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  • 1.
    Adbo, Karina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hur ska vi skapa struktur och logik i kemiundervisningen?2014In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, no 1, p. 28-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Adbo, Karina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Relationships between models used for teaching chemistry and those expressed by students2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is focused upon chemistry as a school subject and students' interpretations and use of formally introduced teaching models. To explore students' developing repertoire of chemical models, a longitudinal interview study was undertaken spanning the first year of upper secondary school chemistry. Matter in its different states was selected as the target framework for this study. The results presented are derived from both generalisations of groups of students as well as a case study describing an individual learner's interpretation of formal content. The results obtained demonstrated that the formal teaching models provided to the students included in this study were not sufficient to afford them a coherent framework of matter in its different states or for chemical bonding. Instead, students' expressed models of matter and phase change were to a high degree dependent on electron movement (Paper I), anthropomorphism (Paper II) and, for one student, a mechanistic approach based on small particles and gravitation (Paper III). The results from this study place focus on the importance of learners' prior learning (previous experiences) and the need to develop a coherent framework of formal teaching models for the nature of matter and phase change.

  • 3.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ankarloo, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Norell, M C
    Olofsson, Linus
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svenson, Johan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, U
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Enantioselective synthetic receptors for Tröger’s base1999In: Bioorganic Chemistry, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 363-371Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian Alan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Enantioselective SPE on Tröger’s base molecularly imprinted polymers2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian Alan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Study of the kinetics of enantioselective solid-phase extraction on Tröger’s base molecularly imprinted polymers2001In: Analytica Chimica Acta, Vol. 435, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren-Holmberg, Jenny
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian Alan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Kinetics of enantioselective solid-phase extraction of Tröger’s base molecularly imprinted polymers2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Taber, Keith
    Developing a way to view chemistry: a case study of one Swedish student’s rich conceptualisations to make sense of upper high school chemistryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Taber, Keith
    University of Cambridge.
    Developing an Understanding of Chemistry: A case study of one Swedish student's rich conceptualisation for making sense of upper secondary school chemistry2014In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 1107-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report a case study of a 16-year-old Swedish upper secondary student's developing understanding of key concept areas studied in his upper secondary school chemistry course. This study illustrates how the thinking of an individual learner, Jesper, evolves over a school year in response to formal instruction in a particular educational context. Jesper presented a range of ideas, some of which matched intended teaching whilst others were quite inconsistent with canonical chemistry. Of particular interest, research data suggest that his initial alternative conceptions influenced his thinking about subsequent teaching of chemistry subject matter, illustrating how students' alternative conceptions interact with formal instruction. Our findings support the claims of some researchers that alternative conceptions may be stable and tenacious in the context of instruction. Jesper's rich conceptualisation of matter at submicroscopic scales drew upon intuitions about the world that led to teaching being misinterpreted to develop further alternative conceptions. Yet his intuitive thinking also offered clear potential links with canonical scientific concepts that could have been harnessed to channel his developing thinking. These findings support the argument that identifying students' intuitive thinking and how it develops in different instructional contexts can support the development of more effective science pedagogy.

  • 9.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Taber, Keith
    Learners' Mental Models of the Particle Nature of Matter: A study of 16-year-old Swedish science students2009In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 757-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results presented here derive from a longitudinal study of Swedish upper secondary science students' (16-19 years of age) developing understanding of key chemical concepts. The informants were 18 students from two different schools. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mental models of matter at the particulate level that learners develop. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews based around the students' own drawings of the atom, and of solids, liquids, and gases. The interview transcripts were analysed to identify patterns in the data that offer insight into aspects of student understanding. The findings are discussed in the specific curriculum context in Swedish schools. Results indicate that the teaching model of the atom (derived from Bohr's model) commonly presented by teachers and textbook authors in Sweden gives the students an image of a disproportionately large and immobile nucleus, emphasises a planetary model of the atom and gives rise to a chain of logic leading to immobility in the solid state and molecular breakdown during phase transitions. The findings indicate that changes in teaching approaches are required to better support learners in developing mental models that reflect the intended target knowledge.

  • 10.
    Adbo, Karina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Vidal Carulla, Clara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Designing play-based learning chemistry activities in the preschool environment2019In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1756-1108, E-ISSN 1756-1108, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 542-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the design of play-based learning activities for chemistry in preschool. Viewing chemistry as a part of our past and present culture instead of as a subject, provides the backdrop for a more holistic approach to chemistry within this specific environment. A cultural-historical perspective, together with scaffolding, emergent science skills and sustained shared thinking, made up the framework for the design of the learning activities. Results show that when scaffolding and emergent science skills are used within the design, they provide good support for both the content and the teacher in the actual learning situation. Working with scaffolding was also beneficial for professional development. However, for a progressive and inclusive activity design, it is essential to take into account aspects of the immediate environment and methods for direct evaluation.

  • 11.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Adbo, Karina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ankarloo, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedin-Dahlström, Jimmy
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Jokela, Päivi
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Linus
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren-Holmberg, Jenny
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Shoravi, Siamak
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svenson, Johan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Can we rationally design molecularly imprinted polymers?2001In: Analytica Chimica Acta, Vol. 435, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Adbo, Karina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Per Ola
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedin-Dahlström, Jimmy
    Karlsson, Jesper G.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Rosengren, Jenny P.
    Svenson, Johan
    Wikman, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Molecularly imprinted polymers: unique possibilities for environmental monitoring2002In: Proceedings of Kalmar Eco-Tech'01 : conference on leachate and waste water treatment with high-tech and natural systems : the 3rd International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation Between Companies/Institutions in the Nordic Countries and the Countries in the Baltic Sea Region : November 26 to 28, 2001 Kalmar, Sweden / [ed] William Hogland, Vilmantė Vyšniauskaitė, Högskolan i Kalmar, 2002, p. 285-288Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Taber, Keith
    et al.
    Adbo, Karina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Developing chemical understanding in the explanatory vacuum: Swedish high school students' use of an anthropomorphic conceptual framework to make sense of chemical phenomena2013In: Concepts of Matter in Science Education / [ed] Tsaparlis, G & Sevilan, H, Springer, 2013, p. 347-370Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results presented here derive from a research project exploring 16-18 year old

    Swedish upper secondary science students’ developing understandings of key

    concepts for matter and phase change. In the Swedish educational context there is

    limited prescription of what is taught at different grade levels, and students may only

    meet scientific models of the submicroscopic structure of the matter some years after

    considering the phenomena that these models have been developed to explain.

    Students may develop alternative and sometimes idiosyncratic imaginative notions to

    populate this ‘explanatory vacuum’. In this study we discuss one aspect of student

    responses in a sequence of semi-structured interviews spread over a single school

    year, viz. the common use of anthropomorphic language in student descriptions and

    explanations of basic chemical phenomena – change of state, chemical bonding and

    reactions. Such anthropomorphic language has been considered to have the potential

    either to facilitate or impede progression in students’ learning in chemistry. In the

    present study we found a high level of anthropomorphic language in students’

    explanations. In some cases there were clear indications that our interviewees were

    aware of the limitation of their anthropomorphic explanations, which could be

    considered to take the role of temporary place-holder for technical ideas not yet

    available. However, in many other instances anthropomorphism was used without any

    indication of its limited explanatory power. In these circumstances anthropomorphic

    explanations would appear to satisfy epistemic hunger, the human “need to ‘make

    meaning’ and understand their surroundings” (De Jesus, Teixeira-Dias, & Watts,

    2003, p. 1017), and take the place of canonical explanations.

  • 14.
    Vidal Carulla, Clara
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Adbo, Karina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Using Cultural-Historical Theory to Design and Assess a Chemistry Play-Based Learning Intervention2019In: Cultural-Historical Psychology, ISSN 1816-5435, E-ISSN 2224-8935, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been performed in Sweden, where the preschool curriculum states that children's understanding of simple chemical processes is a goal to strive towards [13]. However, uncertainty within the current preschool practice exists and has been described by B. Sundberg et al. [20]. Motivated by the lack of scientific literature on what chemistry content is suitable for preschool children and how to introduce it, this study aims to tackle how abstract concepts like "atoms" and "molecules" can be introduced to preschool children. With this purpose, a play-based learning intervention was designed, following the cultural- historical model for preschool science education proposed by M. Fleer [7], and implemented in two Swedish preschools, dividing a total of 20 three-years-old children into four groups of five children each. Data were collected in the form of video-recordings of the sessions and analysed following the principles from the experimental-genetic method summarized by N. Veresov [23]. Results are presented in the form of vignettes that illustrate significant moments from the intervention, together with discussion of how the social situation of development, the zone of actual development and the mediating tools facilitate the children in starting to talk about atoms.

1 - 14 of 14
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