lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bellenberg, Sören
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Huynh, Dieu
    TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany.
    Poetsch, Ansgar
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Germany;Univ Plymouth, UK.
    Sand, Wolfgang
    Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany;TU Bergakad Freiberg, Germany;Donghua Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Vera, Mario
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Chile, Chile.
    Proteomics Reveal Enhanced Oxidative Stress Responses and Metabolic Adaptation in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Biofilm Cells on Pyrite2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, p. 1-14, article id 592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress and growth inhibition by inactivation of essential enzymes, DNA and lipid damage in microbial cells. Acid mine drainage (AMD) ecosystems are characterized by low pH values, enhanced levels of metal ions and low species abundance. Furthermore, metal sulfides, such as pyrite and chalcopyrite, generate extracellular ROS upon exposure to acidic water. Consequently, oxidative stress management is especially important in acidophilic leaching microorganisms present in industrial biomining operations, especially when forming biofilms on metal sulfides. Several adaptive mechanisms have been described, but the molecular repertoire of responses upon exposure to pyrite and the presence of ROS are not thoroughly understood in acidophiles. In this study the impact of the addition of H2O2 on iron oxidation activity in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans DSM 14882(T) was investigated. Iron(II)- or sulfur-grown cells showed a higher sensitivity toward H2O2 than pyrite-grown ones. In order to elucidate which molecular responses may be involved, we used shot-gun proteomics and compared proteomes of cells grown with iron(II)-ions against biofilm cells, grown for 5 days in presence of pyrite as sole energy source. In total 1157 proteins were identified. 213 and 207 ones were found to have increased levels in iron(II) ion-grown or pyrite-biofilm cells, respectively. Proteins associated with inorganic sulfur compound (ISC) oxidation were among the latter. In total, 80 proteins involved in ROS degradation, thiol redox regulation, macromolecule repair mechanisms, biosynthesis of antioxidants, as well as metal and oxygen homeostasis were found. 42 of these proteins had no significant changes in abundance, while 30 proteins had increased levels in pyrite-biofilm cells. New insights in ROS mitigation strategies, such as importance of globins for oxygen homeostasis and prevention of unspecific reactions of free oxygen that generate ROS are presented for A. ferrooxidans biofilm cells. Furthermore, proteomic analyses provide insights in adaptations of carbon fixation and oxidative phosphorylation pathways under these two growth conditions.

  • 2.
    Christel, Stephan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Herold, Malte
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Bellenberg, Sören
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Universität Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine
    Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland;Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), Switzerland.
    El Hajjami, Mohamed
    Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.
    Pivkin, Igor
    Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland;Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), Switzerland.
    Sand, Wolfgang
    Universität Duisburg-Essen, Germany;Donghua University, Peoples Republic of China;Mining Academy, Germany;Technical University Freiberg, Germany.
    Wilmes, Paul
    University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Poetsch, Ansgar
    Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany;Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Vera, Mario
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Weak Iron Oxidation by Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Maintains a Favorable Redox Potential for Chalcopyrite Bioleaching2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 3059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioleaching is an emerging technology, describing the microbially assisted dissolution of sulfidicores that provides a more environmentally friendly alternative to many traditional metal extractionmethods, such as roasting or smelting. Industrial interest increases steadily and today, circa 15-20%of the world’s copper production can be traced back to this method. However, bioleaching of theworld’s most abundant copper mineral chalcopyrite suffers from low dissolution rates, oftenattributed to passivating layers, which need to be overcome to use this technology to its full potential.To prevent these passivating layers from forming, leaching needs to occur at a lowoxidation/reduction potential (ORP), but chemical redox control in bioleaching heaps is difficult andcostly. As an alternative, selected weak iron-oxidizers could be employed that are incapable ofscavenging exceedingly low concentrations of iron and therefore, raise the ORP just above the onsetof bioleaching, but not high enough to allow for the occurrence of passivation. In this study, wereport that microbial iron oxidation by Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans meets these specifications.Chalcopyrite concentrate bioleaching experiments with S. thermosulfidooxidans as the sole ironoxidizer exhibited significantly lower redox potentials and higher release of copper compared tocommunities containing the strong iron oxidizer Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Transcriptomic responseto single and co-culture of these two iron oxidizers was studied and revealed a greatly decreasednumber of mRNA transcripts ascribed to iron oxidation in S. thermosulfidooxidans when cultured inthe presence of L. ferriphilum. This allowed for the identification of genes potentially responsible forS. thermosulfidooxidans’ weaker iron oxidation to be studied in the future, as well as underlined theneed for mechanisms to control the microbial population in bioleaching heaps

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf