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  • 1.
    Akiskali, Turkan
    et al.
    Akdeniz University, Türkiye.
    Kitapci, Olgun
    Akdeniz University, Türkiye.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Dataset - Literature on service robots in the hospitality industry2022Dataset
  • 2.
    Akiskali, Turkan
    et al.
    Akdeniz University, Türkiye.
    Kitapci, Olgun
    Akdeniz University, Türkiye.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Service robots in the hospitality industry: A state-of-the-art literature review2022Inngår i: Tourism, Hospitality and Culture 4.0: shifting towards the metaverse / [ed] Piera Buonincontri, Luisa Errichiello, Roberto Micera & Giacomo Del Chiappa (guest editor), Milano: McGraw-Hill, 2022, s. 75-96Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a state-of-the-art literature review of past research on service robots in the hospitality sector. Data collection took place between October 2021 and March 2022. The sample is made up of articles that have been published since 2017, which is the earliest research that is available. The dataset (Akiskali et al., 2022) included fifty-nine articles retrieved from the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases. Analysis followed the micro-classification of the retrieved articles into three categories based on their focus of study: service robots' relationships with (1) customers, (2) employees, and (3) firms. Results and conclusions provide an overview of the existing literature and suggest directions for the future.

  • 3.
    Angelakis, Angelos
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Inwinkl, Petra
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Sweden;University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabanci University, Türkiye;INTI International University, Malaysia.
    Zelenajova, Anna
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rozkopal, Veronika
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Gender differences in leaders’ crisis communication: a sentiment-based analysis of German higher education leaderships’ online posts2024Inngår i: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 49, nr 4, s. 609-622Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the communication styles of rectors and vice-rectors of German public universities during the COVID-19 pandemic to explore the influence of gender on leadership communication. We collected data from social media and university websites; and analysed the language used to identify transformational, transactional, and servant leadership styles. Our results showed that female leaders demonstrated more positive communication than men and a stronger preference for transformational leadership, while male leaders tended to use a transactional style. Additionally, we found that both male and female leaders exhibited a high degree of empathetic concern for their stakeholders, contributing to the overall positive tone of communication. These findings suggest that gender may play a role in how university leaders communicate during times of crisis, highlighting the importance of inclusive and compassionate leadership in higher education.

  • 4.
    Angelakis, Angelos
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Inwinkl, Petra
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS).
    Zelenajova, Anna
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rozkopal, Veronika
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Gender (Still) Matters in the Crisis Communication: A Sentiment-Based Analysis of German Higher Education Leaderships' Online Posts in the Context of COVID-192023Inngår i: Presented at the 25th Hochschulmanagement Workshop-Conference, Vienna, Austria, February 23-24, 2023, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Angelakis, Angelos
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Inwinkl, Petra
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Zelenajova, Anna
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rozkopal, Veronika
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    How do University Rectors and Vice-Rectors Communicate in Times of Crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic? A Sentiment-Based Study2022Inngår i: Presented at the British Academy of Management - International Symposium in Finance, Kissamos (ISF2022), Crete, Greece, July 29-31, 2022, Kissamos, Greece, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper examines insights into leadership communication at German public universities during the Covid-19 pandemic. It aims to answer the following two research questions: Did the communication of rectors and vice-rectors during the pandemic show signs of transformational, transactional, or servant leadership styles, and were there gender differences? Did the rectors communicate in a positive, neutral, or negative tone, and did this communication differ by gender? 

    Design/methodology/approach: We examine three leadership styles (i.e., transformational, transactional, and servant leadership styles) in a sentiment-based qualitative study of web-based data, such as online texts and verbal statements from publicly available communication channels. The significance of this study is to examine gender differences in text and verbal messages and also to understand how communication and social media reflect on leadership. 

    Findings: The findings support our hypotheses, and confirm gender differences: Women are more likely to have a transformational leadership style than men. Men are often attributed to transactional leadership characteristics. Furthermore, women's communication is more favorable than that of male rectors and vice-rectors at German public universities, whilst communicating messages more positively has the power to encourage and inspire. 

    Research limitations/implications: The manually collected data (for an intense time period for public universities) appears to create the possibility that not all of the individual's online communication statements are captured.Practical Implications: The statements' content appears mainly in German, and the tone and message may appear to be linguistic inconsistencies. All comments are translated into English by an online translator. 

    Originality/value: How women exercise leadership and publicly communicate in a crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, has not yet been researched extensively. Workspace gender equality is an essential aspect of leadership, despite decades of regulation and intended interventions to ideally promote gender-equal representation in leadership positions. The findings positively contribute to the academic literature and encourage greater representation of women in leadership positions, as their potential remains untapped. 

  • 6.
    Angelakis, Angelos
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Inwinkl, Petra
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Zelenajova, Anna
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Rozkopal, Veronika
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    How do University Rectors Communicate in Times of Crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic? A Sentiment-Based Study2022Inngår i: Presented at the 10th International Conference on Contemporary Marketing Issues, Naxos, Greece, July 8-10, 2022, Naxos, Greece, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper examines insights into leadership communication at German public universities during the Covid-19 pandemic. It aims to answer the following two research questions: Did the communication of rectors and vice-rectors during the pandemic show signs of transformational, transactional, or servant leadership styles, and were there gender differences? Did the rectors communicate in a positive, neutral, or negative tone, and did this communication differ by gender?

    Design/methodology/approach: We examine three leadership styles (i.e., transformational, transactional, and servant leadership styles) in a sentiment-based qualitative study of web-based data, such as online texts and verbal statements from publicly available communication channels. The significance of this study is to examine gender differences in text and verbal messages and also to understand how communication and social media reflect on leadership.

    Findings: The findings support our hypotheses, and confirm gender differences: Women are more likely to have a transformational leadership style than men. Men are often attributed to transactional leadership characteristics. Furthermore, women's communication is more favorable than that of male rectors and vice-rectors at German public universities, whilst communicating messages more positively has the power to encourage and inspire.

    Research limitations/implications: The manually collected data (for an intense time period for public universities) appears to create the possibility that not all of the individual's online communication statements are captured.

    Practical Implications: The statements' content appears mainly in German, and the tone and message may appear to be linguistic inconsistencies. All comments are translated into English by an online translator.

    Originality/value: How women exercise leadership and publicly communicate in a crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, has not yet been researched extensively. Workspace gender equality is an essential aspect of leadership, despite decades of regulation and intended interventions to ideally promote gender-equal representation in leadership positions. The findings positively contribute to the academic literature and encourage greater representation of women in leadership positions, as their potential remains untapped.

