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  • 1. Adamopoulos, S
    et al.
    Karastergiou, S
    Foti, D
    Filippou, V
    Chips recovered from waste particleboards by hydro-mechanical methods2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was studied the recovery of wood chips from waste particleboards by immersion in water at ambient temperature and by mechanical treatment (agitation and impact, waterblasting). Four different categories of waste particleboards were used, with and without coating, after their reduction in smaller pieces with dimensions of about 7 × 8 cm.  The investigated methods were: (I) immersion for 3 days-impregnation with vacuum and pressure-agitation and impact (II) immersion for 7 days-drying-rewetting for 12 hours-agitation and impact (III) immersion for 3 days-waterblasting. The maximum thickness swelling (about 90%) was achieved by immersing the particleboards in the water for 3 days, and therefore the vacuum and pressure impregnation step can be omitted in practice. Recovery of wood chips was significantly higher (51.54%) in the case of successive wetting and drying cycles compared to simple immersion in water (17.32%). Both these methods I and II, involving agitation and impact for recovering wood chips from waste particleboards, are easily applicable at the industry. Method III with waterblasting resulted in complete recovery of wood chips within a very short time, but its application requires more research

  • 2.
    Adamopoulos, Stegerios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Gellerich, A
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Mantanis, G
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Kalaitzi, T
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Militz, H
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Resistance of Pinus leucodermis heartwood and sapwood against the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana2012In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, Vol. 7, no 4, 242-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the decay resistance of Pinus leucodermis wood to the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana. Based upon the median weight losses of 30.65% for heartwood and of 34.68% for sapwood obtained in the biological tests, both the heartwood and sapwood material examined was classified as not durable (durability class 5) according to the CEN/TS 15083-1 classification. Total extractives were low, 3.93% in heartwood and 1.00% in sapwood, while lignin content was 22.60% and 25.41% in heartwoodand sapwood, respectively. It is highly recommended to use protective treatments before using P.leucodermis wood in outdoor conditions.

  • 3.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    A laser drilling technique to improve impregnability of spruce and fir2016In: 3rd BASF Wolman Conference, 14 September 2016, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Fiber analysis techniques for sustainable manufacturing of corrugated board and packaging2006In: Proceedings of the 2006 Naxos International Conference on Sustainable Management and Development of Mountainous and Island Areas: 29th September - 1st October 2006, Island of Naxos, Greece / [ed] Evangelos I. Manolas, Democritus University of Thrace , 2006, Vol. 1, 1-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental – economic pressure and associated regulations have led to a significant increase of recycled paper as the main fibrous component of corrugated board the last years. Corrugating packaging industry is facing the challenge to enhance products derived from recycled pulp and to ensure a satisfactory strength of packages. Advanced techniques are highly needed for the evaluation of packaging fiber supply sources as well as for the utilization of the available resources in an optimal manner. As industrial packaging is based on the characteristics of its constituent fibers, information on the fiber composition of the recycled raw materials is of primary importance for a continual control of fiber sources. This paper reports on the usefulness of fiber analysis techniques as diagnostic methods for assessing the potential quality distribution of fibers for sustainable packaging manufacturing.

  • 5.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Aristotelian University, Greece.
    Flexural properties of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) small clear wood specimens in relation to the direction of load application2002In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 60, no 5, 325-327 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Values of pure moduli of elasticity (PMOE), experimental modulus of elasticity (MOE) in static bending and moduli of rigidity (GLR, GLT) were calculated in juvenile and mature black locust defect-free small wood specimens after loading in static bending alternately on true radial and tangential surfaces. For both juvenile and mature specimens, no significant differences (t-test, 95% probability level) were found between the radial and tangential moduli of elasticity and rigidity. Values of PMOE were found to be 27–32% higher than the corresponding values of MOE at the 15:1 span-to-depth ratio.

  • 6.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    AIDIMA, Spain.
    Identification of Fibre Components in Packaging Grade Papers2006In: IAWA Journal, ISSN 0928-1541, Vol. 27, no 2, 153-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental and economic issues have led to a significant increase of recycled paper as the main fibrous component of corrugated board the last years. Qualitative data on the different fibre types are needed for the evaluation of packaging fibre supply sources, which are becoming numerous and heterogeneous. Fifteen different packaging grade papers (7 linerboards and 8 corrugating medium) were selected to represent all the variety of papers available on the Spanish market. The origin of virgin and recycled fibres was identified by their morphological characteristics employing light microscopy and standard fibre analysis techniques. The waste-based papers (Waste based-liners and Fluting), Kraft-liners and Test-liner were highly variable containing 9–18 different wood and nonwood components. Semi-chemical, with 5–13 components, was the less variable grade. Hardwoods were identified as the most important fibre component from a quantitative standpoint. All papers contained in their hardwood mix Betula, Eucalyptus and Populus in significant amounts. Fagus sylvatica and Tilia were also frequently observed and in some papers were amongst major hardwood components. Prominent softwood components were found to be Pinus sylvestris, P. pinaster, P. radiata, Picea, Larix and in some papers Pinus nigra. The lower presence of a variety of softwood, hardwood and nonwood (mainly grasses) species and genera was due to the paper recycling process.

  • 7.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Aristotelian University, Greece.
    Influence of hot-water extractives on radial and tangential shrinkage of black locust wood (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)2002In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 60, no 5, 377-378 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionRemoval of extractives increases the shrinkage and swelling of wood (Nearn 1955, Salamon and Kozak 1968, Cooper 1974, Taylor 1974). The effect of progressive extraction on the above properties has not been investigated much. In oak (Quercus conferta L.), a forest species rich in extractives, the shrinkage progressively increased with progressive extraction (Voulgaridis et al. 1980). In black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), much of the main-stem volume is comprised of heartwood, characterized by the presence of dark yellow-brown extractives. While the extractives of black locust give the heartwood its distinctive color and decay resistance, they comprise only 6.2 to 8.3% of the dry weight of the main stem (Stringer 1992). Hot-water extractives range from 5.2 to 8.6% (Hart 1968, So et al. 1980). The present study was primarily undertaken to determine whether the progressive removal of hot-water extractives affects the radial and tangential shrinkage of black locust heartwood.

  • 8.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Morphology, properties and recyclability of modified fibres and papers with different chemicals at laboratory, pilot plant and industrial trials2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Quality control of packaging fiber sources2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Quantification of softwood, hardwood and nonwood fibres in packaging grade papers2006In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 5, no 3, 27-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study determined percentages by weight of the fiber components in 15 papers commonly used to produce corrugating packaging in Spain. The papers are manufactured mainly from recycled raw materials. The percentages were determined by means of standard quantitative fiber analysis techniques and use of appropriate weight factors. Hardwoods were the major fiber component in all papers, except kraft liners, varying from 51% to 92% per weight. Kraft liners had greater softwood content (49%-69%)than hardwood, and the most plentiful softwood classes were pines. Douglas-fir was a contaminating fiber component (weight percentage less than 2%) in almost in every paper. Nonwood fibers, entering the papers through the recycling process, were a significant fiber component (2%-9%) in most of the papers, especially the waste-based papers (liners and flutings). Quantitative fiber composition reflects the differences in quality between the papers. Its usefulness could be further explored in the quality control of paper manufacturing for packaging.

    Application: Packaging grade papers incorporate a variety of wood and nonwood fiber types. Manufacturing of papers of consistent and acceptable quality requires knowledge concerning the quantity of each fiber used.

  • 11. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Radial variation of fiber and vessel member dimensions as an indication of juvenile/mature wood transition in black locust2006In: Wood Structure and Properties ’06. / [ed] S. Kurjtatko, J. Kúdela and R. Lagaňa, 2006, 19-23 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    TEI Thessaly, Greece.
    Recovery and utilization of wood and rubber at the end of their lifespan to produce innovative products2014In: Development and Business Prospects in Thessaly by Symbiotic Utilization of Agricultural and Industrial Solid Waste to Produce Materials and Energy, November 24, Larissa, Greece, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Silvicultural practices in relation to quality of timber produced in Greece1999In: 2nd Workshop of COST Action E10: Wood properties for Industrial Use, 13-15 June, Tapada de Mafra, Portugal, 1999, 50-53 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    TEI of Thessaly, Greece.
    Utilisation of recovered wood and rubber for alternative composite Products (Woodrub)2013In: Tire Rubber Recycling Forum 2013, November 19-20, Brussels, Belgium, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Promoting sustainable raw material management and increasing the recycling of waste wood and waste rubber are two strategic thrusts that open large domains for new technologies and innovations.

    This project, in line with objectives of LIFE+ Environment Policy & Governance aims to increase resource efficiency through the utilization of these wood and rubber wastes through the manufacturing of new products based on innovative mixed composites (wood/rubber). This new products will constitute an alternative for the utilization of other traditional and less eco-efficient products in the residential and civil construction sector.

    Moreover, the project will provide a novel end of life route for wood waste managers and rubber waste managersʼ products and entities a new environmental friendly product to public and private construction sector.The use of these products will increase the carbon storage in buildings and replace other building materials which are less environmentally friendly towards carbon storage and emission, both in production processes and raw material use.

    The recovered wood category to be utilised will be waste wood from households (furniture, doors, windows, floors, etc.). This material is chemically contaminated by glues, lacquers, paints and coatings but not by preservatives. After collection, the waste wood material will be chipped and processed in the form of chips without any prior biological, thermal or chemical treatment. This is an innovative approach since the removal of all these chemicals is difficult and time/ cost consuming.

    Recovered rubber form tyres in the form of particles, free from other materials as wires, ropes, synthetic fibres, etc., will be utilised with recovered wood chips or sawn timber for the production of innovative composite products by thermal processes.

    This project is in line with latest research in wood – rubber applications (Yang et al. 2004, Zhao et al. 2008).

  • 15.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Νέες τεχνολογίες συγκοµιδής δασικών προϊόντων: [New technologies for harvesting forest products]2012In: "Harvesting, Supply and Trade of Woody Biomass". Centre for Renewable Energy Sources and Saving (CRES) and Department of Forestry and Management of Natural Environment, TEI of Larissa, 19 October 2012, Karditsa, Greece, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany ; Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Bastani, Alireza
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Gascón-Garrido, Patricia
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Militz, Holger
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Adhesive bonding of beech wood modified with a phenol formaldehyde compound2012In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 70, no 6, 897-901 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Untreated (controls) and phenol–formaldehyde (PF)-modified beech wood (10 and 25 % solid content) were glued with phenol resorcinol formaldehyde (PRF) and polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). Shear strength of PRF-bonded specimens was higher than that of PVAc-bonded ones under dry and wet conditions irrespective of the pre-treatment. Under dry conditions, only PVAc-bonded specimens exhibited reduction in shear strength due to PF-modification with 25 % PF concentration as compared to the controls. PF treated wood provided inferior bonding under wet conditions with the exception of 25 % PF concentration specimens glued with PRF adhesive. Modification with PF resulted in a decrease of adhesive penetration into the porous network of interconnected cells, especially at 25 % PF concentration.

  • 17.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Birmpilis, D
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly.
    Use and properties of recovered paper raw materials for the production of corrugated board2015In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology Rhodes, Greece, 3-5 September 2015, Global NEST , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The difficulty of predicting the properties of paper products produced from heterogeneous sources puts several limitations, which therefore lead to severe economic losses and only a comprehensive characterization will enable their better utilization. The project “RF-CORRUG –Quality control of raw materials from recovered fibres for the production of corrugated board”under the NationalStrategic Reference Framework 2007–2013 ARCHIMEDES IIIdeals with this common technical problem of the corrugated board industry. Specifically, the mainobjective of the project is to supportthe competitiveness of the corrugated board companies (mainly SMEs)by creatinga software tool based on practical models that can predict packaging grade paper properties from fibre data (qualitative, quantitative, morphological) used in their production. This paper presents information on the physical and mechanical properties of recovered packaging papers used in corrugated packaging. A number of different category papers (liners, flutings) used for corrugated board production in Greece were examined. The required paper properties included grammage, porosity, bursting strength, SCT, tensile strength and tearing resistance, and were measured by internationally recognized testersand standards. The data will be used to develop predictive models based on advanced statistical methods for the properties and performance of packagingaccording to information of their recovered raw paper materials.

  • 18.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Chavenetidou, Marina
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Span-to-depth ratio for shear free deformations in static bending of small wood specimens2011In: Wood research, ISSN 1336-4561, Vol. 56, no 3, 429-434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disregarding shear effects is a principal defect in predicting the bending strengths of small clear specimens of timber according to standards. The present study proposes a method to determine spans of 2 x 2 cm wood specimens of black locust and chestnut for shear free deformations in static bending. It was found that for both ring-porous species, spans of at least 40 cm in a bending test would ensure a negligible influence of shear on modulus of elasticity.

  • 19.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Chavenetidou, Marina
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Effect of cambium age and ring width on density and fibre length of black locust and chestnut wood2010In: Wood research, ISSN 1336-4561, Vol. 55, no 3, 25-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between wood density (WD) and fibre length (FL) with cambium age (CA) and ring width (RW) was studied in two ring-porous species, black locust and coppice-grown chestnut, collected in the Sithonia Peninsula, Chalkidiki, Greece. Using regression analysis methods, models of WD and FL in relation to CA and RW were obtained. It was found that the effect of CA and RW on WD and FL was similar for both species examined. WD of black locust and chestnut was predicted better through a model using CA and RW. A model for FL variations was also obtained with CA and RW and was more accurate than the simple models based on the two factors, CA and RW, separately. The multiple regression models suggested that the use of cambial age of growth rings together with their width might explain better their effects on WD and FL of black locust and chestnut.

  • 20.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Foti, Dafni
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Manufacturing and properties of gypsum-based products with recovered wood and rubber materials2015In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 3, 5573-5585 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experimental production of gypsum-based products (cylindrical samples, solid bricks) using different fractions of wood chips and rubber particles was studied. Recovered rubber and wood materials were mixed with gypsum and water in various proportions to fabricate gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber cylindrical samples and standard solid bricks with six holes using appropriate molds. It was shown that to manufacture gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber products with good mechanical strength, coarse fractions of wood and rubber should be used, but the proportion of wood or rubber should not exceed 25%. No thermal conductivity differences were found between the wood-and rubber-type of gypsum products, and particle size and material proportion had no effect. Samples with fine wood and rubber particles present at a lower proportion (25%) exhibited similar sound absorption behavior. The solid bricks had slightly higher strength when loaded at the large surface of their lateral upper side than when loaded at the small surface. The bricks provided better thermal insulation than both the extruded and pressed house bricks but lower than that of insulating bricks. The emission of volatile organic compounds out of the bricks was at an acceptable level according to regulations for construction products.

  • 21.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Tensile strength of handsheets prepared with macerated fibres from solid wood modified with cross-linking agents2015In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 69, no 8, 959-966 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to explain the tensile strength loss of wood due to the modification with 1,3-dimethylol-4,5-dihydroxyethyleneurea (DMDHEU) and glutaraldehyde (GA). Modified and control wood blocks were macerated to deliberate fibres, and handsheets were produced thereof. The nitrogen content of the fibres indicated that maceration removed the major proportions of DMDHEU. The stability of GA in wood during maceration was not assessed. Tensile strength determined at zero span (z-strength) and finite span (f-strength) was equal for the handsheets from DMDHEU-modified fibres and the control handsheets. The microscopic appearance of the tested finite-span paper strips from DMDHEU-modified fibres mainly indicated interfibre failure and did not differ from the fibre fracture mode of the control handsheets. In contrast, the z-strength of the handsheets from GA-modified fibres was lower than that of controls and decreased with increasing content of GA in the initial modified wood. The f-strength behaviour of the handsheets from GA-modified fibres was the opposite: it was higher than that of controls and increased with increasing GA content. The microscopic appearance of the rapture zones of the finite-span testing mainly indicated intrafibre failure for the GA-modified fibres. It was concluded that cross-linking is likely to be the major reason for tensile strength loss of GA- and DMDHEU-modified wood. In terms of DMDHEU-modified wood, the incrustation of the cell wall by the resin and the reduction in pliability could play an additional role.

  • 22.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Karageorgos, Anthony
    Passialis, Costas
    Chavenetidou, Marina
    Mathematical approach for defining juvenile-mature wood transition zone in black locust and chestnut2011In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, no 3, 336-342 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article defines age of transition from juvenile to mature wood in two ring-porous species, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.). A logistic function was proposed using fiber length and ring width data of three black locust trees, aged 35-37 yr, and five chestnut coppice trees, aged 25-27 yr, from Sithonia Peninsula, Chalkidiki, Greece. The approach proved to be practical and objective in delineating maturity zones, and it was based on rate of change of yearly fiber length. The juvenile wood zone spread to the sixth growth ring from the pith in both species, whereas the demarcation of juvenile and mature wood was at age 12 and 14 yr in chestnut and black locust, respectively. Transition zone width comprised rings 7-12 in chestnut and rings 7-14 in black locust.

  • 23.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Karageorgos, Anthony
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Rapti, Elli
    Center for Research and Technology – Hellas (CERTH), Greece .
    Birbilis, Dimitris
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Predicting the Properties of Corrugated Base Papers Using Multiple Linear Regression and  Artificial Neural Networks2016In: Drewno, ISSN 1644-3985, Vol. 59, no 198, 61-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The difficulty in predicting the properties and behaviour of paper products produced using heterogeneous raw materials with high percentages of recovered fibres poses restrictions on their efficient and effective use as corrugated packaging materials. This work presents predictive models for the mechanical properties of corrugated base papers (liner and fluting-medium) from fibre and physical property data using multiple linear regression and artificial neural networks. The most significant results were obtained for the prediction of the tensile strength of liners in the cross direction from the origin (wood type, pulp method) of the fibres using linear regression, and the prediction of the compressive strength of fluting-medium in the longitudinal (machine) direction, according to the short-span test, using a neural network with one hidden layer with 6 neurons, with coefficients of determination at 95.14% and 99.28%, respectively

  • 24.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Koch, Gerald
    Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut, Germany.
    Wood structure and topochemistry of Juniperus excelsa2011In: IAWA Journal, ISSN 0928-1541, Vol. 32, no 1, 67-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood structure and topochemical distribution of lignin and phenolic extractives in Juniperus excelsa Bieb. were investigated using a mature specimen, aproximately 80 years of age, from the Rhodope mountains, Greece. The wood of J. excelsa was found to possess the same qualitative anatomical features as those reported for other Juniperus species of the Western Hemisphere. Quantitative anatomical characteristics recorded for mature wood (heartwood and sapwood) included earlywood and latewood tracheid length, double wall thickness of earlywood and latewood tracheids, lumen diameter of earlywood tracheids and ray height. Scanning UV microspectrophotometry revealed a pronounced lignification of J. excelsa tracheids with detected absorbance values of the secondary cell wall layers being much higher in comparison to all other softwoods studied using this technique. The cell corners and compound middle lamellae were characterised by relative high UV absorbance values as compared to the S2 layers. The phenolic compounds deposited in the axial and ray parenchyma cells possessed higher absorbance values than cell wall associated lignins and had a different spectral behaviour due to the presence of chromophoric groups. According to the obtained UV absorbance spectra, more condensed phenolic compounds were deposited in the heartwood than in the sapwood.

  • 25.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Mai, C
    From wood fibre modification to paper technology: properties of fibres modified with DMDHEU and glutaraldehyde2011In: 3rd biennial International Fibre Engineering Conference, 24 – 26 May, Barcelona, Spain, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    AIDIMA, Spain.
    Martinez, E
    AIDIMA, Spain.
    Ramirez, D.
    AIDIMA, Spain.
    Characterization of packaging grade papers from recycled raw materials through the study of fibre morphology and composition2007In: Global NEST. International Journal, ISSN 1108-4006, Vol. 9, no 1, 20-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restrictions in availability of forest-based raw materials along with favourable environmental policies towards alternative sources of raw materials have forced corrugated packaging industry to shift towards recycled paper and other fibre sources such as non-wood and agro-residues. The variability in raw pulp materials with increasing percentages of recycled fibres is a very common technical problem for the corrugated packaging industry worldwide. Corrugating packaging production is facing the challenge to ensure a satisfactory strength of packages despite the increase of recycled paper as the main fibrous component. Sustainable manufacturing of papers of consistent and acceptable quality requests comprehensive characterization of the fibrous components, which are becoming more heterogeneous. Understanding the influence that heterogeneous recycled raw materials have on packaging grade paper properties offers great potential value to the corrugated board and packaging industry.

    57 linerboards and corrugating medium were selected to represent all the variety of paper grades available on the market at the moment for the production of corrugated board in Spain. The papers were analyzed for their fibre morphology (fibre length, fibre width, lumen diameter, cell wall width and flexibility) and fibre composition (softwood to hardwood and nonwood fibre count and weight) and their strength (compression, bursting and crushing resistance) was evaluated. All the determinations were in accordance with the relevant TAPPI Test Methods. The significant differences found in most of the anatomical characteristics, fibre composition and strength properties among the paper grades reflected the diverse raw materials used for their production as well as their qualitative differences. By means of simple correlation the influence of fibre characteristics and composition on the strength of the papers was determined under two different conditions, at 23 o C and 50% RH and at 20 o C and 90% RH.

    The results demonstrate that besides the physical-mechanical characterization of packaging grade papers, fibre anatomy and composition can be used successfully as a complementary practical test to predict the performance of papers. The application of the predicting correlations is proposed for the evaluation of the fibre supplies for the packaging industry. An enormous potential for cost reduction can be created by the selection of the most appropriate and inexpensive combination of grade papers for a specific packaging use

  • 27. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Mertinez, E
    Ramirez, D
    Characterization of packaging grade papers from recycled raw materials through the study of fibre morphology and composition2005In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology: Rhodes, Rhodes Island, Greece, 1 - 3 September 2005 ; Volume of Abstracts / [ed] University of the Aegean, 2005, Vol. A, 18-25 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Milios, E
    Brutia pine wood properties from young reforestations2007In: / [ed] M. Ispas, 2007, 11-18 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Milios, E.
    Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.
    Doganos, D.
    Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.
    Bistinas, I.
    Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.
    Ring width, latewood proportion and dry density in stems of Pinus brutia Ten2009In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 67, no 4, 471-477 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined basic characteristics of stem wood produced in Pinus brutia Ten. reforestations in Northeastern Greece. Sixteen dominant trees growing at good and medium site qualities were felled at 14–22 years. Site quality classification was based on site quality surrogates and confirmed by using site index curves that were created for a neighbouring area. Discs were taken at three stem positions (base, middle, top) to study variations in ring width, latewood proportion and dry density. Generally, at both good and medium sites, ring width was found to increase towards the top of the stems while latewood proportion and dry density showed a negative relationship with stem height. Radial variability trends were similar at all heights, and at both sites, revealing a rapid increase for ring width in the first 3–6 annual rings followed by a decrease towards the bark, a gradual increase for latewood proportion and no specific change for dry density. Comparisons between wood material produced during the same growth period (2005–2001) showed statistically significant differences among sampling heights in all cases except for dry density in medium sites. At the base of the stems, mean ring width and dry density were significantly (P ≤0.05) higher at good sites (3.6 mm and 0.53 g/cm3) than at medium sites (3.0 mm and 0.50 g/cm3). However, the differences between the sites are of small magnitude and therefore have limited practical impact on wood processing. The availability of such data is useful in utilising small-dimension timber of brutia pine.

  • 30.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Karditsa, Greece.
    Oliver, José-Vicente
    AIDIMA, Spain.
    Fiber composition of packaging grade papers as determined by the Graff “C” staining test2006In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, Vol. 38, no 4, 567-575 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the fiber components of 15 representative papers that are used for the production of corrugated board was carried out by the Graff "C" staining test. The method of processing of softwood, hardwood, and nonwood fibers was determined under a light microscope by their color reactions with the stain. All papers, due to the use of recycled pulp raw materials in their manufacturing, were found to incorporate in their furnish fibers that had been produced with a variety of pulping processes: chemical, mechanical, and semi-mechanical. The recycled-based papers (recycled-liner and recycled-medium) were proved to be the most variable comprising 12-15 different fiber components, while in some of the semi-chemicals only up to 7 components were identified. The weight percentages of the fiber components calculated by the application of weight factors showed that in almost all papers the most important fiber component from a quantitative standpoint was hardwood unbleached kraft followed by softwood unbleached kraft. Besides hardwood unbleached semi-chemical pulp and mechanical softwood pulp that were also plentiful in the papers, there was a smaller number of other components which sum, however, accounted for a significant fraction in the total furnish weight. The results taken on the total softwood, hardwood, and nonwood fibers content of the papers demonstrate that Graff "C" staining test is adequate to analyze both the structure and quality of packaging grade papers in practical industrial testing.

