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  • 1.
    Andersson, Kajsa
    Barometern OT.
    Svensson, Fredrik (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Forskningsprojekt: Alger ska rena utsläpp: "Algerna är en resurs som vi knappt använder"2014In: Baromtern, no 9 augustiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Broman, Elias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Li, Lingni
    Fridlund, Jimmy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Eutrophication induced early stage hypoxic ‘dead zone’ sediment releases nitrate and stimulates growth of archaeaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Baltic Sea, two annual algal blooms occur in spring and summer. The bloom intensity is determined by nutrient concentrations in the water column, while the period depends on weather conditions. During the course of the bloom, dead cells sink to the sediment where their degradation consumes oxygen to create hypoxic zones (< 2 mg/L dissolved oxygen, referred to as ‘dead zones’). These zones prevent the establishment of benthic communities and result in fish mortality. The aim of the study was to determine how the sediment chemistry and microbial community composition changed due to phytoplankton biomass degradation by adding cyanobacterial or diatom biomass to sediment cores from an all-year round oxic coastal Baltic Sea bay. After biomass addition, some typical anaerobic microbial processes were observed such as a decrease in NO2-+NO3- in the sediment surface (0-1 cm) and iron in the underlying layer (1-2 cm). In addition, an increase in NO2-+NO3- was observed in the water phase in all incubations (including controls without addition of phytoplankton biomass). The combination of NO2-+NO3- diffusion from the sediment plus nitrification of the available NH4+ could not account for this increase. Potential nitrogen sources that could at least partially explain this discrepancy included microbial nitrogen fixation and cycling of nitrogen compounds from deeper layers of the sediment. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the addition of diatom biomass caused minor changes in the relative abundance of microbial community members while cyanobacterial biomass caused a large increase in ferrous iron-oxidizing archaea. Considering that OTUs sharing lineages with acidophilic microorganisms were present, it was suggested that specific niches developed in sediment microenvironments. These findings highlight the importance of nitrogen cycling in oxic sediments and early microbial community changes in the sediment surface due to sinking phytoplankton before major hypoxia events occur. The release of nitrate into the water could potentially enhance algal blooms and facilitate the development of ‘dead zones’.

  • 3.
    Broman, Elias
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Li, Lingni
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fridlund, Jimmy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Spring and Late Summer Phytoplankton Biomass Impact on the Coastal Sediment Microbial Community Structure2019In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, no 2, p. 288-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two annual Baltic Sea phytoplankton blooms occur in spring and summer. The bloom intensity is determined by nutrient concentrations in the water, while the period depends on weather conditions. During the course of the bloom, dead cells sink to the sediment where their degradation consumes oxygen to create hypoxic zones (< 2 mg/L dissolved oxygen). These zones prevent the establishment of benthic communities and may result in fish mortality. The aim of the study was to determine how the spring and autumn sediment chemistry and microbial community composition changed due to degradation of diatom or cyanobacterial biomass, respectively. Results from incubation of sediment cores showed some typical anaerobic microbial processes after biomass addition such as a decrease in NO2 + NO3 in the sediment surface (0–1 cm) and iron in the underlying layer (1–2 cm). In addition, an increase in NO2 + NO3 was observed in the overlying benthic water in all amended and control incubations. The combination of NO2 + NO3 diffusion plus nitrification could not account for this increase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the addition of cyanobacterial biomass during autumn caused a large increase in ferrous iron-oxidizing archaea while diatom biomass amendment during spring caused minor changes in the microbial community. Considering that OTUs sharing lineages with acidophilic microorganisms had a high relative abundance during autumn, it was suggested that specific niches developed in sediment microenvironments. These findings highlight the importance of nitrogen cycling and early microbial community changes in the sediment due to sinking phytoplankton before potential hypoxia occurs.

  • 4.
    Olofsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Frick, Brage
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Fredrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Baltic Sea microalgae transform cement flue gas into valuable biomass2015In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 11, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show high feasibility of using cement industrial flue gas as CO2 source for microalgal cultivation. The toxicity of cement flue gas (12-15% CO2) on algal biomass production and composition (lipids, proteins, carbohydrates) was tested using monocultures (Tetraselmis sp., green algae, Skeletonema marinoi, diatom) and natural brackish communities. The performance of a natural microalgal community dominated by spring diatoms was compared to a highly productive diatom monoculture S. marinoi fed with flue gas or air-CO2 mixture. Flue gas was not toxic to any of the microalgae tested. Instead we show high quality of microalgal biomass (lipids 20-30% DW, proteins 20-28% DW, carbohydrates 15-30% DW) and high production when cultivated with flue gas addition compared to CO2-air. Brackish Baltic Sea microalgal communities performed equally or better in terms of biomass quality and production than documented monocultures of diatom and green algae, often used in algal research and development. Hence, we conclude that microalgae should be included in biological solutions to transform waste into renewable resources in coastal waters. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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