  • 7.
    Angelakis, Angelos
    et al.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Inwinkl, Petra
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS).
    Berndt, Adele
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Winkler, Raphaela
    Hodzic, Nejra
    Female CEOs: A structured literature review2023Inngår i: Presented at the International Symposium in Business (ISBIZ23), Greece, July 24-28, 2023, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: "Where Are All the Women CEOs?" (Fuhrmans, 2020) is a corporate question describing the growing sense of gender diversity and women's discrimination in top leadership positions. Nowadays, gender equality is an important topic and plays a strategically important role in corporations. However, women remain underrepresented and are treated differently than men counterparts in top executive positions. Thus, this research aims to provide insights into the major themes and critically reflect on the literature regarding women/female CEOs of the past two decades.

    Design/methodology/approach: A Structured Literature Review (SLR) was conducted. All included articles stemmed from the ABS or ABDC journal rankings, resulting in 162 relevant articles. The time frame was 2000 through 2020 (20 years). Databases included in this review were: Scopus (Elsevier), ProQuest, Emerald Insight, JSTOR and ABI/Inform. All results were limited to English-only peer-reviewed scientific journal articles.

    Findings: The analysed literature on women/female CEOs addresses their personal and professional characteristics (outer appearance and leadership style), their appointment and hierarchical advancement, their effect on different business organizational aspects (such as firm performance and governance), the gender pay gap and the glass ceiling/cliff. Furthermore, the findings suggest that women are underrepresented in CEO positions, face various discrimination statuses, and bear with cultural and ethnic barriers to elevating hierarchy.

    Research limitations/implications: The coding process, in particular, the code grouping, could be influenced by the researchers’ subjectivity. In addition, not all collected data was analysed, as some codes and data were not considered beneficial for this research. 

    Originality/value: To the best of the authors' knowledge, such research regarding female leadership, namely the CEO position, is limited, and no structured literature review within the AJG/ABDC ranking was found during the data collection phase. Hence, such an effort can serve for future research to dive deeper into the topic of female/women CEOs. The method has been described in detail to ensure transparency and researchers’ reproducibility of the results.

  • 8.
    Bisson, Christophe
    et al.
    Kadir Has University, Turkey .
    De Kervenoal, Ronan
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK .
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Social e-Atmospherics in Practice (or not): A French and Turkish Web Designers’ Perspectives2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the development of social e-atmospherics. And yet, e-atmospherics have motivated an emerging body of research which reports that both better layouts and ‘recognized’ atmospherics encourage consumers to modify their shopping habits. While the literature has analyzed mainly the functional (design) aspect of e-atmospherics, little has been done in terms of linking its characteristics’ to social (co-) creation. This paper attempts to redress the imbalance by exploring the anatomy from a website designer perspective of the social dimension of design in relation to e-atmospherics, which includes factors such as the aesthetic design of space and the influence of visual cues as a socially constructed meaning. We identify the challenges that web designers as social agents, who interact within intangible social reference sets, restricted by social standards, value, beliefs, status and duties, face daily within their work. We aim to review the current understanding of the importance and voluntary integration of social cues displayed by web designers from a mature market and an emerging market, and provides an analysis based recommendation towards the development of an integrated e-social atmospheric framework. Results report exploratory findings from questionnaires with 10 French and 16 Turkish web designers. These allow us to re-interpret the web designers’ reality regarding social e-atmospherics. We contend that by comprehending (before any consumer/client input) social capital, daily micro practices, habits and routine of designers, a deeper understanding of social e-atmospherics possible functions in the future will be unpacked.

  • 9.
    Bozkaya, Burcin
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Premium e-grocery: exploring value in logistics integrated service solutions2009Inngår i: Paper presented at the International Conference for Prospects for Research in Transport and Logistics on a Regional – Global Perspective, Istanbul, Turkey, February 12-14, 2009, Elsevier, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    E-grocery is gradually becoming viable or a necessity for many families. Yet, most e-supermarkets are seen as providers of low value “staple” and bulky goods mainly. While each store has a large number of SKU available, these products are mainly necessity goods with low marginal value for hedonistic consumption. A need to acquire diverse products (e.g., organic), premium priced products (e.g., wine) for special occasions (e.g., anniversary, birthday), or products just for health related reasons (e.g., allergies, diabetes) are yet to be served via one-stop e-tailers. In this paper, we design a mathematical model that takes into account consumers’ geo-demographics and multi-product sourcing capacity for creating critical mass and profit. Our mathematical model is a variant of Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (CVRPTW), which we extend by adding intermediate locations for trucks to meet and exchange goods. We illustrate our model for the city of Istanbul using GIS maps, and discuss its various extensions as well as managerial implications.

  • 10.
    Celebi, Dilay
    et al.
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.
    Bayraktar, Demet
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Multi criteria classification for spare parts inventory2008Inngår i: Paper presented at the 38th Computer and Industrial Engineering Conference, Beijing, China, October 31-November 2, 2008, 2008, s. 1780-1787Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintenance operations directly influence the performances of railway vehicles and play a crucial role in railway services to provide uninterrupted and high quality service to passengers. With the exception of preventive activities, the demand of spare parts for maintenance tasks is usually random; hence, the fast and secure management of the spare parts inventory is an important factor for the successful execution of the maintenance process. The purpose of this research is to extend the classical ABC analysis by developing a multi-criteria inventory classifi- cation approach for supporting the planning and designing of a maintenance system. Relevant classification criteria and control characteristics of maintenance spare parts are identified and selected and discussed in terms of their effects on maintenance operations, purchasing characteristics, positioning of materials, responsibility of control, and control principles.

  • 11.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Activating e-bank users: exploring the potential impact of e-atmospherics and experiential marketing2009Inngår i: Services marketing: concepts, strategies and cases / [ed] K. Douglas Hoffman, John E.G. Bateson, Emma H. Wood & Alexandra J. Kenyon, London: Delmar Cengage Learning, 2009, s. 560-562Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Activating e-bank users: exploring the potential impact of e-atmospherics and experiential marketing2008Inngår i: Consumer behaviour / [ed] Jim Blythe, London: Delmar Cengage Learning, 2008Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Secured bank was established as a private commercial bank in the mid 1950's with currently over $40 billion in assets. It is now the third largest bank in Turkey with over 10.2 millions customers, 489 branches, and 2000 ATMs. Since 1999, a call centre and an Internet transaction site are available using state-of-the art technology. Secured bank is the leader in foreign trade, financing 25% of Turkey's exports and 19% of its imports; cash management, custody and Internet banking and manages the fastest growing credit card loyalty reward program in Turkey. Secured bank has long been renowned for its services' innovation. The culture of innovation that enhances customer expectations is at the centre of both their business and marketing strategies. It was the first to offer multi-currency cash management, Internet and telephone banking, Shop & Miles (the first frequent flyer program credit card), Flexi Card (the first credit card in Europe to allow customers to create their ideal credit card, customized to their specific financial needs) and Minibank (an innovative banking program for kids).

  • 13.
    De Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Dimensionalizing e-grocery shopping 'in practice': an illustration through Turkish consumers' front-loading activities2007Inngår i: Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Business, Management, and Economics (ICBME 2007), Izmir, Turkey, 13-17 June, 2007, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Two supermarkets in Turkey offer mechanisms to encourage consumers to shop online. Little is, however, available to comprehend Turkish household purchasing arrangements, processes and practices for tangible goods such as groceries. Our theoretical perspective draws on body of research covering areas such as intra-household economy and relationships, consumer decision making process, and e-tailing. We surmise that, due to the nature of the products/services, e-grocery shopping is bringing new complexities for consumers. These socially embedded practices should also be understood within the domestic/household context. We present the case for a re-conceptualisation of the practices that surround e-grocery in an emerging country situation. Technology mediated household organisation is reviewed in the context of diverse technological generations and access types. Household internal dynamics, coping mechanisms, the need for ever changing experiences are explored. Critical thresholds in information processing, and household organization are identified. Strategic recommendations are then formulated and plans for future research presented.

  • 14.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Grey market e-shopping and trust building practices in China2008Inngår i: Trust and new technologies: marketing and management on the Internet and mobile media / [ed] Teemu Kautonen & Heikki Karjaluoto, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, s. 56-73Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    ‘It’s in Her Eyes’ A ‘barometer’ for EU accession through female perceptions of role portrayals in advertising: a crosscultural study of Ukraine and Turkey2007Inngår i: Paper presented at the 36th European Marketing Academy (EMAC) Conference, Reykjavik, Iceland, May 25-27, 2007, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines female response to gender role portrayals in advertising for Ukraine and Turkey. Being both new potential EU candidates, we argue that gender stereotype could also be used as a ‘barometer’ of progress and closure towards a more generally accepted EU behaviour against women. While their history remains different, both from a political and society values point of views, constraints are currently being faced that require convergence or justification of practices and understanding. Principal components analysis is employed over 290 questionnaires to identify the underlying dimensions. Results indicate overall similarities in perceptions, fragmentation within groups, but seem to provide divergence regarding thresholds.

  • 16.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Bisson, Christophe
    Yeditepe University, Turkey.
    The influence of social E-Atmospherics in practice: a website content analysis perspective2008Inngår i: Paper presented at the 7th International Marketing Trends Congress, Venice, Italy, January 25-26, 2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    E-atmospherics have been often analyzed in terms of functional features, leaving its characteristics' link to social capital co-creation as a fertile research area. Prior research have demonstrated the capacity of e-atmospherics' at modifying shopping habits towards deeper engagement. Little is known on how processes and cues emerging from the social aspects of lifestyle influence purchasing behavior. The anatomy of social dimension and ICT is the focus of this research, where attention is devoted to unpack the meanings and type of online mundane social capital creation. Taking a cross-product/services approach to better investigate social construction impact, our approach also involves both an emerging and a mature market where exploratory content analysis of landing page are done on Turkish and French web sites, respectively. We contend that by comprehending social capital, daily micro practices, habits and routine, a better and deeper understanding on e-atmospherics incumbent and potential effects on its multi-national e-customer will be acquired.

  • 17.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Cetin, Seda
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Soylu, Yesim
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Adopting the experiential values propositions as e-atmospherics: an illustration through the case of e-banking2008Inngår i: Paper presented at the 15th International EIRASS Conference on recent advances in Retailing and Services Science (EIRASS), Zagreb, Croatia, July 14-17, 2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For a couple of years now, the Columbia Business School and in particular Bernd Schmitt have been advocating for more work to be done regarding 'experiential marketing'. Taking the case of e-atmospherics in Turkish e-banking practices, we revisit the theory of strategic experiential modules which are sense, feel, think, act and relate. Two major ebanking experience providers' types of communication, product design, retail presence and epresence have been unpacked. These are Garanti Bank, who's known with its many award winning web site, and Akbank who has a standard web site. The Turkish banking at the border of the EU and under global influences has expended and liberalized dramatically over the last decade making the most of new technologies, hence offering an interesting perspective in a non-homogenous society where the technological divide remains important. First a qualitative content analysis of both bank's homepages is conducted. This is followed by 43 online surveys, where 18 is Garanti Bank consumer, 19 is Akbank consumer and 6 is both Garanti and Akbank consumer, to explore how e-atmospherics experiential features currently recognized by users. Our findings indicate that experiential marketing in e-banking can be expected to be the key to greater online migration of consumers and differentiation among the players. Yet, while the first two steps sense and feel are explicitly developed by both players, act and relate still remain poor. Moreover, 'think' is discovered to be a key moderator where both banks seem to lack clear strategy.

  • 18.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Eryarsoy, Enes
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Kasap, Nihat
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Categorizing ‘intention to use’ e-government services through mobile phone: the importance of front loading activities2008Inngår i: Paper presented at the International Conference on Information Resources Management (Conf-IRM), Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, May 18-20, 2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    E-government has often been heralded as the new way forwards for emerging countries. While many such countries are already offering e-government services and are gearing up for further growth, little is actually known of the forming stages that are necessary to ensure a greater rate of success and avoid the traditional failure traps linked to new technology and information system adoption and diffusion. We situate our research in the case of mobile phone as a reflection of the current market situation in emerging countries. We contend, in this paper, that more research is needed to understand future intention to use e-government services through mobile phone technology. Front loading activities both from a government and technology perspectives are required to facilitate the decision making process by users.

  • 19.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Hallsworth, Alan
    Surrey University, UK.
    Canning, Catherine
    Glasgow Caledonian University, UK .
    Capturing loyalty across garment ranges: the case of supermarket children's clothing in the UK2008Inngår i: Paper presented at the 15th International EIRASS Conference on recent advances in Retailing and Services Science (EIRASS), Zagreb, Croatia, July 14-17, 2008, 2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the UK clothing and fashion industry has undergone some major changes. While the demise of traditional high street brands such as C&A have been widely heralded in the media, a new phenomenon has dramatically changed the children's garment landscape with the emergence of supermarkets as viable alternative providers. In a world where fashion is the prerogative of a substantial majority of the population, image, social status, personality, identity and self expression are so crucial and modelled around key top brands, the main UK supermarket chains seem - rather against the odds - to have created a new, socially-acceptable type of fashion consumption. Have supermarkets own label brands really moved from 'me too' to suitable everyday prestige alternatives? In addition, while parents control purchases for the smallest children, are they convinced to stay loyal across the age ranges - without somehow stigmatizing themselves or their children? Our exploratory research encompasses supermarket stores that are located on the outskirts of town - not accessible by walking from city centres - as a reflection of current spatial change in shopping patterns in the UK. Fifty nine interviews conducted in two ASDA and two TESCO stores in Devon and in Glasgow were analyzed. Our theoretical perspective draws on a body of research covering areas such as intra-household economy and relationships, children and childhood imagery, the consumer decision making process, and retailing. We surmise that, due to the nature of the products/services, clothing shopping is, in effect, bringing new complexities for consumers which have yet to be addressed by most retailers' marketing strategies. While ease of access (through linked grocery shopping) price and quality are perceived as the main decision factors, we reveal that style and design, commendation by word of mouth, refund policies and assortment/variety also linked to multiplicity of usage are greatly influencing parental choice. We highlight the increasing importance of browsing as a modern improvisation choice practice (planned impulse buying). We then provide a re-definition of 'taste and style' and another view of what it could be to be a good parent. Supermarket clothing ranges are perceived as a way to help in grounding, forming and assessing future clothing consumptions.

  • 20.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Ozyegin University, Turkey.
    Palmer, Mark
    Aston University, UK .
    Online Social Capital: Understanding E-Impulse Buying in Practice2009Inngår i: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 320-328Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially constructed marketing imageries (e.g. e-atmospherics) help consumers while making choices and decisions. Still, human and retailing technology interactions are rarely evaluated from a social practice perspective. This article explores the potential impact of socially constructed e-atmospherics on impulse buying. A framework with three interrelated factors, namely social acoustic, co-construction and mundane language enactment is analysed. The way these allow for e-social norms to organically emerge is elaborated through a set of propositions. Retailing implications are subsequently discussed.

  • 21.
    de Kervenoael, Ronan
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Soopramanien, Didier
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Anticipating e-grocery services pre-purchase practices: contrasting trajectories in households’ organisation2007Inngår i: Paper presented at the 14th International EIRASS Conference on recent advances in Retailing and Services Science (EIRASS), San Francisco, USA, June 29-July 2, 2007, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Supermarkets offer multiple mechanisms to encourage consumers to shop online. Little is, however, available to comprehend household purchasing arrangements, processes and practices before going online. Our theoretical perspective draws on body of research covering areas such as intra-household economy and relationships, consumer decision making process, and retailing. We surmise that, due to the nature of the products/services, e-grocery shopping is, in effect, bringing new complexities for consumers which have yet to be addressed by most retailers’ e-strategies. Nowadays, there is simply no single member whom is ‘in sole charge of grocery shopping’. New e-grocery pre-purchase procedures should, however, be adapted to the chosen channel. These socially embedded practices should also be understood within the domestic/household context. In this paper, we present the case for a re-conceptualisation of the pre-purchase practices that surround e-grocery. Technology mediated household organisation is reviewed in the context of multiple equipment, diverse technological generations and access types, and household members’ geographical locations. We then, provide a theoretical analysis in the perspective of consumers’ daily life established social practices and cultural norms and routines, constrained by the repetitive aspects of grocery shopping. Household internal dynamics, coping mechanisms, the need for ever changing experiences are explored. The multifaceted aspects of information gathering and sharing are unpacked including foreseen usage of grocery in specific social circumstances (conspicuity of food consumption) and perspectives (timing, logistic, and alternatives). Critical thresholds in information processing, and household organization are identified. Strategic recommendations are then formulated and plans for future research presented.

  • 22.
    Duvan, Bora Selcen
    et al.
    Renault Turkey, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Used car remarketing2009Inngår i: Paper presented at the International Conference on Social Sciences (ICSS) 2009, Izmir, Turkey, September 10-13, 2009, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Car manufacturers and dealers have tended to exclude used cars from their businesses thinking that the focus of dealers’ sales efforts should be on new cars, which carry higher price tags targeting wealthier buyers. Dealers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have been aiming to push the new car inventory to the market with applicable incentives. However, used cars have started to add more to dealers’ bottom lines than sales of higher-status new cars. Improved quality and reliability of used cars have initiated a devoted customer base. As a result, manufacturers started to consider the crucial role of used vehicle management in improving residual values, new car sales and manufacturer brand equity.

  • 23.
    Elms, Jonathan
    et al.
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Dunphy, Claire
    Lancaster University, UK.
    de Kervenoae, Ronan
    Sabanci University, Turkey;Aston Business School, UK .
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    “It’s in his eyes”: the negotiation and interpretation of masculinity using the Dolce et Gabbana’s 2005 print advertising campaign2007Inngår i: Paper presented at the 4th Workshop on Interpretive Consumer Research (EIASM), Marseilles, France, April 26-27, 2007, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of 'masculinity' has over more years received increased attention within consumer research discourse suggesting the potential of a 'crisis of masculinity', symptomatic of a growing feminisation, or 'queering' of visual imagery and consumption (e.g. Patterson & Elliott, 2002). Although this corpus of research has served to enrich the broader gender identity debate, it is, arguably, still relatively underdeveloped and therefore warrants further insight and elaboration. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to explore how masculinity is represented and interpreted by men using the Dolce et Gabbana men's 2005 print advertising campaign. The rationale for using this particular campaign is that it is one of the most homoerotic, provocative, and well publicised campaigns to cross over from the 'gay' media to more mainstream UK men's magazines. Masculinity, and what it means to be 'masculine', manifests itself within particular ideological, moral, cultural and hegemonic discourses. Masculinity is not a homogenous term which can be simply reduced, and ascribed, to those born as 'male' rather than 'female'. One may exhibit different degrees of masculinity or femininity, depending on social-cultural situation regardless of biological sex (Eagly 1987; Putreve, 2001). Fischer and Arnold (1994) suggest, for example, that masculine and feminine identities are 'orthogonal' rather than 'bi-polar' concepts, entangled and enmeshed together in a dialectical relationship. Therefore, it is more appropriate to consider multiple masculinities, which are plural, transient and ephemeral. As Askegaard (1991) maintains socio-cultural identity concerns' questions such as "who are we and who are the others?" and "how are we related to each other?". Advertising images, and imagery, attempt to answer some of these questions, through the continual negotiation of both individually and culturally accepted masculinities. Masculinity is not merely a 'visual' concept but advertisers have begun to represent 'visions of masculinity' to entice male consumers (e.g. Schroeder & Borgerson, 1998; Schroeder & Zwick, 2004). The portrayal of masculinity through the representation of male body has emerged from that of the muscle bound, rugged, 'cowboy', the stereotypical 'heterosexual masculinity' of the 1960s, to the 'New Man' of the 1980s: a more sensitive man who is in touch with his 'feminine' emotional side (Patterson & Elliott, 2002). The 'New Man' has been recently reinvented, taking the form of the 'metrosexual male' - the 'straight' man who dresses 'gay' - which is increasingly been used as a marketing ploy to target products, particularly clothes and cosmetics, at younger men (Simpson, 2002). This, in turn, has led to increased men's participation in the wider cultural arenas of consumption as well as encouraging visual consumption where 'men gaze at men' (e.g. Patterson & Elliott, 2002). A convenience sample of sixteen in-depth interviews was conducted with self-identified 'straight' men, between the ages of 18 and 24. Within the interview context, each respondent was asked to construct of collage of their masculine self ideals using images from men's magazines. Following the logic of 'photo-elicitation' and 'auto-driving' (Heisley & Levy, 1991), respondents were then given a copy of the Dolce et Gabanna print ads, which they were asked to describe in detail. Our findings would suggest that, for these men the visual images contained within the ads were largely rejected as representative of a singular, hegemonic, notion of 'masculinity'. The men voiced varying degree of distaste of the use and representation of the male models displaying interest and intrigue in each other in various state of undress with little, or no, reference to women within the ads. These models were not axiomatically considered as not being 'masculine' but were defended as "definitely not being 'gay'". A further concurrent theme was the continuous need for the men to demonstrate and reinforce their own masculinity by discursively 'proving' themselves as heterosexual men. Our tentative conclusions argue that masculinity manifests itself in not only what is included in the ads, and what is not, but also, more importantly, in the intangible spirit or character of the visual imagery. This masculine spirit is expressed visually via physical body image, but more insightful interpretation of masculinity is embodied within body language and gaze, as illustrated in Figure 1.

  • 24.
    Farhoudinia, Bahareh
    et al.
    Sabancı University, Türkiye.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabancı University, Türkiye.
    Kasap, Nihat
    Sabancı University, Türkiye.
    Emotions unveiled: detecting COVID-19 fake news on social media2024Inngår i: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, E-ISSN 2662-9992, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikkel-id 640Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the pernicious effects of fake news, underscoring the critical need for researchers and practitioners to detect and mitigate its spread. In this paper, we examined the importance of detecting fake news and incorporated sentiment and emotional features to detect this type of news. Specifically, we compared the sentiments and emotions associated with fake and real news using a COVID-19 Twitter dataset with labeled categories. By utilizing different sentiment and emotion lexicons, we extracted sentiments categorized as positive, negative, and neutral and eight basic emotions, anticipation, anger, joy, sadness, surprise, fear, trust, and disgust. Our analysis revealed that fake news tends to elicit more negative emotions than real news. Therefore, we propose that negative emotions could serve as vital features in developing fake news detection models. To test this hypothesis, we compared the performance metrics of three machine learning models: random forest, support vector machine (SVM), and Naïve Bayes. We evaluated the models’ effectiveness with and without emotional features. Our results demonstrated that integrating emotional features into these models substantially improved the detection performance, resulting in a more robust and reliable ability to detect fake news on social media. In this paper, we propose the use of novel features and methods that enhance the field of fake news detection. Our findings underscore the crucial role of emotions in detecting fake news and provide valuable insights into how machine-learning models can be trained to recognize these features.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Farhoudinia, Bahareh
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Kasap, Nihat
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Fake news in business and management literature: A systematic review of definitions, theories, methods, and implications2023Inngår i: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 2050-3806, E-ISSN 2050-3814Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to conduct an interdisciplinary systematic literature review of fake news research and to advance the socio-technical understanding of digital information practices and platforms in business and management studies. The paper applies a focused, systematic literature review method to analyze articles on fake news in business and management journals from 2010 to 2020. The paper analyzes the definition, theoretical frameworks, methods, and research gaps of fake news in the business and management domains. It also identifies some promising research opportunities for future scholars. The paper offers practical implications for various stakeholders who are affected by or involved in fake news dissemination, such as brands, consumers, and policymakers. It provides recommendations to cope with the challenges and risks of fake news. The paper discusses the social consequences and future threats of fake news, especially in relation to social networking and social media. It calls for more awareness and responsibility from online communities to prevent and combat fake news. The paper contributes to the literature on information management by showing the importance and consequences of fake news sharing for societies. It is among the frontier systematic reviews in the field that cover studies from different disciplines and focus on business and management studies.

  • 26.
    Farhoudinia, Bahareh
    et al.
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Kasap, Nihat
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Lexicon-based sentiment analysis of fake news on social media2022Inngår i: Presented at the AIRSI2022 Conference: Technologies 4.0 in Tourism, Services & Marketing, Zaragoza, Spain, July 11-13, 2022, Zaragoza, Spain, 2022, Zaragoza, Spain, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media is considered one of the primary sources of information. Besides all benefits that social media bring to human life, the popularity of social media simultaneously caused a rapid spread of fake news. Fake news poses a serious threat to societies since it enhances the polarity among different ideas, such as political parties. The fake news issue was further exacerbated during the COVID-19 Pandemic, and fake news studies attracted the attention of plenty of researchers (e.g., Apuke & Omar, 2021; Elías & Catalan-Matamoros, 2020). For example, Fake news claiming that 5G cell towers affect the human immune system has led to the burning of some cell towers in Europe (Mourad et al., 2020). Researchers claimed that fake stories spread more rapidly than true ones on social media (Vosoughi et al., 2018). The rapid spread of fake news makes companies and organizations vulnerable. Fake news about a company can directly affect the company's stock price and cause financial losses. A literature review reveals that scholars from multidisciplinary areas are interested in this topic; for instance, psychology scholars aim to answer research questions such as why people believe and share fake news (Talwar et al., 2019) and what are the characteristics of people who share or are involved in the spread of fake news (Ben-Gal et al., 2019; Brashier & Schacter, 2020). Computer science scholars aim to find ways to detect fake news, using machine learning techniques to create detection models (Faustini & Covões, 2020; Ozbay & Alatas, 2020). Emotion and sentiment analysis of fake news have not been studied in the literature; thus, this research will contribute to the field significantly.

  • 27.
    Fis, Ahmet Murat
    et al.
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Gur, Faik
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Being a woman entrepreneur in Turkey: life role expectations and entrepreneurial self-efficacy2019Inngår i: SAGE Open, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 1-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Two major competing life roles, work, and family, are reported to dominate people’s efforts in constructing a life. Here, we aim to explore whether and how attributed life roles and related coping strategies of current and aspiring women entrepreneurs meaningfully differentiate and whether the existence of entrepreneurs in their families affects the formation of these different clusters. In our empirical, two-part exploratory study conducted in the emerging economy setting of Turkey, first, we utilize the survey results of 234 women entrepreneurs to explore the issue, and then in the second part of the study, we administer face-to-face interviews to draw out some critical insights. We end up with three different clusters differentiating in their responses to challenges and effect of these on their entrepreneurial self-efficacy beliefs. We believe our study may shed some light on understanding nonhomogeneous women response to roles and challenges in society and women’s entrepreneurial journey.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Gashi Nulleshi, Shqipe
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för management (MAN).
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS).
    Entrepreneurship in precarious environments: A tale of digital wizards and social warriors2024Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the intersection of entrepreneurship and social dynamics in precarious environments, particularly focusing on how digital technologies—AI, blockchain, AR, and VR—shape gender equality, social inclusion, and community cohesion. These factors are critical for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Through a mixed-methods approach and snowball sampling of 24 entrepreneurs, the research delves into the lived experiences of entrepreneurs facing discrimination and limited access to resources. Preliminary findings reveal the underrepresentation of these entrepreneurs and the challenges they face due to gender and ethnic biases. The paper assesses the impact of entrepreneurial endeavors on social dynamics and community well-being, offering insights into how entrepreneurship can foster social change and empowerment. The study contributes to the discourse on entrepreneurship in challenging contexts, the role of digital technologies in creating positive social outcomes, and the broader implications for achieving the SDGs.

  • 29.
    Gümüş, Burcu
    et al.
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Varnalı, Kaan
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Adoption of Really New Products: Retro Appearance and the Bandwagon Effect2014Inngår i: Marketing theory challenges in emerging markets / [ed] Maja Szymura-Tyc, Katowice: Publishing House of the University of Economics , 2014, s. 23-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature has paid far too little attention to the potential impact of retro appearance and bandwagon effect on the adoption of really new products. By integrating the retro appearance and bandwagon perspectives, we aim to contribute to the understanding of adoption of really new products. We purport that retro appearance and peer effect – familiar product appearances and observing peer usage – may attenuate the negative prejudgments towards really new products associated with perceived risks and facilitate adoption.

  • 30.
    Ishäll, Lars
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Aktas, Vezir
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bjursell, Cecilia
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Johan, Bäcklund
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Upplevelser av digitaliseringens effekter på lärandet, sociala interaktioner och arbetsmiljön: en kvalitativ pilotstudie under global pandemi2021Inngår i: Presented at FALF 2021: "Hälsosamt arbetsliv - utopi eller verklighet?", Online, June 14-16, 2021, 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    I det post-industriella samhället integrerar människor med digitala enheter i vardagen, vilket innebär att saker vi redan gör kan göras på helt nya sätt och framför allt att helt nya saker är möjliga att göra (Statens Offentliga Utredningar [SOU], 2016). Det kan göra våra liv bättre, men också göra dem värre. Trots att smarttelefonen som ett viktigt digitalt verktyg spelar en viktig roll i folks liv, visade tidigare studier att smarttelefonberoende kan leda till en minskning av produktiviteten på grund av att spendera tid på smarttelefonen under arbetet (Duke & Montag, 2017). Mer positiva effekter av digitaliseringen är möjligheten till sociala interaktioner (Hülür & Macdonald, 2020), att hämta kunskap som behövs i det dagliga beslutsfattandet (Mick & Fournier,1998), digitaliseringen har även förändrat arbetsmiljön genom att det möjliggör hemarbete (Okkonen, Vuori och Palvalin, 2019, February).

    Syfte

    Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka attityder till digitaliseringen och hur den påverkar människors liv i termer av att lärande, social interaktion och arbetsmiljön. 

    MetodEn pilotstudie med kvalitativ forskningsmetod där nio undersökningsdeltagare intervjuades, varav fem var kvinnor (M=32 år) och fyra var män (M=38 år) ingick i studien. Alla deltagarna hade gymnasieutbildning och arbetslivserfarenhet varierade mellan 3 och 30 år. Samtliga deltagare ägde smarttelefoner eller datorer. Två undersökningsdeltagare ägde surfplattor och en deltagare hade också smart TV. Alla undersökningsdeltagare rekryterades med hjälp av bekvämlighets urval. Intervjuguide var semistrukturerad som bestod av fyra övergripande teman (Tema 1. Attityder gentemot digitala enheter, Tema 2. Digitala enheters påverkan på lärandet, Tema 3. Digitala enheters påverkan på sociala interaktioner, Tema 4. Digitala enheters påverkan på arbetsmiljön). 

    Resultat

    Undersökningens resultat visar att undersökningsdeltagarna har igenomsnitt 4-5 timmar skärmtid. Skärmtiden kan delas upp i underhållning och arbete och just denna mix gör det svårt att lägga ifrån sig tekniken och att den är integrerad i vardagen på alla sätt. 

    Deltagarna rapporterade att ett surfbeteende kan skapa ineffektivitet i ens liv, men även oro över att strålning från enheterna kan vara farlig. Mer positiva saker var att man har all information tillgänglig på enkelt sätt och dessa enheter gör livet roligare och mer intressant. Deltagarna lyfter också upp tillgängligheten och möjligheterna som tekniken erbjuder, den är lika effektiv att underhålla som att använda för att kommunicera med sina vänner och kollegor. 

    Det finns stora möjligheter att lära sig via digitala enheter, tidigare handlade om att googla medan idag kan man titta på filmer och klipp på saker man vill lära sig. Det är lättare att lära sig självt med digitala enheterna. En annan effekt av digitaliseringen är att det är lättare att underhålla sina relationer och skapa nya kontaktar. Nackdelarna är att det lätt att det blir missförstånd när man kommunicerar via digitala enheter. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31. Koçaş, Cenk
    et al.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Ekonometrik Rekabet Modelleme ve Pazar Tepki Analizi: (Econometric modelling of competitive markets and market response)2008Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Makul, Sinem
    et al.
    Akdeniz University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS).
    Kitapci, Olgun
    Akdeniz University, Turkey.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    Brunel University London, UK.
    Navigating the New Norm in Restaurants: To continue (or not) with the QR-code Menus2023Inngår i: Presented at AIRSI2023: The Metaverse Conference, Zaragoza, Spain, May 15-17, 2023, University of Zaragoza, Spain, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the reasons why restaurant managers in the Antalya region, a Mediterranean tourist hub, reverted to traditional print menus after initially transitioning to QR-code menus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Restaurant menus are essential tools for directing customers' attention to profitable food services and are part of the restaurant's atmosphere, which impacts perceived quality. While technology has been used to enhance the restaurant atmosphere and increase revenues, the pandemic accelerated the adoption of digital menus, which were seen as more sanitary. However, some restaurants decided to revert to traditional print menus despite their cost, environmental impact, and unsanitary nature. The study uses a comparative case study design and qualitative methods to identify the motivators and barriers to the use of digital menus in the food and beverage industry and inform policymakers and decision-makers on possible approaches to environmentally friendly, healthy, and cost-effective solutions.

  • 33. Merdin Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    The emerging “we” tribe of human-robot partners in consumption spaces2022Inngår i: Presented at the AIRSI2022 Conference: Technologies 4.0 in Tourism, Services & Marketing, Zaragoza, Spain, July 11-13, 2022, Zaragoza, Spain, 2022, Zaragoza, Spain, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Several sectors have embraced service robots to support the tribal need to congregate intra-pandemic. This research identifies the growing "we" tribe of human-robot partners in consuming situations due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Through a series of in-depth interviews with robotic service providers as well as consumers, we unpack major reflections on the cobotic teams. Surprisingly, while the Covid-19 era encouraged social isolation, it also fostered new connections between human and nonhuman communities to keep us connected. Following the development of the major features of human-robot tribes, we conclude with recommendations to reevaluate the marketing mix framework that would account for the new customer journey to better speak to the relevant marketing theory.

  • 34.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Kadir Has University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF). Sabanci University, Turkey.
    Consumer Attitudes towards Low vs. High Power Robotic Services and the Covid Pandemic2021Inngår i: Presented at the 2021 Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing: "Reframing Marketing Priorities", Online, July 5-7, 2021, Academy of Marketing , 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Kadir Has University, Türkiye.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabanci University, Türkiye.
    Consumers and Service Robots: Power Relationships amid COVID-19 Pandemic2023Inngår i: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 70, artikkel-id 103174Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotics significantly influence retail and consumer services. The COVID-19 pandemic further amplified the rise of service robots (SRs) through social distancing measures. While robots are embraced widely by retailers and service providers, consumers’ interaction with SRs remains an intriguing avenue of research across contexts. By taking a relative social power perspective, we report on a series of pre- and intra-COVID-19 studies. Our findings suggest that Gen-Z consumers hold more positive attitudes towards SRs perceived as lower in power vis-à-vis the human user. The longitudinal nature of our study also reveals that while attitudes towards such low-power services turned more negative during the COVID-19 pandemic, attitudes towards SRs that are high in power vis-à-vis the human user remained stable. In practical terms, while Gen-Z consumers hold more positive attitudes towards low-power robots, such service providers also face the challenge of relatively changeable attitudes towards them, especially during crisis times.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Kadir Has University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Robots falling flat on the marketers’ faces2022Inngår i: Presented at Unanticipated and Unintended Consequences of Service Robots in the Frontline - Online Workshop, University of Surrey, UK, September 15, 2022, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, businesses use a variety of artificial intelligence (AI) applications, such as service robots (Wirtz et al., 2018). Aside from the innumerable benefits, their quick and broad deployment has also led to a number of problematic issues (Honig & Oron-Gilad, 2018). For example, several studies focused on how people reacted to failing algorithms (Srinivasan & Sarial-Abi, 2021). Even fewer studies investigated how people react when robots fail (i.e. Choi et al., 2021). Prominent marketing strategies involved depicting resilient and well-engineered robots in states of falling, failing, beating up, and aiming at evoking various feelings (i.e. empathy, warmth, or comfort). Despite it being a significant phenomenon, almost no previous research investigated how consumers react to robots depicted as falling, failing, beaten up, or lost (see Table 1 for a list of popular robot failures and falls). 

    The most prominently portrayed type of robot failure in popular media is “the fall.” In this research, our goal is to investigate what people think and feel about the phenomenon of "failing robots" in the context of a "fall, as consumers evaluate the same technology (i.e., robots) in somewhat diverse ways (Siino & Hinds, 2005; Gretzel & Murphy, 2019). We present the initial findings of our content analysis to pinpoint the specific concepts consumers focused on when formulating their thoughts and feelings on falling robots.

  • 37.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Brunel University London, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabancı University, Turkey.
    The Effect of Human Interference in Robotic Service Failures on Customer Comfort and Customer Aggression2023Inngår i: Proceedings of Academy of Marketing 2023: Annual Conference and Doctoral Colloquium: From Revolution to Revolutions / [ed] F. Kerrigan, Academy of Marketing , 2023, s. 87-88Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As the deployment of service robots increases globally, some individuals may view their exceptional capabilities as disempowering and unsettling, potentially leading to a loss of human power and identity. Moreover, as human interference with service robots is expected to rise alongside their widespread deployment, it may increase the likelihood of robot failures. This study seeks to explore customers' reactions to varying degrees of physical human interference in robotic failures.

  • 38.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Brunel University London, UK.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabancı University, Turkey.
    The Effect of Human Interference in Robotic Service Failures on Customer Comfort and Customer Aggression2023Inngår i: Paper presented at Frontiers in Service, Maastricht, The Netherlands, June 15-18, 2023, 2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As the number of service robots (SRs) marketed throughout the world grows (IFR, 2021), some robots are perceived not as empowering but make people uneasy and threaten customers' power and human identity (Mende et al., 2019). Since robots are anticipated to potentially replace frontline service employees (Marinova et al., 2017), the dystopia even extended to humans losing their power to robots with extraordinary capabilities (Huang & Rust, 2018). Relatedly, individuals interfering with robots and their service functions in positive or negative ways are also likely to rise as service robots become widely deployed. Occurrences of robot failures are highly likely, especially when people around mess with them (Letheren et al., 2020). For example, two students were recently arrested on suspicion of vandalising a meal delivery SR (Smith, 2022). In this research, we uniquely investigate how customers react to robotic failures, varying in the degree of physical human interference in these failures. Physical interference by humans to SRs and SR's failure is also closely related to how comfortable/anxious customer feels. Customer comfort in robotic services has just recently started to be investigated, despite its many crucial downstream consequences (Becker et al., 2022). Given the closely-knit relationship between physical human interference in robots and felt comfort (Čaić et al., 2022), we bring in empirical findings that one of the most desirable outcomes of service interactions as customer comfort. Previous SR studies have used either qualitative methods (e.g., netnography, Gretzel & Murphy, 2019), theoretical/conceptual models (Belanche et al., 2020b; Huang & Rust, 2018; Wirtz et al., 2018), systematic literature reviews (Naneva et al., 2020), or have taken the managers' perspective (e.g., Xu et al., 2020). Answering the call for more methodologically varied research into customer-robot interaction (Granulo et al., 2021; Jörling et al., 2019; Mende et al., 2017), we ran two online between-subject experimental studies. We manipulated human interference in robotic service failure (without any human interference, with direct human interference, and with indirect human interference) using two distinct visual manipulation sets in each experiment (box lift failure and balanced standing failure). We measured customer comfort (Becker et al., 2022), customer aggression (Ben-Zur & Yagil, 2005), customer attitudes, and human interference manipulation checks. We consistently demonstrated that customers have more favorable attitudes towards a service robot if the failure was caused by indirect interference from a human instead of direct interference or no interference. This effect is mediated by customer comfort, which is, in turn, moderated by the degree of customer aggression. Marketers might emphasize that SR failed due to indirect interference from humans to alleviate the negative impact, decrease anxiety, and increase customer comfort.

  • 39.
    Merdin-Uygur, Ezgi
    et al.
    Brunel University London.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS). Sabanci University, Turkey.
    The robot saw it coming: Physical human interference, deservingness, and self-efficacy in service robot failures2024Inngår i: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic services’ popularity continues to increase due to technological advancements, labour shortages, and global crises. Yet, while providing these services, robots are subject to occasional physical interruption by humans to them, thus restricting their functioning and, at times, leading to failure. To investigate this issue, the present study examined the role of third-party human interference in service robot failures and its effects on the observers’ attitudes towards and willingness to engage with the robot. We manipulated human interference resulting in different robotic service failures in two online scenario-based experiments. The results revealed that individuals held less favourable attitudes towards a failed service robot without (vs. with) physical human interference, and they were less willing to engage with the failed service robot without (vs. with) physical human interference. The perceived deservingness of the robot accounted for this effect, moderated by the person’s self-efficacy regarding robots. The results are discussed with their implications for not only the theory of service failures and human-service robot interactions but also for robotic service providers.

