lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 61
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berggren, Åsa
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Oxford College of Emory University, UK.
    Ett utmanat koncept?: Ritualbegreppets möte med arkeologin2010In: Den rituella människan: Flervetenskapliga perspektiv / [ed] Anne-Christine Hornborg, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010, p. 25-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet ritual är problematiskt. Sedan 1990-talets början har forskningen på området i allt högre grad kommit att ifrågasätta användningen av begreppet (Bell 1992; Humphrey & Laidlaw 1994; Thinès & de Heusch 1995; Stausberg 2002). Samtidigt som tidigare definitioner av begreppet har problematiserats, har det också vidgats till att omfatta allt fler kategorier av handlingar. Ämnet har också rört sig från sin religionshistoriska vagga och blivit en egen disciplin: Ritual Studies, som förutom religionsvetenskap och socialantropologi också inkluderar ämnen som konstvetenskap, teatervetenskap, litteraturvetenskap, etologi, etnologi, psykologi, sociologi osv. Vi vill här visa att också arkeologin har en plats i denna diskussion.

  • 2.
    Berggren, Åsa
    et al.
    Sydsvensk arkeologi.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    From Spectator to Critic and Participant: A New Role for Archaeology in Ritual Theory2010In: Journal of social archaeology, ISSN 1469-6053, E-ISSN 1741-2951, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 171-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to understand ritual in the past, archaeology has long relied on theories developed in other disciplines. While these theories, which often rely on written or oral information, have added many important dimensions to our interpretation of the archaeological record, they have often proven difficult to successfully articulate with the archaeological sources. Moreover, archaeology has tended to remain on the receiving end of the formulation of social theory, and has only rarely participated in the theoretical development and critique. In this article we argue that we see a central role for archaeology to contribute to the development of ritual theory. Through two case studies from Scandinavian prehistory we illustrate how the application of a practice-based ritual theory allows us to more firmly connect the theoretical framework to our archaeological sources. This connection not only leads us toward a synchronization of materials, methods and theories, but it also allows us to engage in the broader interdisciplinary theoretical discussion about ritual. The specific challenges posed by the archaeological sources and the archaeological process of interpretation point to new questions relating to the application of theoretical frameworks, and may even suggest some solutions.

  • 3. Brück, Joanna
    et al.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Is Archaeology Still a Project for the Nation State? An editorial Comment2016In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Association of Archaeologists has long fostered critical analysis of the relationship between archaeology and politics, particularly the politics of national, regional and supra-regional identities. Although the role of nationalism in the birth of archaeology as a discipline is well recognized, the events of the past few years – from the referendum on Scottish independence in 2014, to the movement for secession in eastern Ukraine, and the rise of explicitly nationalist political movements across the continent – suggest that the (re)formulation of national identities is likely to continue to have major implications both for our interpretation of the past and for the practice of archaeology in the present. In light of this, the Archaeological dialogues editorial board organized a round table at the EAA meeting in Glasgow in September 2015 to explore the extent to which institutional, legislative and funding structures as well as political and cultural imperatives continue to bind our discipline into the construction of nationalist narratives, and this more or less in spite of long-standing critical debates within the discipline itself that for decades have problematized the relationship. Are we caught in a ‘can't-live-with-and-can't-live-without’ situation? While explicitly nationalist archaeologies have become almost obsolete in the European academies, we rarely contemplate the impact of nationalism on funding or the definition and protection of cultural heritage, for example. Several of the following papers suggest that without the nation state's involvement, the vicissitudes of global capitalism would result in a situation where it would be extremely difficult to adequately protect our ‘heritage’, however that is defined.

  • 4.
    Ekengren, Fredrik
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    I tillvarons gränsland: Perepktiv på kroppen mellan liv och död2009Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Lars
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Zagorska, Ilga
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Berzins, Vadis
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    Cerinja, Aija
    University of Latvia, Latvia.
    New Aspects of the Mesolithic-Neolithic cemeteries and settlement at Zvejnieki, Northen Latvia2017In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 57-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reflects upon recent international research at Zvejnieki in northern Latvia, a renowned complex of a burial ground and two settlement sites used in the Mesolithic and Neolithic. Since its discovery and first excavations in the 1960s, Zvejnieki continues to produce evidence that provides new grounds for understanding mortuary practises and ancient lifeways. This information is relevant for other contemporary sites in Europe revealing new and hitherto unexpected elements of burial traditions.

