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  • 1. F. Stallard, Robert
    et al.
    Lindell, Lina
    Geology, hydrology, and soils2014In: Perú: Cordillera Escalera-Loreto / [ed] Nigel Pitman, Corine Vriesendorp, Diana Alvira, Jonathan A. Markel, Mark Johnston, Ernesto Ruelas Inzunza, Agustín Lancha Pizango, Gloria Sarmiento Valenzuela, Patricia Álvarez-Loayza, Joshua Homan, Tyana Wachter, Álvaro del Campo, Douglas F. Stotz, Sebastian Heilpern, Chicago: The Field Museum , 2014, p. 280-292Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cordillera Escalera mountain range on the Loreto-San Martín border in Amazonian Peru was barely known to scientists until the September 2013 expedition described in this report. Richly illustrated with twenty four color plates featuring more than one hundred photographs, this volume contains the full results of the expedition’s rapid inventories of the geology, plants, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals in the Cordillera Escalera, as well as in-depth descriptions of the history, daily life, and natural resource use of local Shawi communities. Contributors also discuss threats to and opportunities for the landscape and its people and offer recommendations for sustaining biodiversity and human well-being in this megadiverse region of Peru. This volume contains the expedition team’s full report in both Spanish and English, as well as an overview in Shawi.

  • 2.
    Lindell, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Environmental Effects of Agricultural Expansion in the Upper Amazon: A study of river basin geochemistry and hydrochemistry, and farmers' perceptions2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis natural science is combined with environmental psychology in order to determine how deforestation and subsequent agricultural expansion in the Peruvian highland jungle has affected the natural environment and rural livelihoods. This region is part of one of the most biodiverse areas on Earth and is also exposed to high pressure from deforestation that threatens the ecosystems as well as the well-being of local populations. The problem stretches beyond the upper Amazon since the region constitutes headwaters to theAmazon Riverand is part of the most important forest ecosystem of the world.

    This study evaluates the relative controls of human induced land-cover change and natural factors on the chemical status of soils, stream waters, and sediments, mainly through a spatial sampling design. The field work was located to two adjacent river basins underlain by sedimentary rocks. Streams of 48 independent sub-basins, the two main rivers, 80 upland soil sites (weakly developed soils on sandstone and siltstone) and four vertical profiles of floodplain sediments were sampled and analysed for major and trace elements, including nutrients and potentially toxic metals. Further, perceptions of environmental changes were investigated through a combination of quantitative and qualitative interview data collected from 51 smallholder farmers.

    Soils of primary forests were found to be chemically similar to those of regenerated forests and agricultural land-covers (pastures and coffee plantations), and differences in chemical concentrations between streams draining areas to varying degrees covered by forest were assigned to natural variability. In addition, the chemical composition of alluvial deposits was similar in the two drainage basins despite a substantial difference in exploitation degree (30 % versus 70 % cleared from forest). Thus, no evidence was found of long-term changes in the geochemistry of the Subandean river basins as a result of the conversion of primary forest to agricultural land-uses. The farmers, however, perceived an overall increase in environmental degradation as well as a change towards drier and warmer climatic conditions. The climate change was reported to be the main factor responsible for a negative trend in life quality (rural livelihoods). The results may be used in the work of identifying priorities and key factors necessary for environmental and socioeconomic sustainability in the upper Amazon.

     

  • 3.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Henningsson, Marianne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marquardt, Kristina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Åström, Mats E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Farmers´(local and colonists) perceptions of environmental changes in the forest frontier of the upper Amazon, Peru2014In: International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology, ISSN 1462-4605, E-ISSN 1741-5004, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 394-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amazon ecosystem degradation profoundly impacts life supporting processes of global importance such as climate regulation, as well as localconditions for livelihoods. In Peru’s highland jungle, an expanding deforestationfront of forest conversion to agriculture has vastly transformed the landscape.

    Small-scale farming, the main driver of forest degradation, and consequently household natural resource management affect ecosystem functionality.To investigate farmers’ attitudes and priorities to services provided by the ecosystems (ES) we interviewed 51 farmers, both local and colonists. They strongly agreed that over the last three decades, local conditions for livelihoods have deteriorated following forest degradation and climate change. The latterwas reported the primary contributor to an impaired life quality and their greatest concern. Overall, local farmers perceived greater than did colonists who were also more positive towards intensive agricultureand forestry. This should be considered in environmental conservation efforts in the upper Amazon.

  • 4.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Åström, Mats
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Los Efectos de la Agricultura de Tala y Quema sobre la Fertilidad de los Suelos de la Amazonia Subandina, Perú2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Åström, Mats E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Sarenbo, Sirkku
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Effects of forest slash and burn on the distribution of trace elements in floodplain sediments and mountain soils of the Subandean Amazon, Peru2010In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1097-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest clearing through slash and burn to open up agricultural land is an ongoing process in large parts of the Amazon Basin. This activity severely affects the structure and balance of the natural ecosystem, and also has the potential to cause substantial changes in landscape geochemistry. The latter is the topic of this study, with special attention on translocation of potentially toxic trace elements from deforested areas to downstream aquatic and terrestrial systems. Sampling of floodplain sediments and mountain soils (Inceptisols on redbed lithologies) was carried out in two adjacent Subandean river basins, with deforestation extents of ca. 1/3 and 2/3 of the basin areas. Several 'toxic and potentially toxic metals (e.g., Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu and Ni) and other major and minor elements showed concentration peaks at certain depths in the alluvial deposits of both basins. These peaks were associated with organic matter, and occurred just below layers of combustion residues originating from burning of in situ biomass. Downward migration of particles originating in the combustion residues is suggested to be the direct mechanisms of the metal enrichments. Further evidence of an in situ origin of the metal peaks in the sediments was provided by the geochemical composition of soils located upstream of the floodplains. Disturbed soils (i.e. soils of pasture, coffee plantations, secondary forest and recently swidden fields) were found to be similar to soils under natural forest. Moreover, trace element concentrations in floodplain deposits were similar in the two drainage basins despite the large difference in exploitation degree. Thus, no evidence was found of large scale (basin-wide) increases in trace-metal leaching or translocation as a result of the extensive deforestation and agricultural land-use that has been practiced in the Amazonian highland jungle over more than 100 a.

  • 6.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Åström, Mats E.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Öberg, Tomas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Effects of land use change vs natural control on stream water chemistry in the subandean Amazon, Peru.2009In: Proceedings of XII Brazilian Congress on Geochemistry and VIII International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry. Oct 18-22, Ouro Preto, Brazil., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Åström, Mats E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Öberg, Tomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Land-use change versus natural controls on stream water chemistry in the Subandean Amazon, Peru2010In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 485-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluates the effects of deforestation and land-use change, as compared to natural controls, on stream water chemistry in the Subandean Amazon Dissolved major and trace elements were determined near the stream outlet of 48 independent watersheds with varying morphology. bed rock composition and intactness of forest cover (pristine to highly exploited) Geomorphological characteristics were derived from a digital elevation model, geological formations from digitalized maps and forest cover from digital classification of SPOT satellite images Partial least square regression and multiple linear regression showed that watershed average elevation, which ranged between 396 and 1649 m, was the strongest control on stream water chemistry, explaining >70% of the variation in K and a considerable part also for Mn, U, Mg and HCO3 with near exponential concentration increases down the altitude gradient Forest cover, which ranged between 7% and 99%, correlated strongly with average elevation (Spearman correlation coefficient, r(s) = 0.8), but had no statistically significant impact on stream solute concentrations Thus, in the studied Subandean region, watershed scale deforestation has not resulted in measurable impacts oil stream water chemistry which is dominated by the spatial variation in natural controls.

  • 8.
    Lindell, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Åström, Mats E.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Öberg, Tomas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Land-use versus natural controls on soil fertility in the Subandean Amazon, Peru.2010In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 408, no 4, p. 965-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deforestation to amplify the agricultural frontier is a serious threat to the Amazon forest. Strategies to attain and maintain satisfactory soil fertility, which requires knowledge of spatial and temporal changes caused by land-use, are important for reaching sustainable development. This study highlights these issues by evaluating the relative effects of agricultural land-use and natural factors on chemical fertility of inceptisols on redbed lithologies in the Subandean Amazon. Macro and micronutrients were determined in topsoil and subsoil in the vicinity of two villages at a total of 80 sites including pastures, coffee plantations, swidden fields, secondary forest and, as a reference, adjacent primary forest. Differences in soil fertility between the land cover classes were investigated by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLSR). Primary forest soil was found to be chemically similar to that of coffee plantations, pastures and secondary forests. There were no significant differences between soils of these land cover types in terms of plant nutrients (e.g. N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mo, Mn, Zn, Cu and Co) or other fertility indicators (OM pH,, BS, EC, CECe and exchangeable acidity). The parent material (as indicated by texture and sample geographical origin) and the slope of the sampled sites were stronger controls on soil fertility than land cover type. Elevated concentrations of a few nutrients (NO3 and K) were, however detected in soils of swidden fields. Despite being fertile (higher CECe, Ca and P) compared to Oxisols and Ultisols in the Amazon lowland, the Subandean soils frequently showed deficiencies in several nutrients (e.g. P, K, NO3, Cu and Zn), and high levels of free Al at acidic sites. This paper concludes that deforestation and agricultural land-use has not introduced lasting chemical changes in the studied Subandean soils that are significant in comparison to the natural variability.

  • 9.
    Manniche, Jesper
    et al.
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Topsø Larsen, Karin
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Brandt Broegaard, Rikke
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Holland, Emil
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Chaja, Patryk (Contributor)
    Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Kierek, Marta (Contributor)
    Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland.
    Benaim, Andre (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Svensson, Katrine (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Gunnarsson, Roger (Contributor)
    Energikontor Sydost AB.
    Paulauskas, Stasys (Contributor)
    Strategic Self-Management Institute, Lithuania.
    Paulauskas, Aleksandras (Contributor)
    Strategic Self-Management Institute, Lithuania.
    Lindell, Lina (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sattari, Setayesh (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Kordestani, Arash (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Management Accounting and Logistics.
    Allmér, Hans (Contributor)
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Destination: A circular tourism economy: a handbook for transitioning toward a circular economy within the tourism and hospitality sectors in the South Baltic Region2017 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This handbook provides an overall understanding of the concept of the circular economy and of the societal dynamics through which innovations and transitioning processes towards a circular economy are realised. 

    It describes and discusses the specific economic and political context for applying and developing the circular economy in the CIRTOINNO project. The specific contexts are the tourism sectors in the South Baltic partner regions. 

    It investigates and discusses the opportunities for small and medium-sized tourism businesses to adopt circular economy ideas, and to identify possible ‘good practices’ among tourism SMEs in developing and applying circular economy solutions, especially in relation to the fields of foci of the CIRTOINNO project: accommodation, food and spa services. 

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