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  • 1.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    Högskolan Borås.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    University of Hull.
    Ways of intertwining caring and learning: supporting an embodied understanding of how patients can be cared for within an existential framework2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To support care for patients in an adequate way, Caring science theory and nursing practice need to be intertwined to bridge problematic dualisms such as mind and body, sense and sensibility, theory and practice, learning and caring. The overall aim in caring is to support wellbeing and to strengthen health and how this is achieved has been discussed extensively. However ways of overcoming such dualistic understandings are needed to pave the way for a care that is up to the task of responding to human possibilities and vulnerabilities within the complexity of existence.

    In supporting patients, we argue that a range of aspects, inter-relational, intellectual, emotional and embodied need to be evoked and reflected upon by students as a beginning foundation for the incorporation of, and the intertwining of Caring science theory and practice. This intertwining draws on knowledge for ‘the head’, ‘the heart’, ‘the hand’ (Galvin & Todres, 2013) and can develop and support a particular sensibility and sensitivity both of which are needed within clinical and learning contexts.

    In this presentation we will show the importance of a solid theoretical foundation drawn from Husserl’s lifeworld theory and theory of intentionality, Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy concerning how everything is intertwined in existence, as well as Gadamer’s ideas about shared understandings and Gendlin’s work on embodied relational understanding. While we have drawn from all these phenomenological perspectives, we will show how they serve as a coherent direction for overcoming the dualistic consequences of ‘splits’ such as, between human and world, illness and well-being , caring and technology, learning and caring, youth and old age, life and death and so on (Dahlberg et al., 2009).

    Such existential ways of understanding and well considered ‘didactic tools’ are needed to support this concern. We will share a number of illustrations from the lifeworld led care and education theme within EACS to contribute to such developments:

    • Embodied interpretations shared as poems (Galvin & Todres, 2011)
    • Using films to support the understanding of Caring science theory and practice (Hörberg, Ozolins & Ekebergh, 2011; Hörberg & Ozolins, 2012)
    • Learning through students’ creating poems from their responses to film (Hörberg, Ozolins & Galvin)
    • The intertwining of caring and learning in clinical settings illustrated through two examples: firstly, a ‘developing and learning care unit’ (Ekebergh, 2009, 2011; Holst & Hörberg, 2012, 2013) and secondly, as a student led health clinic (Ozolins & Elmqvist & Hörberg, 2013) both supported by structures specifically from the lifeworld perspective.

    This paper could serve reflection on how to integrate Caring science theory with practice in order to develop new curricula and practice to take care of the pending dualisms and other obscuring influences, such as 21st century organisational structures and demands that are problematic in research, learning and caring.

  • 2. Galvin, Kathleen
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Todres, Les
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    From Phenomenology to Caring Science: Directions for qualitative research and practice2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Learning to care in changing times2017In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 20-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Developing and Learning Care Unit is a learning environment in clinical practice designed to integrate theory and practice by using lifeworld didactics in order to support pairs of students in their professional development. Lifeworld didactics is based on a lifeworld led learning approach, which focuses on each student’s experiences and knowledge and supports each individual student and the students as a pair. The aim of this study is to explain and create an understanding of the phenomenon “learning space” that occurs in the interaction between patient, pairs of students and supervisors, during clinical practice. This hermeneutic study is based on a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach. The analysis is based on observations and interviews with patients, pairs of student nurses and supervisors at Developing and Learning Care Units. The result shows that the patient, pairs of students and supervisors are placed in the learning space, and are therefore related to each other. The relationships that arise in the learning space are enhanced through responsibility and the respect shown to each other. A relationship that appears to be supportive is characterized by: thoughtfulness, understanding of each other and enabling to ask questions. This creates an interplay of dynamic movements that are directed toward a common goal and thus provide opportunities to give and receive support. A balance between the patient, pairs of students and supervisor should thus be recognized to facilitate a favorable learning environment.

  • 4.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The experiences of supporting learning in pairs of nursing students in clinical practice2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, no September, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how supervisors experience supporting nursing students' learning in pairs on a Developing and Learning Care Unit in Sweden. The present study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenology. A total of 25 lifeworld interviews were conducted with supervisors who had supervised pairs of students. The findings reveal how supervisors support students' learning in pairs through a reflective approach creating learning space in the encounter with patients, students and supervisors. Supervisors experience a movement that resembles balancing between providing support in learning together and individual learning. The findings also highlight the challenge in supporting both the pairs of students and being present in the reality of caring. In conclusion, the learning space has the potential of creating a relative level of independency in the interaction between pairs of students and their supervisor when the supervisor strives towards a reflective approach.

  • 5.
    Holst, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The learning space: interpersonal interactions between nursing students, patients, and supervisors at developing and learning care units2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1368337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous research shows that the learning space is significant for students’ learning in pairs in clinical practice but does not explain the meaning of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is thus to explain and understand the learning space that occurs in the interaction between the patients, the pairs of nursing students, and the supervisors on a developing and learning care unit in Sweden. 

    Method: The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on hermeneutics. A total of 39 informants, consisting of 16 patients, five pairs of students (10 students), and 13 supervisors, were observed and interviewed. 

