lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Cedeno, D
    et al.
    Conceicao, RV
    Souza, MRW
    Quinteiro, RVS
    Carniel, LC
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Rodrigues, LF
    Bruzza, EC
    An experimental study on smectites as nitrogen conveyors in subduction zones2019In: Applied Clay Science, ISSN 0169-1317, E-ISSN 1872-9053, Vol. 168, p. 409-420Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    da S. Ramos, Alessandro
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    de Araujo, Gabriel E.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Siviero, Leonardo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo M.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Heemann, Roberto
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio V.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Comparative assessment between different sample preparation methodologies for PTGA CO2 adsorption assays—Pellet, powder, and fragment samples2018In: Adsorption Science and Technology, ISSN 0263-6174, E-ISSN 2048-4038, Vol. 36, no 7-8, p. 1441-1455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carbon dioxide sorption process at coal seams is very important for understanding the trapping mechanisms of carbon capture and storage. The gas retention capacity of coal seams can be estimated using indirect methods based on the adsorption/desorption isotherms obtained in the laboratory. However, the gas sorption capacity can be overestimated or underestimated depending on the sample preparation. This work evaluates different sample preparations and their theoretical adsorption capacity using coal samples from the Cambui coal field (Parana Basin), southern Brazil. Experiments using a thermogravimetric balance were done to calculate the theoretical adsorption capacity, while sample characterization was done through immediate analysis, elementary analysis, and mineralogical studies. The sample preparations used in this work were powder, pellets, and fragments. While the powder form presents an average behavior, without any experimental complication, the pellet is extremely sensitive to any variation in the sample preparation, such as fractures, and the fragment requires a much longer experiment time than the other sample preparations, being impracticable for some cases.

  • 3.
    Dano, Alexandre
    et al.
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Praeg, Daniel
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Migeon, Sebastien
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Augustin, Jean-Marie
    IFREMER, France.
    Ceramicola, Silvia
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho Herbert
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Ducassou, Emmanuelle
    Univ Bordeaux 1, France.
    Mascle, Jean
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Fluid Seepage in Relation to Seabed Deformation on the Central Nile Deep-Sea Fan, Part 1: Evidence from Sidescan Sonar Data2014In: Submarine Mass Movements and their Consequences: 6th International Symposium / [ed] Krastel, S Behrmann, JH Völker, D Stipp, M Berndt, C Urgeles, R Chaytor, J Huhn, K Strasser, M Harbitz, CB, Springer, 2014, p. 129-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central Nile Deep-Sea Fan contains a broad area of seabed destabilisation in association with fluid seepage: slope-parallel sediment undulations are associated with multibeam high-backscatter patches (HBPs) related to authigenic carbonates. During the 2011 APINIL campaign, a deep-towed sidescan and profiling system (SAR) was used to acquire high-resolution data along three transects across water depths of 1,700-2,650 m. Three seabed domains are distinguished, all developed within stratified sediments overlying mass-transport deposits (MTDs). Upslope of the undulations (<1,950 m), sidescan HBPs record focused fluid seepage via seabed cracks. In the western area of undulations, sidescan HBPs are distinct from intermediate-backscatter patches (IBPs) that extend up to 850 m parallel to the undulations, mainly along their downslope flanks; some contain sub-circular HBPs up to 300 m wide, three associated with smaller (<10 m) hydroacoustic gas flares. Focused fluid seeps are inferred to have shifted over time to form elongate carbonate pavements, preferentially along the footwalls of faults beneath the undulations that provide pathways for fluid flow. In contrast, in the eastern area of undulations, sidescan imagery reveal only slope-transverse furrows formed by turbulent flows, interpreted to indicate that fossil carbonates sampled during submersible operations have been exhumed by erosion.

  • 4.
    de Castro Araujo Moreira, Andrea Cristina
    et al.
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA Res Ctr CENPES, Brazil;Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Santana Musse, Ana Paula
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA Res Ctr CENPES, Brazil.
    do Rosario, Fatima
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA Res Ctr CENPES, Brazil.
    Chiaranda Lazzarin, Helen Simone
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Cavelhao, Gabriel
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Chang, Hung Kiang
    Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Brazil.
    Oliva, Andresa
    Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Brazil.
    Landulfo, Eduardo
    Inst Pesquisas Energet & Nucl IPEN CNEN SP, Brazil.
    Nakaema, Walter Morinobu
    Inst Pesquisas Energet & Nucl IPEN CNEN SP, Brazil.
    Melo, Clarissa Lovato
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS CEP, Brazil.
    Bressan, Lia Weigert
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS CEP, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS CEP, Brazil.
    Constant, Marcelo Jardim
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS CEP, Brazil.
    Spangler, Lee H.
    Montana State Univ, USA.
    Dobeck, Laura M.
    Montana State Univ, USA.
    The first Brazilian Field Lab fully dedicated to CO2 MMV experiments: from the start-up to the initial results2014In: 12th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-12 / [ed] Dixon, T Herzog, H Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2014, p. 6227-6238Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at geological sequestration sites that are cost effective yet help minimize risk. This perspective motivated PETROBRAS, the National Oil Major in Brazil, through its R&D investments portfolio to prioritize research projects that would contribute to decreasing the technological gap in the area. The Company's periodic surveys indicated the lack of infrastructure, as well as expertise in CO2 MMV, as two of the most critical issues at the national level. In order to bridge that gap, initial steps were taken in 2010 for the start-up and development of the first CO2 MMV Field Lab in Brazil, fully sponsored by PETROBRAS, with a long term goal of enabling the ranking of the best, most cost-effective MMV technology alternatives to be deployed at commercial large scale CCGS sites scheduled to be installed in the country. In addition to providing basic infrastructure to carry out the CO2 injection and controlled release experiments, the facility was designed for the simultaneous testing of multiple measuring methodologies. Additional benefits of the initiative are the creation of expertise and the acceleration of the know-how in MMV in Brazil, as well as the development of a deeper and more practical knowledge of CO2 dynamics and impacts in a real world, open air scenario. Under the full support of the PETROBRAS R&D Center (CENPES), through its Climate Change Mitigation Technological Program (PROCLIMA), the Brazilian Pilot CO2 MMV Lab was made possible through a joint 4-year research Project, conceived and carried out by PETROBRAS and local academia in Brazil, in close cooperation with international experts. An overview of the Project and the multiple research areas encompassed will be presented, together with the preliminary results of the first CO2 injection campaign, which took place in 2013. (c) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  • 5.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo J. M.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Classification of Fuel Blends Using Exploratory Analysis with Combined Data from Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Analysis2017In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 523-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemometric tools were applied for exploratory analysis and classification of fuel blends using the combined information on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope analysis through isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Principal component analysisand hierarchical clustering analysis were applied for exploratory analysis, while support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify the biodiesel/diesel blends. All of the chemometric models used present better results from the combination of spectral information with isotopic data for biodiesel contents of over 10% in the mixture, with the best results being Obtained from the SVM classification. Therefore, the development presented in this paper could become an important technique to improve the discrimination of the feedstock used in biodiesel production and a resource for quality control in industry.

  • 6.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo J. M.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ramos, Alessandro S.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Pires, Jessica P.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Engelmann, Pamela de M.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio V.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Discriminant analysis of biodiesel fuel blends based on combined data from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and stable carbon isotope analysis2017In: Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, ISSN 0169-7439, E-ISSN 1873-3239, Vol. 161, p. 70-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multivariate approach was used for classification of fuel blends using the combined information from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and stable carbon isotopes analysis by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS). Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the classification of biodiesel/diesel fuel blends containing 0-100% (v/v) of biodiesel. The LDA and PLS-DA methods were able to discriminate samples ranging from 10% to 100% biodiesel (v/v) using the combined information from FTIR and IRMS. Since the global trend is toward a gradual increase in the percentage of biodiesel in fuel blends, the technique presented in this paper could be an important development in improving the traceability and identification of different raw materials used in biodiesel production.

  • 7.
    Engelmann, Pamela de Medeiros
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Moser, Letícia Isabela
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    do Canto Bruzza, Eduardo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Barbieri, Cristina Barazzetti
    General Institute of Forensics, Brazil.
    Barela, Pâmela Susin
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Pompéu de Moraes, Diogo
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho Herbert
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Goudinho, Flávio Soares
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Melo, Clarissa Lovato
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Environmental monitoring of water resources around a municipal landfill of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 26, p. 21398-21411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Brazil, landfills are commonly used as a method for the final disposal of waste that is compliant with the legislation. This technique, however, presents a risk to surface water and groundwater resources, owing to the leakage of metals, anions, and organic compounds. The geochemical monitoring of water resources is therefore extremely important, since the leachate can compromise the quality and use of surface water and groundwater close to landfills. In this paper, the results of analyses of metals, anions, ammonia, and physicochemical parameters were used to identify possible contamination of surface water and groundwater in a landfill area. A statistical multivariate approach was used. The values found for alkali metals, nitrate, and chloride indicate contamination in the regional groundwater and, moreover, surface waters also show variation when compared to the other background points, mainly for ammonia. Thus, the results of this study evidence the landfill leachate influence on the quality of groundwater and surface water in the study area.

  • 8.
    Engelmann, Pâmela de Medeiros
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Barbieri, Cristina Barazzetti
    General Institute of Forensics, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho Herbert
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo Medina
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Environmental monitoring of a landfill area through the application of carbon stable isotopes, chemical parameters and multivariate analysis2018In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 76, p. 591-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leachate produced during an organic matter decomposition process has a complex composition and can cause contamination of surface and groundwaters adjacent to a landfill area. The monitoring of these areas is extremely important for the characterization of the leachate produced and to avoid or mitigate environmental damages. Thus, the present study has the objective of monitoring the area of a Brazilian landfill using conventional parameters (dissolved metals and anions in water) and alternative, stable carbon isotopes parameters (δ13C of dissolved organic and inorganic carbons in water) in addition to multivariate analysis techniques. The use of conventional and alternative parameters together with multivariate analysis showed that cells of the residues are at different phases of stabilization of the organic matter and probably already at C3 of the methanogenic phase of decomposition. In addition, the data showed that organic matter stabilization ponds present in the landfill are efficient and improve the quality of the leachate. Enrichment of the heavy 13C isotope in both surface and groundwater suggested contamination in two sampling sites.

  • 9.
    Giongo, Adriana
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Haag, Taiana
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lopes Simao, Taiz L.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Medina-Silva, Renata
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Utz, Laura R. P.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Bogo, Mauricio R.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Bonatto, Sandro L.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Zamberlan, Priscilla M.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho H.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio V.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Sbrissa, Gesiane F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Kowsmann, Renato O.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Freire, Antonio F. M.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Miller, Dennis J.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Viana, Adriano R.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Eizirik, Eduardo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Discovery of a chemosynthesis-based community in the western South Atlantic Ocean2016In: Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, ISSN 0967-0637, E-ISSN 1879-0119, Vol. 112, p. 45-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemosynthetic communities have been described from a variety of deep-sea environments across the world's oceans. They constitute very interesting biological systems in terms of their ecology, evolution and biogeography, and also given their potential as indicators of the presence and abundance of consistent hydrocarbon-based nutritional sources. Up to now such peculiar biotic assemblages have not been reported for the western South Atlantic Ocean, leaving this large region undocumented with respect to the presence, composition and history of such communities. Here we report on the presence of a chemosynthetic community off the coast of southern Brazil, in an area where high-levels of methane and the presence of gas hydrates have been detected. We performed metagenomic analyses of the microbial community present at this site, and also employed molecular approaches to identify components of its benthic fauna. We conducted phylogenetic analyses comparing the components of this assemblage to those found elsewhere in the world, which allowed a historical assessment of the structure and dynamics of these systems. Our results revealed that the microbial community at this site is quite diverse, and contains many components that are very closely related to lineages previously sampled in ecologically similar environments across the globe. Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaeal groups were found to be very abundant at this site, suggesting that methane is indeed an important source of nutrition for this community. In addition, we document the presence at this site of a vestimentiferan siboglinid polychaete and the bivalve Acharax sp., both of which are typical components of deep-sea chemosynthetic communities. The remarkable similarity in biotic composition between this area and other deep-sea communities across the world supports the interpretation that these assemblages are historically connected across the global oceans, undergoing colonization from distant sites and influenced by local ecological features that select a stereotyped suite of specifically adapted organisms. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Iglesias, Rodrigo S.
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Maraschin, Anderson J.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Sbrissa, Gesiane
    Toho University, Japan.
    Characterization and modeling of CO2‐water‐rock interactions in Hygiene Sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Denver Basin, aimed for carbon dioxide geological storage2018In: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2152-3878, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 781-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon capture and geological storage are among the most valuable technologies capable of reducing CO2 emissions. Long‐term interactions between CO2 and a reservoir, and the integrity of geological formations, are key factors in the selection of adequate reservoirs for permanent storage. Numerical models of CO2‐water‐rock geochemical interactions are often employed to predict the fate of CO2 stored in a reservoir over time. The Hygiene Sandstone, in the Denver Basin, Colorado, USA, is a geological formation with potential for CO2 storage, and was therefore studied in this work, in which we collected and characterized outcrop samples in order to supply the input parameters for numerical simulations. Four representative thin sections of Hygiene Sandstone outcrops were quantified in terms of detrital constituents, diagenesis, and porosity on the basis of conventional petrography. Sandstone mineralogy included, in decreasing order, quartz, K‐feldspar, muscovite, albite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, poikilotopic calcite, and siderite. Porosity ranged from 4% to 13%. A geochemical modeling study of CO2‐water‐rock interactions performed with two characterized samples and brine data from the Hygiene Sandstones, simulating reservoir conditions, suggested that the mineralogy of the sandstone is quite stable under the conditions that were tested and only minor mineralogical and porosity alterations would occur within a thousand years of storage.

