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  • 1. Ding, JW
    et al.
    Andersson, R
    Soltesz, V
    Willén, R
    Loft, S
    Poulsen, HE
    Pärsson, H
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bengmark, S
    The effect of biliary decompression on bacteral translcation in jauniced rats1993In: HRP Surgery, Vol. 7, p. 99-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Ding, JW
    et al.
    Andersson, R
    Soltezs, V
    Pärsson, H
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wang, W
    Bengmark, S
    Inhibition of bacterial translocation in obstructive jaundice by MTP-PE in the rat1994In: Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 20, p. 720-728Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Ekström, P
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Differentiation of ganglion cells and amacrine cells in the rat retina: correlation with expression of HuC/D and GAP-43 proteins2003In: Developmental Brain Research, Vol. 145, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Engelsberg, K
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ghosh, F
    Culturing of porcine full-thickness retina.2005In: Ophthalmic Research, Vol. 37, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Engelsberg, K
    et al.
    Wasselius, J
    Ehinger, B
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Apoptotic cell death and microglial cell responses in cultured rat retina.2004In: Graefe´s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, Vol. 242, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Englund-Johansson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Department of Ophthalmology, Clinical Sciences, Lund, University of Lund, Sweden..
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela
    Department of Ophthalmology, Clinical Sciences, Lund, University .
    Ekström, Per
    Department of Ophthalmology, Clinical Sciences, Lund, University .
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Human neural progenitor cells promote photoreceptor survival in retinal explants2010In: Experimental Eye Research, ISSN 0014-4835, E-ISSN 1096-0007, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 292-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different types of progenitor and stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study was conducted to investigate whether human neural progenitor cells (HNPCs) have neuroprotective properties on retinal explants models with calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death. In the first experiments, HNPCs in a feeder layer were co-cultured for 6 days either with postnatal rd1 mouse or normal rat retinas. Retinal histological sections were used to determine outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, and to detect the number of photoreceptors with labeling for calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL. The ONL thickness of co-cultured rat and rd1 retinas was found to be almost 10% and 40% thicker, respectively, compared to controls. Cell counts of calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL labeled photoreceptors in both models revealed a 30-50% decrease when co-cultured with HNPCs. The results represent significant increases of photoreceptor survival in the co-cultured retinas. In the second experiments, for an identification of putative survival factors, or a combination of them, a growth factor profile was performed on conditioned medium. The relative levels of various growth factors were analyzed by densitometric measurements of growth factor array membranes. Following growth factors were identified as most potential survival factors; granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), neurotrophic factor 3 (NT-3), placental growth factor (PIGF), transforming growth factors (TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-D). HNPCs protect both against calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in the rd1 mouse and against caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in normal rat retinas in vitro. The protective effect is possibly achieved by a variety of growth factors secreted from the HNPCs.

  • 7. Ghosh, F
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ehinger, B
    Long-term full thickness embryonic rabbit retinal transplants1999In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 40, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Ghosh, F
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wong, F
    Petters, RM
    Transplantation of full-thickness retina in the rhodopsin transgenic pig.2004In: Retina, Vol. 24, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gullberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Nina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Polacek, Charlotta
    Precechtelova, Jana
    Badurova, Miriam
    Sojka, Martin
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Israelsson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bopegamage, Shubhada
    Hafenstein, Susan
    Lindberg, A. Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    A single coxsackievirus B2 capsid residue controls cytolysis and apoptosis in rhabdomyosarcoma cells.2010In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 84, no 12, p. 5868-5879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coxsackievirus B2 (CVB2), one of six human pathogens of the group B coxsackieviruses within the enterovirus genus of Picornaviridae, causes a wide spectrum of human diseases ranging from mild upper respiratory illnesses to myocarditis and meningitis. The CVB2 prototype strain Ohio-1 (CVB2O) was originally isolated from a patient with summer grippe in the 1950s. Later on, CVB2O was adapted to cytolytic replication in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Here, we present analyses of the correlation between the adaptive mutations of this RD variant and the cytolytic infection in RD cells. Using reverse genetics, we identified a single amino acid change within the exposed region of the VP1 protein (glutamine to lysine at position 164) as the determinant for the acquired cytolytic trait. Moreover, this cytolytic virus induced apoptosis, including caspase activation and DNA degradation, in RD cells. These findings contribute to our understanding of the host cell adaptation process of CVB2O and provide a valuable tool for further studies of virus-host interactions.

  • 10. Guo, G
    et al.
    Willén, R
    Andersson, R
    Pärsson, H
    Liu, X
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bengmark, S
    Morphological response of the peritoneum and spleen to intraperitoneal biomaterials1993In: The International Journal of Artificial Organs, Vol. 16, p. 276-284Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Guo, W
    et al.
    Andersson, R
    Ljungh, Å
    Pärsson, H
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bengmark, S
    Orally administered phospholipids inhibit abdominal rubber-drain-induced bacterial translocation in the rat.1994In: Digestion, Vol. 55, p. 417-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Hallberg, E
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Elofsson, R
    The aesthetasc concept: structural variations of putative olfactory receptor cell complexes in Crustacea1992In: Microscopy Research and Technique, Vol. 22, p. 325-335Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Hallberg, E
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wallén, R
    Olfactory sensilla in crustaceans: morphology, sexual dimorphism and distribution patterns1997In: International Journal of Insect Morphology and Embryology, Vol. 26, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Department of Zoology, University of Lund .
    Identification of different types of serotonin-like immunoreactive olfactory interneurons in four infraorders of decapod crustaceans1991In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 264, no 2, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An antiserum raised against serotonin (5HT) was applied to the brains of representatives of four different infraorders of decapod crustaceans, and revealed two morphological classes of olfactory interneurons. They were classified by the position and size of their cell bodies, and their connection pattern. One class consisted of giant olfactory interneurons and the other of globuli cells. They were regarded as input and intrinsic interneurons, respectively, because of their morphology. The two classes displayed a similar pattern in two of the infraorders, whereas only one class appeared in the other two infraorders. 

  • 15.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bruun, A
    deVente, J
    Ehinger, B
    Immunohistochemical analysis of the developing inner plexiform layer in postnatal rat retina2000In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 41, p. 305-313Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bruun, A
    Ehinger, B
    Gap junction protein connexin43 is heterogeneously expressed among glial cells in the adult rabbit retina1999In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 407, p. 395-403Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bruun, A
    Grasbon, T
    Ehinger, B
    Growth of postnatal rat retina in vitro. Development of neurotransmitter systems2000In: Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy, Vol. 19, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bruun, A
    Törngren, M
    Ehinger, B
    Development of glutamate receptor subunit 2 immunoreactivity in postnatal retina2000In: Visual Neuroscience, Vol. 17, p. 737-742Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Carlberg, M
    NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase activity in deutocerebrum of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (Crustacea, Decapoda)1994In: Brain Research, Vol. 649, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    LUND UNIV, DEPT ZOOL, S-22362 LUND, SWEDEN.
    Carlberg, M
    LUND UNIV, DEPT ZOOL, S-22362 LUND, SWEDEN.
    NO-synthase: What can research on invertebrates add to what is already known?1995In: Advances in Neuroimmunology, Vol. 5, p. 431-442Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study attempts to review presently known data regarding the distribution of nitric oxide (NO) synthase and the function of NO in invertebrate species. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase, and activates guanylate cyclase which in turn leads to an increase in levels of cGMP in target cells. Major contributions to the knowledge of NO as a messenger molecule in invertebrates have been made by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and biochemical assays. These techniques suggest the presence of a L-arginine/NO pathway in a variety of tissues, thus implicating muliple roles for NO in invertebrates.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ehinger, B
    Structural changes in the developing retina maintained in vitro2005In: Vision research, Vol. 45 (25-26), p. 3235-3243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    The Wallenberg Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Ehinger, Berndt
    The Wallenberg Retina Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
    Postnatal development of the rat retina and some of its neurotransmitter systems in vitro.2001In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 131, p. 589-598Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Gefors, L
    Wallén, R
    Hallberg, E
    Structure and distribution patterns of aesthetascs and male-specific sensilla in Lophogaster typicus (Mysidacea)1996In: Journal of Crustacean Biology, Vol. 16, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hallberg, E
    Male-specific structures in the olfactory system of mysids (Mysidacea; Crustacea)1992In: Cell and Tissue Research, Vol. 268, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hallberg, E
    The organization of the olfactory lobes of Euphausiacea and Mysidacea (Crustacea, Malacostraca)1992In: Zoomorphology, Vol. 112, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lundqvist, T
    Hallberg, E
    Nässel, D
    Tachykinin-related neuropeptide in the crayfish olfactory midbrain1999In: Cell and Tissue Research, Vol. 296, p. 405-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mellon, DF
    Nitric oxide as a putative messenger molecule in the crayfish olfactory midbrain1998In: Brain Research, Vol. 807, p. 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Schmidt, M
    Dopaminergic modulation of spontaneous activity in the brain of the crayfish, Cherax destructor (Decapoda, Crustacea)1997In: Canadian Journal of Zoology, Vol. 75, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Törngren, M
    Wasselius, J
    Månsson, L
    Ehinger, B
    Developmental expression of DCC in the rat retina2001In: Developmental Brain Research, Vol. 130, p. 133-138Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wallén, R
    Hallberg, E
    Electron microscopic localization and experimental modification of NADPH-diaphorase in crustacean sensory axons1996In: Invertebrate Neuroscience, Vol. 2, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Liljekvist-Larsson, I
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Retinal neurospheres prepared as tissue for transplantation2005In: Developmental Brain Research, Vol. 160 (2), p. 194-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Liljekvist-Larsson, I
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Studies of host-graft interactions in vitro2007In: Journal of Neural Engineering, Vol. 4, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Liljekvist-Larsson, I
    et al.
    Törngren, M
    Abrahamson, M
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Growth of the postnatal rat retina in vitro: Analyses of mRNA expression for photoreceptor proteins using quantitative RT-PCR.2003In: Molecular Vision, Vol. 9, p. 657-664Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Progenitor cell-derived factors enhance photorecepto survival in rat retinal explants.2008In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1227, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explantation of postnatal rat retinas is associated with degenerative events that show morphological similarities to human retinal degenerative disorders. The most evident morphological features are photoreceptor apoptosis involving caspase-3 and Müller cell activation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the content of protective factors in rat retinal progenitor cells and analyze the influence of the identified factors on the survival of photoreceptor cells and retinal gliosis. Tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were identified as putative beneficial factors, and their combined effect was examined in rat retinal explant cultures. Photoreceptor apoptosis was estimated by cell counts of cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-12 immunolabeled as well as TUNEL labeled cells. TIMP-1 and VEGF in combination significantly suppressed photoreceptor apoptosis involving caspase-3 activation. Cell counts of caspase-12 and TUNEL labeled photoreceptors showed no significant difference between the experiment and control retinas. TIMP-1 and VEGF appeared to have no effect on Müller cell activation as measured by GFAP and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Our data suggest that TIMP-1 and VEGF in combination promote the survival of photoreceptor cells in rat retinal explants, possibly by affecting a caspase-3 signaling pathway.

  • 35.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Death of photoreceptors in organotypic retinal explant cultures: implication of rhodopsin accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum stress.2011In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, ISSN 0165-0270, E-ISSN 1872-678X, ISSN 0165-0270, Vol. 197, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress may be induced following aberrant rhodopsin accumulation in photoreceptors in explanted rat retinas. Rhodopsin accumulation was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of pancreatic ER-kinase and eukaryotic initiator factor 2α as well as increased levels of C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 78 and eventually increased cleaved caspase-12 and cleaved caspase-3. Glucose-regulated protein 78, pancreatic ER-kinase, caspase-12 and cleaved caspase-3 were present in photoreceptors, indicating that ER-stress and apoptosis are induced in this cell population. These results suggest that ER-stress and subsequent apoptosis is induced in healthy photoreceptors, presumably by aberrant accumulation of rhodopsin and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiator factor 2α. The explant culture system may allow investigations of neuroprotective strategies.

  • 36.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Further assessment of neuropathology in retinal explants and neuroprotection by human neural progenitor cells.2011In: Journal of Neural Engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, E-ISSN 1741-2552, Vol. 8, no 6, p. Article ID: 066012-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanted rat retinas show progressive photoreceptor degeneration that appears to be caspase-12-dependent. Decrease in photoreceptor density eventually affects the inner retina, particularly in the bipolar cell population. Explantation and the induced photoreceptor degeneration are accompanied by activation of Müller and microglia cells. The goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of a feeder layer of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) could suppress the degenerative and reactive changes in the explants. Immunohistochemical analyses showed considerable sprouting of rod photoreceptor axon terminals into the inner retina and reduced densities of cone and rod bipolar cells. Both sprouting and bipolar cell degenerations were significantly lower in retinas cultured with feeder layer cells compared to cultured controls. A tendency toward reduced microglia activation in the retinal layers was also noted in the presence of feeder layer cells. These results indicate that hNPCs or factors produced by them can limit the loss of photoreceptors and secondary injuries in the inner retina. The latter may be a consequence of disrupted synaptic arrangement.

  • 37.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Neuropathology of cultured retinas: degenerative events and rescue paradigms2011In: Advances in Eye Research. Volume 2 / [ed] William L. Thomsen, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011, no 2, p. 177-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Taylor, Linnea
    Univ Lund Hosp.
    Ghosh, Fredrik
    Univ Lund Hosp.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry. Örebro universitet.
    Autophagy and ER-stress contribute to photoreceptor degeneration in cultured adult porcine retina2014In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1585, p. 167-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate rod and cone photoreceptor degeneration in organotypic cultures of adult porcine retina. Our hypothesis was that the photoreceptors accumulate opsins, which, together with exposure to cyclic dim light illumination, induce autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER-stress) to overcome damaging protein overload. For this purpose, retinas were cultured for 48 h and 72 h during which they were illuminated with dim light for 8 h/day; specimens were analyzed by means of immunohistochemistry, Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and transmission electron microscopy. ER-stress and photoreceptor degeneration was observed in conventionally cultured retinas. The additional stress in the form of dim light illumination for 8 h/day resulted in increased levels of the ER-stress markers GRP78/BiP and CHOP, as well as increased level of active caspase-12. Increased autophagic processes in cone and rod photoreceptors were detected by LC3B-II increases and occurrence of autophagosomes at the ultrastructural level. Illumination also resulted in altered protein expression for autophagy inducers such as p62 and Beclin-1. Moreover, there was a decrease in phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which further indicate an increase of autophagy. Rod and cone photoreceptors in retinas from a diurnal animal that were exposed to dim light illumination in vitro displayed autophagy and ER-stress processes. As no alteration of rhodopsin mRNA was observed, autophagy and ER-stress are suggested to decrease rhodopsin protein at the posttranscriptional level. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Taylor, Linnéa
    Lunds universitet.
    Ghosh, Fredrik
    Lunds universitet.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Autophagy en ER-stress contribute to photoreceptor degenenration in cultured adult porcine retinaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40. Nässel, D
    et al.
    Elekes, K
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Dopamine-immunoreactive neurons in the blowfly visual system: light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry1988In: Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy, ISSN 0891-0618, E-ISSN 1873-6300, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dopamine-immunoreactive (DA-IR) neurons were mapped in detail in the visual system of the blowfly, Calliphora erythrocephala. Three types of DA-IR neurons could be identified in the optic lobes. One type constitutes a population of several thousand columnar small field amacrine neurons in the second neuropil region, the medulla. The other two types are large field projection neurons innervating the next, more central, synaptic region comprising the lobula and the lobula plate, as well as centres of the midbrain. Their cell bodies are located latero-ventrally in the brain. No DA-IR neurons were seen in the most peripheral visual synaptic neuropil, the lamina. The two types of projection neurons form overlapping wide field arborizations in the lobula and lobula plate and cannot be distinguished from each other in this region. Their central connections are different, however. One type of projection neuron, BOD1, consists of two neurons that bilaterally connect the optic lobes and neuropil on each side of the oesophageal foramen in the posterior protocerebrum. The other type, BOD2, also consists of two bilateral neurons similar to BOD1, but with their central processes posteriorly in the lateral protocerebrum. The amacrine DA-IR neurons form lateral processes in three layers of the medulla synaptic neuropil. These neurons were also investigated by means of electron microscopical immunocytochemistry. They contain predominantly clear vesicles, but a few dense core vesicles could be resolved. The synaptic connections of the DA-IR amacrines suggest that they form centrifugal feedback circuits between the inner and the outer portion of the medulla. The present results indicate that dopamine may be a neurotransmitter in functionally different classes of neurons of the blowfly visual system: amacrines and projection neurons. 

  • 41. Nässel, DR
    et al.
    Ohlsson, LG
    Johansson, Kjell
    Department of Zoology, University of Lund.
    Grimmelikhuijsen, C
    Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry in the blowfly optic lobe reacting with antisera to RFamide and FMRFamide.1989In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different antisera to the molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide FMRFamide, and its fragment, RFamide (Arg-Phe-NH2), label a distinct population of neurons in the optic lobe of the blowfly, Calliphora erythrocephala. Seven morphological types of RFamide/FMRFamide-like immunoreactive neurons could be distinguished in the optic lobes based on the locations of their cell bodies, their axonal projections and the distribution of their processes. Of these, two types could be resolved in their entire extent, the others were labeled only in their cell bodies and terminal processes or were partly obscured by other immunoreactive processes. The RF-like immunoreactive neurons in the optic lobes are of two main classes: (1) two types of large field projection neurons and (2) five types of local neurons. One type of projection neurons (five in each lobe) connects the entire projected retinal mosaic of the medulla and lobula in the optic lobe with protocerebral centres associated with the mushroom body calyx. The other type (2-3 invading each lobe) has cell bodies in the protocerebrum and contralateral processes invading optic lobes. Of the class of local neurons there are two amacrine RF-like immunoreactive neurons in each medulla. Each of these amacrines supplies the entire mosaic with fine processes. The remaining local RF-like immunoreactive neurons are present in relatively large numbers (one type in more than 2000 copies in each medulla) and-supply the medulla, lobula and lobula plate neuropils with fine varicose processes. In the medulla the RF-like immunoreactive processes are arranged in strict layers whereas in the lobula complex the distribution is diffuse. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry, using both pre-embedding immuno peroxidase-antiperoxidase and post-embedding protein A-gold labeling, was employed for analysis of cytology and synaptic connections of RF-like immunoreactive neurons in the medulla. The varicosities of the processes of the large field projection neurons were not found to make chemical synapses with other neurons in the medulla. The spines of the RF-like immunoreactive processes of the large medulla amacrines, however, make pre- and postsynaptic contacts with other neural elements. Our findings indicate that an RFamide/FMRFamide-like substance may be used as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator by optic lobe neurons of different types. The local and projection RF-like immunoreactive pathways probably play different roles in visual processing. 

  • 42. Ohlsson, LG
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Department of Zoology, University of Lund.
    Nässel, D
    Postembryonic development of Arg-Phe-amide-like and cholecystokinin-like immunoreactive neurons in the blowfly optic lobe1989In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 256, p. 199-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adult optic lobes of the blowfly Calliphoraerythrocephala were found to be innervated by more than2000 neurons immunoreactive to antisera raised against theneuropeptides FMRFamide, its fragment RFamide, andgastrin/cholecystokinin (CCK). All of the CCK-like immunoreactive(CCK-IR) neurons also reacted with antisera toRFamide, FMRFamide and pancreatic polypeptide. A fewRFamide/FMRFamide-like immunoreactive (RF-IR) neuronsdid not react with CCK antisera; they reacted insteadwith antisera to Leu-enkephalin and Met-enkephalin-Arg 6-Phe 7. The RF-IR neurons are, thus, heterogeneous withrespect to their contents of immunoreactive peptides. Twoof the RF-IR neuron types innervating the adult optic lobescould be traced in their entirety only after following theirpostembryonic development, because of the complexity ofthe trajectories of the immunoreactive neuronal process inthe adult insect. The majority of the cell bodies of the RFIRand CCK-IR neurons lie within the optic lobes andare derived from imaginal neuroblasts of the inner and outeroptic anlagen. Six of the peptidergic neurons are, however,metamorphosing larval neurons with their cell bodiesin the central part of the protocerebrum. The full extentof immunoreactivitiy is not attained in some of the neuronsuntil the late pupal or early adult stage. The larval opticcenter was also found to be innervated by neurons immunoreactivewith both RFamide and CCK antisera. The cellbodies of these RF-IR/CCK-IR neurons are located nearthe developing lamina (one on each side). In the 24 h pupa,the cell bodies of these neurons are still immunoreactive,but thereafter they cannot be immunolabeled apparentlydue to cell death or a change in transmitter phenotype. 

  • 43. Persson, K
    et al.
    Alm, P
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, KE
    Co-existence of nitrergic, peptidergic and acetylcholine esterase-positive nerves in the pig lower urinary tract1995In: Journal of Autonomous Nervous System, Vol. 52, p. 225-236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Persson, K
    et al.
    Alm, P
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, KE
    Nitric oxide synthase in the pig lower urinary tract: immunohistochemistry, NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and functional effects1993In: Brittish Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 110, p. 521-530Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Persson, K
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, P
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, KE
    Morphological and functional evidence against a sensory and sympathetic origin of nitric oxide synthase-containing nerves in the rat lower urinary tract1997In: Neuroscience, Vol. 77, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Persson, K
    et al.
    Poljakovic, M
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, B
    Morphological and biochemical investigations of nitric oxide synthase and related enzymes in the rat and pig urothelium1999In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, Vol. 47, p. 739-749Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svanborg, Catharina
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Larsson, Bengt
    Svensson, Maj-Lis
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Escherichia coli-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase expression in the mouse bladder and kidney2001In: Kidney International, Vol. 59, p. 893-904Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Pärsson, H
    et al.
    Jundzill, W
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Jonung, T
    Norgren, L
    Healing characteristics of polymer-coated or collagen treated Dacron grafts: an experimental study1994In: Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 2, p. 242-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49. Swartbol, P
    et al.
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pärsson, H
    Norgren, L
    NADPH-diaphorase (NO-synthase) expression of endothelial cells during four weeks healing of stretch-e PTFE graft. An experimental porcine study1996In: International Angiology, Vol. 15, p. 225-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Wang, WD
    et al.
    Pärsson, H
    Andersson, R
    Soltesz, V
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bengmark, S
    Bacterial translocation, intestinal ultrastructure and cellular systematic membrane permeability after major liver resection in the rat1994In: Brittish Journal of Surgery, Vol. 81, p. 579-584Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 54
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