lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bell, Henry
    et al.
    Irving, SarahUniversity of Edinburgh, UK.
    A Bird is Not a Stone: An Anthology of Contemporary Palestinian Poetry translated into the Languages of Scotland2014Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A major collection of contemporary Palestinian poetry translated by 24 of Scotland's very best writers including Alasdair Gray, Liz Lochhead, James Robertson, Jackie Kay, William Letford, Aonghas MacNeacail, DM Black, Tom Pow, Ron Butlin and John Glenday. A Bird is not a Stone is a unique cultural exchange, giving both English and Arabic readers a unique insight into the political, social and emotional landscape of today's Palestine. Includes both established and emerging Palestinian poets. Foreword by Scotland's Mackar (Poet Laureate) Liz Lochhead.

  • 2.
    Irving, Sarah
    King's College London, UK.
    A Tale of Two Yusifs: Recovering Arab Agency in Palestine Exploration Fund Excavations 1890–19242017In: Palestine Exploration Quarterly, ISSN 0031-0328, E-ISSN 1743-1301, Vol. 149, no 3, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scholarly literature on the history of archaeology and archaeological organisations in late nineteenth/early twentieth century Palestine focuses almost exclusively on the Western excavators and scholars who headed this work. But Arab workers did the bulk of the actual digging, and on a daily basis they were often overseen by fellow Arabs as foremen and gang leaders. This paper applies lessons from relational history as it has been used in Levantine intellectual and labour contexts to understand the roles of two particular men, Yusif ‘abu Selim' Khazin and Yusif Khattar Kanaan, who worked for the Palestine Exploration Fund between 1890 and World War One, acting as foremen, researchers, site directors and many other roles for Frederick Bliss, R.A.S Macalister, and Duncan Mackenzie. Despite their often slim and ghostly presence in the records, in which both men are often referred to only by their shared first name, the writings of Bliss and Macalister reveal them to have been indispensable on-site and as offering insights and knowledge which influenced how both archaeological finds and indigenous life in Palestine was understood.

  • 3.
    Irving, Sarah
    University of London, UK.
    “A young man of promise”: finding a place for Stephan Hanna Stephan in the hHistory of Mandate Palestine2018In: Jerusalem Quarterly, ISSN 0334-4800, Vol. 73, p. 42-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Irving, Sarah
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Gender, Conflict, and Muslim-Jewish Romance: Reading ʿAli Al-Muqri’s The Handsome Jew and Mahmoud Saeed’s The World through the Eyes of Angels2016In: Journal of Middle East Women's Studies, ISSN 1552-5864, E-ISSN 1558-9579, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 343-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National or ethnic collectivities are often coded in art, propaganda, and other media as “female”—passive, possessed, and penetrable by the enemy other. Particularly during times of conflict, the nation or homeland is depicted as a woman whose purity must be protected by men. Feminist explorations of this phenomenon have often focused on the language and practice of sexual violence against women in war. Mary Layoun’s discussion of Cypriot fiction raises a different possibility: when women transgress group boundaries and make their own choice to pursue sexual relationships with the other, this rupture of dominant ideologies opens up new ways of thinking about identity but may also end with those disruptions being suppressed and crushed. This article uses Layoun’s ideas to inform a close reading of two recent novels written in Arabic, both of which depict Muslim-Jewish amatory relations in a way that counters stereotypical ideas about how such relationships are seen in the Arab world.

  • 5. Irving, Sarah
    Leila Khaled: Icon of Palestinian Liberation2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dubbed 'the poster girl of Palestinian militancy', Leila Khaled's image flashed across the world after she hijacked a passenger jet in 1969. The picture of a young, determined looking woman with a checkered scarf, clutching an AK-47, was as era-defining as that of Che Guevara.

    In this intimate profile, based on interviews with Khaled and those who know her, Sarah Irving gives us the life-story behind the image. Key moments of Khaled's turbulent life are explored, including the dramatic events of the hijackings, her involvement in the Marxist Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (a radical element within the PLO), her opposition to the Oslo peace process and her activism today.

    Leila Khaled's example gives unique insights into the Palestinian struggle through one remarkable life – from the tension between armed and political struggle, to the decline of the secular left and the rise of Hamas, and the role of women in a largely male movement.

  • 6.
    Irving, Sarah
    Edge Hill University, UK.
    Love as a Peace Process?: Arab-Jewish Love in the Anglophone Palestinian Novels of Naomi Shihab Nye and Samir El-Yousef2017In: Commonwealth Essays and Studies, ISSN 0395-6989, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 39-50Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf