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  • 1.
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Impossible care2017In: Does Design Care...?: An International Workshop of Design Thought and Action, University of Lancaster, 2017, p. 99-103Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Carleklev, Stephanie
    Stringling2011In: Ambience'11 exhibition: where art, technology and design meet / [ed] Annika Hellström, Hanna Landin och Linda Worbin, Borås: The Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås , 2011, p. 26-27Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    The Future Is Present: Designing Time for Sustainable Change2017In: 11th International Conference on Design Principles & Practices: Design for the Global Village, Champaign, IL: Common Ground Research Networks , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In matters of teaching design for sustainable change, we are still in a situation that requires us to break new ground. New sets of tools, methods, and criteria are needed. One important criterion is the aspect of temporality. Not thinking about design's long-term effects, pushing acceleration, and neglecting the future have been a major cause of our unsustainable present. Still time is not commonly addressed in design education. To work with time offers several exciting possibilities. One is to extend the focus onto the entire life cycle of an artefact, exploring technical solutions and systems; another is to address aspects of planning for an unpredictable future. The third, which is at the core of my research, is to focus on design as a process rather than an object, and to design time itself. Design is what it makes possible, what it allows for, not what shape or finish it has. My research, which taken place through work with students and staff at the Department of Design, hopes to inspire new ways of working with sustainability within design educations.

  • 4.
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Sterte, Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Pedagogy for teaching design – with an emphasis on sustainable design2013In: Design learning for tomorrow: design education from kindergarten to PhD, 2013, p. 1451-1465Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching sustainability is not solely a question of providing relevant information; it is foremost about training students to meet the challenges of tomorrow. In design this can mean to shift the focus from material, form and function towards systems, correlation and time – a process supported both by how we teach as well as what we teach. But pedagogy still seems to be treated like a poor cousin to the more important design knowledge. This  made us curious about the correlation between pedagogy and teaching design for sustainable change.

    By applying a study of Eilam and Trop (2011) onto the curriculum of an undergraduate design programme and through interviews with students we investigated the underlying pedagogy. Eilam and Trop had identified four pedagogical components that supported a holistic learning experience in their study.

    It proves more fruitful to incorporate sustainability wholeheartedly in a programme, instead of teaching it as a separate course. Pedagogies like emotional learning in realistic design projects and multidimensional learning in theoretical courses support an education for sustainable change and prepare students to meet the challenges of tomorrow without missing their professional  development.

  • 5.
    Fountain, Wendy
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Hruza, Stephan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Making resilience through design doing2019In: Cumulus Conference Proceedings Rovaniemi 2019: Around the Campfire – Resilience and Intelligence. 27th May – 1st June 2019, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Jonna Häkkilä, Minna Pakanen, Elina Luiro, Enni Mikkonen, Satu Miettinen, Aalto: Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media , 2019, p. 83-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose ‘resilience making’ in this paper as urgent, creative and adaptive action through an account of its exploration with students in the first year of an international BFA in design. We focus on the learning design being carried out for the fourth iteration of the module ‘Resilience’ - the last of eight modules completed by students in an introductory year structured around design tools and processes.Our core proposition is that context-rich, place-based making is a means to connect students within social-ecological systems as continua, rather than positioning them as separate from the abstract concepts and systems theory we typically expect them to comprehend. Arising from this learning design process, we highlight insights around sustainability epistemologies, meaningmaking in place, and our valuing of contextual and traditional knowledge.As design practitioner-teachers, we outline our working position in relation to sustainability and resilience education, and our aims of integrating design knowing, seeing and doing. We then detail how the module will unfold with students during May 2019 - a month characterised by:

    • place-specific making days progressing in focus from personal, to community, to large-scale system resilience

    • structured reflection by students on their first year learning and placebased making; and

    • a culminating, ‘co-citizen’ lab week in which students are challenged to carry out adaptive action by linking their own system and timescales in the context of their diverse learning community.

    We close by questioning how we might advance ‘resilience making’ as designled adaptive action, and strengthen our own resilience as practitioners and teachers of design in a time of crisis.

  • 6.
    Rodgers, Paul
    et al.
    Lancaster University, United Kingdom.
    Innella, Giovanni
    Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan.
    Bremner, Craig
    Charles Sturt University, Australia.
    Coxon, Ian
    Charles Sturt University, Australia.
    Broadley, Cara
    The Glasgow School of Art, UK.
    Cadamuro, Alessia
    Open University, UK.
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Chan, Kwan
    Dilnot, Clive
    Fathers, James
    The Lancaster Care Charter2019In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 73-77Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the fall of 1991 the Munich Design Charter was published in Design Issues. This charter was written as a design-led “call to arms” on the future nations and boundaries of Europe. The signatories of the Munich Design Charter saw the problem of Europe, at that time, as fundamentally a problem of form that should draw on the creativity and expertise of design. Likewise, the Does Design Care…? workshop held at Imagination, Lancaster University in the autumn of 2017 brought together a multidisciplinary group of people from 16 nations across 5 continents, who, at a critical moment in design discourse saw a problem with the future of Care. The Lancaster Care Charter has been written in response to the vital question “Does Design Care…?” and via a series of conversations, stimulated by a range of presentations that explored a range of provocations, insights and more questions, provides answers for the contemporary context of Care. With nation and boundary now erased by the flow of Capital the Charter aims to address the complex and urgent challenges for Care as both the future possible and the responsibility of design. The Lancaster Care Charter presents a collective vision and sets out new pragmatic encounters for the design of Care and the care of Design.

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