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  • 1.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Information in use - Aspects of information quality in workflows2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Jokela, Päivi
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Karlsudd, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Östlund, Louise
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Evaluation model for e-phenomena - a case study2003In: Proceedings of the MicroCAD 2003 International Scientific Conference i Miskolc, Ungern, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Wennberg, Louise
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    System thinking on Risk Analysis2004In: SABI 2004: Business Systems -- Environmental Contexts, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word risk originates from the Italian word risicare which means to dare and from this point of view, risk is more of a choice than a fate. Risk is about the actions that we dare to take and these in turn depend on the freedom we have to make choices (Bernstein, 1998). It can also be defined as the possibility of harm or loss to any resource within an information system, which accentuate the importance of identifying the organisation's assets (Ramachandran, 2002).

    The obvious fact that information is one of the most important asset within a company, results in that it is necessary to try to predict the risks that exists against these and consequently also against the organisation's goals and visions. It is impossible to identify all potential risks but a very good tool for identifying as many as possible and then assigning them appropriate protective measures, is the risk analysis.

    Since many significant security processes are built upon risk analysis and also security planning, it is necessary that the analysis is accomplished in an accurate way. This meaning that factors in the inner and outer surrounding environment that could affect the final result also must be taken into consideration, e.g. different communication channels. Thus, a holistic perspective is necessary when performing a risk analysis but also when working with security issues in general.

    Today, security solutions are often focused on technology and not on the system as a whole (Schneier, 2000) and considering that development and use of technology has lead us to think in terms of systems, we mean that this should hold for the information security area as well. Also the fact that the concept of wholeness is very important in information security and that general system theory is a general science of wholeness (v. Bertalanffy, 1969), makes us wonder: what could be more suitable to apply on security issues?

    For that reason, we present some ideas for a modified risk analysis method in this paper, based upon an existing risk analysis used by the case study object The Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies, Apoteket AB. They has recently added two customer care centres to its organisation and as a result of this, also a number of communication channels that are integrated with different information sources that contains classified information, e.g. personal particulars. The ideas of a modified risk analysis could be used by customer care centre organisations using several communication channels. These ideas are influenced by general systems theory that has been combined with a method used to analyse information flows in organisations. We have studied the company's existing risk analysis method and in combination with qualitative data, e.g. interviews, we have some suggestions of a risk analysis that emphasises the holistic perspective and the relations between the different entities in the overall information system.

    The suggested ideas will be reviewed together with the department of IT-security at Apoteket AB and after that tested within the organisation. It is noticeable that like all work with information security, the suggested method is a cyclic process that constantly develops and undergoes changes in relation to its dynamic context. Results and feedback from this implementation will be presented in forthcoming papers during 2004.

  • 4.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Östlund, Louise
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Computer Epistemology - Från Adam och Eva till Ada och e2004Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Östlund, Louise
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Guidelines towards quality assured e-health services2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Östlund, Louise
    Blekinge University of Technology.
    Informatisk forskning om riskanalysprocess applicerad på Apoteket AB:s kundcenterverksamhet2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Brandt, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Östlund, Louise
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Risk analysis in contact centres2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Elm, Patrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Iqbal, Sarfraz
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Exploring threshold concept when teaching Systems Thinking and Soft Systems Methodology2018In: OR60 Annual Conference, 11-13 Sept. 2018, Lancaster University, Birmingham: The Operational Research Society, Birmingham, UK: The Operational Research Society , 2018, p. 202-202, article id OR60A3581Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that the threshold concepts of a discipline are the gateways to a deeper understanding of disciplinary knowledge. These are also keys to improving student learning outcomes and progressive learning. Research has been done on systems as a threshold concept for understanding other disciplinary issues, like sustainability. However, we explore the threshold concepts of understanding systems itself, that is, in this case the disciplinary framework of systems thinking and Soft Systems Methodology. The term threshold concept is stated as having emerged from the UK project Enhancing Teaching and Learning Environments in Undergraduate Courses. It is argued to be a means leading to a transformed way of understanding or learning. Five key characteristics of threshold concepts have been identified in previous research. These are troublesome knowledge, transformation, irreversibility, integration, and boundedness. Later on, reconstitution, discourse and liminality were added.

