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  • 1. Andersson, K-E
    et al.
    Garcia Pascual, A
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Forman, A
    Tottrup, A
    Electrically-induced, nerve-mediated relaxation of rabbit urethra involves nitric oxide1992In: Journal of urology, Vol. 147, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersson, K-E
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide-mediated effects in lower urinary tract smooth muscle.World1994In: Journal of urology, Vol. 12, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Andersson, K-E
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nitric oxide synthase and the lower urinary tract: possible implications for physiology and pathophysiology1995In: Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology. Supplement, Vol. 175, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Andersson, K-E
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    The L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway and non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxation of the lower urinary tract1993In: General pharmacology, Vol. 24, p. 833-839Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Andersson, M
    et al.
    Pouakovic, M
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in Escherichia coli-infected urothelium: involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase2006In: BJU international, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Christ, G J
    et al.
    Day, N S
    Day, M
    Zhao, W
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pandita, R K
    Andersson, K-E
    Increased connexin43-mediated intercellular communication in a rat model of bladder overactivity in vivo2003In: American journal of physiology (Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.), Vol. 284, p. R1241-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Christ, G J
    et al.
    Venkateswarlu, K
    Day, N S
    Valcic, M
    Santizo, C
    Zhao, W
    Wang, H Z
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    Intercellular communication and bladder function2003In: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, Vol. 539, p. 239-254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Demirel, Isak
    et al.
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Säve, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Kruse, Robert
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Persson, Katarina
    Univ Örebro, Dept Clin Med, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) in human bladder epithelial cells infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli2013In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins inhibit pro-inflammatory signalling mediated by Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways. To evade the immune response some pathogens appear to modify the host SOCS proteins. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are able to subvert the host response evoked by bladder epithelial cells, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UPEC can modify the host SOCS and STAT3 response. Real time RT-PCR studies demonstrated an increased SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in the isolated human bladder epithelial cell lines (RT-4 and 5637) in response to cytokines. UPEC strain IA2 increased SOCS3, but not SOCS1, mRNA levels with a peak at 6h after infection. The increase of SOCS3 was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. The UPEC strain IA2 caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of STAT3. This study demonstrates that UPEC are able to affect SOCS3 and STAT3 signalling in human uroepithelial cells. The finding that UPEC are able to induce mediators involved in suppression of host cytokine signalling may help to elucidate how UPEC may circumvent the host response during urinary tract infection.

  • 9. Demirel, Isak
    et al.
    Vumma, Ravi
    Mohlin, Camilla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Svensson, Lovisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Säve, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Persson, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Nitric Oxide Activates IL-6 Production and Expression in Human Renal Epithelial Cells2012In: American Journal of Nephrology, ISSN 0250-8095, E-ISSN 1421-9670, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 524-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Increased nitric oxide (NO) production or inducible form of NO synthase activity have been documented in patients suffering from urinary tract infection (UTI), but the role of NO in this infection is unclear. We investigated whether NO can affect the host response in human renal epithelial cells by modulating IL-6 production and mRNA expression. Methods: The human renal epithelial cell line A498 was infected with a uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain and/or the NO donor DETA/NO. The IL-6 production and mRNA expression were evaluated by ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. IL-6 mRNA stability was evaluated by analyzing mRNA degradation by real-time RT-PCR. Results: DETA/NO caused a significant (p < 0.05) increase in IL-6 production. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling, but not JNK, were shown to significantly suppress DETA/NO-induced IL-6 production. UPEC-induced IL-6 production was further increased (by 73 +/- 23%, p < 0.05) in the presence of DETA/NO. The IL-6 mRNA expression increased 2.1 +/- 0.17-fold in response to DETA/NO, while the UPEC-evoked increase was pronounced (20 +/- 4.5-fold). A synergistic effect of DETA/NO on UPEC-induced IL-6 expression was found (33 +/- 7.2-fold increase). The IL-6 mRNA stability studies showed that DETA/NO partially attenuated UPEC-induced degradation of IL-6 mRNA. Conclusions: NO was found to stimulate IL-6 in renal epithelial cells through p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and also to increase IL-6 mRNA stability in UPEC-infected cells. This study proposes a new role for NO in the host response during UTI by modulating the transcription and production of the cytokine IL-6. Copyright (C) 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 10. Dupont, M C
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Spitsbergen, J M
    Tuttle, J B
    Steers, W D
    The neuronal response to bladder outlet obstruction, a role for NGF1995In: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, Vol. 385, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Fovaeus, M
    et al.
    Fujiwara, M
    Högestätt, E D
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    A non-nitrergic smooth muscle relaxant factor released from rat urinary bladder by muscarinic receptor stimulation1999In: Journal of urology, Vol. 161, p. 649-653Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Fovaeus, M
    et al.
    Fujiwara, M
    Högestätt, E D
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    A non-nitrergic smooth muscle relaxant factor released from the contracting rat urinary bladder1998In: Acta physiologica Scandinavica, Vol. 162, p. 115-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Fujiwara, M
    et al.
    Andersson, K-E
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nitric oxide-induced cGMP accumulation in the mouse bladder is not related to smooth muscle relaxation2000In: European journal of pharmacology, Vol. 401, p. 241-250Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Garcia-Pascual, A
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Lund .
    Holmquist, F
    Andersson, K-E
    Endothelin-1-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and contraction in isolated rabbit detrusor and urethral smooth muscle1993In: General Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-3623, E-ISSN 1879-0011, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) caused a concentration-dependent increase in the formation of inositol phosphates (IPs) in isolated rabbit detrusor and urethral smooth muscle preparations prelabelled with myo-[H-3]inositol. 2. The increase in accumulation of IPs was slow in onset in both detrusor and urethra, with no significant accumulation demonstrable during the first 30 min. The increase in IPs accumulation found after exposure of detrusor tissue to ET-1 (10(-7) M) for 2 hr (250 +/- 38%, n = 7) was not significantly different from that found in the urethra (279 +/- 40%, n = 6), when expressed as per cent of corresponding control values. 3. Pretreatment with nifedipine (10(-6) M) did not reduce IPs formation. In contrast, no increase in IPs formation was demonstrated in Ca2+-free medium. 4. ET-1 (10(-11) - 10(-7) M) produced concentration-dependent, slowly developing contractions in both detrusor and urethral preparations. Pretreatment with H-7 (3 x 10(-5) M) for 30 min before ET-1 application resulted in a non-parallel shift of the ET-1 concentration-response curve with significant reductions in maximal responses in both tissues. 5. ET-1-induced contractions in urethral preparations were markedly inhibited by Ni2+ (3 x 10(-4) M), whereas the effect of Ni2+ in the detrusor was less pronounced. 6. The results suggest that ET-1 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the rabbit detrusor and urethra. Both IPs formation and contractile activation evoked by ET-1 are dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+-entry pathways seem to be differently activated in the detrusor and urethra, since Ca2+-influx through dihydropyridine-sensitive channels is involved in the ET-1-induced contraction of the detrusor, whereas a Ni2+-sensitive, nifedipine-resistant pathway seems to dominate in the urethra. 

  • 15. Giraldi, A
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Werkström, V
    Alm, P
    Wagner, G
    Andersson, K-E
    Effects of diabetes on neurotransmission in rat vaginal smooth muscle2001In: International journal of impotence research, Vol. 13, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Ho, K M T
    et al.
    Borja, M C
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Brading, A F
    Andersson, K-E
    Expression of nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the human female striated urethral sphincter2003In: Journal of urology, Vol. 169, p. 2407-2411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Holmquist, F
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bodker, A
    Andersson, K-E
    Some pre- and postjunctional effects of castration in rabbit isolated corpus cavernosum and urethra1994In: Journal of urology, Vol. 52, p. 1011-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Igawa, Y
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    Uvelius, B
    Mattiasson, A
    Facilitatory effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide on spinal and peripheral micturition reflex pathways in conscious rats with and without detrusor instability1993In: Journal of urology, Vol. 149, p. 884-889Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Ishizuka, O
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mattiasson, A
    Naylor, A
    Wyllie, M
    Andersson, K-E
    Micturition in conscious rats with and without outlet obstruction: role of spinal alpha1-adrenoceptors1996In: British journal of pharmacology, Vol. 117, p. 962-966Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Johansson, R K
    et al.
    Andersson, K-E
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nerve-mediated bladder contraction is impaired by cytokines: involvement of iNOS2003In: European journal of pharmacology, Vol. 476, p. 221-227Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Johansson, R K
    et al.
    Pandita, R K
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Garcia-Pascual, A
    de Vente, J
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Activity and expression of nitric oxide synthases in the hypertrophied rat bladder and the effect of nitric oxide on bladder smooth muscle growth2002In: Journal of urology, Vol. 168, p. 2689-2694Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Johansson, R K
    et al.
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Andersson, K-E
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Expression of nitric oxide synthase in bladder smooth muscle cells: regulation by cytokines and L-arginine2002In: Journal of urology, Vol. 168, p. 2280-2285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Johansson, Rebecka
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Phenotypic modulation of cultured bladder smooth muscle cells and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase2004In: The American journal of physiology (Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.), Vol. 286, p. r642-648Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Kruse, Robert
    et al.
    Säve, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Persson, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Adenosine Triphosphate Induced P2Y(2) Receptor Activation Induces Proinflammatory Cytokine Release in Uroepithelial Cells.2012In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 188, no 6, p. 2419-2425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: We characterized and identified the uroepithelial P2 receptor responsible for adenosine triphosphate mediated release of the cytokines interleukin-8 and 6.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The human renal epithelial cell line A498 (ATCC™) was cultured and stimulated with different purinergic agonists with or without prior inhibition with different antagonists or signaling pathway inhibitors. Supernatant was analyzed for interleukin-8 and 6 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. P2 receptor mRNA expression was assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The candidate receptor was knocked down with siRNA technology. Interleukin-8 and 6 responses were measured after purinergic stimulation of knocked down cells.

    RESULTS: ATP and ATP-γ-S (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) were equipotent as inducers of interleukin-8 and 6 release. Agonist profile experiments using different P2 receptor agonists indicated that P2Y(2) was the main contributor to this release, although P2Y(11) and P2X(7) activation could not be excluded. Signaling pathway experiments showed that interleukin-8 release involved phospholipase C and inositol trisphosphate mediated signaling, indicating a P2Y receptor subtype. Antagonist experiments indicated P2Y(2) as the responsible receptor. Gene expression analysis of P2 receptors showed that strong expression of P2Y(2) receptor and subsequent knockdown of P2Y(2) receptor mRNA for 72 and 96 hours abrogated interleukin-8 and 6 release after purinergic stimulation with adenosine triphosphate-γ-S.

    CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-8 and 6 release after purinergic stimulation in uroepithelial A498 cells is mediated through P2Y(2) receptor activation.

  • 25.
    Mohlin, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Säve, Susanne
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Studies of the Extracellular ATP-Adenosine Pathway in Human Urinary Tract Epithelial Cells2009In: Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-7012, E-ISSN 1423-0313, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 196-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Extracellular ATP may be metabolized to AMP and adenosine by the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 and, in this study, we characterized the pathways for adenosine formation in human urinary tract epithelial cells. Methods: Bladder (RT4) and kidney (A498) epithelial cells were grown in cell culture and the expression of CD39 and CD73 was investigated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine adenosine formation in cell medium. Results: RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed a high CD73 and a low CD39 expression in human urinary tract epithelial cells, whereas neutrophils had a higher CD39 than CD73 expression. Adenosine was produced when the cells were exposed to 5'-AMP (substrate for CD73), but not when exposed to 5'-ATP (substrate for CD39). A pronounced inhibition of 5'-AMP-induced adenosine formation by the CD73 inhibitor AMP-CP confirmed the involvement of CD73. Adenosine production from 5'-ATP was slightly increased (p < 0.05) when epithelial cells were cocultured with neutrophils. Conclusions: The data demonstrate that adenosine formation from extracellular ATP is negligible in urinary tract epithelial cells due to low CD39 expression in this cell type. However, the epithelial cells express CD73 and are able to convert extracellular AMP to adenosine.

  • 26. Nilsson, B O
    et al.
    Lindqvist, A
    Pandita, R K
    Swärd, K
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Effects of polyamine synthesis inhibition on polyamines, growth and mechanical properties in hypertrophic rat urinary bladder1998In: Pharmacology and toxicology, Vol. 82, p. 287-294Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Ny, L
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Larsson, B
    Chan, J
    Weiss, L M
    Wittner, M
    Tonowitz, H B
    Localization and activity of nitric oxide synthases in the gastrointestinal tract of Trypansoma cruzi infected mice1999In: Journal of neuroimmunology, Vol. 99, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Pandita, R K
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    Capsaicin-induced bladder hyperactivity and nociceptive behaviour in conscious rats. involvement of spinal nitric oxide1997In: Journal of the autonomic nervous system, Vol. 67, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Pandita, R K
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    Effects of the K+-channel opener, ZD6169, on volume and PGE2-stimulated bladder activity in conscious rats1997In: Journal of urology, Vol. 158, p. 2300-2304Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Pandita, R K
    et al.
    Persson, Katarina
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hedlund, P
    Andersson, K-E
    Testosterone-induced prostatic growth in the rat causes bladder overactivity unrelated to detrusor hypertrophy1998In: Prostate, Vol. 35, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, P
    Johansson, K
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, K-E
    Co-existence of nitrergic, peptidergic and acetylcholine esterase positive nerves in the pig lower urinary tract1995In: Journal of the autonomic nervous system, Vol. 52, p. 225-236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, P
    Johansson, K
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, K-E
    Nitric oxide synthase in pig lower urinary tract: immunohistochemistry, NADPH diaphorase histochemistry and functional effects1993In: British journal of pharmacology, Vol. 110, p. 521-530Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, P
    Johansson, K
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, K-E
    The L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in pig lower urinary tract: nitric oxide synthase immuno-histochemistry, NADPH-diaphorase activity and functional effects1994In: The biology of nitric oxide: 3, physiological and clinical aspects, Portland Press, 1994, p. 413-417Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, P
    Uvelius, B
    Andersson, K-E
    Nitrergic and cholinergic responses in the rat lower urinary tract after pelvic ganglionectomy1998In: American journal of physiology, Vol. 273, (Regulatory Integrative Comp. Physiol. 43), p. R389-R398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Lund .
    Andersson, K-E
    Nitric oxide and relaxation of pig lower urinary tract1992In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 416-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1 We studied the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) nerve-mediated relaxation induced by electrical stimulation in pig isolated lower urinary tract smooth muscle, and the possible involvement of the L-arginine (L-ARG)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway in this response. 2 Trigonal strips, precontracted by noradrenaline (NA), carbachol or endothelin-1 (ET-1), relaxed frequency-dependently in response to electrical stimulation. Maximum relaxation was obtained at 6-8 Hz, and amounted to 56 +/- 2%, 77 +/- 3% and 62 +/- 6% of the agonist-induced tension in preparations contracted by NA, carbachol, or ET-1, respectively. Exposure to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 10(-7) - 10(-5) M) concentration-dependently reduced the relaxant response in preparations contracted by NA. L-NOARG (10(-6) M) reduced the maximal response to 51 +/- 8% of control. L-NOARG (10(-5) M) abolished all relaxation, and unmasked a contractile component; D-NOARG had no effect. Also in trigonal preparations. where the tension had been raised by carbachol or ET-1, L-NOARG (10(-5) M) markedly reduced relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation. 3 In trigonal preparations contracted by NA, maximal relaxation was increased after pretreatment with L-ARG (10(-3) M), and the inhibitory effect of L-NOARG (10(-6) M) was prevented. Incubation of the trigonal strips with methylene blue had no effect on relaxations elicited at frequencies <6Hz, but a small inhibition was observed at higher frequencies. 4 Administration of NO (present in acidified solution of NaNO2) induced concentration-dependent relaxations in trigonal preparations contracted by NA, carbachol, or ET-1. L-NOARG (10(-5) M) and L-ARG (10(-3) M) had no effect on these relaxations. However, methylene blue (10(-5) M) significantly shifted the concentration-response curve for NO to the right. NANC-relaxation and NO-induced relaxation of trigonal preparations were both inhibited by oxyhaemoglobin (10(-5) M) and pyrogallol (10(-4) M). 5 In urethral preparations precontracted by NA, electrical stimulation caused frequency-dependent relaxations. A maximum relaxation of 73 +/- 4% was obtained at 10 Hz. Also in the urethra, NANC-relaxation was blocked by L-NOARG (10(-5) M), and a contractile response generally appeared. 6 Detrusor strips treated with alpha-beta-methylene ATP (10(-5) M) and atropine (10(-6) M), and then contracted by ET-1, showed relaxations (19 +/- 3% of the induced tension) in response to electrical field stimulation (2-20 Hz) only when the tension was high. No response at all, or small contractions, were found in response to electrical stimulation in K+ (35 mM)-contracted detrusor strips. Detrusor preparations contracted by carbachol were concentration-dependently relaxed by exogenously administered NO, SIN-1 (NO-donor), and isoprenaline, whereas vasoactive intestinal polypeptide had minor effects. NO and SIN-1 induced maximal relaxations of 63 +/- 3% and 70 +/- 4%, respectively, of the tension induced by carbachol. Isoprenaline produced an almost complete relaxation (96 +/- 4%). 7 The results suggest that NANC-nerve mediated relaxation, involving the L-ARG/NO pathway, can be demonstrated consistently in the pig trigonal and urethral, but not in detrusor smooth muscle. The importance of this pathway for lower urinary tract physiology and pathophysiology remains to be established. 

  • 36.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, K-E
    Non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxation and levels of cyclic nucleotides in rabbit lower urinary tract1994In: European journal of pharmacology, Vol. 268, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Dean-McKinney, T
    Steers, W D
    Tuttle, J B
    Activation of the transcription factors NFB and AP-1 in bladder smooth muscle exposed to obstruction and mechanical stretching2001In: Journal of urology, Vol. 165, p. 633-639Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Garcia-Pascual, A
    Andersson, K-E
    Difference in the actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide on pig detrusor and vesical arterial smooth muscle1991In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 143, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide has been demonstrated in urinary bladder nerves, and suggested to play a role in local control of bladder motility. In isolated strips of pig detrusor muscle, calcitonin gene-related peptide did not affect spontaneous contractile activity, or contractions induced by high K+, carbachol, substance P, and electrical field stimulation. In contrast, calcitonin gene-related peptide elicited a concentration-dependent and pronounced (78–99%) relaxation of vesical arteries precontracted with endothelin-1, noradrenaline or prostaglandin F2x. As a vasodilator, CGRP was approximately 50 times more potent than acetylcholine. Removal of the endothelium abolished acetylcholine-induced relaxation, but did not affect the relaxation produced by calcitonin gene-related peptide. Pretreatment with methylene blue, glibenclamide or indomethacin had no influence on CGRP's ability to relax the vessels. The inhibitor of NO-synthesis, NG-nitro-L-arginine, had no effect on the maximum vascular relaxation induced by calcitonin gene-relate peptide.

    It is concluded that in the pig, calcitonin gene-related peptide has no functionally important mechanical effects on isolated detrusor muscle strips, but is a potent dilator of vesical arteries. The vascular effects of the peptide are endothelium-independent, and seem to be exerted directly on the vascular smooth muscle. 

  • 39.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Garcia-Pascual, A
    Forman, A
    Tottrup, A
    Andersson, K-E
    Nitric oxide and non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve-mediated relaxation of isolated rabbit and pig urethral and trigonal smooth muscle1992Other (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Garcia-Pascual, A
    Holmquist, F
    Andersson, K-E
    Endothelin-1-induced contractions of isolated pig detrusor and vesical arterial smooth muscle: calcium dependence and phosphoinositide hydrolysis1992In: General pharmacology, Vol. 23, p. 445-453Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Lund .
    Igawa, Y
    Mattiasson, A
    Andersson, K-E
    Effects of inhibition of the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the rat lower urinary tract in vivo and in vitro1992In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 107, p. 178-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1 The present study was performed to investigate how blockade of the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO)pathway influences the function of the lower urinary tract in vivo, as studied by cystometry in consciousrats and in vitro, in isolated muscle preparations from the rat detrusor and urethra.2 L-N0-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 10 and 20 mg kg-, administered intra-arterially,decreased micturition volume and bladder capacity, and increased spontaneous bladder contractions.D-NAME (20mgkg-') had no effect. No changes in the urodynamic parameters were recorded ifL-NAME (20mgkg-') was administered in combination with L-arginine (200mgkg-').3 Cystometries performed after intra-arterial administration of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (3mgkg-') and 3-morpholino-sydnonimin hydrochloride (SIN-1, 2mgkg-') showed a decrease in bladdercapacity, micturition volume and threshold pressure. SIN-1, but not SNP, induced spontaneous bladdercontractions.4 Isolated precontracted urethral preparations responded to electrical stimulation with a frequencydependenttetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxation. L-NAME (10-4 M), but not D-NAME, reduced the maximalrelaxation to 31 ± 8% (n = 8) of the response prior to drug administration. The inhibition induced byL-NAME was completely reversed by L-arginine (10-3 M). SNP (10-1 10-4 M), SIN-1 (10-6-3 x l0-4M) and NO (10-5-10-3M; present in acidified solution of NaNO2), caused relaxation (93-100%) ofurethral preparations. L-NAME did not affect these relaxations.5 Detrusor strips contracted by carbachol or K' showed contractions in response to electricalstimulation, even when pretreated with a,p-methylene ATP and/or atropine. Small relaxations (14-41%)of detrusor strips were evoked by SNP (10-6-10-4M), SIN-1 (10-5-3 x 10-4M) and NO (10-5-10-3M). Electrically (20 Hz) induced contractions of the detrusor muscle were unaffected by addition ofL-NAME (10-6_10-4 M) or L-arginine (10-3 M).6 The present results suggest that the L-arginine/NO pathway is of functional importance for thebladder outlet region, but that its role in the detrusor is questionable. They also suggest that the site ofaction of L-NAME for inducing bladder hyperactivity in the rat is the outlet region rather than thedetrusor muscle. 

  • 42.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, K
    Alm, P
    Larsson, B
    Andersson, K-E
    Morphological and functional evidence against a sympathetic or sensory origin of nitric oxide synthase containing nerves in the rat lower urinary tract1997In: Neuroscience, Vol. 77, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pandita, R K
    Aszodi, A
    Ahmad, M
    Pfeifer, A
    Fässler, R
    Andersson, K-E
    Functional characteristics of urinary tract smooth muscles in mice lacking cyclic GMP protein kinase type I2000In: American journal of physiology, Vol. 279, p. R1112-R1120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pandita, R K
    Spitsbergen, J M
    Steers, W D
    Tuttle, J B
    Andersson, K-E
    Spinal and peripheral mechanisms contributing to hyperactive voiding in spontaneously hypertensive rats1998In: American journal of physiology, Vol. 275, p. R1366-R1373Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Johansson, K
    Larsson, B
    Morphological and biochemical investigation of nitric oxide synthase and related enzymes in the rat and pig urothelium1999In: Journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry, Vol. 47, p. 739-750Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Svanborg, Catharina
    Karpman, Diana
    Human renal epithelial cells express iNOS in response to cytokines but not bacteria2002In: Kidney International, Vol. 61, p. 444-455Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sando, J J
    Tuttle, J B
    Steers, W D
    Protein kinase C in cyclic stretch-induced nerve growth factor production by urinary tract smooth muscle cells1995In: American journal of physiology, Vol. 269 (Cell Physiol. 38), p. C1018-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Steers, W D
    Tuttle, J B
    Regulation of nerve growth factor secretion in smooth muscle cells cultured from rat bladder body, base and urethra1997In: Journal of urology, Vol. 157, p. 2000-2006Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svanborg, Catharina
    Poljakovic, Mirjana
    Larsson, Bengt
    Svensson, Maj-Lis
    Johansson, Kjell
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Escherichia coli-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase expression in the mouse bladder and kidney2001In: Kidney International, Vol. 59, p. 893-904Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Persson, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Svane, D
    Glavind, B
    Uvelius, B
    Forman, A
    Andersson, K-E
    Effects of ovariectomy on mechanical properties and collagen content in rabbit lower urinary tract smooth muscle1996In: Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology, Vol. 30, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 77
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