  • 31. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Passialis, C
    Voulgaridis, E
    Prediction of bending and shear strength properties by using nondestructive parameters in fir and black locust2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Passialis, C
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, E
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Oliver, JV
    Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain.
    Grammage and structural density as quality indexes of packaging grade papers manufactured from recycled pulps2014In: Drewno, ISSN 1644-3985, Vol. 57, no 191, 145-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrugated packaging production is currently facing the challenge to ensure a satisfactory strength of packaging despite the continuous increase in recycled paper as the main fibrous component. This research addresses a very common technical problem for the corrugated board industry – the difficulty of predicting the properties of paper products produced from heterogeneous sources. Grammage and structural density, being easily available data, were examined as quality parameters of the most common categories of packaging paper in Europe. Grammage, ranging from 100 to 225 g/m2, has been found to be a dominant parameter for estimating the strength properties of paper.

  • 33.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Relationship of the toughness and the modulus of elasticity in static bending of small clear spruce wood specimens2010In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 68, no 1, 109-111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike static bending, toughness is a mechanical property less commonly measured in clear wood. The paper presents results on the relationship of toughness and modulus of elasticity in static bending based on DIN standard tests on small, clear specimens of spruce, 2×2 cm2 in cross section.

  • 34. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Passialis, Costas
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Fibre characteristics of papers used in European corrugated packaging industry2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Passialis, Costas
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Fibre characteristics of papers used in European corrugated packaging industry2009In: ATIP. Association Technique de L'Industrie Papetiere, ISSN 0997-7554, Vol. 63, no 4, 14-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Ring width, latewood proportion and density relationships in black locust wood of different origins and clones2010In: IAWA Journal, ISSN 0928-1541, Vol. 31, no 2, 169-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sectional discs were cut at breast height from 19 black locust trees aged 18–39 years of different clones and origin (Greece, Bulgaria and Hungarian clones J, U and NY). Ring width, latewood proportion and dry density were measured according to standard laboratory techniques in order to examine their relationships. Latewood proportion was found to increase (except for one tree from Bulgaria) with increasing ring width and logarithmic equations were calculated with relatively high correlation coefficients. A positive relation between dry density and latewood proportion was found in black locust of Bulgarian origin and in the Hungarian clone NY while in all other cases no meaningful relationship was observed. In mature wood, improved positive linear correlations were observed between dry density and latewood proportion with the exception of the Hungarian clone U. Regression analysis revealed low correlations between dry density and ring width and only black locust from Bulgaria had a high positive correlation. The positive correlations between dry density and ring width were slightly improved in mature wood with the exception of clone J from Hungary.

  • 37.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Karditsa, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Technological Educational Institute of Karditsa, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Strength properties of juvenile and mature wood in black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)2007In: Wood and Fiber Science, ISSN 0735-6161, Vol. 39, no 2, 241-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to investigate the strength properties of juvenile and mature wood in black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.). Wood specimens were prepared from various stem heights, up to 9 m, of five naturally-grown black locust trees, 21-37 years old. Mechanical properties tested included moduli of rupture (MOR) and elasticity (MOE), and pure modulus of elasticity (PMOE) in static bending, stress wave modulus of elasticity (SWMOE) in dynamic strength, axial compression, and toughness. Comparisons between juvenile and mature wood specimens of similar densities (0.667-0.894 g/cm3 and 0.682-0.892 g/cm3, respectively) showed that juvenile wood had a statistically significant lower mean MOR (138.78 N/mm2), MOE (13,936 N/mm2), PMOE (18,125 N/mm2), SWMOE (16,813 N/mm2) and toughness strength (155.25 KJ/m2) than the mature wood (148.29 N/mm2, 14,747 N/mm2, 19,498 N/mm2, 17,635 N/mm2 and 181.27 KJ/m2, respectively). On the contrary, no statistically significant differences were found for the mean strength in axial compression among juvenile (63.75 N/mm2) and mature wood (66.65 N/mm2). Fractured surfaces of juvenile and mature wood specimens in static bending and toughness were classified into the "splintering tension" type of failure, while compression failures were of the "shearing type" according to ASTM D 143-83 standards. Lower strength of juvenile wood in most of the properties examined may be attributed to anatomical and chemical properties rather than density of wood specimens. The adverse influence of juvenile wood on strength properties should be considered for effective management (e.g. longer rotation age and other genetic and forest or plantation management measures that reduce juvenile wood content) and utilization of the species.