    It is suggested that the Zvejnieki population was partly mobile, and the site was one of the places to bury the dead. The ancestral link was established through transportation and use of occupational debris from more ancient sites and through the incorporation of earlier burial space or even burials into the new graves. The depth of a burial also appears to be a significant variable in ancient mortuary practices.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Åsa M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Reconcilable Differences: Cremation, Fragmentation, and Inhumation in Mesolithic and Neolithic Sweden2014In: Transformation by Fire: The Archaeology of Cremation in Cultural Context / [ed] Ian Kuijt, Colin P. Quinn, Gabriel Cooney, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2014, p. 47-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lillios, Katina T.
    et al.
    University of Iowa, USA.
    Waterman, Anna J.
    Mount Mercy University, USA.
    Mack, Jennifer E.
    Artz, Joe Alan
    EwarthView Environmental Inc, USA.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    In Praise of Small Things: Death and Life at the Late Neolithic-Early Bronze Age Burial of Bolores, Portugal2015Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    A Baltic Way of Death?: A tentative exploration of identity in Mesolithic cemetery practices2010In: Uniting Sea II: Stone Age Societies in the Baltic Sea Region / [ed] Åsa M. Larsson, Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2010, p. 127-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a preliminary exploration of how identity may have been expres- sed in the mortuary rituals around the Baltic during the Mesolithic. The case- studies discussed are the large cemeteries at Skateholm in Sweden, Zvejnieki in Latvia and Vedbæk/Bøgebakken in Denmark. Besides the often discussed variability and complexity recognized in the mortuary practices at these sites, the treatment of the dead also encompasses a number of fundamental shared practices involving the treatment of the body. In this paper, which builds on a practice theory view of both ritual and identity, the author proposes that by ex- ploring the taken-for-granted, the fundamental and often unreflected practices in the treatment of the dead, we might be able to get at some dimensions of a shared identity around the Baltic and how they might have changed over time.

  • 9.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    A future for archaeology: in defense of an intellectually engaged, collaborative and confident archaeology2018In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 51, no 1-2, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a critical review of inter- and transdisciplinarity in archaeology, this paper examines the power relationships within archaeology with regards to collaborators within and beyond the academy. By making a case for an archaeology that openly collaborates across disciplines and knowledge sys- tems, but also more firmly articulates itself and its value, the paper makes a case for an engaged and problematising archaeology for the future.

  • 10.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    A Proper Burial. Some Thoughts on Changes in Mortuary Ritual, and how Archaeology can begin to understand them.2015In: Death and Changing Rituals: Function and meaning in ancient funerary practices / [ed] J. Rasmus Brandt, Håkon Roland, Marina Prusac, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2015, 1, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund university, Sweden.
    A Taphonomy of Ritual Practice.: A field-anthropological study of Late Mesolithic Burials.2003In: Mesolithic on the Move. : Papers Presented at the Sixth International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Stockholm 2000. / [ed] L. Larsson, H. Kindgren, K. Knutsson, D. Loeffler & A. Åkerlund, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2003, p. 527-535Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    Archaeology, Identity, and the Right to Culture: Anthropological perspectives on repatriation2008In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 157-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate concerning repatriation and reburial is attracting increasing attention in Sweden. While most archaeologists today understand the importance of repatriation and the arguments underlying the claim, the process is not completely unproblematic and certainly not in all cases. This article explores some tendencies within the international debate about repatriation, and frames them within a more general discussion about human rights, the right to culture, and the role of cultural heritage within this debate. Through a critical approach to the debate, it is argued that archaeology needs to be a more active party in the negotiations.

