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  • 1. Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Andersson, Kjell
    Andersson-Eklund, Lena
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Haley, CS
    Hansson, I
    Johansson Moller, Maria
    Knott, SA
    Lundström, Kerstin
    Marklund, Lena
    Case history in animal improvement: Genetic mapping of QTLs for growth and fatness in the pig1997In: Molecular analysis of complex traits / [ed] A Paterson, CRC Press Inc , 1997, p. 241-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Haley, C S
    Ellegren, Hans
    Knott, S
    Johansson, Maria
    Andersson, Kjell
    Andersson Eklund, Lena
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Fredholm, Merete
    Hansson, Ingemar
    Håkansson, Jan
    Lundström, Kerstin
    Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci for growth and fatness in pigs1994In: Science, Vol. 263, p. 1771-1774Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bergman, I. M.
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Okumura, N.
    Inst Soc Technoinnovat Agr Forestry & Fisheries, Japan.
    Uenishi, H.
    Natl Inst Agrobiol Sci, Japan.
    Hammer, S. E.
    Univ Vet Med Vienna, Austria.
    Knoll, A.
    Mendel Univ Brno, Czech Republic.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Juul-Madsen, H. R.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Wild boars from Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic and Japan possess intact mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) genes2015In: International Journal of Immunogenetics, ISSN 1744-3121, E-ISSN 1744-313X, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 204-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two-nucleotide deletion recently detected in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene in purebred and crossbred domestic pigs was not found among 68 wild boars representing 4 populations from Europe and Asia. This suggests that the deletion is a result of breeding and/or genetic drift/bottle necks.

  • 4.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Extensive polymorphism in the porcine Toll-like receptor 10 gene2012In: International Journal of Immunogenetics, ISSN 1744-3121, E-ISSN 1744-313X, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The great importance of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in innate immunity is well established, but one family member – TLR10 – remains elusive. TLR10 is expressed in various tissues in several species, but its ligand is not known and its function is still poorly understood. The open reading frame of TLR10 was sequenced in 15 wild boars, representing three populations, and in 15 unrelated domestic pigs of Hampshire, Landrace and Large White origin. Amino acid positions corresponding to detected nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analysed in the crystal structures determined for the human TLR1–TLR2–lipopeptide complex and the human TLR10 Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) dimer. SNP occurrence in wild boars and domestic pigs was compared, and haplotypes for the TLR10 gene and the TLR6-1-10 gene cluster were reconstructed. Despite the limited number of animals sequenced in the present study (N = 30), a larger number of SNPs were found in TLR10 than recently reported for TLR1, TLR6 and TLR2. Thirty-three SNPs were detected, of which 20 were nonsynonymous. The relative frequency of nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) SNPs between wild boars and domestic pigs was higher in TLR10 than recently reported for TLR1, TLR6 and TLR2. However, the polymorphism reported in the present study seems to leave the function of the TLR10 molecule unaffected. Furthermore, no nonsynonymous SNPs were detected in the part of the gene corresponding to the hinge region of the receptor, probably reflecting rigorously acting functional constraint. The total number of SNPs and the number of nonsynonymous SNPs were significantly lower (< 0.05) in the wild boars than in the domestic pigs, and fewer TLR10 haplotypes were present in the wild boars. The majority of the TLR6-1-10 haplotypes were specific for either wild boars or domestic pigs, probably reflecting differences in microbial environment and population history.

  • 5.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    European wild boars and domestic pigs display different polymorphic patterns in the Toll-like receptor (TLR)1, TLR2, TLR6, and TLR10 genes.2010In: International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health Paris, France, 31 May – 2 June 2010: The AGAH 2010 Abstract Book, 2010, p. 35-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Toll-like receptors (TLR) are vitally important pattern recognition receptors linking innate and adaptive immunity. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in human TLR genes have been associated with disease. There are few studies on associations between polymorphisms in TLR genes and disease in pigs, but the TLR2/TLR6 heterodimer is activated by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and the expression of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 is modulated in the presence of different Salmonella serovars. Porcine TLR1, TLR6, and TLR10 are located in a cluster on the p arm of chromosome 8, while TLR2 resides on the q arm. Previously, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for immune-related traits on pig chromosome 8, close to the KIT gene and the microsatellite S0225, respectively. In order to explore polymorphism in some TLR genes in European wild boars and domestic pigs, TLR1, TLR2, and TLR6 were sequenced in 25 wild boars, representing three populations, and in 15 domestic pigs of Hampshire, Landrace, and Large White origin. Similarly, TLR10 was sequenced in 15 wild boars and 15 domestic pigs. In TLR1 and TLR2, more SNP were present in the domestic pigs than in the wild boars. In TLR6, SNP numbers were similar in both animal groups, but the level of heterozygosity was higher in the domestic pigs than in the wild boars. In TLR10, again, more SNP were present in the domestic pigs, and a higher number of nonsynonymous SNP were detected in TLR10 compared to the other genes. This may suggest redundancy for TLR10 in pigs. 

  • 6.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Amelie
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Polymorphisms in porcine TLR1, TLR2, and TLR62008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Amelie
    Fossum, Caroline
    Andersson, Leif
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Genetic analysis of porcine TLR genes2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    European wild boars and domestic pigs display different polymorphic patterns in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1, TLR2, and TLR6 genes2010In: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, E-ISSN 1432-1211, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been extensively studied and their immense importance in innate immunity is now being unveiled. Here, we report pronounced differences – probably reflecting the domestication process and differences in selective pressure – between wild boars and domestic pigs regarding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR genes. The open reading frames of TLR1, TLR2, and TLR6 were sequenced in 25 wild boars, representing three populations, and in 15 unrelated domestic pigs of Hampshire, Landrace, and Large White origin. In total, 20, 27, and 26 SNPs were detected in TLR1, TLR2, and TLR6, respectively. In TLR1 and TLR2, the numbers of SNPs detected were significantly lower (P ≤ 0.05, P ≤ 0.01) in the wild boars than in the domestic pigs. In the wild boars, one major high frequency haplotype was found in all three genes, while the same pattern was exhibited only by TLR2 in the domestic pigs. The relative frequency of non-synonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) SNPs was lower for the wild boars than for the domestic pigs in all three genes. In addition, differences in diversity between the genes were revealed: the mean heterozygosity at the polymorphic positions was markedly lower in TLR2 than in TLR1 and TLR6. Because of its localization – in proximity of the bound ligand – one of the non-synonymous SNPs detected in TLR6 may represent species-specific function on the protein level. Furthermore, the codon usage pattern in the genes studied deviated from the general codon usage pattern in Sus scrofa.

  • 9.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Juul-Madsen, Helle R.
    Heegaard, Peter M.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    MBL-A concentrations and MBL1 genotypes in European wild boars, Large White pigs, and wild boar/Large White crossbreds2010In: 8th European Colloquium on Acute Phase Proteins in Helsinki, 2010.08.25-2010.08.27, 2010, p. 25-26Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala university.
    Okumura, Naohiko
    Institute of Society for Techno-innovation of Agriculture, Japan.
    Uenishi, Hirohide
    National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan.
    Guldbrandtsen, Bernt
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Essler, Sabine
    Univ of Veterinary Medicine, Austria.
    Knoll, Ales
    Mendel University, Czech Republic.
    Heegaard, Peter
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Juul-Madsen, Helle
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    MBL1 genotypes in wild boar populations from Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic and Japan2013In: International Journal of Immunogenetics, ISSN 1744-3121, E-ISSN 1744-313X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 131-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G949T in the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 1 gene has been associated with low MBL-A concentration in serum and detected at different frequencies in various European pig populations. However, the origin of this SNP is not known. Part of the MBL1 gene was sequenced in 12 wild boar/Large White crossbred pigs from the second backcross (BC 2) generation in a family material originating from two wild boar x Large White intercrosses. Also, MBL-A serum concentration was measured in the entire BC 2 generation (n = 45). Furthermore, the genotypes of 68 wild boars from Sweden, Austria, the Czech Republic, and Japan were determined in regard to five previously described SNPs in MBL1. The T allele of G949T was present among the BC 2 animals. MBL-A serum concentration in the BC 2 animals showed a bimodal distribution, with one-third of the animals at levels between 0.7 and 1.6 μg mL−1 and the remaining pigs at levels around 13 μg mL−1. There was a co-variation between the presence of the T allele and low MBL-A concentration in serum. The genotyping of the wild boars revealed differences between populations. The T allele of G949T was not detected in the Austrian and Japanese samples and is thus unlikely to be an original feature of wild boars. In contrast, it was present at high frequency (0.35) among the Swedish wild boars, probably representing a founder effect. Five MBL1 haplotypes were resolved. Only two of these were present among the Japanese wild boars compared to four in each of the European populations. This difference may reflect differences in selection pressure and population history.

  • 11. Brunsberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    Gustafsson, Kenth
    Structure and organization of porcine MHC class II DRB genes: evidence for genetic exchange between loci1996In: Immunogenetics, Vol. 44, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Fokusgrupper avslöjar representationersmöjligheter och begränsningar för lärande i naturvetenskap2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Torremorrel, M
    Univ Minnesota.
    Escherichia coli and Salmonella in pigs2010In: Breeding for Disease Resistance in Farm Animals / [ed] RFA Axford, S Bishop, F Nicholas, JB Owen, Walllingford, UK: CABI Publishing, 2010, 3rd, p. 232-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diarrhoea due to bacterial infections is a problem mainly in the young growing animal, including the pig. Among the bacteria that cause diarrhoea in pigs are various strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Considerable genetic variation in resistance/susceptibility has been found for both neonatal and post-weaning diarrhoea caused by E. coli carrying F4 fimbriae and post-weaning diarrhoea and oedema disease due to E. coli strains with F18 fimbriae. The loci for the receptors of both types of fimbriae have been mapped: the F4 receptor(s) to chromosome 13 (SSC13) and the F18 receptor to chromosome 6 (SSC6). Several candidate genes have been suggested for the F4 receptor, among them different mucine genes (MUC4, MUC13), and a very close association between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in an alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase gene (FUT1) and the F18 receptor has been identified.Resistance to Salmonella infections in mice is associated with the antimicrobial activity of macrophages, and some studies have suggested that it is linked with polymorphism in the Nramp1 gene. The gene has been identified in several species including the pig, but data are so far lacking concerning association between polymorphism in the porcine gene and resistance-susceptibility to Salmonella infection. Using transcriptome profiles, several porcine genes that are differentially up or downregulated during Salmonella infection have been identified. Further studies of associations between polymorphisms in these genes and the outcome of Salmonella infection may facilitate the development of tools to identify carrier pigs, and lead towards identification of markers that can be used to select for resistant pigs.Breeding for increased disease resistance can be potentially performed in several ways; excluding susceptible breeding of animals after exposure, marker-assisted selection (MAS) based on closely linked loci or direct selection based on polymorphism in the causative gene. The rapid development in molecular genetics has provided dense genome maps and the tools to identify and study individual genes, both at the deoxyribonuclease acid (DNA) and the expression level. Overall use of genetic markers influencing disease traits is expected to increase significantly in the coming years. This number will grow as large-scale accurate disease phenotypes are collected in pedigreed populations. It is likely that many disease markers will contribute additively to the selection criteria and will be used as part of complex selection indices that will balance other economically significant traits.

  • 14.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Cedric, Linder
    Uppsala Universitet.
    An exploration of how university students relate to representations used within two different science disciplines2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    University students' reflections on representations in genetics and stereochemistry revealed by a focus group approach2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part ofthis difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In orderto optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure themeaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge.Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representationsin introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealedhow students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations.The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting themeaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in theirproblem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiarto the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”.The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways ofinterpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussionsenhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a universitycontext to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitfulway.

  • 16.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala Universitet.
    University students' reflections on representations in introductory genetics and stereochemistry2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that are regarded as difficult. Part of thisdifficulty is derived from them having representations as part of their disciplinary discourses. Inorder to optimally support students’ learning and meaning-making, teachers need to thoughtfullyuse representations to structure the learning experience in ways that open up the variation instudents’ prior knowledge. For our study, university students’ reasoning on representations ingenetics and organic chemistry was investigated using a focus group approach (8 groups, 4-8students/group). This revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations withdisciplinary-specific representations. For instance, they stated that they preferred familiarrepresentations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations.Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances in certain representations, but nonethelesschose not to use those representations in their problem solving. The focus group discussions ledthe students to become more aware of their own and others meaning-making. At the same time,feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teacher’s awareness of thestudents’ prior knowledge and meaning-making. Consequently, we posit that a design focus groupmethodology can be fruitfully used both to promote teacher development and progression, andstudent learning.

  • 17.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Escherichia coli resistance in pigs1991In: Breeding for disease resistance / [ed] JB Owen, RFE Axford, CAB International, Redwood Press Ltd , 1991, p. 424-435Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    Dep. Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Bergström, Malin
    Gustafsson, Ulla
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Fossum, Caroline
    Genetic variation in Con A induced interleukin 2 production by porcine blood mononuclear cells1991In: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, ISSN 0165-2427, E-ISSN 1873-2534, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 351-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic variation in concanavalin A (Con A)-induced proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied in blood collected from 96 piglets, a aged 7 weeks. The piglets were the offspring of seven sires and 24 dams. Pronounced differences between litters from various dams were observed in the immune parameters measured. Also, large individual differences in the magnitudes of Con A-induced proliferation and IL-2 production were seen for PBMC collected from individual pigs within each litter. Both the time course and magnitude of IL-2 activity showed genetic variation, as results from the offspring of the seven sires differed significantly. However, only the time course, not the magnitude, of proliferation differed among the offspring groups. It was possible to establish a rank order for the sires based on the IL-2 production of PBMC by their offspring. As IL-2 has a key role in regulating the immune response, mitogen-induced IL-2 activity seems to be a good candidate as a general marker for cell-mediated immunity in pigs. 

  • 19.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Duval-Iflah, Yvonne
    Gustafsson, Ulla
    Ellegren, Hans
    Johansson, Maria
    Juneja, R Kumar
    Marklund, Lena
    Andersson, Leif
    The porcine intestinal receptor for Escherichia coli K88ab, K88ac; Regional localization on chromosome 13 and influence on IgG response to the K88 antigen1995In: Animal Genetics, Vol. 26, p. 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ellegren, Hans
    Winterö, A K
    Rouhonen-Lehto, Marja
    Fredholm, Merete
    Gustafsson, Ulla
    Juneja, R Kumar
    Andersson, Leif
    A large linkage group on pig chromosome 7 including the MHC class I, class II (DQB), and class III (TNFB) genes1993In: Immunogenetics, Vol. 38, p. 363-366Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wattrang, Eva
    Andersson, Leif
    Fossum, Caroline
    Mapping quantitative trait loci for stress induced alterations in porcine leukocyte numbers and functions2000In: Animal Genetics, Vol. 31, 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wattrang, Eva
    Magnusson, Ulf
    Fossum, Caroline
    Genetic variation in parameters reflecting immune competence of swine1994In: Vet Immunol Immunopathol, Vol. 40, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wattrang, Eva
    Marklund, Lena
    Moller, Maria
    Andersson, Leif
    Fossum, Caroline
    Mapping quantitative trait loci for immune capacity in the pig1998In: J Immunology, Vol. 161, 829-835Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Ellegren, Hans
    et al.
    Fredholm, Merete
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Winterö, A K
    Andersson, Leif
    Conserved synteny between pig chromosome 8 and human chromosome 4 but rearranged and distorted linkage maps1993In: Genomics, Vol. 17, p. 599-603Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Ellegren, Hans
    et al.
    Johansson, Maria
    Chowdhary, Bhanu P
    Marklund, Stefan
    Ruyter, D
    Marklund, Lena
    Bräuner-Nielsen, P
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ingemar
    Juneja, R Kumar
    Andersson, Leif
    Assignement of 20 microsatellite markers to the porcine linkage map1993In: Genomics, Vol. 16, p. 431-439Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Jacobsen, M
    et al.
    Kracht, SS
    Esteso, G
    Cirera, S
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Archibald, AL
    Bendixen, C
    Anderson, L
    Fredholm, M
    Jorgensen, CB
    Refined candidate region specified by haplotype sharing for Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac susceptibility alleles in pigs.2010In: Animal Genetics, ISSN 0268-9146, E-ISSN 1365-2052, Vol. 41, p. 21-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    P>Infection of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab/ac is a major welfare problem and financial burden for the pig industry. Natural resistance to this infection is inherited as a Mendelian recessive trait, and a polymorphism in the MUC4 gene segregating for susceptibility/resistance is presently used in a selection programme by the Danish pig breeding industry. To elucidate the genetic background involved in E. coli F4ab/ac susceptibility in pigs, a detailed haplotype map of the porcine candidate region was established. This region covers approximately 3.7 Mb. The material used for the study is a three generation family, where the founders are two Wild boars and eight Large White sows. All pigs have been phenotyped for susceptibility to F4ab/ac using an adhesion assay. Their haplotypes are known from segregation analysis using flanking markers. By a targeted approach, the candidate region was subjected to screening for polymorphisms, mainly focusing on intronic sequences. A total of 18 genes were partially sequenced, and polymorphisms were identified in GP5, CENTB2, APOD, PCYT1A, OSTalpha, ZDHHC19, TFRC, ACK1, MUC4, MUC20, KIAA0226, LRCH3 and MUC13. Overall, 227 polymorphisms were discovered in the founder generation. The analysis revealed a large haplotype block, spanning at least 1.5 Mb around MUC4, to be associated with F4ab/ac susceptibility.

  • 27. Jacobsen, Mette
    et al.
    Archibald, Alan
    Cirera, Susan
    Edfors, Inger
    Andersson, Leif
    Fredholm, Merete
    Jorgensen, Claus
    SNP discovery in the region responsible for ETEC F4ab/ac resistance in pigs2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Jacobsen, Mette
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cirera, Susanna
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Joller, David
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Esteso, Gloria
    Universidad de Córdoba, Spain.
    Kracht, Steffen S.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bendixen, Christian
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Archibald, Alan L.
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Vogeli, Peter
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Neuenscwander, Stefan
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Bertschinger, Hans U.
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Rampoldi, Antonio
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University.
    Fredholm, Merete
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jørgensen, Claus B.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Characterisation of five candidate genes within the ETEC F4ab/ac candidate region in pigs2011In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 4, article id 225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that express the F4ab and F4ac fimbriae is a major contributor to diarrhoea outbreaks in the pig breeding industry, infecting both newborn and weaned piglets. Some pigs are resistant to this infection, and susceptibility is inherited as a simple dominant Mendelian trait. Indentifying the genetics behind this trait will greatly benefit pig welfare as well as the pig breeding industry by providing an opportunity to select against genetically susceptible animals, thereby reducing the number of diarrhoea outbreaks. The trait has recently been mapped by haplotype sharing to a 2.5 Mb region on pig chromosome 13, a region containing 18 annotated genes.

    Findings

    The coding regions of five candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/ac infection (TFRC, ACK1, MUC20, MUC4 and KIAA0226), all located in the 2.5 Mb region, were investigated for the presence of possible causative mutations. A total of 34 polymorphisms were identified in either coding regions or their flanking introns. The genotyping data for two of those were found to perfectly match the genotypes at the ETEC F4ab/ac locus, a G to C polymorphism in intron 11 of TFRC and a C to T silent polymorphism in exon 22 of KIAA0226. Transcriptional profiles of the five genes were investigated in a porcine tissue panel including various intestinal tissues. All five genes were expressed in intestinal tissues at different levels but none of the genes were found differentially expressed between ETEC F4ab/ac resistant and ETEC F4ab/ac susceptible animals in any of the tested tissues.

    Conclusions

    None of the identified polymorphisms are obvious causative mutations for ETEC F4ab/ac susceptibility, as they have no impact on the level of the overall mRNA expression nor predicted to influence the composition of the amino acids composition. However, we cannot exclude that the five tested genes are bona fide candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/ac infection since the identified polymorphism might affect the translational apparatus, alternative splice forms may exist and post translational mechanisms might contribute to disease susceptibility.

  • 29. Jacobsen, Mette
    et al.
    Nejsum, P
    Joller, D
    Bertschinger, HU
    Python, P
    Edfors, Inger
    Cirera, S
    Archibald, Alan
    Churcher, C
    Esteso, G
    Bürgi, E
    Karlskov-Mortensen, P
    Andersson, Leif
    Vögeli, Peter
    Roepstorff, A
    Göring, HHH
    Anderson, TJC
    Thamsborg, SM
    Fredholm, Merete
    Jörgensen, Claus B
    Mapping of genes involved in E.coli and helminth susceptibility in pigs2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Johansson, Amelie
    et al.
    Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Jeon, JT
    Andersson, Leif
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Analysis of the upstream region of the porcine Dominant white/KIT locus2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Johansson, Amelie
    et al.
    Bongcam-Rudolff, Erik
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Jeon, JT
    Andersson, Leif
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mapping the mutation for the Belt allele at the porcine Dominant whit/KIT locus2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johansson, Amelie
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pielberg, G
    Andersson, L
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Polymorphism at the porcine Dominant white/KIT locus influence coat colour and peripheral blood cell measures2005In: Animal genetics, Vol. 36 (4), p. 288-296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Johansson, Amelie
    et al.
    Pielberg, Gerli
    Andersson, Leif
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Polymorphism at the porcine KIT locus influence the peripheral blood measures2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Brunnberg, Lena
    Ellegren, Hans
    Gustafsson, Ulla
    Ringmar-Cederberg, Eva
    Andersson, Kjell
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    The gene for dominant white colour in the pig is closely linked to ALB and PDGFRA on chromosome 81992In: Genomics, Vol. 14, p. 965-969Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wågman, Åsa
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Anne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    University teachers’ professional development through a focus group approach2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Joller, D
    et al.
    Jorgensen, CB
    Bertschinger, HU
    Python, P
    Edfors, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Cirera, S
    Archibald, A
    Bürgi, E
    Karlskov-Mortensen, P
    Andersson, L
    Fredholm, M
    Vögeli, P
    Refined localization of the Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac receptor locus on pig chromosome 132009In: Animal Genetics, ISSN 0268-9146, E-ISSN 1365-2052, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 749-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     P>Diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing F4 fimbriae leads to considerable losses in pig production. In this study, we refined the mapping of the receptor locus for ETEC F4ab/F4ac adhesion (F4bcR) by joint analysis of Nordic and Swiss data. A total of 236 pigs from a Nordic experimental herd, 331 pigs from a Swiss experimental herd and 143 pigs from the Swiss performing station were used for linkage analysis. Genotyping data of six known microsatellite markers, two newly developed markers (MUC4gt and HSA125gt) and an intronic SNP in MUC4 (MUC4-8227) were used to create the linkage map. The region for F4bcR was refined to the interval SW207-S0075 on pig chromosome 13. The most probable position of F4bcR was in the SW207-MUC4 region. The order of six markers was supported by physical mapping on the BAC fingerprint contig from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Thus, the region for F4bcR could be reduced from 26 to 14 Mb.

  • 37. Joller, D
    et al.
    Jorgensen, Claus B
    Bertschinger, HU
    Burgi, E
    Stannarius, C
    Mortensen, PK
    Cirera, S
    Archibald, Alan
    Genini, S
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    Fredholm, Merete
    Vögli, Peter
    Refined linkage mapping of the Escherichia coli F4ac receptor gene on pig chromosome 132006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Jorgensen, Claus B
    et al.
    Andersson, SI
    Cirera, S
    Archibald, Alan
    Raudsepp, Terje
    Chowdhary, Bhanu
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    Fredholm, Merete
    Mucin 4: A candidate gene for susceptibility towards E. coli F4ab/ac diarrhea in the pig2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Jörgensen, Claus
    et al.
    Cirera, S
    Andersson, SI
    Archibald, Alan
    Raudsepp, T
    Chowdhary, Bhanu
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    Fredholm, Merete
    Linkage and comparative mapping of the genomic segments responsible for susceptibility towards E. coli F4ab/ac diarrhoea in pigs2003In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, Vol. 102, 157-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Karlsson, Madeleine
    et al.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Björnsson, Sven
    Binding and detection of glycosaminoglycans immobilized on membranes treated with cationic detergents2000In: Analytical Biochemistry, Vol. 286, 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Lundén, Anne
    et al.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Liljedahl, Lars-Erik
    Simonsen, Morten
    Associations between major histocompatibility genes and production traits in White Leghorns1993In: Poultry Science, Vol. 72, p. 989-999Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Marklund, Stefan
    et al.
    Kijas, Jim
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Rönnstrand, Lars
    Funa, K
    Moller, Maria
    Lange, D
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Leif
    Molecular basis for the dominant white phenotype in the domestic pig1998In: Genome Research, Vol. 8, p. 826-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Patron Sigfridsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kemilärares reflektioner kringanvändning av visuella representationer2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Patron Sigfridsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University;University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Teachers’ reasoning: Classroom visual representational practices in the context of introductory chemical bonding2017In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 101, no 6, p. 887-906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual representations are essential for communication and meaning-making in chemistry, and thus the representational practices play a vital role in the teaching and learning of chemistry. One powerful contemporary model of classroom learning, the variation theory of learning, posits that the way an object of learning gets handled is another vital feature for the establishment of successful teaching practices. An important part of what lies behind the constitution of teaching practices is visual representational reasoning that is a function of disciplinary relevant aspects and educationally critical features of the aspects embedded in the intended object of learning. Little is known about teachers reasoning about such visual representational practices. This work addresses this shortfall in thearea of chemical bonding. The data consist of semistructured interviews with 12 chemistry teachers in the Swedish upper secondary school system. The methodology uses a thematic analytic approach to capture and characterize the teachers’ reasoning about their classroom visual representational practices. The results suggest that the teachers’ reasoning tended to be limited. However, the teachers’ pay attention to the meaning-making potential of the approaches for showing representations. The analysis presents these visualization approaches and the discussion makes theoretical links to the variation theory of learning.

  • 45. Rosén, M
    et al.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Björnsson, Sven
    Quantitation of repetitive epitopes in glycosaminoglykans immobilised on hydrophobic membranes treated with cationic detergents2002In: Analytical Biochemistry, Vol. 308, 210-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Rosén, Madeleine
    et al.
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Björnsson, Sven
    Detection of GAG-epitopes from different leukocyte populations2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Rouhonen-Lehto, Marja K
    et al.
    Renard, Christine
    Rothschild, Max F
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Kristensen, Birte
    Gustafsson, Ulla
    Larsson, R G
    Varvio, S-L
    Variable number of pig MHC class I genes in different serological defined haplotypes identified by a 3'-untranslated region probe1998In: Animal Genetics, Vol. 29, p. 178-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Wattrang, Eva
    et al.
    Almqvist, M
    Johansson, Amelie
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Fossum, Caroline
    Wallgren, P
    Pielberg, G
    Andersson, L
    Edfors-Lilja, Inger
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Confirmation of QTL on porcine chromosomes 1 and 8 influencing leukocyte numbers, haematological parameters and leukocyte function2005In: Animal genetics, Vol. 36 (4), p. 337-345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Wikman, Susanne
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    University students’ reflections on the use of representations in introductory stereochemistry2011In: Science Learning & Citizenship, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Åhman, Niclas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Gunnarsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    In-service science teacher professional development2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to explore teachers’ professional development when using the tool Content Representations (CoRe) to plan a learning study in chemistry, which they also implemented and analysed. The work of six experienced science teachers, all teaching at the 6th to 9th year (age 13 to 16 years), was followed at eight group meetings during one year. The teachers’ discussions during the group meetings were audio and/or video recorded. Recordings were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. The results show that two main approaches to teaching emerged in the teachers’ discussions, a pragmatic and a reflective approach, respectively. During the investigation period, the focus of the teachers’ discussions changed, from a predominantly pragmatic approach to a predominantly reflective approach. The results indicate that the work with CoRe and learning study stimulated the teachers to express and discuss their knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards teaching, i.e. promoted their professional development.

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