  • 38.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Moustaizis, Stavros
    Technical University of Crete, Greece.
    Kortsalioudakis, Nathanail
    Technical University of Crete, Greece.
    Petrakis, Panagiotis
    Technical University of Crete, Greece.
    Karastergiou, Sotirios
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Foti, Dafni
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Koutsianitis, Dimitrios
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Voulgaridou, Eleni
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Effect of laser drilling on mechanical properties of fir (Abies borisii regis) and spruce (Picea excelsa) wood2014In: Wood Structure, Properties and Quality – 2014: 5th RCCWS International Symposium, Moscow State University Press, 2014, 7-12 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fir and spruce wood specimens, 2×2 cm in cross section and 34 cm long, were pre-pared with true radial and tangential surfaces. All lateral surfaces of the wood specimens were drilled by laser beams to a depth of 0,4 cm (1/5 of specimen thickness) with two drilling pat-terns (distance between holes 1 × 1 cm and 1 × 2 cm). After drilling, static bending (MOR, MOE), axial compression strength and toughness were determined and compared with non-drilled control specimens. The effects of the two laser drilling patterns on mechanical proper-ties of fir and spruce wood specimens were measured and assessed. The results showed that the two drilling patterns created by laser beams on all lateral surfaces of fir and spruce wood specimens at 0,4 mm depth did not practically affect the mechanical properties of wood.

  • 39. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Passialis, Costas
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Oliver, JV
    Utilization of recycled fibre materials in the European corrugated packaging industrial sector2008In: 2nd International Conference on Engineering for Waste Valorisation WasteEng08, June 3-5, Patras, Greece, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Säll, Harald
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Sjöberg, Samuel
    Relationship between ultrasonic velocity and spiral grain in standing hybrid aspen trees2016In: Proceedings of the Hardwood Conference, Eco-efficient Resource Wood with Special Focus on Hardwoods, 8-9 September, 2016, Sopron, Sopron: University of West Hungary Press , 2016, 22-23 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Voulgaridis, E
    Impregnation of timber and regulations applied to preservation practice in Greece1998Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of wood preservation in Greece was started about 80 years ago and refer to creosote-treated timber used in ground contact (i.e. railway sleepers, poles). At present, three creosote impregnation plants and thirteen CCA or CCB units exist in Greece treating about 90.000 m3 of wood per year. Most of the research on wood preservation has been carried out in the last 15-20 years and refer to the application of creosote and water soluble preservatives (CCA, CCB) to native wood species. However, research on a number of specific topics of wood impregnation is lacking. Impregnation of wood is of great importance for Greece, a country with great wood deficit, and, for this reason, the elongation of wood durability is strongly desirable. On the other hand, the environmentally safe impregnation of timber and the use of preservatives in a non-hazardous manner to humans or animals are gaining an increasing importance. There are some national and EU regulations applied to the use of preservatives, while the Greek Organization of Standardization (ELOT) is responsible for approving European standards. The organizations of Greek Telecommunication, Electricity and Railway apply their own standards.

  • 42. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Voulgaridis, E
    Passialis, C
    Morphology and identification of fibre furnish components of papers used in the production of corrugated board2013In: Celuloza Si Harti, ISSN 1220-9848Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Dimensional changes of extracted and non-extracted small wood specimens of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)2003In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 61, no 4, 264-268 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From straight grained heartwood of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), specimens, 3 cm×3 cm in cross section and 0.5 mm (or 10 mm) in axial direction, were cut and used for the determination of dimensional changes and the rate of tangential swelling. Mean radial, tangential and axial shrinkage was 5.30%, 6.67% and 0.16%, respectively, while the coefficient of anisotropy was 1.26. Half of the specimens for the determination of the rate of tangential swelling were extracted for 48 h with distilled hot water. The tangential dimensional change and the time taken to attain half maximum swelling in air-dry and oven-dry specimens were assessed according to a common technique. Extractive removal resulted in an increase of the total magnitude of tangential swelling in both air-dry and oven-dry specimens. However, no significant differences in time taken to attain half maximum swelling between air-dry and oven-dry specimens were observed after extraction. The rate of tangential swelling was lower in air-dry specimens than in oven-dry specimens after 30 min of immersion in water when were non-extracted and after 5 min of immersion in water when were extracted. Extracted air-dry specimens had a greater rate of tangential swelling than non-extracted air-dry specimens and the same occurred for oven-dry specimens. Extraction resulted in a higher diffusion coefficient for air-dry specimens. The diffusion coefficient calculated for non-extracted air-dry specimens (0.901×10−4 cm2/min) showed that black locust is a difficult species to impregnate.

  • 44.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Effect of hot-water extractives on water sorption and dimensional changes of black locust wood2012In: Wood research, ISSN 1336-4561, Vol. 57, no 1, 69-78 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hygroscopicity and the dimensional changes of black locust heartwood were investigated in relation to the progressive removal of hot-water extractives. Extraction in the original specimen form removed only part of the total 8.434 % hot-water extractives, 3.601 % in first extraction and 4.642 % in second extraction. As a result, the adsorption and desorption behaviour of black locust wood was little affected by the extraction and only a small increase was observed in dimensional changes at every RH from 0 % to 97 %. The mean hysteresis coefficient was also little affected by extraction and increased from 0.75 at the unextracted stage to 0.77 at the second extraction. The initial dimensional change 3.76 % of unextracted black locust wood corresponding to RH changes between 43 % and 80 % increased after the first and second extraction to the respective values of 3.96 % and 3.97 %. Extraction had no effect on the significant, very strong linear relationships between swelling or shrinkage and equilibrium moisture content (EMC).

