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  • 1.
    Hönel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    A changeset-based approach to assess source code density and developer efficacy2018In: ICSE '18 Proceedings of the 40th International Conference on Software Engineering: Companion Proceeedings, IEEE , 2018, p. 220-221Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The productivity of a (team of) developer(s) can be expressed as a ratio between effort and delivered functionality. Several different estimation models have been proposed. These are based on statistical analysis of real development projects; their accuracy depends on the number and the precision of data points. We propose a data-driven method to automate the generation of precise data points. Functionality is proportional to the code size and Lines of Code (LoC) is a fundamental metric of code size. However, code size and LoC are not well defined as they could include or exclude lines that do not affect the delivered functionality. We present a new approach to measure the density of code in software repositories. We demonstrate how the accuracy of development time spent in relation to delivered code can be improved when basing it on net-instead of the gross-size measurements. We validated our tool by studying ca. 1,650 open-source software projects.

  • 2.
    Hönel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Importance and Aptitude of Source code Density for Commit Classification into Maintenance Activities2019In: QRS 2019 Proceedings / [ed] Dr. David Shepherd, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commit classification, the automatic classification of the purpose of changes to software, can support the understanding and quality improvement of software and its development process. We introduce code density of a commit, a measure of the net size of a commit, as a novel feature and study how well it is suited to determine the purpose of a change. We also compare the accuracy of code-density-based classifications with existing size-based classifications. By applying standard classification models, we demonstrate the significance of code density for the accuracy of commit classification. We achieve up to 89% accuracy and a Kappa of 0.82 for the cross-project commit classification where the model is trained on one project and applied to other projects. Such highly accurate classification of the purpose of software changes helps to improve the confidence in software (process) quality analyses exploiting this classification information.

  • 3.
    Ulan, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Hönel, Sebastian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Quality Models Inside Out: Interactive Visualization of Software Metrics by Means of Joint Probabilities2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Sixth IEEE Working Conference on Software Visualization, (VISSOFT), Madrid, Spain, 2018 / [ed] J. Ángel Velázquez Iturbide, Jaime Urquiza Fuentes, Andreas Kerren, and Mircea F. Lungu, IEEE, 2018, p. 65-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing software quality, in general, is hard; each metric has a different interpretation, scale, range of values, or measurement method. Combining these metrics automatically is especially difficult, because they measure different aspects of software quality, and creating a single global final quality score limits the evaluation of the specific quality aspects and trade-offs that exist when looking at different metrics. We present a way to visualize multiple aspects of software quality. In general, software quality can be decomposed hierarchically into characteristics, which can be assessed by various direct and indirect metrics. These characteristics are then combined and aggregated to assess the quality of the software system as a whole. We introduce an approach for quality assessment based on joint distributions of metrics values. Visualizations of these distributions allow users to explore and compare the quality metrics of software systems and their artifacts, and to detect patterns, correlations, and anomalies. Furthermore, it is possible to identify common properties and flaws, as our visualization approach provides rich interactions for visual queries to the quality models’ multivariate data. We evaluate our approach in two use cases based on: 30 real-world technical documentation projects with 20,000 XML documents, and an open source project written in Java with 1000 classes. Our results show that the proposed approach allows an analyst to detect possible causes of bad or good quality.

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