jesper
    et al.
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Topsø Larsen, Karin
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Brandt Broegaard, Rikke
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Holland, Emil
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Chaja, Patryk (Contributor)
    Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Kierek, Marta (Contributor)
    Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Benaim, Andre (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Svensson, Katrine (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Gunnarsson, Roger (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Paulauskas, Stasys (Contributor)
    Strategic Self-Management Institute, Lithuania.
    Paulauskas, Aleksandras (Contributor)
    Strategic Self-Management Institute, Lithuania.
    Lindell, Lina (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sattari, Setayesh (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Kordestani, Arash (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Allmér, Hans (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Destination: A circular tourism economy: a handbook for transitioning toward a circular economy within the tourism and hospitality sectors in the South Baltic Region2017 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This handbook provides an overall understanding of the concept of the circular economy and of the societal dynamics through which innovations and transitioning processes towards a circular economy are realised. 

    It describes and discusses the specific economic and political context for applying and developing the circular economy in the CIRTOINNO project. The specific contexts are the tourism sectors in the South Baltic partner regions. 

    It investigates and discusses the opportunities for small and medium-sized tourism businesses to adopt circular economy ideas, and to identify possible ‘good practices’ among tourism SMEs in developing and applying circular economy solutions, especially in relation to the fields of foci of the CIRTOINNO project: accommodation, food and spa services. 

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