  • 13.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Body and Ritual.2004In: Encyclopedia of Religious Rites, Rituals and Festivals.  / [ed] F. Salomone, New York: Routledge, 2004, p. 81-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Book Review: A Deeper Look at the 'How' of Heritage: Mångfaldsfrågor i kulturmiljövården: Tankar, kunskaper och processer 2002-2012. By Anders Högberg. Pp. 189. Lund: Nordic Academic Press. 2013. 209 SEK. ISBN: 978-91-87351-34-12014In: Public Archaeology, ISSN 1465-5187, E-ISSN 1753-5530, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 345-352Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Building Bridges Between Burial Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death: Where is the Archaeological Study of the Dead Going?2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 13-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Capturing Ritual Practice: An attempt to harmonize archaeological method and theory2008In: Religion, Archaeology and the Material World / [ed] Lars Fogelin, Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University , 2008, p. 159-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden;Emory University, USA.
    Caught in the Middle: An archaeological perspective on repatriation and reburial2008In: UTIMUT: Past Heritage – Future Partnerships. Discussions on Repatriation in the 21st Century / [ed] Mille Gabriel, Jens Dahl, Copenhagen: IWGIA International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs , 2008, p. 84-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Cautionary Optimistic: A reply2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory university, USA.
    Claiming the Past.: A critical view of the arguments driving repatriation of cultural heritage and their role in contemporary identity politics2013In: Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, ISSN 1750-2977, E-ISSN 1750-2985, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 170-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role that the worldwide movement of repatriation of human remains and cultural heritage—from museums and other institutions to minorities and indigenous populations—plays in contemporary identity politics. Beyond the obvious positive outcomes of this process, including a significant democratization of the field of archaeology, the repatriation movement poses challenges, mainly because it relies on concepts such as past–present continuity that are sometimes subtly, sometimes not so subtly, problematic for legitimizing group identities and group claims to cultural heritage and human remains. It is argued that while archaeologists and anthropologists must continue to support the idea of increasing democratization of interpreting the past, they must also maintain the right to remain critical to all claims of the past by any particular group.

  • 20.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Commentary on Grauer and Miller, and DeWitte and Kowaleski2018In: Fragments: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Ancient and Medieval Pasts, ISSN 2161-8585, Vol. 7, p. 73-79Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The papers by DeWitte and Kowaleski, and Grauer and Miller are exemplary interdisciplinary studies, bringing together the written word of historical records with the material remains of the dead to tell a more complete and complex story about violence and disease in Medieval England. Both demonstrate how integrated, critical analysis of varying sources through the lens of different disciplines adds both nuance and depth to our understanding of the past. This commentary will engage these two papers in a discussion about key components of their interdisciplinary scholarship, but also push further by pointing out dimensions and possibilities that they leave unexplored. The purpose of doing this is not to critique the papers’ findings, but rather to open up a discussion of new directions for interdisciplinary scholarship, especially in the era of the “Third Science Revolution”[1] and its effects on archaeology, bioarchaeology, and our understanding of the past. This commentary will challenge the idea of what we expect interdisciplinary work in archaeology to “look like”; it will break away from the limiting dyadic relationship that has come to dominate the field in favor of a more dynamic and expanding approach that engages with a broader range of disciplines on equal terms.

  • 21.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Contested Burials: The dead as witnesses, victims and tools2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial / [ed] Sarah Tarlow, Liv Nilsson Stutz, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 801-816Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary archaeology is increasingly engaged with the public and is also more sensitive than in the past concerning the role it plays in communities. This engagement is productive and stimulating, but it also forces archaeologists to engage with conflicting interpretations of the past and their own role in these interpretations. Burial archaeology holds a special place in this engagement since the places for the dead, and the dead themselves, are potent in mobilizing responses among the living that pertain to a range of powerful fields, including politics, religion, and emotion. This is especially clear in situations where the excavation and/or the interpretation of a burial site are contested by different stakeholders. This chapter explores the dynamics underlying these conflicts and takes a closer look at the different roles the dead and archaeology may be given in such conflicts.

  • 22.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Coping with Cadavers: Ritual Practices in Mesolithic Cemeteries2009In: Mesolithic horizons: papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Belfast, 2005 / [ed] Sinéad McCarton, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009, Vol. 2, p. 657-663Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Dialogue with the Dead: Imagining Mesolithic Mortuary Rituals2013In: Archaeological Imaginations of Religion / [ed] Thomas Meier, Petra Tillessen, Budapest: Archaeolingua, 2013, p. 337-358Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dynamic Cadavers: A "Field-Anthropological" Analysis of the Skateholm II Burials1999In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 4, no 1998, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    Embodied Rituals and Ritualized Bodies: Tracing Ritual Practcies in Late Mesolithic Burials2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the ritual dimensions of the mortuary practices in the late Mesolithic cemeteries at Skateholm in Southern Sweden and Vedbæk-Bøgebakken in Eastern Denmark. With a combination of methods and theories that all focus on the ritual practices as action, a new approach to burials in archaeology is proposed. Special attention is given to the treatment of the body after death, which is regarded to hold a central role in the mortuary practices. The focus on the body and on practices as actions is a central part of the method of analysis applied to the material. The French taphonomic approach anthropologie de terrain, which ultimately aims to reconstruct the acts that constituted the mortuary rituals, allows for a firm connection between the archaeological material and the theoretical framework. Through the engagement with practice theory and ritual theory, this thesis also touches upon the fundamental questions of why we need rituals to structure our lives and our world. More specifically, it discusses different dimensions of the need for rites of passage at death. How does ritual help us deal with the dual aspect of the crisis of death – the loss of a social being and the emergence of a cadaver? What does it mean for us to deal with the inevitably decomposing remains of our dead? How do the experiences and memories of these rituals contribute to shape our notions of body, self, life and death? Ultimately, this thesis is an attempt to make a connection, on the level of the processes of structuration of human life, between then and now, them and us.

  • 26.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Escaping the Allure of Meaning: Toward new paradigms in the study of ritual in prehistory2007In: Old Norse religion in long-term perspectives: Origins, changes, and interactions. An international conference in Lund, Sweden, June 3—7, 2004 / [ed] Anders Andrén, Kristina jennbert, Catharina Raudvere, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2007, p. 95-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    From Here and to Death: The Archaeology of the Human Body2018In: A Companion to the Anthropology of Death / [ed] Antonius C. G. M. Robben, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 323-335Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the positioning of the dead body in archaeology as a bridge between different lines of inquiry. In archaeology, the dead body is both object and subject, providing a unique link to personhood and lived experience through its very materiality. It is also both biological and cultural, and, while it is conspicuously defined by death, it is more commonly explored to access life. By uncovering these connections, this chapter reveals the complexity of the archaeological study of dead bodies.

  • 28.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Human Lives and Deaths2018In: The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences / [ed] Sandra L. Lopez Varela, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is inherently transdisciplinary as a discipline. In addition to data, it requires the methodological and interpretative work of science, humanities, and social science to puzzle together the fragmented pieces of the past into a coherent story about human lives and deaths. This entry argues that while archaeology is currently benefitting from an intensification of cross‐disciplinary collaborations, we need to maintain this direction in the discipline by developing stronger literacy across the subdisciplinary boundaries and foster a disciplinary culture that explicitly credits the different sides equally.

  • 29.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden.
    "…I will feel lost, unhappy and at home.": Travel and deep analogies as archaeological tools2007In: On the Road: studies in honour of Lars Larsson / [ed] Birgitta Hårdh, Kristina Jennbert, Deborah Olausson, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 2007, p. 133-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Legislating multivocality: drawing on the NAGPRA experience2011In: Archaeology of indigenous peoples in the North: proceedings from a workshop held in Vuollerim 6000 år, 3-4 December 2005 / [ed] Anders Olofsson, Umeå: Department of Historical, Philosphical and Religious Studies, Umeå University , 2011, p. 9-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general consensus today within archaeology and anthropology that we need to reach outside of the disciplinary boundaries and make archaeology and anthropology relevant for people outside o f the profession. Multivocality - whether as an abstract theoretical concept, or a practical reality- isbecomingmorethanabuzz-word,andisprogressivelyinfluencing policies and practices. This situation is especially evident in parts of the world where archaeology and anthropology historically were associated with colonial powers and colonial strategies. In several instances it is also in these parts of the world that we today see the most far-reaching changes in new policies, and where legislation is used to provide a process for multivocality involving especially indigenous peoples in order to fundamentally change the way archaeology and anthropology are practiced. As these issues are becoming increasingly global, it is reasonable to assume that all archaeologists, anthropologists, museum professionals etc, will need to discuss the possible strategies available in dialogue with each other and with other stakeholders. As we continue this discussion we can draw on the experiences in other parts of the world in order to formulate our strategies. This article critically examines an example of one such legislative effort, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) passed in the United States in 1990.

  • 31.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Marginal and Mainstream: Religion, politics and identity in the contemporary US, as seen through the lens of the Kennewick Man / the Ancient One2012In: From Archaeology to Archaeologies: The "Other" Past / [ed] Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw, Eleni Stefanou, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012, p. 33-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The calls to repatriate human remains and cultural items from museums and research collections back to their source communities started out as an activist movement in the 1960s among disenfranchised minorities and indigenous peoples. Today, half a century later repatriation has risen to the surface of the international cultural debate and is embraced by the establishment in many parts of the world. This movement from the marginal to the mainstream has shifted the field of archaeology and museum practices toward engaging with the public and descending communities. But this newly gained influence also invites us to reflect more critically than before over the values and ideas that underlie debates and legislations. Through the example of the  Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation  Act , and with a particular focus on the Kennewick case, this chapter critically examines the underlying values and cultural concerns that frame the repatriation debate in the United States, including a contested relationship between faith and science, the role of race in identity production and the value placed on private ownership. It is argued that these cultural values and beliefs align the repatriation movement with the American mainstream, and while they have been critically examined elsewhere in archaeological and anthropological theory, this critique has taken place predominantly in academic contexts that are completely separate from the repatriation debate.

  • 32.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mats Larsson. Life and Death in the Mesolithic of Sweden (Oxford: Oxbow, 2017, 144pp., 61 illustr., hbk, ISBN 978-1-78-570385-0)2018In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 658-660Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Minnet och glömskan av de döda i Skateholm.2004In: Minne och Myt / [ed] Å. Berggren, S. Arvidsson & A.-M. Hållans, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2004, p. 81-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden.
    More than Metaphor: Approaching the Human cadaver in Archaeology2008In: The Materiality of Death: bodies, burials, beliefs / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander, Terje Oestigaard, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2008, p. 19-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Mortuary Practices2014In: The Oxford handbook of the archaeology and anthropology of hunter-gatherers / [ed] Vicki Cummings, Peter Jordan, Marek Zvelebil, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 712-728Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mortuary rituals, as culturally learned and reproduced practices, emerge among prehistoric hunters and gatherers and persist as a key component of human cultures through time. This article takes a closer look at the phenomenon by discussing how mortuary practices articulate with cosmology and world view in general, and how we see this phenomenon emerge over the course of human evolution. These theoretical considerations provide an introduction to a case study of mortuary practices among Mesolithic hunters-gatherers in northern Europe. The purpose of the case study is to explore the many ways in which the treatment of the dead was part of both creating and giving form to a hunter-gatherer cosmology, taking into consideration both observations from the larger cemetery sites that have long dominated discussions of hunter-gatherer cosmology and mortuary ritual, and also more recently explored finds that highlight other ways of disposal of human remains.

  • 36.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University ; Emory University, USA.
    Respone to Apel and Darmark: Evolution and Material Culture2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    Review of Berit J. Sellevold (ed.): Old Bones: Osetoarchaeology in Norway: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow: Novus Forlag, Oslo, 2014. 356 pp. ISBN: 978-82-7099-783-12015In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 83-84Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38. Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    [Review of] Ethics and Burial Archaeology. By Duncan Sayer. Pp. 156, Illus 9. Duckworth, 2010. Price: £12.99. ISBN 978 0 7156 3893 42011In: The Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0066-5983, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 455-456Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39. Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    [Review of] Global Ancestors: Understanding the Shared Humanity of our Ancestors: Edited by Margaret Clegg, Rebecca Redfern, Jelena Bekvalac, and Heather Bonney. Pp. ix and 163, Illus 17. Oxbow Books, 2013. Price: £30.00. ISBN 978 184217 533 02015In: The Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0066-5983, Vol. 172, no 2, p. 500-501Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    [Review of] The Archaeology of the Dead: Lectures in Archaeothanatology, by Henri Duday, 2009. Translated by Anna Maria Cipriani and John Pearce.: Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-1-84217-356-5 paperback £30 & US$60; x+158 pp., 143 figs.2010In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 478-479Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Sensing death and experiencing mortuary ritual2019In: The Routledge Handbook of Sensory Archaeology / [ed] Robin Skeates and Jo Day, London: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 149-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensory archaeology of death reconstructs the sensory experiences of death and the dead body but also of the ritual practices that structured the understanding of death. Given that death is a crisis—both on an individual and social level—the ritual response to death can often act to augment or affect sensory experiences.This chapter explores some of the ways in which archaeology captures these impressions by reconstructing experiences of the scent, sound, taste, sight and touch of death through engagement with the dead body and the material traces of the ritual practices.

  • 42.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Setting it Straight: A re-analysis of the Mesolithic Barum burial according to the principles of Anthropologie 'de terrain'2007In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 11-12, no 2005-2006, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    The Importance of “Getting It Right”: Tracing Anxiety in Mesolithic Burials2016In: The Archaeology of Anxiety: The Materiality of Anxiousness, Worry, and Fear / [ed] Jeffrey Fleisher, Neil Norman, Springer, 2016, p. 21-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the connections between mortuary ritual and anxiety as a psychological response to death. Focus is placed on understanding the ritual response itself, both as practice and as an outlet for anxiety generated by the ambiguous threat of the unknown and uncontrollable, i.e., death. The chapter examines to what extent we are able to trace the presence of anxiety in the archaeological remains of mortuary rituals among the Mesolithic hunters and gatherers around the Baltic Sea. The work builds on an archaeothanatologically based reconstruction of the ritual practices of the treatment of the dead human bodies, combined with an explicit consideration of psychological theories of anxiety. By drawing on theories from ritual studies, which view these practices as central social and cultural phenomena, and from psychology, where ritual behaviors are commonly associated with anxiety, the study identifies ways to access the emotional state of anxiety through archaeological sources.

  • 44.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    The Many Archaeologies of Ritual: [Review of] Anna Lucia d’Agata and Aleydis Van de Moortel, eds, Archaeologies of Cult. Essays on Ritual and Cult in Crete in honor of Geraldine C. Gesell. (Hesperia supplement 42, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2009, 354 pp., 146 illus., pbk, ISBN 978 0 87661 542 3) and Evangelos Kyriakides, ed., The Archaeology of Ritual (Cotsen Advanced Seminars 3, Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, 2007, 331 pp., illustr., pbk, ISBN 978 1 931745 47 5)2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 389-392Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45. Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    The Noah Complex and Archaeology in the Holy Land: The case of the Mamilla Cemetery and the Museum of Tolerance and Human Dignity2012In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 221-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The partial development of the Old Muslim Mamilla cemetery in Jerusalem for the planned construction of a Museum of Tolerance and Human Dignity has spurred protests from the Muslim descending communities and from around the world. Archaeology played a central role in the process since the development only could go ahead after a large number of burials had been removed from the site by excavation. In the process the place transitioned from having been a neglected marginalized space in the urban landscape to become a contested place filled with new significance and symbolism. This process of transformation is accompanied by a shift in cultural heritage production. Through this case, this article critically explores the role and responsibility of archaeology drawing on debates that view cultural heritage production as both problematic and essential. Rather than taking sides, the piece aims at highlighting the complexities of the debates and the challenged facing archaeology.

  • 46.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Oxford College of Emory University, UK.
    The way we bury our dead: Reflections on mortuary ritual, community and identity at the time of the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition2010In: Documenta Praehistorica, ISSN 1408-967X, Vol. 37, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how archaeologists can approach ways in which the ritual treatment of the dead body was a means of reproducing a sense of identity and community in the past. The approach combines a theoretical framework grounded in practice and body theory with a methodological approach based on taphonomic analysis. This framework is introduced to analyze the mortuary practices at the Mesolithic cemeteries of Skateholm I and II, Vedbæk, Bøgebakken and Zvejnieki. Beyond the immediate context, the study seeks to reflect on how similarities and differences noticeable over time and space may provide an insight into changing identity processes.

  • 47.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Emory University, USA.
    To Gaze Upon the Dead: The Exhibition of Human Remains as Cultural Practice and Political Process in Scandinavia and the USA2016In: Dealing with the Dead: Mortuary Archaeology and Contemporary Society / [ed] Howard Williams, Melanie Giles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 268-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48. Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Unwrapping the Dead: Searching for evidence of wrappings in the mortuary practices at Zvejnieki2006In: Back to the Origin: New research in the Mesolithic-Neolithic Zvejnieki cemetery and environment, northern Latvia / [ed] Lars Larsson, Ilga Zagorska, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 2006, p. 217-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund University.
    Uppför Hawkes stege: Hur kan vi studera ritualer i det förflutna?2004In: Arkæologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 11, p. 15-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln diskuterar möjligheten för arkeologer att utifrån materiella källor diskutera ritual i det förflutna. Med utgångspunkt i ett avhandlingsarbete om mesolitiska gravar (Nilsson Stutz 2003) föreslås en kombination av handlingsteori och metoden ”anthropologie de terrain” som en väg till insikt. Författaren understryker behovet av att synkronisera arkeologisk teori och metod.

  • 50.
    Nilsson Stutz, Liv
    Lund university, Sweden;University of Michigan, USA.
    Äntligen!! Bredd och djup om arkeologi och etik från en svensk horisont.: Review of H. Karlsson (ed.) Swedish Archaeologists on Ethics, Bricoleur Press, 2004.2005In: Meta: Medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, no 4, p. 51-53Article, book review (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 61
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf