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  • 1.
    Björklund, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Playing to learn or learning as a prerequisite to play?: an example of mathematical learning content2017In: NERA 2017 Abstracts: Learning and education – material conditions and consequences: 23-25 March 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2017, article id 125Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Björklund, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Teachers’ involvement in children’s mathematizing: beyond dichotomization between play and teaching2018In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 469-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on mathematics teaching in a play-based and goal-oriented practice, such as preschool, and on how different lines of actions may impact children’s learning opportunities. Video recordings of authentic play activities involving children and nine teachers from different preschools were analyzed qualitatively to answer the following research questions: (1) What lines of action do teachers use when they teach mathematics in play? and (2) What implications may different ways of teaching have for children’s learning opportunities? The analysis revealed four different categories: confirming direction of interest; providing strategies; situating known concepts; and challenging concept meaning. As these differ regarding both the mathematics content focused on and the kind of knowledge emphasized, they have implications for children’s learning opportunities.

  • 3.
    Björklund, Camilla
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Att undervisa i matematik i förskolan2017In: Förskolan och barns utveckling: Grundbok för förskollärare / [ed] Anne-Li Lindgren, Niklas Pramling, Roger Säljö, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 171-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Björklund, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    I mötet mellan lekens frihet och undervisningens målorientering i förskolan.2019In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 64-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on the openness of play and the goal-direction of teaching in preschool. The aim was to investigate how goal-orientation may be formed in play and in what ways this impacts on the play in relation to the children’s intentions. The study is based on 62 video documentations of play situations in which preschool teachers participate. The results show that goal-oriented processes can be integral to play when preschool teachers enable children to develop knowledge and skills necessary for the play. This, however, demands joint attention in the interaction as well as the teacher understanding the child’s understanding of the content that is necessary for the play simultaneously. Formulating learning goals in line with children’s intentions seems to be critical since children’s intentions direct the play and thus which learning goals that will be possible or necessary to comprise.

  • 5.
    Ebbelind, Andreas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Förskoleklassens Metodik: Upptäck och utforska matematik2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Student Teachers’ Visions of Good Mathematics Teaching and its (dis)connection to Practice2017In: ICT in mathematics education: the future and the realities : Proceedings of MADIF 10 
The tenth research seminar of the Swedish Society for Research in Mathematics Education 
Karlstad, January 26–27, 2016, Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, three Swedish studies focusing on student teachers in transition from university to teacher practice are analyzed with respect to similarities and differences in how the teacher students describe the mathematics teaching they want to do as well as how they relate to teaching they already see carried out. Despite the different theoretical and methodological orientations in the examined studies, we find commonalities. One commonality is how the student teachers align with reform ideas when they talk about preferred mathematics teaching. Another commonality is how teaching observed in school based teacher education is typically described in negative terms since it does not conform to these reform ideas. We discuss this divide as a potentially negative effect of trying to use teacher education as a reform instrument.

  • 7.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Sweden.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Lingefjärd, Thomas
    Universtiy of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Digitala verktyg i matematikundervisningen: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematikundervisning med digitala verktyg I, åk 1-3, Del 1: Nätet som resurs ]2016Other (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Helenius, Ola
    et al.
    NCM, Sweden.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Lingefjärd, Thomas
    Universtiy of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Digitala verktyg i matematikundervisningen: [ ingår i Lärportalens modul Matematikundervisning med digitala verktyg I, åk 4-6, Del 1: Nätet som resurs ]2016Other (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Karlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Maria, JohanssonLuleå University.Palmér, HannaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Entreprenöriellt lärande i matematik: Vad, hur, varför?2017Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Kidron, Ivy
    et al.
    Jerusalem College of Technology, Israel.
    Bosch, Marianna
    Universitat Ramon Llull, Spain.
    Monaghan, John
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Theoretical perspectives and approaches in mathematics education research2018In: Developing Research in Mathematics Education: Twenty Years of Communication, Cooperation and Collaboration in Europe / [ed] Tommy Dreyfus, Michele Artigue, Despina Potari, Susanne Prediger, Kenneth Ruthven, Routledge, 2018, p. 254-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing Research in Mathematics Education is the first book in the series New Perspectives on Research in Mathematics Education, to be produced in association with the prestigious European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. This inaugural volume sets out broad advances in research in mathematics education which have accumulated over the last 20 years through the sustained exchange of ideas and collaboration between researchers in the field. An impressive range of contributors provide specifically European and complementary global perspectives on major areas of research in the field on topics that include:the content domains of arithmetic, geometry, algebra, statistics, and probability;the mathematical processes of proving and modeling;teaching and learning at specific age levels from early years to university;teacher education, teaching and classroom practices;special aspects of teaching and learning mathematics such as creativity, affect, diversity, technology and history;theoretical perspectives and comparative approaches in mathematics education research.This book is a fascinating compendium of state-of-the-art knowledge for all mathematics education researchers, graduate students, teacher educators and curriculum developers worldwide.