    We have explored threshold concepts for teaching systems thinking and Soft Systems Methodology in a mixed knowledge environment, including students from different disciplines, in a developing country. The students were presented with an issue related to their everyday life as university students and with the aim of applying systems thinking ideas and techniques for the betterment of their university and, in the long run, their society. They were also asked to write a reflection paper related to the learning objectives of the course and on what they have learnt about Soft Systems Methodology (theory) and when applied to the specific case. We report on which pertinent threshold concepts we have identified, both of our own experience as teachers and of the students’ reflection papers.

  • 9.
    Gibney, Michele
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. University of the Pacific, USA.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Somerville, Mary M.
    University of the Pacific, USA.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Pireva Nuci, Krenare
    Unniversity for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Evolution of a Course: Instructional Design Elements and Impacts2018In: UBT International Conference, UBT Knowledge Center , 2018, article id 125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 2017 Spring semester, international educators from Sweden and the United States collaborated on delivery of an Information Systems, Analysis, Design and Modeling graduate course at the University for Business and Technology (UBT) in Kosovo. In the Spring of 2018, the team taught course was offered a second time, with both graduate and undergraduate students. In the first year, student work focused on the conceptual design of a UBT Knowledge Center ecosystem, using Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) co-design tools. The Spring 2018 course built upon and expanded this work through more granular exploration of possible local systems designs for making local knowledge discoverable, employing SSM and emphasizing Informed Learning to foster an enriched exploration of the topic. Differences between the pedagogical course design and student experience reflections will be explored in this paper to highlight the impact of ‘flipped classroom’ teaching and cross- disciplinary/cross-degree group work, within the larger context of systems thinking educational efficacy.

  • 10.
    Golshan, Behrooz
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Digital Capability for Practice: Implications of Appreciative Systems Model on Analysing Organisational Strategies2018In: OR60 Annual Conference, 11-13 Sept. 2018, Lancaster University, Birmingham: The Operational Research Society , 2018, p. 215-215, article id OR60A3482Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT-enabled innovations continually disrupt logics of value, competition and organisation in a growing number of industries. Increasingly, value is created, delivered and captured in complex cross-industry value networks through which external resources and capabilities are accessed. Accordingly, strategic intentions for interorganisational collaborations have become an integral part of the overall strategic framework for firms operating in such environments.

    Driving from the Appreciative Systems Model, Digital capability and Strategy as Practice perspectives, the proposed model illustrates how and why strategic decisions are made and sustained in complex digitalised environments. That is, events and ideas such as technological change, competition, business trends or internal shortcomings leads to formulation of strategic intentions that are validated by the organisational digital capability. The action phase that follows might involve business model reconfiguration and investments in new IS competencies. Lessons learnt during such cycle adding to the newly acquired IS competencies reinforces the organisational digital capability, which elevates the standards used for formulating future appreciations. 

    In line with the emerging literature on the concept of digital capability, the proposed framework accounts for the two-way relationship between IS/IT and organisational strategies. That is, previous investments in IS/IT functions affect standards and perceptions of events and ideas, which lead to changed appreciations. The action phase that follows might include investments in new IS/IT functions which in turn affect the future cycles. The concepts of appreciation and action also comply with the notions of strategy as intended (appreciation) verses strategy as executed (action), and how both of them affect future cycles.

  • 11.
    Golshan, Behrooz
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Methodological Inefficiencies for Investigating Digital Strategy: Application of Appreciative Systems Models for Longitudinal Studies2019In: The OR Society Annual Conference OR61, 3-5 September 2019, Sibson Building, Kent University: Conference Handbook, The Operational Research Society , 2019, p. 157-158, article id OR61A89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic Information Systems research has faced a significant methodological shortcoming in the recent decades. That is, while scholars appreciate the systemic nature of implications of digital technologies on operational and competitive environments, and the two-way relationship between investments in digital technologies and strategic moves, mainstream analytical approaches fail to grasp such systemic and bidirectional relationships. Consequently, cumulative research does not provide comprehensive contextualising and theorising the implications of emerging digital technologies on digital transformation of organizations, markets and industries. Investigating the process of digital transformation in an insurance company through the lenses of the Appreciative Systems Models for over eight years, we believe that the model can serve as the philosophical underpinning to devise new analytical models for investigating strategic information systems in a holistic perspective.