  • 45.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Aristotelian University, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotelian University, Greece.
    Within-tree variation in growth rate and cell dimensions in the wood of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)2002In: IAWA Journal, ISSN 0928-1541, Vol. 23, no 2, 191-199 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is regarded as an important natural resource almost throughout the world but relatively little is known about the within-tree variability of the anatomical characteristics of its wood. Discs 2 cm thick were cut at 2.25 m intervals, from the ground level to the top from ten black locust trees, 18–37-years-old, from the University Forest of Taxiarchi, Chalkidiki, Greece. The discs were used for the determination of growth rate and cell dimensions (fiber length and vessel member length and diameter) and their withintree variability (radial, oblique, vertical). Growth rate increased within the first 5–9 growth rings from the pith and then gradually decreased. Oblique variation of growth rate did not exhibit any clear tendency but a decrease at the top. In the case of vertical variation, growth rate decreased gradually with the year of cambium formation. Radial variability curves were found to be typical for the dimensions of cells (fibers, vessel members) especially for the fiber length. A rapid increase in cell dimensions was observed in the first 7–11 growth rings, the juvenile zone. Oblique and vertical variation of cell dimensions did not exhibit any clear tendencies.

  • 46.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Larissa, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Ποιότητα και μεταβλητότητα της δομής του ξύλουσε σχέση με την αξιοποίησή του: [Quality and variability of wood structure in relation to its utilization]2012In: Το Δάσος: Μια Ολοκληρωμένη Προσέγγιση: [The forest: An integrated approach] / [ed] Aristotélis Papageorgíou, Geórgios Karétsos, Geórgios Katsadorákis, WWF Greece , 2012, 213-227 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47. Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Passialis, C.
    Wood quality characteristics of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia  L.)2001In: Forest Research - New Series, Vol. 14, 63-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    CARACTERISTICILE MATERIALULUI FIBROS ŞI PROPRIETĂŢILEHÂRTIEI RECICLATE FOLOSITE ÎN FABRICAREA CARTONULUIONDULAT: Morphology and identification of fibre furnish components of papers used in the production of corrugated board2013In: 7th International Symposium on Advanced Technologies for the Pulp, Paper and Corrugated Board Industry, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacture of corrugated board containers (boxes, trays, etc.) involves a productionchain integrated by paper manufacturers, semi-elaborates (corrugated board) manufacturers andcontainer manufacturers, the majority of which in Europe are SMEs. Nowadays, corrugated boardcontainers are mostly manufactured with recovered paper. The greatest threat faced by thementioned production chain is related to the lack of quality and availability of recovered paper asraw material. Specifically, one of the most important properties of packaging paper is itsmechanical strength, which depends mostly on the length of the fibres of which paper iscomposed. These fibres are longer in virgin pulps (those coming from papers obtained fromwood, i.e. not yet recycled). However, the high pressure on the demand - as well as the currenteconomic and ecological restrictions in the use of forest based materials - has led to a situation inwhich very little quantity of virgin fibre enters the recycling chain. This means that the strengthquality of recycled fibres - and by extension of the papers - is constantly decreasing with the ongoingrecycling cycles. In addition, recovered paper presents a very high variability, whatconstitutes an obstacle when it comes to manufacturing containers having homogeneousproperties fixed by the customers at fixed costs. The difficulty of predicting the properties ofpaper products produced from heterogeneous sources puts several limitations, which thereforelead to severe economic losses and only a comprehensive characterization will enable their betterutilization. The project “RF-CORRUG – Quality control of raw materials from recovered fibresfor the production of corrugated board” under the National Strategic Reference Framework 2007–2013 ARCHIMEDES III deals with this common technical problem of the corrugated boardindustry. Specifically, the main objective of the project is to support the competitiveness of thecorrugated board companies (mainly SMEs) by creating a software tool based on practical modelsthat can predict packaging grade paper properties from fibre data (qualitative, quantitative, morphological) used in their production. This papers presents information on fibres (qualitativeand quantitative analysis, morphology) and packaging papers (physical and mechanicalproperties) used in corrugated packaging. A number of different category papers (liners, flutings) used for corrugated board production in Greece were examined. The main fibre characterizingtechniques, employed were fibre furnish analysis, morphological analysis of fibre, lightmicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, zero span tensile test was done tomeasure the average fibre strength of fibre. The required paper properties were measured byinternationally recognized testers and standards. The data will be used to develop predictivemodels based on advanced statistical methods for the properties and performance of packagingpapers according to information of their fibres.

  • 49.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Gypsum-based bricks (WoodRub BRICKS) manufactured from recovered wood and rubber2014In: Performance and maintenance of biobased building materials influencing the life cycle and LCA / [ed] Andreja Kutnar, Miha Humar, Michael Burnard, Mojca Žlahtič, Dennis Jones, 2014, 33-34 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Greece.
    Recycled Waste Paper and the Corrugated Packaging Industry in Europe2009In: Proceedings of 24th International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management: Philadelphia, PA USA, March 15-18, 2009, 2009, 400-411 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 110
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