    Results: The results reveal that an interpersonal linkage between the patients, the students, and the supervisors is created within the learning space. A learning space, based on respect towards each other, creates the prerequisite for beneficial and supportive interactions that contribute to a deeper relationship. 

    Conclusion: The phenomenon is complex due to its expandable nature and due to the fact that the learning space cannot be isolated from the surrounding environment. In order to exploit the potential of the learning space it is of importance to understand and consider the learning space as a whole.

  • 6.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Att använda film för att levandegöra väsentliga kunskaper för vårdande2015In: Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan / [ed] Mia Berglund & Margaretha Ekebergh, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Do you understand me?: how music and singing can create a meaningful space of importance to express and understand wellbeing and suffering2017In: European Academy of Caring Sciences in collaboration with Nordic College of Caring Science: “Wellbeing and caring in changing times”, Nord University, Bodø, Norway, 20–21 April 2017: book of abstracts, 2017, p. 22-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wellbeing has many forms and can be expressed in many different ways. Earlier research has shown that using films in nursing education can support the learning of caring science, and bring a touching context for the students that can be related to nursing practice. This presentation focus on how wellbeing and suffering are expressed in the film Once by John Camey and how this can be understood in relation to caring and the support of health processes. In addition, it is of importance to educate both sensible and sensitive nurses, and we suggest that different kinds of learning strategies such as using films that touch upon existential aspects. By relating the film to the students' experiences, caring science concepts and philosophy, the understanding of human existence can be expanded and deepened. In this particular presentation we use the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty to clarify how intersubjectivity points both to the individuality and individual expression, and at the same time to the in-between and co-existence through music and singing together. Vignettes from the film are analysed in order to provide a deepened understanding of how music and singing can contribute to wellbeing and health processes.

  • 8.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Film as Support for Promoting Reflection and Learning in Caring Science2012In: Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, ISSN 2079-7222, E-ISSN 1445-7377, Vol. 12, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring science with a foundation in “the lived experience” may be viewed as a “patient science” i.e. the nursing has its starting point in the patient’s perspective. To support the students to learn caring science, the learning situation has to embrace the students’ lived experience in relation to the substance of caring science. One of the challenges in education is how to make the theoretical meanings more vivid, when there are no patients present. To obtain lived experiences as a foundation for teaching, written patient narratives and fiction like novels in combination with scientific literature are often used. Questions about how film can be used in this context to support learning of caring science have recently emerged.

     

    The aim of this study was to describe how film as learning-support may boost reflection in learning caring science. The data was collected through audio-taped seminars, written reflections and group-interviews with students on basic-, advanced-, and doctoral levels. The analysis was based on the Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach, founded on phenomenology.

     

    The result shows how film as a learning-support enhances the understanding of the caring science theory, and gives a deeper understanding of the subject. Film can be very touching and supportive for the students’ embodied reflections. Hence, it is important that the students are encouraged to watch the film from a caring science perspective and this requires a structure for learning-support related to the film, such as focus and purposes of watching the film, as well as support for follow-ups. The film per se does not create such support and guidance, but must be combined with well considered pedagogic thoughts on what learning is and how learning can be supported. The result is highlighted with the help of Maurice Merleau-Pontys philosophy of “the lived body”, and “the flesh of the world”.

  • 9.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lifeworld-Led Learning of Caring Science: Film as a Support for Learning2011In: Knowledge for Caring Science – Directions and Options, EACS Conference May 5th, 2011, 2011, p. 18-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences. Borås University.
    Intertwining caring science, caring practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective: two contextual examples2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 10363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning supportthat can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caringand learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and wellbeingas well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In thisarticle, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from lifeand thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding ofthe intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring andlearning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person’s health andlearning processes.

  • 11. Keen, Steven
    et al.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Caring for the understanding and use of qualitative research findings2007In: International Human Science Research Conference, Rovereto, Italien, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ozolins, Lise- Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The phenomenon of touch2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Beröringens fenomenologi i vårdsammanhang2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the phenomenon of touch and describes its meaning in the healthcare context. Caring science theory based on a lifeworld approach forms the theoretical perspective of the dissertation and consequently the patient perspective is guiding the research. The ontological, epistemological and methodological framework of the thesis is phenomenology.

    The overall aim was to describe the phenomenon of touch in the healthcare context. Touch showed to be a phenomenon with several diverse aspects being differentially explicit in different contexts. Four empirical studies were therefore conducted in different contexts. Further, a synthesis of the empirical results was carried out to show the invariant meanings and structure of the phenomenon. Furthermore, a philosophical illumination of the results was carried out to further deepen and expand the understanding of touch related to healthcare. The phenomenon of touch is described as a complex caring movement, as an interplay between lived bodies forming a foundation to understand health, suffering, well-being, and care. The results show how touch has the power to both alleviate the patients’ suffering and to experience joy and deep connectedness, as well as how touch can frighten and cause or worsen suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the person who touches must be fully present in all senses of the word. Caring touch of different kinds can never be reduced to a “method”. It is much more than a mechanical and static act or a treatment. Moreover, touch that is objectifying may be understood as an obstacle or detrimental for the caring relationship and well-being since it lacks the necessary pliable interpersonal room. Such touch creates distance and alienation rather than closeness, trust and togetherness. If the potential of touch for caring is to be used and the threat of non-caring warded off, then the intentionality of touch must be balanced visavi the existential vulnerability of the individual. Therefore carers need to be open and attentive to the lifeworld of the patients to enhance their health-processes and avoid hurting them.

  • 14.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    A nursing student-run health clinic: an innovative project based on reflective lifeworld-led care and education2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students need support in order to be able to intertwine caring science theory with practice through reflection. In this theoretical paper a nursing student-run health clinic based on lifeworld led learning and caring is described and propounded as providing such support. The student nurses are offered possibilities for integrating theoretical and practical knowledge by the re-location of parts of the theoretical courses to this innovative learning environment. In applying a phenomenological attitude, both in the learning situation and in the caring situation, the natural (unreflective) attitude is challenged in order for the student nurses to gain a deeper and broader understanding of caring science within their caring practice and vice versa. This means that the nursing students can develop a reflective caring approach that is important in order to become both sensitive and sensible nurses. This paper can be supportive for nurse educators in developing nursing education to meet the needs of the modern society. Our perspective on health, well-being and reflective learning can also inspire persons who work in clinical practice and with health promotion.

  • 15.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences and Social Work.
    Nurses’ experiences of problematic situations with migrants in emergency care in Sweden2003In: Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing, ISSN 1361-9004, E-ISSN 1532-9275, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to explore and describe nurses’ reports of situations with migrants in emergency care that have been experienced as problematic.

    Research design and methods: An explorative study. A purposive sample was chosen. Forty-nine registered nurses, 32 women and 17 men, experienced in emergency care, documented their experiences in written descriptions of 64 problematic situations. The data were analysed using qualitative method.

    Results: The results are described as nine main categories that emerged from the data. The nurses’ experiences of problematic encounters with migrants in emergency care were described as (1) difficulties related to different behaviour, (2) language barriers, (3) difficulties related to contact with relatives, (4) reliance on authorities, (5) complicating organisational factors, (6) difficulties related to gender roles, (7) situations perceived as threatening, and also (8) difficulties related to the patient’s earlier experiences of violence and (9) to the use of natural remedies.

    Conclusions: The results showed that the main problem was related to communication difficulties including language barriers and cultural dissimilarities. In order to diminish the problems, the use of adequate interpreters is important and training programmes must be developed to improve knowledge about the care of migrants from different parts of the world. The importance of searching for the unique individual perspective is stressed.

  • 16.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Att lära sig en vårdande hållning2015In: Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan / [ed] Mia Berglund & Margaretha Ekebergh, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 69-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Caring touch: patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act.

  • 18.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The phenomenon of touch in an anthroposophic clinical context.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Health and Caring Sciences.
    The phenomenon of touch in healthcare contexts: a flowing movement2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rask, Mikael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Safipour, Jalal
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Wenneberg, Stig
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andersson, Lisbet
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson Blomster, Monica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Borg, Christel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Validation of the verbal and social interaction questionnaire for nursing students: the focus of nursing students in their relationship with patients2018In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Verbal and Social Interaction Nursing Students questionnaire (VSI-NS) has been created to measure the development of verbal, social and interactional skills of nursing students with patients, from their perspective in nursing care. The aim of the present study was to determine the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire. The study had a methodological and developmental design and was carried out in four steps: adjustment of the items, face validity, data collection and data analysis. The number of items was reduced from 48 to 31. The factor analysis of the final 31 items resulted in four quite distinct factors: “Inviting to talk about feelings and thoughts”, “Building a caring relationship”, “Encouraging social and practical aspects in daily life” and “Caring towards health and wellbeing”. The results showed satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of content validity, construct validity and the internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire.  It could be concluded that the original conceptual model could serve as a theoretical foundation to explain and understand nurses’ caring interactions with their patients.

  • 21.
    Strömwall, Annette
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    “Seeing the patient as a human is their priority”: patients’ experiences of being cared for by pairs of student nurses2018In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A Developing and Learning Care Unit (DLCU) is a model used in the clinical practice of student nurses that aims at bridging the gap between theory and praxis, by supporting nursing students’ learning through supervision in pairs. The aim of this study is to describe how patients experience being cared for by pairs of student nurses. 

    Methods: The study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenological traditions. Data was collected in lifeworld interviews of 17 patients cared for by pairs of student nurses. The data was explored and analysed for meaning.

    Results: To be cared for by student nurses, supervised in pairs entails being involved in the students’ learning and being met with responsibility and a willingness to care and learn. This means being made the centre of attention, being seen, taken seriously and being listened to as a valuable human being. The students’ care is shown to be more flexible and has a more open approach, in comparison to that of the ordinary staff, and they ‘do something extraordinary’ and give of their time.

    Conclusions: Pairs of students, who are supervised within a learning model that support students’ learning through reflection, can contribute to patient experiences of being given good care.

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