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  • 1.
    Al-Shaaban, Sarah
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Wallin, Emmy
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sjöqvist, Sarah
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Color associations in relation to context: A quantitative study concerning whether or not colors are contextually dependent/independent.2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge about consumers color preferences is important for marketers to be able to reach out with attractive product offerings to consumers. To determine the color that appeals to consumers, marketers have used color consultants. Associative to learning can help marketers better understand the evolution of color preferences.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the contextual independence/dependence of consumers associations of colors.

    Findings: The result showed that color associations were dependent of the context. The two hypotheses, the association to the blue/black color on context is different compared to the general and symbolic associations to the color blue/black are not rejected. This means that the color associations depend on context. 

  • 2.
    Amsteus, Martin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Al-Shaaban, Sarah
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Wallin, Emmy
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Sjöqvist, Sarah
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Colors in Marketing: A Study of Color Associations and Context (in) Dependence2015In: International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, ISSN 2308-3816, E-ISSN 2222-6990, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mirroring an increasing awareness of the importance of colors, today marketing managers are paying increasing attention to the deployment of color in marketing as well as to the applicability of universal color associations. Two colors considered to carry several specific universal associations are blue and black. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to assess the contextual independence/dependence of consumers’ associations with the colors blue and black. Associative learning theory was deployed to specify the hypotheses. The hypotheses were tested through a paired sample t-test. The results show that the universal associations with the colors are different from the associations with the colors when they are displayed in a specific context. The implications for further research and limitations of the study are presented. Managers may want to consider the associations colors have in the specific context rather than relying on universal associations of colors.

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  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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