  • 40.
    Oncul, Selmin D.
    et al.
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Bayraktar, Demet
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.
    Celebi, Dilay
    Istanbul Technical University, Turkey.
    A review of timetabling and resource allocation models for light-rail transportation systems2009Inngår i: Paper presnted at the International Conference for Prospects for Research in Transport and Logistics on a Regional – Global Perspective, Istanbul, Turkey, February 12-14, 2009, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper surveys the relevant operations research literature on timetabling and resource allocation problems with a special attention paid to the transportation systems. The purpose of this review is to define the critical objectives, determine the key components and identify the key issues for developing a comprehensive mathematical model for timetabling of light rail transit vehicles in sequence with the assignment of drivers as an available resource. In doing so, the implications of the emerging timetabling research is discussed, components of the mathematical models proposed are reviewed, and the extend they reflect real business practices are analyzed. Finally, fundamental issues and primary elements of a simple model in association with general timetabling and resource allocation problems are presented.

  • 41.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Call to Redefine Human-Robot Interaction: From Social Robots to Gun Shooting Humanoids2018Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the human-robot interactionliterature in the scope of recent technological progress. Itgives various examples of emerging human-robotinteraction and calls upon a re-definition of the interactionconcept.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Central Bank Digital Currency in the Context of Covid-19: What the Future Holds for Marketers and Consumers?2021Inngår i: Presented at the 2021 Annual Conference of the Academy of Marketing: "Reframing Marketing Priorities", Online, July 5-7, 2021, Academy of Marketing , 2021, 2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Conceptualizing Consumer Paradoxes towards the Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) in the context of COVID-192021Inngår i: Presented at the AIRSI2021 Conference: Technologies 4.0 in Tourism, Services & Marketing, Online, July 12-14, 2021, 2021, s. 62-68Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As the introduction of CBDCs is further accelerated in the context of COVID-19, the literature is yet to focus on the consumer side of the emerging paradigm shift to money and its surrounding financial services. This paper conceptualizes the possible consumer paradoxes towards the CBDCs by introducing the spillover effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and some critical aspects of the CBDCs. Also, it reviews the consumer readiness literature in the milieu of CBDCs and points some future research directions. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Florida Atlantic University, USA;Cankaya University, Turkey .
    Cultural recognition in one-to-one Internet advertising2002Inngår i: Presented at 11th Annual IMDA Conference, Jul 20-24, 2002, Antalya, Turkey, 2002Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the world is interconnected through a complex web of transnational networks and the freer flow of trade, the challenges of making local adjustments in marketing activities are more acute now then ever before. Internet is helping to eliminate the distance between nations and between consumers. However, it appears that the emphasis is still on treating customers worldwide as part of one homogenous segment. For example, English is still taken as the net Latin by many firms and predominates most of net communications. Marketers need to take the Internet seriously to reconsider the potential as well as the limitation it possesses in realizing the impact of cultural differences. Apart from language, which is an important element in culture, knowledge of traditions and customs of a specific culture and integration of this knowledge with advertising activities on the internet would differentiate the marketing activity from the similar ones that are being run as well as resulting in higher attention and better interpretation levels. This paper focuses on the use of the Internet for reaching micro segments that recognize cultural differences in the global market place. Doing so, it emphasizes the importance of realizing the differences in language, religion, and specific tastes in advertising activities on the Internet. The varying contributions of these elements to interpretations of messages are determined and policies to be implemented for higher attention rates are suggested. In addition, the challenges exist there of on the Internet, such as presence of inhomogeneous infrastructure facilities and specific consumer concerns are explored throughout the paper. The differences in consumer concerns are sough and the changing availability of Internet, telephony, computer, and legal issues are studied. Finally, the types of firms and industries that can utilize the provided policies for capturing cultural differences are examined. Internet is a very important tool both in terms of communicating messages to micro segments and also for targeting specifically these segments. However, strategies to be implemented in Internet advertisement should be given special emphasis in order to tailor them according to the varieties in cultures. Global Internet advertising mainly promises a potential for services businesses. Both the businesses themselves and the advertisement activities are open to adjustments. Cultural differences can easily be recognized in the activities of services marketing on the Internet due to their flexible natures.

  • 45.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey.
    Effie 2013 Kazananlar Kitabi: (Effie 2013 Award Winners Book)2014Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 46.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Özyeğin University, Turkey.
    Experiential practises via digital services2009Inngår i: Presented at the eChallenges Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, October 21-23, 2009, 2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 47.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring (MF).
    Fashion Accessory Brand Development via Up-cycling of Throwaway Clothes: The Case of Chapputz2021Inngår i: Social and Sustainability Marketing: A Casebook for Reaching Your Socially Responsible Consumers through Marketing Science / [ed] Jishnu Bhattacharyya;Manoj Kumar Dash;Chandana Hewege;Sathyaprakash Balaji Makam;Lim Weng Marc, Routledge, 2021, s. 563-574Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Upcycling becomes increasingly essential in the fashion industry, primarily when about 4/5th of all textiles are directed to landfills worldwide. One young social entrepreneur, Yasin, decided to tackle the challenges involved with the dramatically increasing textile waste in Turkey, while simultaneously empowering rural females through its upcycling production process. The presented case introduces Chapputz in its endeavor as a fashion accessory brand developed via the upcycling of throwaway clothes which followed the traditional Nomadic weaving practice. 

  • 48.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Jönköping University, Sweden;Bahcesehir University, Turkey.
    Game prosumption2018Inngår i: Encyclopedia of computer graphics and games / [ed] Newton Lee, Cham: Springer, 2018Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 49.
    Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Linnéuniversitetet, Ekonomihögskolan (FEH), Institutionen för marknadsföring och turismvetenskap (MTS).
    Game Prosumption2024Inngår i: Encyclopedia of Computer Graphics and Games / [ed] Lee, N., Cham: Springer, 2024, s. 778-780Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Game prosumption refers to the process of both production and consumption of computer games rather than focusing on either one (production) or the other (consumption).

  • 50. Ozturkcan, Selcen
    Globalization and economic growth2002Inngår i: Paper presented at the 11th Annual IMDA Conference, Antalya, Turkey, July 20-24, 2002, 2002Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization describes the ongoing global trend toward the freer flow of trade and investment across borders and the resulting integration of the international economy. Because it expands economic freedom and spurs competition, globalization is believed to raise the productivity and living standards of people in countries that open themselves to the global marketplace. Globalization has evolved since Columbus and de Gama sailed from Europe more than 500 years ago. This paper surveys the economic growth associated with globalization. Doing so, it investigates the dynamics between openness, poverty, inequality, and globalization. It also explores the methods that could have been utilized by the developing countries.

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