  • 11.
    Norén, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm university.
    Palmér, HannaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.Cooke, AudreyCurtin university, Australia.
    Nordic Research in Mathematics Education: Papers of NORMA 172017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Assessment as a tool in the professional identity development of novice mathematics teachers.2012In: Proceedings of MADIF8: Evaluation and Comparison of Mathematical Achievement: Dimensions and Perspectives / [ed] Bergsten, C.; Jablonka, E. & Raman, M., Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2012, p. 161-170Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The empirical material and the results presented in this paper are taken from a study investigating novice primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development. This paper focuses on how the novice primary school mathematics teachers in the study use assessments as a tool in professional identity development. The respondents equate pupils’ results in assessments with understanding and learning and they use the assessments primarily as confirmation in identity development as mathematics teachers and not as material for planning lessons. In this paper, confirmation through assessment is illustrated by the case of Helena, one of the respondents in the study.  

  • 13.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Beliefs and knowledge for teaching Mathematics in school in the narratives of identity.2010In: Proceedings of the conference MAVI-15: Ongoing research on mathematical beliefs Genoa: Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Genova - Provincia di Genova / [ed] Fulvia Furinghetti and Francesca Morselli, International Conference on Mathematical Views (MAVI), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Connecting Theories in a Case Study of Primary School Mathematics Teachers' Professional Identity Development2013In: CERME8 (European Research in Mathematics Education), 6-10 Feb., 2013, Anatalya: WG Papers ; Different theoretical perspectives / approaches in research in mathematics education / [ed] Behiye Ubuz, Çiğdem Haser, Maria Alessandra Mariotti, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2013, p. 2850-2859Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on a connection between two theories used in a case study of the professional identity development of primary school mathematics teachers. The two theories connected are communities of practice and patterns of participation. The reason for the connection was the need for a framework that would make it possible to analyse both the individual and the social parts of professional identity development. In this paper, the connection is presented, illustrated briefly using empirical examples and evaluated.

  • 15.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Digitala verktyg i förskolans arbete med matematik2015In: De yngsta barnens matematik / [ed] Camilla Björklund & Karin Fransén, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, p. 151-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    How to understand changes in novice mathematics teachers' talk about good mathematics teaching?2018In: Views and Beliefs in Mathematics Education: The Role of Beliefs in the Classroom / [ed] Benjamin Rott, Günter Törner, Joyce Peters-Dasdemir, Anne Möller, Safrudiannur, Springer, 2018, p. 127-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how novice primary-school mathematics teachers talk about (good) mathematics teaching in general and mathematics textbooks in particular at the time of their graduation from university and a year later. The changes in their talk are discussed first in terms of beliefs research and second from a participatory perspective on identity formation. A comparison of findings with the two approaches shows that what beliefs research often explains as changes in belief, inconsistency, or hidden beliefs can be understood as identity formation in communities of practice from a participatory perspective.

  • 17.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Identity development in limbo: teacher transition from education to teaching2010In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 101-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theories and results discussed in this article are from a study investigating the identity development of novice primary mathematics teachers. The article has two aims: first, to elaborate the notion of beliefs in relation to the notions of identity and identity development, with the purpose of developing a framework to investigate the process of becoming and being a teacher of mathematics; and second, to offer an example of the use of this framework in a study of novice primary mathematics teachers. The core of the example is the case of Jenny, a Swedish novice primary mathematics teacher. Jenny’s case, however, is not simply about her but also identity development when the formal aspect of employment is missing, a case not rare in Sweden.

  • 18.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Inconsistency, Regression or Development?: The professional Identity of a Novice Primary School Mathematics Teacher2014In: Development of Mathematics Teaching: Design, Scale, Effects. Proceeding of MADIF 9. The Ninth Swedish Mathematics Education Research Seminar Umeå February 4-5, 2014 / [ed] O. Helenius, A. Engström, T. Meaney, P. Nilsson, E. Norén, J. Sayers, M. Österholm, Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2014, p. 107-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing awareness of the social dimensions in the professionalidentity development of mathematics teachers. This paper reports on similaritiesand differences in how a novice teacher talks about good mathematics teachingand high-performing mathematics students at the time of her graduation and thenone year later. By analysing the social dimensions of the novice teachers’professional identity development these changes, often referred to asinconsistency and/or regression, can be understood as development in hermemberships in different kind of communities of practice.

  • 19.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    (In)consistent?: The mathematics teaching of a novice primary school teacher2013In: Current state of research on mathematical beliefs XVIII: Proceedings of the MAVI-18 Conference, September 12-15, 2012, Helsinki, Finland / [ed] Hannula, Markku; Portaankorva-Koivisto, Päivi; Laine, Anu; Näveri, Liisa, Helsinki: International Conference on Mathematical Views (MAVI), 2013, p. 229-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focusing on the mathematics teaching of Helena, a Swedish novice teacher. Helena is one of seven teachers in a case study of primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development. She is also an example of a teacher whose mathematics teaching, from an observer’s perspective, may appear inconsistent with her talk about mathematics teaching. However, in this paper a conceptual framework aimed at analysing professional identity development will be used making the process of her mathematics teaching visible and then her mathematics teaching appear as consistent.

  • 20.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    (In)consistent? The mathematics teaching of a novice primary school teacher.2012In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 17, no 3-4, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the mathematics teaching of Helena, a Swedish novice teacher. Helena is one of seven teachers in a case study of primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development. She is also an example of a teacher whose mathematics teaching, from an observer’s perspective, may appear inconsistent with her talk about mathematics teaching. However, in this article a conceptual framework aimed at analysing professional identity development will be used making the process of her mathematics teaching visible and then her mathematics teaching appear as consistent.

  • 21.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Just as expected and exactly the opposite: Novice primary school mathematics teachers’ experience of practicing teachers2014In: Current State of Research on Mathematical Beliefs XX: Proceedings of the MAVI-20 Conference September 29 – October 1, 2014, Falun, Sweden / [ed] Lovisa Sumpter, International Conference on Mathematical Views (MAVI), 2014, p. 151-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results presented in this paper are from an ethnographic case study of seven novice primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development. During their teacher education, these novice teachers experienced a new way of teaching mathematics. At the time of their graduation, they expressed a wish to change how mathematics is taught in schools. However, they also expressed that practicing teachers might prevent them from implementing this change because practicing teachers might want to stick to traditional methods. Two years after graduation, the respondents had not succeeded in implementing the changes they wanted to the teaching of mathematics. By following the respondents in the two years after their graduation, the study shows how practicing teachers become a limitation for the respondents, not by interfering but by being absent. The title of the paper, Just as expected and exactly the opposite, reflects this change.

  • 22.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Just As Expected And Exactly The Opposite: Novice Primary School Mathematics Teachers’ Experience Of Practicing Teachers2014In: ECER 2014, The Past, the Present and the Future of Educational Research: Network: 24. Mathematics Education Research, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this paper is a Swedish study with the aim to understand and describe the professional identity development of seven novice primary school teachers of mathematics (Palmér, 2013). These novice teachers work as primary school class teachers, teaching several subjects whereof mathematics is one. This is similar to other countries around the world were most primary school teachers are educated as generalists (Tatto, Lerman & Novotná, 2009).

    The teaching profession, with or without focus on mathematics teaching, is often described in terms of a changed profession without much continuity between teacher education and schools (Cooney, 2001; OECD, 2005; Sowder, 2007). Graduating from teacher education and starting to work as a teacher can be understood as a transfer or shift in professional identity where the interplay between the individual and their social environment is a central part about which to develop understanding (McNally, Blake, Corbin & Gray, 2008). In the here presented study this understanding is developed through investigating the novice teachers’ participation and reification in different communities of practice (Wenger 1998).

    According to Wenger (1998) identity development is to be understood as the negotiated experience of self in the learning trajectory within and between communities of practice. A community of practice is defined through the three dimensions of mutual engagementjoint enterprise and shared repertoire. Mutual engagement is the relationships between the members, about them doing things together as well as negotiating the meaning within the community of practice. Joint enterprise regards the mutual accountability the members feel in relation to the community of practice and it is built by the mutual engagement. The shared repertoire in a community of practice regards its collective stories, artifacts, notions and actions as reifications of the mutual engagement.

    An individual can participate in communities of practice trough engagement, imagination and/or alignment. Engagement implies active involvement and requires the possibility to physical participation in activities. Imagination implies going beyond time and space in physical sense and create images of the world and makes it possible to feel connected even to people we have never met but that in some way match our own patterns of actions. Participation through alignment implies that the individual change, align, in relation to the community of practice the individual wants to, or is forced to, be a member of. All three kinds of memberships are constantly changing and learning trajectories in communities of practice can be peripheral, inbound, inside, on the boundary or outbound (Wenger, 1998).

    At the time of their graduation the novice teachers in the here presented study expressed a wish to change the mathematics teaching in schools. In their teacher education they had experienced a new way to teach mathematics in line with what is often named as the reform (Ross, McDougall & Hogaboam-Gray, 2002; NCTM, 1991 & 2000). This is similar to what several other studies have shown (for example Bjerneby Häll, 2006; Cooney, 2001; Sowder, 2007) However, the novice teachers also expressed several limitations they thought would prevent them from succeeding with their desired changes. In this paper especially one of those limitations will be focused on, namely practicing teachers. At the time of their graduation the novice teachers express that practicing teachers probably will limit their possibilities to change mathematics teaching in a reformative direction since practicing teachers want to keep on to the traditions. In this paper it will be described, based on the novice teachers’ memberships and learning trajectories in communities of practice, how they deal with this expected limitation during the two years after their graduation and how it influences their professional identity development.

    Method

    When wanting to acquire a deep understanding of a phenomenon, Flyvbjerg (2006) advocates choosing a few cases where the respondents have maximum experience of what is to be investigated. The seven respondents in the here presented study were selected because they in teacher education chose mathematics as one of their main subjects. Some of them also wrote their final teacher education Bachelor theses on mathematics education. The average age of the respondents (all female) at the time for their graduation was 31 years. An ethnographic approach was used to make visible the interplay between the individual and their social environment. Ethnography is not a collection of methods but a special way to look at, listen to and think about social phenomena where the main interest is to understand the meaning activities have for individuals and how individuals understand themselves and others (Arvatson & Ehn 2009; Aspers 2007; Hammersley & Atkinsson 2007). The empirical material in the study is from self-recordings made by the respondents, observations and interviews. All of these have been made in a selective intermittent way (Jeffrey & Troman 2004), which means that the time from the start to the end of the fieldwork has been long, but with a flexible frequency of field visits. The observations have been both participating and non-participating and the interviews have been both spontaneous conversations during observations and formal interviews (individual and in groups) based on thematic interview guides. The respondents used mp3-players for their self-recordings and they were told to record whatever and whenever they wanted and that it was up to them to decide what was important for the researcher to know about starting to work as a primary school teacher of mathematics. These varying empirical materials have in the analysis been treated as complete-empiricism (Aspers, 2007). The analysis has been made in two different, but co-operating, ways: with communities of practice as a lens and with methods inspired by grounded theory. Using grounded theory implies building and connecting categories grounded in the empirical material by using codes (Charmaz, 2006). In the study one such category became frames for teaching mathematics. This category was developed through coding segments where the respondents expressed (words and/or actions) obstacles, difficulties and/or resistance regarding their mathematics teaching. Within this category the here presented limitation, practicing teachers, is a subset.

    Expected Outcomes

    At the time of graduation the novice teachers are outbound members by engagement and imagination in a community of reform mathematics teaching. They have an expectation that practicing teachers will limit their possibilities to change mathematics teaching in line with the shared repertoire in this community of practice. The years after graduation are very different for the respondent but they all work as teachers in one way or another. Similar is that they feel lonely since there are no cooperation between the teachers in schools as they had expected. The novice teachers work on their own and not much of the kind of mathematics teaching they talked about before graduation is visible. Two years after graduation the novice teachers meet for a group interview. In the interview they, among other things, talk about their wish to change mathematics teaching and why they have not managed to do this so far. Again they start to talk about practicing teachers as a limitation. However, not by preventing the novice teachers from teach mathematics as they want to, but by being absent. The novice teachers lack the opportunity to collaborate with and get support from other teachers. The worry they expressed before graduation regarding being limited by practicing teachers has changed into a wish that other teachers would take more notice of and help them. The title of the paper, just as expected and exactly the opposite, reflect this change. Other teachers became a limitation but not by interfering but by being absent. Two years after graduation, the novice teachers are peripheral members in the community of reform mathematics teaching. However, the lack of opportunities to collaborate with other teachers has prevented them from developing new memberships in communities of teachers and/or teaching (mathematics), which make their professional identity development lonesome.

    References

    •Arvastson, G. & Ehn, B. (2009). Etnografiska Observationer. Lund: Studentlitteratur AB. •Aspers, P. (2007). Etnografiska metoder. Malmö: Liber AB. •Bjerneby Häll, M. (2006). Allt har förändrats och allt är sig likt. En longitudinell studie av argument för grundskolans matematikundervisning. Lindköpings Universitet: Utbildningsvetenskap. •Charmaz, K. (2006). Constructing Grounded Theory. A Practical Guide through Qualitative Analysis. London: SAGE Publications. •Cooney, T.J. (2001). Considering the Paradoxes, Perils, and Purposes of Conceptualizing Teacher Development. In F.L. Lin & T.J. Cooney (Eds.), Making Sense of Mathematics Teacher Education (pp.9-31). Dordrects: Kluwer Academic Publishers. •Flyvbjerg, B. (2006). Five Misunderstandings About Case-Study Research. Qualitative Inquiry, 12(2), 219-245. •Hammersley, M. & Atkinson, P. (2007). Ethnography. Principles in Practice. Third edition. London: Routledge. •Jeffrey, B. & Troman, G. (2004). Time for ethnography. British Educational Research Journal, 30(4), 535-548. •McNally, J., Blake, A., Corbin, B. & Gray, P. (2008). Finding an Identity and Meeting a Standard: Connecting the Conflicting in Teacher Induction. Journal of Education Policy, 23(3), 287-298. •NCTM (1991). Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics. National Council of teachers of mathematics. Charlotte: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics & Information Age Publishing. •NCTM (2000). Principles and standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics & Information Age Publishing. •OECD (2005) Education and Training Policy: Teachers Matter, attracting, developing and retaining effective teachers. •Palmér, H. (2013). To Become – or Not To Become – a Primary School Mathematics Teacher. A Study of Novice Teachers’ Professional Identity Development. Linnaeus University Dissertations No 130/2013. Växjö: Linnaeus University Press. •Ross, J.A. McDougall, D. & Hogaboam-Gray, A. (2002). Research on Reform in Mathematics Education, 1993-2000. The Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 48(2), 122-138. •Sowder, J.T. (2007). The Mathematical Education and Development of Teachers. In: F.K. Lester (Ed.), Second Handbook of Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning (pp.157-224). Charlotte: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics & Information Age Publishing. •Tatto, M.T., Lerman, S. & Novotná, J. (2009). Overview of Teacher Education Systems Across the World. In R. Even & D.L. Ball (Eds.), The Professional Education and Development of Teachers of Mathematics. The 15th ICMI Study (pp.15-23). NewYork: Springer. •Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of Practice. Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • 23.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Konflikt mellan vision och möjlighet hos blivande lärare i matematik.2010In: Mathematics and Mathematics Education: Cultural and Social Dimensions.: Proceedings of MADIF 7 / [ed] Christer Bergsten, Eva Jablonka, Tine Wedege, Linköping: Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2010, p. 200-210Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Primary School Teachers' Image of a Mathematics Teacher2015In: Views and Beliefs in Mathematics Education: Results of the 19th MAVI Conference / [ed] Carola Bernack-Schüler, Ralf Erens, Andreas Eichler, Timo Leuders, Springer, 2015, p. 121-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results presented in this paper derive from a longitudinal case study of seven novice primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development. In the study it was found that thisprofessional identity development did not include becoming a mathematics teacher.A primary school teacher in Sweden, like in many other countries, teaches many subjects but, at the same time they are the first teachers to teach mathematics to the school children. In the paper it will be shown how the noviceprimary school teachers’ image of a mathematics teacher preventedthem from developinga sense of themselves asmathematics teachers.

  • 25.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Professional Primary School Teacher Identity Development: a pursuit in line with an unexpressed Image2016In: Teacher Development, ISSN 1366-4530, E-ISSN 1747-5120, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 682-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results presented in this article are taken from a case study of novice primary school mathematics teachers’ professional identity development from the perspective of the teachers themselves. The empirical material was collected through self-record­ings, observations and interviews. The results show how the professional identity development of these novice teachers becomes a pursuit in line with their image of a primary school teacher. To develop a sense of themselves as primary school teachers they need to establish their own individual (including graduation and personal knowledge) and social (the ability to work in one school, have colleagues, and have a class of their own for which they do the planning and teaching) criteria. These criteria are shown to be both a precondition for and a part of professional identity development. The novice teachers’ image of what it means to be a primary school teacher directs their actions and becomes the goal of their professional identity development. Because of its high impact, student and novice teachers’ image of primary school teachers ought to be made visible in both teacher education and teacher induction.

  • 26.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Programming in preschool: with a focus on learning mathematics2017In: International Research in Early Childhood Education, ISSN 1838-0689, E-ISSN 1838-0689, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a teaching intervention where programming was used to facilitate preschoolers’ learning of mathematics, especially in their development of spatial thinking. In the intervention, the programming was made with a small programmable robot especially designed for young students. The results indicate that the children developed their ability to mentally compare and connect movements in reality with maps and symbols. Further, the children showed ability to mentally envision, hold in mind, and conceptualize actions and relationships between paper maps, gridded maps, and symbols. Thus, the intervention indicates potential in teaching mathematics through programming in preschool.

  • 27.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Telling identities in self-recordings2012In: Proceedings of Norma 11: The sixth nordic conference on mathematics education in Reykjavik, May 11-14, 2011 / [ed] Gunnarsdottir, G.H.; Hreinsdottir, F.; Palsdottir, G.; Hannula, M.; Hannula-Sormunen, M.; Jablonka, E.; Jankvist, U.T.; Ryve, A.; Valero, P.; Wæge, K., University of Iceland Press, 2012, p. 493-502Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is on self-recording, a method for collecting empirical data. The context for the method is a study of the professional identity development of novice primary school mathematics teachers as seen from the perspective of the teachers themselves. The background for using the method is based on theoretical and methodological issues as well as problems regarding data collection in this study. Self-recordings were tried as a complement to observations and interviews and contributed with data of original character, e.g. data regarding current happenings and data giving insights into day-to-day work from the perspective of the informants. In this paper, the theoretical and methodological starting points, the method as such and examples of the empirical outcome will be presented and discussed

  • 28.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    The conflict emerge before graduation2009In: PME33: In search for theories in mathematics education / [ed] Marianna Tzekaki maria Kaldrimidou Haralambos Sakonidis, 2009, p. 439-439Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    To become, or not to become, a primary school mathematics teacher.: A study of novice teachers’ professional identity development.2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about the process of becoming, or not becoming, a primary school mathematics teacher. The aim is to understand and describe the professional identity development of novice primary school mathematics teachers from the perspective of the novice teachers themselves.

    The study is a case study with an ethnographic direction where seven novice teachers have been followed from their graduation and two years onwards. The ethnographic direction has been used to make visible the whole process of identity development, both the individual and the social part. The empirical material in the study consists of self-recordings made by the respondents, observations and interviews. The empirical material is analysed in two different but co-operating ways. First a conceptual framework was developed and used as a lens. Second, methods inspired by grounded theory are used. The purpose of using them both is to retain the perspective of the respondents as far as possible.

    At the time of graduation the respondents are members in a community of reform mathematics teaching and they want to reform mathematics teaching in schools. In their visions they strive away from their own experiences of mathematics in school and practice periods. Four cases are presented closely in the thesis as they show four various routes into, and out of, the teaching profession. These four cases make visible that the respondents’ patterns of participation regarding teaching mathematics changes when they become members in new communities of practice with mathematics teaching as part of the shared repertoire. But, the four cases also make visible that the existence of such communities of practice seems to be rare and that the respondents’ different working conditions limit their possibilities of becoming members in those that exist. During the time span of this study, the respondents hardly receive any feedback for their performance as mathematics teachers. Even if they teach mathematics they don´t teach it as they would like to and they don´t think of themselves as mathematics teachers. Two years after graduation none of the respondents has developed a professional identity as primary school mathematics teacher.

    A primary school teacher in Sweden is a teacher of many subjects but they are the first teachers to teach our school children mathematics. For the respondents to develop a sense of themselves as a kind of primary school mathematics teacher, mathematics teaching has to become part of their teacher identities. For this to become possible, mathematics must become a part of their image of a primary school teacher as an image of a primary school mathematics teacher. Furthermore memberships in communities of practice with mathematics in the shared repertoire must be accessible, both during teacher education and after graduation. Then professional identity development as a primary school teacher would include becoming and being a teacher of mathematics. 

  • 30.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Using tablet computers in preschool: How does the design of applications influence participation, interaction and dialogues?2015In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results in this article explore whether and how the design of applications used on tablet computers influences the interaction and dialogues that occur between children and pedagogues, the participation of children in the activities and the mathematics that can be learned. While mathematics offered a lens to explore the use of tablet devices, child–teacher interactions is the focus of this article. Twelve pedagogues were observed as they used different applications with 25 preschool children. These applications were categorised based on their classification (boundaries of the application) and framing (form of the application). It was shown that the same pedagogue interacted differently with the children based on the application they were using. Further, the children’s participation as well as the structure and content of the dialogues between pedagogues and children differed based on classification and the framing of the application used. The results indicate that the design of the applications influences the pedagogues and the educational context in which children are invited to participate.

  • 31.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Variation is good - Math book is bad: Connecting typologies to dichotomous wording2011In: Current State of Research on Mathematical Beliefs XVII.: Proceeding of the MAVI-17 Conference / [ed] Bettina Roesken & Michael Casper, Bochum: International Conference on Mathematical Views (MAVI), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    What Happens when Entrepreneurship Enters Mathematics Lessons?2016In: Proceedings of the 40th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education / [ed] Csíkos, C., Rausch, A., & Szitányi, J., IGPME - The International group of the Psychology of Mathematics Education , 2016, Vol. 4, p. 27-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Swedish curriculum, entrepreneurship is to permeate all teaching in primary school. However, little is known about how entrepreneurship influences the teaching of different subjects. This paper reports on an educational design research study investigating the potential in combining entrepreneurship and mathematics in primary school. Two examples are given of how mathematics teaching changes when entrepreneurship enters mathematics lessons. The results indicate that there may be a win-win situation between mathematical and entrepreneurial competences, at least when it comes to creativity and tolerance for ambiguity.

  • 33.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    What is the difference?: Young children learning mathematics through problem solving2016In: Mathematics Education in the Early Years: Results from the POEM2 Conference, 2014 / [ed] Tamsin Meaney ; Ola Helenius ; Maria L. Johansson ; Troels Lange ; Anna Wernberg, Springer, 2016, p. 255-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports from a design research study where young children were taught mathematics through problem solving. In the study a sequence of five problem solving lessons were conducted in two Swedish preschool classes. This implies that the children were six years old. This paper will report from interviews made with the children after the sequence of problem solving lessons. The lessons in the study was categorised as work by the children but with difference from how they usually worked. The differences emphasised by the children were that they in the problem solving lessons had been working together with their classmates, thinking a lot, not using textbooks but manipulatives. Further they emphasised that they had got surprised many times. At the same time as these answers say something about the problem solving lessons they also say something about the ordinary mathematics teaching in these preschool classes. This emphasises the need of discussing how much and, especially, in which way young children are to be taught mathematics.

  • 34.
    Palmér, Hanna
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Är ett halvt kex lika många som ett helt kex?2008In: Didaktiska Studier från förskola och skola. / [ed] Ingrid Pramling Samuelsson & Niklas Pramling, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2008, 1, p. 19-40Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Björklund, Camilla
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Collective but Diverse: Preschool Teachers Networking to Develop Toddler Mathematics2017In: Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, ISSN 1442-3901, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on professional development among teachers within a Swedish national network on toddler mathematics education. The activities within this network can be understood as participant-oriented collective professional development based on a knowledge of practice approach. An inventory of toddler mathematics was performed within this network through observations of authentic mathematical activities. The inventory made diversity in the participating teachers’ perceptions of toddler mathematics visible; different activities were labelled similarly and opposite, similar activities were labelled differently. The inventory made clear the need for theoretical influence and discussions in practical inquiry. The addition of theoretical notions made previous invisible diversity among the network members visible, and strengthened the opportunities for further collective professional development. Diversity becoming visible contributed to the knowledge of practice approach, as well as the development of the professional language of the participating teachers.

  • 36.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Björklund, Camilla
    University of Gothenburg.
    Different perspectives on possible – desirable – plausible mathematics learning in preschool2016In: Nordisk matematikkdidaktikk, ISSN 1104-2176, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 177-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the question of what is considered possible – desirable – plausible in preschool mathematics. On the one hand, there is a growing consensus that preschool mathematics matters, on the other hand, there are different opinions about how it should be designed and what constitutes an appropriate content. In the article we provide an overview of similarities and differences found in eight articles published in a thematic issue of NOMAD on preschool mathematics. The overview is based on Bernstein’s notions vertical and horizontal discourses, and how content for learning is described as basic or advanced mathematics. The aim is not to evaluate or rate the articles but to illustrate diversity regarding possible – desirable – plausible in current research of preschool mathematics.

  • 37.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Björklund, Camilla
    University of Gothenburg.
    How do preschool teachers characterize their own mathematics teaching in terms of design and content?2017In: Proceeding of the tenth congress of the European society for research in mathematics education (CERME10, February 1-5, 2017) / [ed] T Dooley & G Gueudet, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2017, p. 1885-1892Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preschool mathematics may look very different in different contexts. These differences concern bothwhat mathematics children are offered to learn and how the learning of that mathematics isorchestrated. In this paper we present an ongoing study on how Swedish preschool teacherscharacterize their own mathematics teaching in terms of design and content. The target preschoolteachers are those working with the youngest children aged one to three. We present two examplesof how these preschool teachers describe and characterize their mathematics teaching in terms ofdesign and content and we discuss possible contributions to research and practice.

  • 38.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ebbelind, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Matematiklärande2012In: Förskoleklassens Didaktik: Möjligheter och Utmaningar / [ed] Katarina Herrlin, Elisabeth Frank, Helena Ackesjö, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2012, p. 134-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Ebbelind, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    What is possible to learn?: Using ipads in teaching mathematics in preschool2013In: Proceedings of the 37th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education.: Mathematics learning across the life span. / [ed] Anke M. Lindmeier & Aiso Heinze, IPN, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education , 2013, p. 425-432Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present results from a study investigating the potential of using Ipads when teaching mathematics in preschool. The study explores how the design of applications influences the dialogs that occur between teachers and children and the mathematics that is made possible to learn. The results presented in this paper are from the first investigation where the notions of classification and framing have been used to classify applications. Observations of teachers and children working together with different applications have been carried out and the results indicate that applications with weak framings promote free dialogues withholding mathematics, irrespective whether the classification is strong or not.  

  • 40.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Helenius, Ola
    NCM.
    Analys av digitala programvaror2015Other (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Henriksson, Jenny
    Hussein, Rania
    Integrating Mathematical Learning During Caregiving Routines: A Study of Toddlers in Swedish Preschools2016In: Early Childhood Education Journal, ISSN 1082-3301, E-ISSN 1573-1707, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the interest in preschool mathematics has increased. However, studies seldom focus on children under the age of three and research is scarce on the early use of mathematics observed in natural settings. This article reports a study of mathematical possibilities during diaper changing in a preschool setting. A diaper change can be a communicative moment when the child can experience mathematics with a professional preschool teacher, but it can also be a moment of mechanical routine with no pedagogical context. The intention of the study presented here was to investigate the mathematical potential preschool teachers described in relation to diaper changing and to examine the ways this potential was put into action. Both similarities and differences emerged regarding the mathematical potential preschool teachers described in relation to diaper changing and the mathematical content that they were observed to communicate. The results show that it is possible to communicate mathematical content in a pedagogical way during diaper changes, making this routine a learning opportunity for children. However, the results also show variations in the observed range and context of such communication, and therefore the potential for mathematical learning during diaper changes seems to differ widely.

  • 42.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Karlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Teaching for entrepreneurial and mathematical competences: teachers stepping out of their comfort zone2016In: Proceeding of the MAVI-22 Conference, Växjö, Sweden, International Conference on Mathematical Views (MAVI), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential in combining the teaching of entrepreneurial and mathematical competences in Swedish primary schools. The focus in this paper, however, is not on the wholeness of this study but on changes in the teacher role when entrepreneurial and mathematical competences are to be combined in teaching – as expressed by the teachers themselves. Two of these expressed changes are “saying less” and “daring to let go of control”. In the paper, these two changes are explored in relation to how they seem to influence these teachers’ teaching of mathematics, and some implications are drawn regarding how their students’ possibilities to learn mathematics may have been influenced.

  • 43.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Johansson, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Karlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Teaching for entrepreneurial and mathematical competences: teachers stepping out of their comfort zone2018In: Students' and Teachers' Values, Attitudes, Feelings and Beliefs in Mathematics Classrooms: Selected Papers from the 22nd MAVI Conference, Springer, 2018, p. 13-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential in combining the teaching of entrepreneurial and mathematical competences in Swedish primary schools. The focus in this paper, however, is not on the wholeness of this study but on changes in the teacher role when entrepreneurial and mathematical competences are to be combined in teaching – as expressed by the teachers themselves. Two of these expressed changes are “saying less” and “daring to let go of control”. In the paper, these two changes are explored in relation to how they seem to influence these teachers’ teaching of mathematics, and some implications are drawn regarding how their students’ possibilities to learn mathematics may have been influenced. 

  • 44.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Karlsson, Lena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Primary School Students' Images of Problem Solving in Mathematics2017In: Teaching and Learning in Maths Classrooms: Emerging Themes in Affect-Related Research: Teachers' Beliefs, Students' Engagement and Social Interaction / [ed] Andra, C Brunetto, D Levenson, E Liljedahl, P, Springer, 2017, p. 27-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on primary school students’ images of problem solving in mathematics. The teachers of these students have been involved in a national professional development programme on problem solving in mathematics involving them reading literature and conducting problem-solving lessons in their classes. One semester after this professional development programme, interviews were carried out with both teachers and students. These interviews show that the students have very different images of problem solving, both in relation to each other and in relation to the teachers. These different images will influence what these students think about problem solving and what they learn about and by problem solving, as well as influencing the potential for their teachers to teach problem solving

  • 45.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Maria, Johansson
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Combining entrepreneurship and mathematics in primary school: what happens?2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on an educational design research study exploring the potential of combining entrepreneurship and mathematics – two of the key competencies stressed as important in a society of lifelong learning. The aim of the study was to explore what happens when entrepreneurship is integrated into mathematics lessons. Eight Swedish primary schools were involved in the iterative design wherein researchers and teachers together planned, implemented, and evaluated lessons. The results indicate that combining entrepreneurial and mathematical competencies may produce a win-win situation. Entrepreneurial competencies can be of value when students are learning mathematics, and at the same time mathematics teaching can be organised so that students develop both mathematical and entrepreneurial competencies.

  • 46.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Roos, Helena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    What is implied when researchers claim to use a theory?2017In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on the use of theories and on what we imply when we in research claim to use a theory. In this article, diverse uses of one theory will be illustrated with reference to ten different studies. The aim is not to evaluate or judge how the theory is used in these studies, but to discuss how the diverse uses of one and the same theory may infer very different things in research. Questions are raised about what happens with the hierarchy and the coherence of an argument and what conclusions can be drawn when only some parts of a theory are used.

  • 47.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    Ryan, Ulrika
    Malmö Högskola.
    Helenius, Ola
    NCM.
    Undersöka och upptäcka matematik med IKT2015Other (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Skott, JeppeLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Students' and Teachers' Values, Attitudes, Feelings and Beliefs in Mathematics Classrooms: Selected Papers from the 22nd MAVI Conference2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Department of Mathematics Education.
    van Bommel, Jorryt
    Karlstad University.
    Exploring the role of representations when young children solve a combinatorial task2017In: ICT in mathematics education: the future and the realities: Proceedings of MADIF 10
The tenth research seminar of the Swedish Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 
Karlstad, January 26–27, 2016 / [ed] Häggström, Jonas mfl, Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about the representations young children spontaneously use when they are solving a combinatorial task. The paper describes connections between the representations used by the children and how they solve the combinatorial task, and considers whether the results from studies regarding representations of quantity also apply to combinatorial tasks. Our results indicate some connections between the representations used and the solutions presented, but these connections do not seem to apply to the results from studies of quantity. Some possible explanations for this are outlined in the paper, but more studies will be needed to further elaborate on these issues.

  • 50.
    Palmér, Hanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics Education.
    van Bommel, Jorryt
    Karlstad Universitet.
    How to Solve it: Students' Communication when Problem Solving in Groups2015In: Nordic research in mathematics education: Proceedings of NORMA14, Turku, June 3–6, 2014 / [ed] Silfverberg, H., Kärki, T., & Hannula, M.S, Turku: The Finnish Research Association for Subject Didactics , 2015, p. 329-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a design research study of the implementation and development of mathematics teaching through problem solving in lower primary school. The focus is on the communication between students working with problem solving in groups. In the paper episodes of two groups of students working with the same problem solving task are analysed. When analysing the episodes the interaction between the problem solvers rather than on the learning of each individual problem solver are foregrounded. The results show that students’ expectations about the rules of the activity are of importance for the communication in the groups to become effective.

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