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  • 1.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Expressing 'confirmation' in Swedish: The interplay of word and utterance prosody2007In: Proceedings of the 16th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] Jürgen Trouvain, William J. Barry, Saarbrücken: Saarland University , 2007, p. 1093-1096, article id 1442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An exploratory study on the prosodic signaling of ‘confirmation’ in Swedish is presented. Pairs of subjects read short dialogs, constructed around selected target words, in a conversational style. A falling utterance intonation was found on the target word, and the signaling of word prosody (lexical pitch accent) appeared to be, to a certain degree, optional.

  • 2.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Revisiting intonational pitch accents in Swedish: Evidence from lexical accent neutralization2010In: Presented at TIE4. The Fourth European Conference on Tone and Intonation: September 9-11, 2010. Stockholm University, Campus Frescati, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2010, p. 69-70Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Buanzur, Tuarik C.
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, Germany.
    Niebuhr, Oliver
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark;Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, Germany.
    Focal F0 peak shape and sentence mode in Swedish2015In: Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015, Glasgow: University of Glasgow , 2015, article id 0363Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shape characteristics of rising-falling accentual F0 peaks of Stockholm Swedish Accent I words in narrow focus are studied in a corpus of 287 read sentences. The corpus includes statements and three types of polar questions. Results reveal a clear effect of sentence mode on the shape of the accentual rises: Statements are predominantly characterized by convex rises, questions by concave rises.

  • 4.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Carling, Gerd
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The sounds of a mixed language2014In: Scandoromani: Remnants of a Mixed Language / [ed] Gerd Carling, Lenny Lindell, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Leiden & Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2014, p. 24-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    F0 peak timing, height, and shape as independent features2014In: TAL 2014. The 4th International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages: Nijmegen, The Netherlands, May 13-16, 2014 / [ed] C. Gussenhoven, Y. Chen, D. Dediu, Nijmegen: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2014, p. 138-142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A considerable amount of evidence from several intonation languages (e.g., German, English, Italian) supports the idea that F0 peak timing, height, and shape variables form a feature bundle, which is used to encode two-fold intonational (e.g., sentence-level) pitch accent distinctions such as L+H* vs. L*+H. The three types of features in the bundle can be weighted differently but the outcome seems to be functionally equivalent. In this sense, they are ‘substitute phonetic features’. This paper presents data from two distinct prosodic dialect types of Swedish, a pitch-accent language, suggesting that these F0 variables can also be used independently of each other in order to encode two different contrasts (i.e., a three-fold contrast), each of which phonetically and functionally related to the L+H* vs. L*+H distinction in an intonation language. For Central Swedish, we observe two peak raising strategies which go along with differently shaped rises: ‘extending’ (= faster rise) and ‘shifting’ (= slower rise), which tend to be used to signal ‘speaker-related’ emphasis (e.g., ‘surprise’) or ‘message- related’ emphasis (e.g., ‘correction’), respectively. For Southern Swedish, we observe an ‘extended’ peak and an ‘extended and delayed’ peak.

  • 6.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University.
    On the Intonation of Confirmations in Southern Swedish2013In: Nordic Prosody: Proceedings of the XIth Conference, Tartu 2012 / [ed] Eva Liina Asu-Garcia, Pärtel Lippus, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013, p. 87-96Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how confirmations are intoned by nine speakers of Southern Swedish. Test phrases like ja, det var med bilen/bilar ‘yes, it was by car’ (Accent 1)/‘...with cars’ (Accent 2) were elicited, both as new-information responses and confirmations. Speakers made a clear distinction between the utterance types using two, simultaneous intonation strategies. First, they realised the nuclear accent on the target word with a considerably lower F0 peak in con- firmations than in new-information responses. Second, they added a pre-nuclear accent on the verb in confirmations. While they maintained the word-accent distinction on the target word in confirmations, the encoding of the word accent (Accent 1) on the verb seemed to be op- tional. This suggests that the pre-nuclear accent serves a primarily intonational function and that Southern Swedish may have purely intonational pitch accents, contrary to the traditional view. 

  • 7.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The prosody of contrastive topics in Southern Swedish2012In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2012 / [ed] Anders Eriksson, Åsa Abelin, Gothenburg: Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg , 2012, p. 1-4Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a pilot study on the prosodic marking of a contrastive topic in Southern Swedish. A test sentence was elicited in three experimental conditions: initial focus; final focus; contrastive topic (initial word) plus focus (final word). F0 patterns were analysed in recordings of 10 speakers. A majority of the speakers distinguished clearly between the conditions, but speakers employed different strategies. The most common one involved modifying the range and/or level of the F0 patterns given by the lexical pitch accents. Another frequent strategy involved a rising pitch accent on the initial word, where the lexical pitch accent would normally stipulate a fall. This result was unexpected and indicates that Southern Swedish sentence intonation might be more complex than typically assumed.

  • 8.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bruce, Gösta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Revisiting South and Central Swedish intonation from a comparative and functional perspective2012In: Understanding Prosody: The role of context, function and communication / [ed] Oliver Niebuhr, Berlin & Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2012, p. 135-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund university.
    House, David
    Royal Institute of Technology, KTH.
    Acoustic features of multimodal prominences: Do visual beat gestures affect verbal pitch accent realization?2017In: The 14th International Conference on Auditory-Visual Speech Processing (AVSP2017) / [ed] Slim Ouni, Chris Davis, Alexandra Jesse, Jonas Beskow, Stockholm: KTH , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interplay of verbal and visual prominence cues has attracted recent attention, but previous findings are inconclusive as to whether and how the two modalities are integrated in the production and perception of prominence. In particular, we do not know whether the phonetic realization of pitch accents is influenced by co-speech beat gestures, and previous findings seem to generate different predictions. In this study, we investigate acoustic properties ofprominent words as a function of visual beat gestures in a corpus of read news from Swedish television. The corpus was annotated for head and eyebrow beats as well as sentence-level pitch accents. Four types of prominence cues occurredparticularly frequently in the corpus: (1) pitch accent only, (2) pitch accent plus head, (3) pitch accent plus head plus eyebrows, and (4) head only. The results show that (4) differs from (1-3) in terms of a smaller pitch excursion and shorter syllable duration. They also reveal significantly larger pitch excursions in (2) than in (1), suggesting that the realization of a pitch accent is to some extent influenced by the presence of visual prominence cues. Results are discussed in terms of the interaction between beat gestures and prosody with a potential functional difference between head and eyebrow beats.

  • 10.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Multimodal levels of prominence: the use of eyebrows and head beats to convey information structure in Swedish news reading2016In: ISGS Conference 2016. Gesture, Creativity, Multimodality: Book of abstracts, Paris: New Sorbonne University Paris 3 , 2016, p. 319-319Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Multimodal prominences: Exploring the patterning and usage of focal pitch accents, head beats and eyebrow beats in Swedish television news readings2017In: Speech Communication, ISSN 0167-6393, E-ISSN 1872-7182, Vol. 95, p. 100-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facial beat gestures align with pitch accents in speech, functioning as visual prominence markers. However, it is not yet well understood whether and how gestures and pitch accents might be combined to create different types of multimodal prominence, and how specifically visual prominence cues are used in spoken communication. In this study, we explore the use and possible interaction of eyebrow (EB) and head (HB) beats with so-called focal pitch accents (FA) in a corpus of 31 brief news readings from Swedish television (four news anchors, 986 words in total), focusing on effects of position in text, information structure as well as speaker expressivity. Results reveal an inventory of four primary (combinations of) prominence markers in the corpus: FA+HB+EB, FA+HB, FA only (i.e., no gesture), and HB only, implying that eyebrow beats tend to occur only in combination with the other two markers. In addition, head beats occur significantly more frequently in the second than in the first part of a news reading. A functional analysis of the data suggests that the distribution of head beats might to some degree be governed by information structure, as the text-initial clause often defines a common ground or presents the theme of the news story. In the rheme part of the news story, FA, HB, and FA+HB are all common prominence markers. The choice between them is subject to variation which we suggest might represent a degree of freedom for the speaker to use the markers expressively. A second main observation concerns eyebrow beats, which seem to be used mainly as a kind of intensification marker for highlighting not only contrast, but also value, magnitude, or emotionally loaded words; it is applicable in any position in a text. We thus observe largely different patterns of occurrence and usage of head beats on the one hand and eyebrow beats on the other, suggesting that the two represent two separate modalities of visual prominence cuing.