  • 11.
    Iglesias, Rodrigo S.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Melo, Clarissa L.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Heemann, Roberto
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Machado, Claudia X.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Carbon capture and geological storage in Brazil: an overview2015In: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2152-3878, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brazil is recognized for possessing a low carbon-intensive energy matrix, with most of its power being generated from hydroelectricity. Its greenhouse gas emissions profile is dominated by deforestation and land-use change. Despite this characteristic, the country has been committed to the development of carbon capture and geological storage (CCS) research since this technology started to be recognized as a relevant solution for greenhouse gas emission reductions. This development has gained attention recently owing to the beginning of the production of pre-salt reservoirs, which may contain significant amounts of CO2 in the produced fluids. The work has been carried out mostly through the efforts of the academia and industrial enterprises. This paper presents a summary and a brief description of the recent activities being carried out by these sectors, aiming to develop and promote CCS in Brazil.

  • 12.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Uppsala University.
    Diagenesis and Sequence Stratigraphy: an integrated approach to constrain evolution of reservoir quality in sandstones2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diagenesis and sequence stratigraphy have been formally treated as two separate disciplines in sedimentary petrology. This thesis demonstrates that synergy between these two subjects can be used to constrain evolution of reservoir quality in sandstones. Such integrated approach is possible because sequence stratigraphy provides useful information on parameters such as pore water chemistry, residence time of sediments under certain geochemistry conditions, and detrital composition, which ultimately control diagenesis of sandstones.

    Evidence from five case studies and from literature, enabled the development of a conceptual model for the spatial and temporal distribution of diagenetic alterations and related evolution of reservoir quality in sandstones deposited in paralic environments. Diagenetic alterations that have been constrained within the context of sequence stratigraphy include: (i) formation of kaolinite and intragranular porosity, and mechanical infiltration of clay minerals in sandstones lying at variable depths below sequence boundaries, (ii) formation of pseudomatrix and cementation by calcite, dolomite, and siderite in lag deposits at parasequence boundaries, (iii) cementation by kaolinite, pyrite, and calcite in sandstones lying in the vicinity of parasequence boundaries with coal deposits, (iv) formation of glaucony in condensed interval at parasequence boundaries, transgressive and maximum flooding surfaces, (v) formation of berthierine in fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits of the highstand systems tract, (vi) cementation by calcite in bioclastic sandstones of the transgressive systems tract, and (vii) formation of kaolinite in fluvial deposits of the lowstand systems tract. The distribution of such alterations put important constrains for the pattern of burial diagenesis (e.g., formation of chlorite, illite, quartz), related evolution of reservoir quality in sandstones, and distribution of baffles and barriers for fluid flow in the context of sequence stratigraphy.

  • 13.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho
    Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil.
    Oliveira, Rafael
    Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil.
    Praeg, Daniel
    Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Brazil ; Géoazur, France.
    Gomez Pivel, Maria Aljandra
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil.
    dos Reis, Antonio Tadeu
    Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Brazil.
    Silva, Cleverson
    Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Brazil.
    Leonel, Bruno
    Seaseep Dados de Petróleo, Brazil.
    Gas seeps and gas hydrates in the Amazon deep-sea fan2018In: Geo-Marine Letters, ISSN 0276-0460, E-ISSN 1432-1157, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 429-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep-sea fans have been proposed to act as carbon sinks, rapid deposition driving shallow methanogenesis to favor net storage within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Here, we present new evidence of widespread gas venting from the GHSZ on the upper Amazon deep-sea fan, together with analyses of the first samples of gas hydrates recovered offshore NE Brazil. Multibeam water column and seafloor imagery over an 18,000-km2 area of the upper Amazon fan reveal 53 water column gas plumes, rising from venting features in water depths of 650–2600 m. Most gas vents (60%) are located along seafloor faults that record the ongoing gravitational collapse of the fan above deep décollements, while others (40%) are located in water depths of 650–715 m within the upper edge of the GHSZ. Gas compositions from hydrates recovered in vents at three locations on and north of the fan indicate biogenic sources (dominantly methane with 2–15% of CO2; δ13C from − 81.1 to − 77.3‰), whereas samples from vents adjacent to the fan proper include possible thermogenic contributions (methane 95%, CO2 4%, and ethane 1%; δ13C – 59.2‰). These results concur with previous findings that the upper edge of the GHSZ may be sensitive to temporal changes in water temperatures, but further point to the importance of gas escape from within areas of gas hydrate stability. Our results suggest the role of fluid migration along pathways created by faulting within rapidly deposited passive margin depocenters, which are increasingly recognized to undergo gravitational collapse above décollements. Our findings add to evidence that gas can escape from sediments to the sea in areas where gas hydrates are stable on passive margins, and suggest the need of further studies of the dynamics of deep-sea depocenters in relation to carbon cycling.

  • 14.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Iglesias, R
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Einloft, S
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions with CO2 Capture and Geological Storage.2017In: Handbook of climate change mitigation and adaptation., Springer, 2017, 2, p. 2197-2237Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) is one of the most promising technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change in a fossil fuel-dependent world. If fully implemented, CCS may contribute to reduce 20 % of global emissions from fossil fuels by 2050 and 55 % by the end of this century. The complete CCS chain consists of capturing CO2 from large stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants and heavy industries and transport and store it in appropriate geological reservoirs such as petroleum fields, saline aquifers, and coal seams, therefore returning carbon emitted from fossil fuels (as CO2) back to geological sinks.

    Recent studies have shown that geological reservoirs can safely store for many centuries the entire greenhouse gas (GHG) global emissions. In this chapter, we present a comprehensive summary of the latest advances in CCS research and technologies that can be used to store significant quantities of CO2 for geological periods of time and therefore considerably contribute to GHG emission reduction.

  • 15.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    et al.
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Machado, CPontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.Rockett, GPontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.Iglesias, RPontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Brazilian Atlas of CO2 Capture and Geological Storage: Atlas Brazileiro de Captura e Armazenamento Geologico de CO22016Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Machado, Claudia Xavier
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.
    Rockett, Gabriela Camboim
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.
    Brazilian Renewable Carbon Capture and Geological Storage Map: Possibilities for the Parana Basin (Brazil).2013In: GHGT-11 Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, 18-22 November 2012, Kyoto, Japan / [ed] Tim Dixon, Kenji Yamaji, Elsevier, 2013, Vol. 37, p. 6105-6111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renewable Carbon Capture and Storage (RCCS) represents an interesting option to reduce CO2 emissions and go towards negative emissions. As part of the CARBMAP Research Program, this study aims to develop a map of RCCS possibilities for the Paraná Basin, Brazil. A Geographic Information System was used to match RCCS-related data. Preliminary results indicate that CO2 emissions matched to the Paraná Basin are derived from ethanol and sugar cane plants. Good possibilities to develop RCCS are in this basing's saline aquifers.

  • 17.
    Medina-Silva, Renata
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    de Oliveira, Rafael R.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Pivel, Maria A. G.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Borges, Luiz G. A.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Simao, Taiz L. L.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Pereira, Leandro M.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Trindade, Fernanda J.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho H.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Valdez, Fernanda P.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Eizirik, Eduardo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Utz, Laura R. P.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Groposo, Claudia
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Miller, Dennis J.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Viana, Adriano R.
    Petrobras SA, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Giongo, Adriana
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Microbial diversity from chlorophyll maximum, oxygen minimum and bottom zones in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean2018In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 178, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conspicuous physicochemical vertical stratification in the deep sea is one of the main forces driving microbial diversity in the oceans. Oxygen and sunlight availability are key factors promoting microbial diversity throughout the water column. Ocean currents also play a major role in the physicochemical stratification, carrying oxygen down to deeper zones as well as moving deeper water masses up towards shallower depths. Water samples within a 50-km radius in a pockmark location of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean were collected and the prokaryotic communities from different water depths - chlorophyll maximum, oxygen minimum and deep-sea bottom (down to 1355 m) - were described. At phylum level, Proteobacteria were the most frequent in all water depths, Cyanobacteria were statistically more frequent in chlorophyll maximum zone, while Thaumarchaeota were significantly more abundant in both oxygen minimum and bottom waters. The most frequent microorganism in the chlorophyll maximum and oxygen minimum zones was a Pelagibacteraceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU). At the bottom, the most abundant genus was the archaeon Nitrosopurnilus. Beta diversity analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequencing data uncovered in this study shows high spatial hetero-geneity among water zones communities. Our data brings important contribution for the characterisation of oceanic microbial diversity, as it consists of the first description of prokaryotic communities occurring in different oceanic water zones in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

  • 18.
    Medina-Silva, Renata
    et al.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Oliviera, Rafael R.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Trindade, Fernanda J.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Borges, Luiz G. A.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Simao, Taiz L. Lopes
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho H.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Valdez, Fernanda P.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Constant, Marcelo J.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Simundi, Carolina L.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Eizirik, Eduardo
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Groposo, Claudia
    CENPES/PETROBRAS, Brazil.
    Miller, Dennis J.
    CENPES/PETROBRAS, Brazil.
    Reis da Silva, Priscila
    CENPES/PETROBRAS, Brazil.
    Viana, Adriano R.
    PETROBRAS/E&P-EXP/GEOF/MNS, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Giongo, Adriana
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Microbiota associated with tubes of Escarpia sp. from cold seeps in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean constitutes a community distinct from that of surrounding marine sediment and water2017In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the depth increases and the light fades in oceanic cold seeps, a variety of chemosynthetic-based benthic communities arise. Previous assessments reported polychaete annelids belonging to the family Siboglinidae as part of the fauna at cold seeps, with the ‘Vestimentifera’ clade containing specialists that depend on microbial chemosynthetic endosymbionts for nutrition. Little information exists concerning the microbiota of the external portion of the vestimentiferan trunk wall. We employed 16S rDNA-based metabarcoding to describe the external microbiota of the chitin tubes from the vestimentiferan Escarpia collected from a chemosynthetic community in a cold seep area at the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. The most abundant operational taxonomic unit (OTU) belonged to the family Pirellulaceae (phylum Planctomycetes), and the second most abundant OTU belonged to the order Methylococcales (phylum Proteobacteria), composing an average of 21.1 and 15.4% of the total reads on tubes, respectively. These frequencies contrasted with those from the surrounding environment (sediment and water), where they represent no more than 0.1% of the total reads each. Moreover, some taxa with lower abundances were detected only in Escarpia tube walls. These data constitute on the first report of an epibiont microbial community found in close association with external surface of a cold-seep metazoan, Escarpia sp., from a chemosynthetic community in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

  • 19.
    Melo, Clarissa L.
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Goudinho, Flavio S.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Bressan, Lia W.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Constant, Marcelo J.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    dos Santos, Victor Hugo J. M.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Pires, Jessica P.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Moreira, Andrea Cristina de C. A.
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil.
    do Rosario, Fatima
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil.
    Musse, Ana Paula S.
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil.
    Integration results of soil CO2 flux and subsurface gases in the Ressacada Pilot site, Southern Brazil2017In: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-13 / [ed] Dixon, T Laloui, L Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2017, p. 3793-3804Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first CO2 monitoring field lab at the Ressacada Farm, in the Southern region of Brazil, started in 2011 and until 2015 offered an excellent opportunity to run controlled CO2 releases experiments in soil and shallow subsurface through vertical injection wells. This paper focus on the presentation and comparison of the results obtained at the last campaign realized at this site in August 2015. The results integrate a time-lapse monitoring experiment of CO2 migration in both saturated and unsaturated sand-rich sediments and soil, using soil CO2 flux measurements and subsurface gas analyses through CO2 concentrations (ppm) and carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13 of CO2). The CO2 flux results in the studied area showed an increase in the flux values according to the increasing of injection rate and along the campaign are directed to the southwest portion of the area. However, even by injecting large amounts of CO2, fluxes are greatly reduced when it rains. The gas analysis also showed an increase in CO2 concentrations according to the increasing of the injection rate mainly in the superficial levels of the monitoring wells (0.5m and 2m depth). The delta C-13 of CO2 found on the 3rd injection day showed the presence of CO2 injected and demonstrate that the sampling methodology with vacutainer vial was effective, since there is no atmospheric contamination. The correlation of isotopic analysis were consistent with the results of concentrations and CO2 fluxes and thus, it is clear that the CO2 breakthrough occurred from the 3rd day of injection, while were obtained the largest CO2 fluxes, the higher gas concentrations in the subsurface, as well as the industrial origin of delta C-13 of CO2.

  • 20.
    Melo, Clarissa L.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Moreira, Andrea Cristina de C. A.
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA, Brazil.
    Goudinho, Flavio S.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Bressan, Lia W.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Constant, Marcelo J.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Oliva, Andresa
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Chang, Hung K.
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Nakaema, Walter M.
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Vinter, Daniel P.
    Univ Estadual Paulista, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    do Rosario, Fatima
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA, Brazil.
    Musse, Ana Paula S.
    PETROBRAS Petr Brasileiro SA, Brazil.
    CO2MOVE Project: The New Brazilian Field Lab Fully Dedicated to CO2 MMV Experiments2017In: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-13 / [ed] Dixon, T Laloui, L Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2017, p. 3699-3715Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After the Ressacada Project experience acquired from 2011 to 2015 when PUCRS, UNESP and other institutions conducted three controlled CO2 release experiments, PETROBRAS, the national oil company that is sponsoring the project, has launched a new challenge to its partners. The company stimulated the implementation of a new Brazilian experimental site where there will be a deepening of studies in geologically more complex conditions and more challenging from a technological point of view. The choice of an area inside PUCRS campus, in Viamao - Rio Grande do Sul state, was motivated by a predominantly clay subsoil and the privileged location of the site in terms of ease logistics and security, which is required for a project of this size that houses high-tech equipment with significant cost. The CO2MOVE project started at 2015 with the subsurface characterization of the site and the assembly and manufacture of an automated system for CO2 and gas tracers with injection capacity for 5 to 50 kg/ day. Based on physical characterization studies and on numerical modeling that is being developed, the site infrastructure will be completed in the next months with the positioning of vertical injection wells, monitoring wells, and other equipment and monitoring mesh. Monitoring tools should be arranged in an area of approximately 100m(2), occupying the entire region surrounding the injection wells. Fieldwork involving CO2 injection and monitoring should have a 60 days duration of which 15 days are for preliminary surveys (pre-injection), 30 days for injection and CO2 monitoring and the last 15 days for post-injection measurements. Following this work, the collected data will be analyzed in the university labs. Similarly to Ressacada Project, this experiment will run measurements of soil CO2 flux with accumulation chambers, CO2 turbulent fluxes with Eddy Covariance, subsurface gases and groundwater monitoring, and resistivity measurements. Other monitoring methods still not tested by the research team will be held as gas tracers monitoring and laser measurements. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 21.
    Melo, Clarissa Lovato
    et al.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catilica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Bressan, Lia Weigert
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catilica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catilica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Constant, Marcelo Jardim
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catilica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    de Castro Araujo Moreira, Andrea Cristina
    PETROBRAS Petroleo Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil;UERJ Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro PPGMA, Brazil.
    Study of gas tracers for CO2 monitoring2014In: 12th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-12 / [ed] Dixon, T Herzog, H Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2014, p. 3864-3868Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas tracers have been tested libr monitoring and detecting CO, displacement in the underground and eventually leakages to the upper layers in geological storage sites. Commonly used tracers are perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). In Brazil, we are canying out gas tracers studies in laboratory for further application in field test 'facilities. These experiments consist of injecting CO, with perfluorocarbon (perfluoropropane PP and pealuormethylcyclopentane PMCP) at low pressure (ca. 290 psi) in pressurized vessels with different types of sediments and soil samples. After flowing through the sample pores, the tracer is adsorbed into a capillary adsorption tube (CAT) with a specific fiber for perfluorcabon. Then, the tracer is extracted from the CAT through a Thermal Desorption System and subsequently analyzed in a Gas Chromatograph with an Electron Capture Detector (GC ECD). The objective of these experiments is to evaluate the PFCs as a monitoring tool; analyzing the tracer retention times in different sediments, as well as understanding the CATs adsorption capacity and performance. After laboratory tests, field experiments will be conducted in the course of this project. Several experiments of CO2 injection and controlled leaks will be developed in shallow vertical wells at the project site as a continuity of the experiments started at Ressacada Fann Site (Florianopolis, Brazil). The project aim is to understand the flow and dispersion of CO2 in soil and atmosphere simulating an eventual leakage from a geological reservoir using an automated system with a dedicated module for tracers injection into CO2 stream. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creavativecommons.org/licesses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). Peer-review under responsibility of the Organizing Committee of GLIGT-12

  • 22.
    Migeon, Sebastien
    et al.
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Ceramicola, Silvia
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Praeg, Daniel
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Ducassou, Emmanuelle
    Univ Bordeaux 1, France.
    Dano, Alexandre
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Mary, Flore
    UPMC, France.
    Mascle, Jean
    UPMC, France.
    Post-failure Processes on the Continental Slope of the Central Nile Deep-Sea Fan: Interactions Between Fluid Seepage, Sediment Deformation and Sediment-Wave Construction2014In: Submarine Mass Movements and their Consequences: 6th International Symposium / [ed] Krastel, S Behrmann, JH Volker, D Stipp, M Berndt, C Urgeles, R Chaytor, J Huhn, K Strasser, M Harbitz, CB, Springer, 2014, Vol. 37, p. 117-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voluminous mass-transport deposits (MTD) have been identified on seismic profiles across the central Nile Deep-Sea Fan (NDSF). The youngest MTDs are buried under 30-100 m of well-stratified slope deposits that, in water depths of 1,800-2,600 m, are characterized by undulating reflectors correlated with slope-parallel seabed ridges and troughs. Seabed imagery shows that, in the western part of the central NDSF, short, arcuate undulations are associated with fluid venting (carbonate pavements, gas flares), while to the east, long, linear undulations have erosional furrows on their downslope flanks and fluid seeps are less common. Sub-bottomprofiles suggest that the western undulations correspond to rotated fault-blocks above the buried MTDs, while those in the east are sediment waves generated by gravity flows. We suggest that fluids coming from dewatering of MTDs and/or from deeper layers generate overpressures along the boundary between MTDs and overlying fine-grained sediment, resulting in a slow downslope movement of the sediment cover and formation of tilted blocks separated by faults. Fluids can migrate to the seafloor, leading to the construction of carbonate pavements. Where the sediment cover stabilizes, sediment deposition by gravity flows may continue building sediment waves. These results suggest that complex processes may follow the emplacement of large MTDs, significantly impacting continental-slope evolution.

  • 23.
    Miller, Dennis J.
    et al.
    PETROBRAS CENPES Ctr Pesquisas & Desenvolvimento, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Viana, Adriano R.
    PETROBRAS E&P EXPLORAT, Brazil.
    Kowsmann, Renato O.
    PETROBRAS CENPES Ctr Pesquisas & Desenvolvimento, Brazil.
    Freire, Antonio Fernando M.
    PETROBRAS E&P EXPLORAT, Brazil.
    Oreiro, Sergio G.
    PETROBRAS E&P EXPLORAT, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho H.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio V.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Heemann, Roberto
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Preissler, Adriane G.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Machado, Claudia X.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Sbrissa, Gesiane F.
    PUCRS Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul, Brazil.
    Natural gas hydrates in the Rio Grande Cone (Brazil): A new province in the western South Atlantic2015In: Marine and Petroleum Geology, ISSN 0264-8172, E-ISSN 1873-4073, Vol. 67, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rio Grande Cone is a large-scale fanlike feature in the continental slope of the Pelotas Basin, Southern Brazil, where ubiquitous world-class bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) are readily observed in seismic records. With the purpose of searching for natural gas hydrate deposits in the Cone area, four oceanographic cruises were carried out between May 2011 and July 2013, leading to the discovery of two pockmark fields, active faults and gas hydrates in shallow sediments. Multichannel seismic, multibeam echo sounder, side scan sonar and sub-bottom profiler records were used to map the shallow section and select sites for piston core sampling. Gas hydrates were recovered in several piston cores within muddy sediments collected inside pockmarks displaying high backscatter in the multibeam and side scan sonar data. We present two representative piston cores where numerous levels of gas hydrates occur, along with degassing features, authigenic carbonate and soupy sediments. Gas dissociated from gas hydrate samples is dominantly methane (>99.78%) with minor quantities of ethane. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the gas strongly suggest a biogenic origin for the analyzed samples. These new findings are regarded as strong enough evidence to consider the Rio Grande Cone as a new gas hydrate province. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Müller Bicca, Marcos
    et al.
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Philipp, Ruy Paulo
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Jelinek, Andrea Ritter
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifícia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    dos Santos Scherer, Claiton Marlon
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Jamal, Daúd Liace
    Universidade Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique.
    Domingos dos Reis, Adriano
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Permian-Early Triassic tectonics and stratigraphy of the Karoo Supergroup in northwestern Mozambique2017In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 1464-343X, E-ISSN 1879-1956, Vol. 130, p. 8-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gondwana continent was the base of great basin inception, sedimentation and magmatism throughout the Cambrian to Middle Jurassic periods. The northwestern Mozambique igneous and metamorphic basement assemblages host the NW-trending Moatize Minjova Basin, which has great economic potential for coal and gas mining. This rift basin was activated by an S-SW stress field during the Early Permian period, as constrained by regional and field scale structural data. Tectonically induced subsidence in the basin, from the reactivation of NW-SE and NNE-SSW regional structures is well recorded by faults, folds and synsedimentary fractures within the Early Late Permian Moatize Formation. NW-SE, N-S and NE-SW field structures consist of post-Karoo reactivation patterns related to a NNE-SSW extension produced by the Pangea breakup and early inception stages of the Great East African Rift System. The Early Late Permian sequences of the Moatize-Minjova Basin are composed of fluvial meandering, coal-bearing beds of the Moatize Formation, which comprises mostly floodplain, crevasse splay and fluvial channel lithofacies associations, deposited in a cyclic pattern. This sequence was overlapped by a multiple-story, braided fluvial plain sequence of the Matinde Formation (Late Permian – Early Triassic). Lithofacies associations in the Matinde Formation and its internal relationships suggest deposition of poorly channelized braided alluvial plain in which downstream and probably lateral accretion macroforms alternate with gravity flow deposits. NW paleoflow measurements suggest that Permian fluvial headwaters were located somewhere southeast of the study area, possibly between the African and Antarctic Precambrian highlands.

  • 25.
    Oliva, Andresa
    et al.
    Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Brazil.
    de Castro Araujo Moreira, Andrea Cristina
    PETROBRAS Petroleo Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil;Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Chang, Hung Kiang
    Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Brazil.
    do Rosario, Fatima Ferreira
    PETROBRAS Petroleo Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil.
    Santana Musse, Ana Paula
    PETROBRAS Petroleo Brasileiro SA CENPES, Brazil.
    Melo, Clarissa Lovato
    Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Bressan, Lia Weigert
    Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Contant, Marcelo Jardim
    Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro UERJ PPGMA, Brazil.
    Chiaranda Lazzarin, Helen Simone
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Cavelhao, Gabriel
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    Corseuil, Henry Xavier
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande Sul PUCRS, Brazil.
    A comparison of three methods for monitoring CO2 migration in soil and shallow subsurface in the Ressacada Pilot site, Southern Brazil2014In: 12th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT-12 / [ed] Dixon, T Herzog, H Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2014, p. 3992-4002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a joint R&D project under the full sponsorship of PETROBRAS, the Brazilian National Oil Company, the first CO2 monitoring field lab was started-up in Brazil in 2011. The site chosen, the Ressacada Farm, in the Southern region of the country, offered an excellent opportunity to run controlled CO2 release experiments in soil and shallow subsurface (< 3 m depth). This paper focuses on the presentation and comparison of the results obtained using electrical imaging, CO2 flux measurements and geochemical analysis of the groundwater to monitor CO2 migration in both saturated and unsaturated sand-rich sediments and soil. In 2013 a controlled release campaign was run, covering an area of approximately 6,300 m(2). Commercial food-grade gaseous carbon dioxide was continuously injected at 3 m depth for 12 days. The average injection rate was 90 g/day, totaling ca. 32kg of gas being released. The low injection rate avoided fracturing of the unconsolidated sediments composing the bulk of the local soil matrix. Monitoring techniques deployed during 30 consecutive days, including background characterization, injection and post-injection periods, were: (1) 3D electrical imaging using a Wenner array, (2) soil CO2 flux measurements using accumulation chambers, (3) water sampling and analysis, (4) 3D (tridimensional) and 4D (time-lapsed) electrical imaging covering depth levels to approximately 10 m below the surface. Water geochemical monitoring consisted of the analyses of several chemical parameters, as well as acidity and electrical conductivity in five multi-level wells (2m; 4m and 6 m depth) installed in the vicinity of the CO2 injection well. Comparison of pre- and post-injection electrical imaging shows changes in resistivity values consistent with CO(2)migration pathways. A pronounced increase in resistivity values occurred, from 1,500 ohm. m to 2,000 ohm. m, in the vicinity of the injection well. The accumulation chamber assessment show significant changes in the CO2 flux during the release experiment: maximum values detected were ca. 270 mmol/m(2)/s(during injection) as compared to background values of c.a. 34mmol/m(2)/s. The pH showed variations after CO2 injection in two monitoring wells at 2m, 4m and 6m depth. After the CO2 injection ceased, the lowest pH measured was 4.1, which represents a decrease of 0.5 relative to the background values. Slight variations in the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) were observed near the CO2 injection well. There was a decreasing trend of this potential, especially in a monitoring well at 6m depth, ranging from 308mV to 229mV, between the background and the injection scenarios. Ppb level increments were detected in the measurements carried out for the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and P) and trace elements (Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr, Ni, Mn, S, V, and Zn). Electrical conductivity and alkalinity, however, remained constant throughout the experiment, with values around 40 mu S.cm(-1) and 2.5 mgCaCO(3).L-1, respectively. The response to CO2 injection was not uniformly observed by the different methods deployed on site. The highest percentage change in resistivity values near the injection well occurred 5 days after the injection had started. However the highest percentage changes in the CO2 flux values occurred 9 days after the injection, 4 days after the observed changes in resistivity values. This delay is probably due to the migration time of the gas from 0.5m depth to the surface. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). Peer-review under responsibility of the Organizing Committee of GHGT-12

  • 26.
    Praeg, Daniel
    et al.
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho Herbert
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Migeon, Sebastien
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Ceramicola, Silvia
    OGS Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Italy.
    Dano, Alexandre
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Ducassou, Emmanuelle
    Univ Bordeaux 1, France.
    Dupre, Stephanie
    IFREMER, France.
    Mascle, Jean
    UNS UPMC CNRS OCA, France.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    Pontif Univ Rio Grande PUCRS, Brazil.
    Fluid Seepage in Relation to Seabed Deformation on the Central Nile Deep-Sea Fan, Part 2: Evidence from Multibeam and Sidescan Imagery2014In: Submarine Mass Movements and their Consequences: 6th International Symposium / [ed] Krastel, S Behrmann, JH Völker, D Stipp, M Berndt, C Urgeles, R Chaytor, J Huhn, K Strasser, M Harbitz, CB, Springer, 2014, p. 141-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the central Nile deep-sea fan, stratified sediments overlying mass-transport deposits (MTDs) are deformed into slope-parallel seabed undulations associated with fluid seepage. The western part of this system, in water depths of 1,950-2,250 m, is examined using multi-frequency data from hull-mounted and deep-towed swath/profiling systems. Sub-bottom profiles show sub-vertical fluid pipes that terminate both at and below seabed, and gas signatures along fault planes bounding the undulations. Fluid seepage is recorded by high-to intermediate-backscatter patches (HBPs, IBPs) that differ in appearance on multibeam imagery (30 kHz, <= 3 m penetration) and sidescan swaths (170/190 kHz, <0.1 m penetration). Comparison of the two suggests a distinction of (a) buried carbonates (0.1-3 m), (b) broad near-seabed (<0.1 m) carbonate pavements elongate along the undulations, (c) sub-circular areas of seabed seepage up to 300 m across. Four of the latter have narrower gas flares at their edges rising 400-800 m above seabed. These results are consistent with an evolving system of narrow fluid conduits that support the growth and burial of carbonate pavements, shifting over millennial timescales along linear zones parallel to fault planes rooted in MTDs. Sediment deformation above MTDs is inferred to provide pathways for fluid escape, but migration of gas-rich fluids from depth is likely to have facilitated slope destabilisation.

  • 27.
    Ramos, Alessandro da S.
    et al.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Rodrigues, Luiz F.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    de Araujo, Gabriel E.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Pozocco, Caroline T. M.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Heemann, Roberto
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio V.
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Geochemical Characterization of Irati And Palermo Formations (Parana Basin-Southern Brazil) for Shale Oil/Gas Exploration2015In: Energy Technology, ISSN 2194-4288, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 481-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shale gas/oil currently are two of the most important unconventional energy resources. Their exploitation has caused an energy revolution in USA, and many countries are investing in it. Brazil has large areas covered with sedimentary basins, but little attention has been devoted to the study of shale containing oil and gas. The parameters analyzed and studied for geochemical data evaluation are: clay mineral identification, mineral matter analysis, elemental analysis (including total organic carbon, total carbon, H, N, and S), and the methane adsorption capacity of shale. Adsorption in Palermo Formation samples (depth 238.5m) was 13.72cm(3)g(-1) and for samples from Irati Formation (depth 218.45, 95.3, and 107.5m) 11.73, 6.17, and 4.61cm(3)g(-1).

  • 28.
    Rockett, Gabriela Camboim
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul CEPAC, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio Grande do Sul CEPAC, Brazil.
    Ramirez, Andrea
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Van den Broek, Machteld
    Univ Utrecht, Netherlands.
    CO2 Storage Capacity of Campos Basin's Oil Fields, Brazil.2013In: GHGT-11: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, 18-22 November 2012, Kyoto, Japan / [ed] Tim Dixon, Kenji Yamaji, Elsevier, 2013, Vol. 37, p. 5124-5133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large potentials for CO2 storage were demonstrated in previous studies in Brazil. This study aims to estimate the CO2 storage capacity in the Campos Basin's oil fields, Southeast Brazil, in order to provide refined values to support CCS planning in the country. The results, based on field/reservoir level data show that there is a large potential for CO2 storage (ca. 950Mt) in the 17 assessed oil fields in the basin, and 75% of this storage capacity is found in sandstone reservoirs.

  • 29.
    Rodrigues, L
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    Goudinho, F.S.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    Laroque, D
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    Lourega, R
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    Heemann, R
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul-PUCRS, Brazil.
    An Alternative Gas Chromatography Setting for Geochemical Analysis.2014In: Journal of Chemical Engineering & Process Technology, E-ISSN 2157-7048, Vol. 5, article id 208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas chromatography is one of the most important techniques used to characterize gas composition of geochemical samples. This work presents a new gas chromatography setting to characterize gaseous composition using three detectors: a Flame Ionization Detector (FID), a Thermal Conductivity Detector (TCD) and a Flame Photometric Detector (FPD). The new gas chromatography setting developed is able to quantify hydrocarbons gases (C1-C5) and non-hydrocarbons (H2S, CO, CO2, N2, O2 and H2) in only one injection and in the same analysis. This alternative gas chromatography is able to reduce time of analysis and save sample that can be used for other kind of analyses.

  • 30.
    Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico
    et al.
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lourega, Rogerio Véscia
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Augustin, Adolpho Herbert
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Sbrissa, Gesiane
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Miller, Dennis
    PETROBRAS/CENPES, Brazil.
    Heemann, Roberto
    Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Viana, Adriano
    PETROBRAS/CENPES, Brazil.
    Freire, Antonio Fernando
    PETROBRAS/CENPES, Brazil.
    Morad, Sadoon
    United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates.
    The influence of methane fluxes on the sulfate/methane interface in sediments from the Rio Grande Cone Gas Hydrate Province, southern Brazil: A influência dos fluxos de metano na interface sulfato/metano em sedimentos de hidrato de gás do Cone do Rio Grande, Sul do Brasil2017In: Brazilian Journal of Geology, ISSN 2317-4692, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 369-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research has been published regarding the relation between major gas hydrate accumulations and the global carbon cycle. In this context, the determination of the sulfate/methane interface (SMI) depth is of primary importance in order to understand the dynamics of methane flux in the shallow section. This paper identifies the depth of the SMI in sediments based on sulfate and methane concentration profiles in cores recovered in the Rio Grande Cone Gas Hydrate Province, Pelotas Basin, southern Brazil. The shape of methane and sulfate concentration profiles in the sediments can be linked to the local methane flux rate as follows: (i) near linear, high upward-diffusing methane flux coupled with high sulfate diffusion from seawater; (ii) irregular, variable methane flux rates; and (iii) kink-type profile, which is indicative of variable rather than strictly high upward methane flux. The areas in which a high methane flux was identified are spatially associated with gas chimneys in sediments within pockmarks, whereas profiles with low methane flux are present in adjacent areas. These chimneys appear as acoustic blankings in seismic records and can therefore be mapped in subsurface. The  wavy-like seismic reflection following the SMI coincides with the occurrence of authigenic carbonate nodules and concretions. In addition, high methane fluxes and the occurrence of concretions and nodules carbonates were correlated by stratigraphic position of the concretions bearing intervals and sulfate profiles

  • 31.
    Santarosa, Cristian S.
    et al.
    Petrobras Res Ctr, Brazil;Pontificia Univ Catolica Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil;Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA.
    Crandall, Dustin
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA;URS, USA.
    Haljasmaa, Igor V.
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA;URS, USA.
    Hur, Tae-Bong
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA;Univ Pittsburgh, USA.
    Fazio, James J.
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA.
    Warzinski, Robert P.
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA.
    Heemann, Roberto
    CEPAC, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    CEPAC, Brazil.
    Romanov, Vyacheslav N.
    Natl Energy Technol Lab, USA.
    CO2 sequestration potential of Charqueadas coal field in Brazil2013In: International Journal of Coal Geology, ISSN 0166-5162, E-ISSN 1872-7840, Vol. 106, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although coal is not the primary source of energy in Brazil there is growing interest to evaluate the potential of coal from the south of the country for various activities. The I2B coal seam in the Charqueadas coal field has been considered a target for enhanced coal bed methane production and CO2 sequestration. A detailed experimental study of the samples from this seam was conducted at the NETL with assistance from the Pontificia Universidade Catolica Do Rio Grande Do Sul. Such properties as sorption capacity, internal structure of the samples, porosity and permeability were of primary interest in this characterization study. The samples used were low rank coals (high volatile bituminous and sub-bituminous) obtained from the I2B seam. It was observed that the temperature effect on adsorption capacity correlates negatively with as-received water and mineral content. Langmuir CO2 adsorption capacity of the coal samples ranged 0.61-2.09 mmol/g. The upper I2B seam appears to be overall more heterogeneous and less permeable than the lower I2B seam. The lower seam coal appears to have a large amount of micro-fractures that do not close even at 11 MPa of confining pressure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 32.
    Schütz, Marta K.
    et al.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Lopes, Natália F.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Cenci, Angélica
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo M.
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Einloft, Sandra
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Dullius, Jeane
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ligabue, Rosane
    Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Influence of Alkaline Additives and Buffers on Mineral Trapping of CO2 under Mild Conditions2018In: Chemical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0930-7516, E-ISSN 1521-4125, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is the main contributor to climate change. CO2 storage in underground brines and oil‐field brines by mineral trapping has been considered as a promising alternative in order to reduce CO2 emissions. However, permanent storage of CO2 in stable carbonate minerals is greatly dependent on brine pH, being favored over an alkaline pH. The effect of alkaline additives (NaOH, KOH, CaO) and buffer solutions (NaHCO3/NaOH, Na2HPO4/NaOH, NH4Cl/NH4OH) on the mineral trapping of CO2 under mild conditions using a synthetic brine is investigated. The results indicate that both NaOH+NH4Cl/NH4OH and KOH+NH4Cl/NH4OH mixtures promote precipitation mainly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3).

  • 33. Silva, I
    et al.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    Steiger, A
    Device for collecting sample of fluids in underwater medium.2014Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Siqueira, Tiago A.
    et al.
    University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Iglesias, Rodrigo S.
    University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Ketzer, João Marcelo
    University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
    Carbon dioxide injection in carbonate reservoirs: a review of CO2-water-rock interaction studies2017In: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2152-3878, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 802-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide injection in geological formations is currently a common procedure in several reservoirs worldwide. More recently, it has been considered a permanent storage solution, avoiding emission to the atmosphere from large industrial sources. Also, it is largely employed in the oil & gas exploration industry, for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. However, it is a known fact that injection of large amounts of CO2 into geological reservoirs may lead to a series of alterations due to chemical and physical interactions with minerals and fluids, especially in carbonate or carbonate-rich reservoirs. Experimental and numerical models have been employed in many studies in the past, to investigate these effects on the geological environment. So far, most of these studies focused on siliciclastic formations, whereas carbonate reservoirs, which are known to be much more chemically reactive when interacting with CO2, were much less investigated. We present a review of experimental and numerical models that have been employed for studying CO2-water-rock interactions, and their application to the investigation of the impact in carbonate reservoir quality and integrity caused by the injection of carbon dioxide.

1 - 34 of 34
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf