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  • 1.
    Corso, Carlos Renato
    et al.
    University of Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Almeida, Erica Janaína Rodrigues
    Santos, Graziely Cristina
    Morão, Luana Galvão
    Fabris, Guilherme
    Mitter, Eduardo Kovalski
    Bioremediation of direct dyes in simulated textile effluents by a paramorphogenic form of Aspergillus oryzae2012In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 65, no 8, p. 1490-1495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Azo dyes are extensively used for coloring textiles, paper, food, leather, drinks, pharmaceutical products, cosmetics and inks. The textile industry consumes the largest amount of azo dyes, and it is estimated that approximately 10–15% of dyes used for coloring textiles may be lost in waste streams. Almost all azo dyes are synthetic and resist biodegradation, however, they can readily be reduced by a number of chemical and biological reducing systems. Biological treatment has advantages over physical and chemical methods due to lower costs and minimal environmental effect. This research focuses on the utilization of Aspergillus oryzae to remove some types of azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The fungus, physically induced in its paramorphogenic form (called ‘pellets’), was used in the dye biosorption studies with both non-autoclaved and autoclaved hyphae, at different pH values. The goals were the removal of dyes by biosorption and the decrease of their toxicity. The dyes used were Direct Red 23 and Direct Violet 51. Their spectral stability (325–700 nm) was analyzed at different pH values (2.50, 4.50 and 6.50). The best biosorptive pH value and the toxicity limit, (which is given by the lethal concentration (LC100), were then determined. Each dye showed the same spectrum at different pH values. The best biosorptive pH was 2.50, for both non- autoclaved and autoclaved hyphae of A. oryzae. The toxicity level of the dyes was determined using the Trimmed Spearman–Karber Method, with Daphnia similis in all bioassays. The Direct Violet 51 (LC100 400 mg · mL−1) was found to be the most toxic dye, followed by the Direct Red 23 (LC100 900 mg · mL−1). The toxicity bioassays for each dye have shown that it is possible to decrease the toxicity level to zero by adding a small quantity of biomass from A. oryzae in its paramorphogenic form. The autoclaved biomass had a higher biosorptive capacity for the dye than the non-autoclaved biomass. The results show that bioremediation occurs with A. oryzae in its paramorphogenic form, and it can be used as a biosorptive substrate for treatment of industrial waste water containing azo dyes.

  • 2.
    Mitter, Eduardo Kovalski
    et al.
    Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Santos, Graziely Cristina
    Almeida, Erica Janaína Rodrigues
    Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Morão, Luana Galvão
    Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Heide Dayane Prates
    Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Corso, Carlos Renato
    Sao Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Analysis of Acid Alizarin Violet N Dye Removal Using Sugarcane Bagasse as Adsorbent2012In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 223, no 2, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development of the textile industry, there has been a demand for dye removal from contaminated effluents. In recent years, attention has been directed toward various natural solid materials that are capable of removing pollutants from contaminated water at low cost. One such material is sugarcane bagasse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate adsorption of the dye Acid Violet Alizarin N with different concentrations of sugarcane bagasse and granulometry in agitated systems at different pH. The most promising data (achieved with pH 2.5) was analyzed with both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms equations. The model that better fits dye adsorption interaction into sugarcane bagasse is Freundlich equation, and thus the multilayer model. Moreover, a smaller bagasse granulometry led to greater dye adsorption. The best treatment was achieved with a granulometry value lower than 0.21 mm at pH 2.50, in which the total removal was estimated at a concentration of 16.25 mg mL−1. Hence, sugarcane bagasse proves to be very attractive for dye removal from textile effluents.

  • 3.
    Santos, Graziely Cristina
    et al.
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Corso, Carlos Renato
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Comparative Analysis of Azo Dye Biodegradation by Aspergillus oryzae and Phanerochaete chrysosporium2014In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 225, no 7, article id 2026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The textile industry often releases effluents into the environment without proper treatment or complete dye removal. Azo dyes, which are characterized by azo groups (―N═N―), are frequently used in the textile industry. Among the different wastewater treatment methods available, biological treatment has been extensively studied. The aim of the present study was to compare the biodegradation of the azo dye Direct Blue 71 by the fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus oryzae in paramorphogenic form using a 100 μg/ml dye solution. Biodegradation tests were performed within 240 h. The absorbance values obtained with UV-VIS spectrophotometry were used to determine the absorbance ratio and the percentage of dye discoloration following the biodegradation test. FTIR analysis allowed the identification of molecular compounds in the solution before and after biodegradation. Both A. oryzae and P. chrysosporium demonstrated considerable potential regarding the biodegradation of dyes in wastewater. These results may contribute toward improving effluent treatment systems in the textile industry.

  • 4.
    Santos, Graziely Cristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Univ. Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Forss, Jörgen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Welander, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Corso, Carlos Renato
    Univ. Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Redox mediator evaluation in the azo dye biodegradation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Azo dye degradation occurs by means of the oxidation–reduction reactions which have the azo dye acting as final electron acceptor. Some carbon sources can act as electron donors because the products of their metabolism act as redox mediators. In order to enhance the dye biodegradation process, the present study aims to evaluate the decolorization of an artificial wastewater, containing the azo dye Direct Red 75 (DR75), led by a microbial consortium from rice husks, testing the effect in the process of glucose and yeast extract as carbon sources. Samples with and without 0.1 M Sodium phosphate buffer were also analysed. The decolorization was measured by means UV-VIS spectrophotometry. The percentage of decolorization of the samples over the time indicates that the sample with yeast extract, rinse water of rice husks and without buffer presented the best decolorization rate, about 80%. Therefore, the results presented in this study may also suggest that yeast extract is a better carbon source for dye biodegradation than glucose.

  • 5.
    Santos-Pereira, Graziely Cristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Corso, Carlos Renato
    UNESP - São Paulo State University, Brazil.
    Forss, Jörgen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Evaluation of two different carriers in the biodegradation process of an azo dye2019In: Journal of Environmental Health Science and Engineering, E-ISSN 2052-336X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 633-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The MBBR solution has been applied for the textile wastewater treatment. However, in order to develop cost-effectivesolutions, waste biomass can be used as carrier. Rice husks are agricultural waste which have been used as an adsorbent of dyes;besides, they can provide and sustain suitable microorganism communities for the degradation of dyes. This study aimed toevaluate the biodegradation of the azo dye Direct Red 75 in two treatment systems with different carriers.Methods Bioreactor Awas composed by an anaerobic bioreactor filled with Kaldnes K1 carriers employed in the MBBR technologyand the study was performed in 2 different temperatures, 30 ± 0.5 °C and 21 ± 2 °C. Biofilter B was composed by a sequencedanaerobic-aerobic system with rice husks as carriers and this study was performed at 21 ± 2 °C. The rice husks was also employed asa source of microorganisms in both systems. Decolourization, surface area of the carriers and other parameters were analysed.Results Biofilter B showed high rates of decolorization, mainly over 90% in all HRT tested (24, 48 and 12 h), presenting itself asa stable system, whereas Bioreactors A showed better performances with 48 h of HRT, about 85%for A at 30 ± 0.5 °C and 45%at21 ± 2 °C. With a similar amount of carriers, analyses showed that rice husks had a much larger surface for microorganisms togrow on than Kaldnes K1.Conclusion The Biofilter B is a worthwhile system to be investigated and applied for the decolourization of textile wastewatertreatment; for instance, in developing countries.

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