  • 12.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Multimodal prominences: How eyebrow and head beats are combined with pitch accents to encode information structure in Swedish news readings2017In: The 6th conference of the Scandinavian Association for Language and Cognition: Book of abstracts, Lund: Lund University , 2017, p. 21-22Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anastasia
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The prosody of topics in two varieties of Swedish: Effects of contrast and referential status2016In: Presented at TIE2016, the 7th Conference on Tone and Intonation in Europe: Canterbury, UK, September 1-3, 2016, Canterbury: University of Kent , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Niebuhr, Oliver
    University of Provence, France.
    Dip and hat pattern: a phonological contrast of German?2008In: Speech Prosody 2008, Fourth International Conference: Campinas, Brazil, May 6-9, 2008 / [ed] Pl?nio A. Barbosa, Sandra Madureira, Cesar Reis, Campinas: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2008, p. 269-272Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the high plateau in a ‘hat pattern’ a phonetic artefact, or does it reflect a phonological feature? Can it contrast with a low plateau, i.e. a ‘dip pattern’? The presented perception experiment supports the phonological point of view, since it shows that the dip/hat contrast can disambiguate German oder-constructions, which are interpretable as ‘alternative’ or ‘yes/no-questions’. This specific function may be derived from a more general substance–function relation: While a hat pattern has a ‘bracketing function’, a dip signals detachment.

  • 15.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Head beats and eyebrow movements as a function of phonological prominence levels and word accents in Stockholm Swedish news broadcasts2015In: Presented at MMSYM 2015, The 3rd European Symposium on Multimodal Communication: Dublin, Ireland, September 17-18, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Head Movements, Eyebrows, and Phonological Prosodic Prominence Levels in Stockholm Swedish News Broadcasts2015In: FAAVSP 2015. The 1st Joint Conference on Facial Analysis, Animation, and Auditory-Visual Speech Processing: Kardinal König Haus, 11 – 13 September 2015, Vienna, Austria, Vienna: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2015, p. 42-42Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Multimodal levels of prominence: A preliminary analysis of head and eyebrow movements in Swedish news broadcasts2015In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2015: Lund, June 8–10, 2015 / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Joost van de Weijer, Lund: Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University , 2015, Vol. 55, p. 11-16Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a first analysis of the distribution of head and eyebrow movements as a function of (a) phonological prominence levels (focal, non-focal) and (b) word accent (Accent 1, Accent 2) in Swedish news broadcasts. Our corpus consists of 31 brief news readings, comprising speech from four speakers and 986 words in total. A head movement was annotated for 229 (23.2%) of the words, while eyebrow movements occurred much more sparsely (67 cases or 6.8%). Results of χ2-tests revealed a dependency of the distribution of movements on the one hand and focal accents on the other, while no systematic effect of the word accent type was found. However, there was an effect of the word accent type on the annotation of ‘double’ head movements. These occurred very sparsely, and predominantly in connection with focally accented compounds (Accent 2), which are characterized by two lexical stresses. Overall, our results suggests that head beats might have a closer association with phonological prosodic structure, while eyebrow movements might be more restricted to higher-level prominence and information-structure coding. Hence, head and eyebrow movements can represent two quite different modalities of prominence cuing, both from a formal and functional point of view, rather than just being cumulative prominence markers.

  • 18.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Tronnier, Mechtild
    Lund University.
    Talets Atomer2013In: Språket, människan och världen: Människans språk 1-2 / [ed] Victoria Johansson, Gerd Carling, Arthur Holmer, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 125-164Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Botinis, Antonis
    et al.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Syllable structure and tonal representation: Revisiting focal Accent II in Swedish2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014. Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014: PERILUS XXIV, June 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 65-70Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of tonal representation as a function of syllable structure constituency in Swedish. The results of a production experiment indicate that the onset of the focal accent rise – which we suggest to be best represented by a bitonal LH command – is associated with the consonant onset of the post- accented syllable. Furthermore, a vowel insertion is favored in certain intervocalic consonant clusters. In light of these findings, as well a parallel study on Greek, we claim: (1) syllabification is a basic prerequisite condition in tonal analysis and intonation studies, (2) tonal targets may define syllable boundaries and hence syllabification and (3) different tonal targets may be associated with different syllable structure constituents in different languages.

  • 20.
    Carling, Gerd
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindell, Lenny
    Lund University.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University.
    Scandoromani: remnants of a mixed language2014Book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Frid, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Automatic estimation of pitch range through distribution fitting2010In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2010 / [ed] Susanne Schötz, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Lund: Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University , 2010, p. 41-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Frid, Johan
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    Lund University.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Towards classification of head movements in audiovisual recordings of read news2017In: Proceedings of the 4th European and 7th Nordic Symposium on Multimodal Communication (MMSYM 2016): Copenhagen, 29-30 September 2016 / [ed] Patrizia Paggio, Costanza Navarretta, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, Vol. 141, p. 4-9, article id 141:002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we develop a system for detection of word-related head movements in audiovisu-al recordings of read news. Our materials consist of Swedish television news broadcasts and comprise audiovisual recordings of five news readers (two female, three male). The corpus was manually labelled for head movement, applying a simplistic annotation scheme consisting of a binary decision about absence/presence of a movement in relation to a word. We use OpenCV for frontal face detection and based on this we calculate velocity and acceleration features. Then we train a machine learning system to predict absence or presence of head movement and achieve an accuracy of 0.892, which is better than the baseline. The system may thus be helpful for head movement labelling.

  • 23.
    Kelterer, Anneliese
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language. Lund University, Sweden.
    House, David
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Head beats as pitch-accompanying visual correlates of primary and secondary lexical stress: Evidence from Stockholm Swedish compounds2018In: Proc. TAL2018, Sixth International Symposium on Tonal Aspects of Languages, Berlin: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2018, p. 124-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interplay of (verbal) prosody with (visual) head and eyebrow movements in a 24-minute corpus of Swedish television news readings. The paper focuses on ‘double’ beat gestures, asking whether their occurrence relates to a word’s lexical prominence structure (simplex; compound), to lexical tonal prosody (Accent 1; Accent 2), or rather to prominence levels (+/- focal accent; +/- nuclear position). The results suggest that double eyebrow beats are a marginal phenomenon. Double head beats are also rare (only 28 of the 688 words annotated for head beats in our 4088- word corpus), but their usage follows a clear pattern: There is no preference for the nuclear position, but a strong preference to occur on a focally-accented compound (Accent 2), which is usually realized with two pitch peaks. In conjunction with previous findings on (single) head beats, the present results suggest that a head beat in this type of data can associate with lexical (primary or secondary) stress in case the stressed syllable is also marked by a (tonal or intonational) pitch peak.

  • 24.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ambrazaitis, Gilbert
    Lund University.
    Ewald, Otto
    Lund University.
    Exploring multidimensionality: acoustic and articulatory correlates of Swedish word accents2017In: Interspeech 2017: 20-24 August 2017, Stockholm / [ed] Francisco Lacerda, The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2017, p. 3236-3240, article id 1502Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates acoustic and articulatory correlates of South Swedish word accents (Accent 1 vs. 2) ᅵ a tonal distinction traditionally associated with F0 timing. The study is motivated by previous findings on (i) the acoustic complexity of tonal prosody and (ii) tonal-articulatory interplay in other languages. Acoustic and articulatory (EMA) data from two controlled experiments are reported (14 speakers in total; pilot EMA recordings with 2 speakers). Apart from the well-established F0 timing pattern, results of Experiment 1 reveal a longer duration of a post-stress consonant in Accent 2 than in Accent 1, a higher degree of creaky voice in Accent 1, as well as a deviant (two-peak) pitch pattern in Accent 2 for one of eight discourse conditions used in the experiment. Experiment 2 reveals an effect of word accent on vowel articulation, as the tongue body gesture target is reached earlier in Accent 2. It also suggests slight but (marginally) significant word-accent effects on word-initial gestural coordination, taking slightly different forms in the two speakers, as well as corresponding differences in word-initial formant patterns. Results are discussed concerning their potential perceptual relevance, as well as with reference to the c-center effect discussed within Articulatory Phonology.

  • 25.
    Svensson Lundmark, Malin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Ambrazaitis, GilbertLund University.van de Weijer, JoostLund University.
    Proceedings from Fonetik 2015: Lund, June 8–10, 20152015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
1 - 25 of 25
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