    The model starts with two stranded ropes that depict the constant flux of events and ideas in the day-to-day life. Actors perceptions of such events and ideas could lead to interventions, or actions, that are justified through judgments and standers. The key point here is that both appreciations and actions affect not only the future flux of events and ideas, but also standards and values that future appreciations would be judged against. In the contexts of digital transformation, the flux of events and ideas represents technological innovations, disruptions and other emerging factors that shape the operational and competitive environments. Appreciations represent strategic intents that are formed by the managements perceptions and judged by the firms experience in acquiring and levering digital technologies. Actions represent business model reconfigurations in order to execute strategic intents. Using this model to develop a timeline based on each time that the organization undergo a change process, could help scholars, and practitioners alike, better understand emerging strategic intentions against the organizational technological and strategic know-how.

  • 12.
    Jokela, Päivi
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Hur kan man främja ett vetenskapligt förhållningssätt och kritiskt tänkande inom datavetenskapliga utbildningar2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Jung, Ivar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    What is the colour of a glass of wine?2012In: Color in food: Technological and Psychophysical Aspects / [ed] Caivano, J.L. & del Pilar Buera, M., Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2012, p. 35-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jung, Ivar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    What is the colour of a glass of wine?2010In: AIC 2010 Color and Food: From the Farm to the Table / [ed] Caivano, J.L & López, M.A., Buenos Aires, 2010, p. 27-30Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jung, Ivar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Victor, Ole
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, School of Design.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Perceived Colour in Transparent materials and Objects2011In: AIC Interaction of Colour & Light in the Arts and Sciences: Midterm Meeting of the International Colour Association (AIC), 7-10 June 2011 Zurich, Switzerland, Conference Programme, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    On System Thinking and Information Security2019In: The OR Society Annual Conference OR61, 3-5 September 2019, Sibson Building, Kent University: Conference Handbook, The Operational Research Society , 2019, p. 161-162, article id OR61A151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Security problems we have to deal with today regarding Internet are created by ourselves. Internet, initially created to handle US Government data traffic, evolved to become communication between different research institutes. The protocols that were used had no security at all. Today we still use this network to almost everything and the complexity has grown tremendously. Compared to when the network initially was created, we now try to protect assets rather than just communicate, divide users according to permission and accessibility, and deal with privacy issues. Basically, everything is depending on the network that initially was created with no security.

    Privacy has been a critical security aspect for the EU, but with the event of the GDPR privacy is both a legal aspect and an auditable ICT concept. GDPR includes topics like: owning your own data, independent of who collected it and where it is stored, and; the right to be forgotten. Each data collector also needs to have a complete data-flow map, describing any privacy data sets in a flow, to make these traceable and ready for audit inspection. Any organization handling EU residents’ data, needs to adhere to proactive Information Security processes. 

    GDPR is based on the principles of Governance, Risk, and Compliance. It is not a purely legal construct; it is a management and strategy issue, not an IT issue. Further examples relate to cloud services with distributed resources, which illustrate the complex problem situation.

    There is a need for a new perspective, moving from systems management to data flow management. We propose a systemic model which illustrate processes and flows within a fractal structure; we build on Beer’s Viable System Model. Such a model enables mapping of complexity and data flows and provide a tool for auditing and, thus, enable meeting the requirements of GDPR.

  • 17.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. Tieto Public.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Towards Secure Data Flow Oriented Multi-Vendor IT Governance Models2017In: UBT 6th Annual International Conference 2017: Leadership and Innovation / [ed] Hajrizi, E., 2017, p. 163-163Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, still, ICT Governance is being regarded as a departmental concern, not an overall organizational concern. History has shown us that implementation strategies, which are based on departments, results in fractional implementations leading to ad hoc solutions with no central control and stagnation for the in-house ICT strategy. Further, this recently has created an opinion trend; many are talking about the ICT department as being redundant, a dying out breed, which should be replaced by on-demand specialized external services. Clearly, the evermore changing surroundings do force organizations to accelerate the pace of new adaptations within their ICTplans, more vivacious than most organizations currently is able to. This leads to that ICT departments tend to be reactive rather than acting proactively and take the lead in the increased transformation pace in which organizations find themselves. Simultaneously, the monolithic systems of the 1980ies/1990ies is often very dominating in an organization, consume too much of the yearly IT budget, leaving healthy system development behind. These systems were designed before data became an organizational all-encompassing resource; the systems were designed more or less in isolation in regards to the surrounding environment. These solutions make data sharing costly and not at all optimal. Additionally, in strives to adapt to the organization’s evolution, the initial architecture has become disrupted and built up in shreds. Adding to this, on May 25, 2018, an upgraded EU Privacy Regulation on General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be activated. This upgraded privacy regulation includes a substantial strengthening of 1994’s data privacy regulation, which will profoundly affect EU organizations. This regulation will, among other things, limit the right to collect and process personal data and will give the data subject all rights to his/her data sets, independentof where this data is/has been collected and by whom. Such regulation force data collecting and processingorganizations to have total control over any personal data collected and processed. This includes detailedunderstanding of data flows, including who did what and when and under who’s authorization, and how data istransported and stored. Concerning data/information flows, maps are a mandatory part of the system documentation. Thisencompasses all systems, including outsourced such as cloud services.Hence, individual departments cannot any longer claim they “own” data. Further, since mid-2000, we have seen aglobal inter-organizational data integration, independent of organizations, public or private. If this integration ceasesto exist, the result will be a threat to the survival of the organization. Additionally, if the organization fails to providea transparent documentation according to the GDPR, substantial economic risk is at stake. So, the discussion aboutthe ICT departments’ demise is inapt. Anyorganizational change will require costly and time-consuming ICTdevelopment efforts to adapt to the legislation of today’s situation. Further, since data nowadays is interconnectedand transformed at all levels, interacting at multiple intersections all over the organization, and becoming a unifiedbase of all operative decisions, an ICT governance model for the organization is require

  • 18.
    Magnusson, Lars
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics. Tieto Public.
    Elm, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Mirijamdotter, Anita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Towards secure data flow oriented multi-vendor IT governance models2018In: International Journal of Business and Technology, ISSN 2223-8387, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-9, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, still, ICT Governance is being regarded as a departmental concern, not an overall organizational concern. History has shown us that implementation strategies, which are based on departments, results in fractional implementations leading to ad hoc solutions with no central control and stagnation for the in-house ICT strategy. Further, this recently has created an opinion trend; many are talking about the ICT department as being redundant, a dying out breed, which should be replaced by on-demand specialized external services. Clearly, the evermore changing surroundings do force organizations to accelerate the pace of new adaptations within their ICT plans, more vivacious than most organizations currently is able to. This leads to that ICT departments tend to be reactive rather than acting proactively and take the lead in the increased transformation pace in which organizations find themselves. Simultaneously, the monolithic systems of the 1980ies/1990ies is often very dominating in an organization, consume too much of the yearly IT budget, leaving healthy system development behind. These systems were designed before data became an organizational all-encompassing resource; the systems were designed more or less in isolation in regards to the surrounding environment. These solutions make data sharing costly and not at all optimal. Additionally, in strives to adapt to the organization’s evolution, the initial architecture has become disrupted and built up in shreds. Adding to this, on May 25, 2018, an upgraded EU Privacy Regulation on General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be activated. This upgraded privacy regulation includes a substantial strengthening of 1994’s data privacy regulation, which will profoundly affect EU organizations. This regulation will, among other things, limit the right to collect and process personal data and will give the data subject all rights to his/her data sets, independentof where this data is/has been collected and by whom. Such regulation force data collecting and processingorganizations to have total control over any personal data collected and processed. This includes detailedunderstanding of data flows, including who did what and when and under who’s authorization, and how data istransported and stored. Concerning data/information flows, maps are a mandatory part of the system documentation. This encompasses all systems, including outsourced such as cloud services. Hence, individual departments cannot any longer claim they “own” data. Further, since mid-2000, we have seen aglobal inter-organizational data integration, independent of organizations, public or private. If this integration ceasesto exist, the result will be a threat to the survival of the organization. Additionally, if the organization fails to providea transparent documentation according to the GDPR, substantial economic risk is at stake. So, the discussion aboutthe ICT departments’ demise is inapt. Any organizational change will require costly and time-consuming ICTdevelopment efforts to adapt to the legislation of today’s situation. Further, since data nowadays is interconnectedand transformed at all levels, interacting at multiple intersections all over the organization, and becoming a unifiedbase of all operative decisions, an ICT governance model for the organization is required.

  • 19.
    Petrakou, Alexandra
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gustavsson, Rune
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Collaborative e-marketplaces containing clusters of SMEs: Drivers and barriers in the local food sector2011In: 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), 2011, IEEE conference proceedings, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the current context of collabo­ration between small local food producers. The aim is to facilitate the design and maintenance of trust­worthy collaborative e-marketplaces containing clusters of SMEs. An ethnographic approach was used and data was collected through observations, interviews and questionnaires. Our findings reveal both drivers to exploit and barriers to harness enabling trustworthy collaboration. Our current test bed is based on a research and design context that lacks mechanisms for governance. To take full advantage of the drivers and to tackle the barriers in a fruitful way, there is a need for a flexible infra­structure that allow for structured requirements, contractual agreements and validation of proposed collaboration services. To address this, we take advantage of recent developments in cloud computing, more specifically the integration of Platform as a Service (PaaS) in the support system.

  • 20.
    Wennberg, Louise
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Information security - an application of a systems approach2006In: Kybernetes, ISSN 0368-492X, E-ISSN 1758-7883, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 786-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The paper aims to describe and discuss the establishment of customer care centres in Sweden with particular concerns about information security.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is part of a series about information security and the approach is to study the subject within an organisation and initially to understand how it works.

    Findings – An effective way was found to embrace as many factors as possible by using a theory that contains the characteristics of the organisation. It was found that a combination of general systems theory and classic information systems theory was very successful.

    Practical implications – The new systems and new structure within the Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies (Apotekes) will in future create better conditions for customers and the opportunity to have products delivered at home or by collection from the centres.

    Originality/value – Describes new and ongoing developments aimed at improving customer care and demonstrates the application of system theory to the resulting organisation and implementation.

  • 21.
    Zetterholm, My
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Brandt, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Jokela, Päivi
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Physio-digital Convergence: Aspects on Security2016In: Proceedings of 7th International Conference Information Systems and Technology Innovations: the New Paradigm for a Smarter Economy / [ed] Kozeta Sevrani, Tirana: University of Tirana , 2016, article id 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fast progressing development of mobile technologies and health applications has given rise to trends like health tracking and quantify self. This kind of mobile health applications can measure an increasing amount of physiological parameters, which implies an increasing interconnectivity between users and mobile technologies. An explorative pre-study was made which studied the relation between users and mobile technologies on students in Sweden and Albania. The results imply an increasing interconnectivity between users and mobile technologies and this can be considered as both a physical and psychological phenomenon. From a system perspective the physiological and digital systems can be seen as converging, driven by both technical innovations and user behavior. This blurring of system boundaries requires for reflections within philosophy and ethics as well as security and integrity. The concept of Physio-digital convergence is proposed as a perspective to further analyze this development. Recommendations on further research include integrity and security issues, which are both pointed out as critical aspects in this context. 

  • 22.
    Östlund, Louise
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Systems science - a theoretical approach2002Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Östlund, Louise
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Säkerhet vid trådlös kommunikation - experimentell studie av standarden IEEE 802.11b vid övergång från trådat LAN till trådlöst LAN2002Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Östlund, Louise
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    The first symposium on systems analyzis2002Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Östlund, Louise
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Brandt, Patrik
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Révay, Peter
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    The importance of analysing communication channels from an information security perspective – a case study2004Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 25 of 25
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf