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  • 1.
    Kumar, Anuj
    et al.
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland.
    Ryparová, Pavla
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Prošek, Zdeněk
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Žigone, Jure
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Petrič, Marko
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Hydrophobicity and resistance against microorganisms of heat and chemically crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous membranes2019In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 360, p. 788-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a water-soluble, semi-ionic and biocompatible polymer with excellent chemical and thermal stability. The chemical crosslinking of PVA membrane improve its stability towards humidity and water. In the present work, PVA nanofibrous membranes were fabricated using roller electrospinning techniques. The prepared membranes were crosslinked by heat treatment, glutaraldehyde dipping, and glutaraldehyde vapour. Furthermore, octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) treatment was used for hydrophobization of the crosslinked membranes. The prepared crosslinked membranes were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The hydrophobization of PVA nanofibrous membranes were analysed by employing optical goniometer and auto-dynamic vapour sorption (AVS) techniques. Further, the PVA membranes were tested against algae and mould growth at in-vitro laboratory conditions. The SEM and FTIR results revealed significant differences in the morphology of the PVA nanofibrous membranes and in chemical bond formation due to crosslinking treatments. Water contact angle and AVS data confirmed a hydrophobization of PVA membranes by the treatments.

  • 2. Jones, G
    et al.
    Adamopoulos, S
    Liziniewicz, M
    Lindeberg, J
    Nondestructive wood density testing in downy birch and silver birch genetics field trial, southern Sweden2019In: / [ed] Wang, Xiping; Sauter, Udo H.; Ross, Robert J.,, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI , 2019, p. 79-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-destructive testing of wood density, as is already done for Eucalyptus, can allow for earlyselection of birch trees for breeding programmes and stands for harvesting. In this work, external stemquality traits were visually assessed in a family trial of downy (Betula pendula) and silver (B.pubescens) birch in southern Sweden. A subsample of trees was measured for wood density using thePilodyn resistometer portable NDT tool. An X-ray microdensitometric analysis of the subsample oftrees was completed using the Itrax X-ray machine for increment cores taken from the south face,through the pith to the north bark at 1.3 m stem height. The Pearson’s r value for Itrax density andPilodyn density was high (0.580 for downy birch and 0.795 for silver birch), and this correlationmeans Pilodyn should provide a good estimate of average birch wood density. Neither species hadstable wood density values at age 13 and both species’ density increased over time from pith to bark.Ring width influence on stem density was minor or non-existant, and may vary between birch species

  • 3.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Stellenbosch University, South Africa .
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Phosphate bonded natural fibre composites: a state of the art assessment2019In: Applied Sciences, ISSN 2523-3963, no 1, article id 910Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, innovative wood composite products and processes have created markets for new and existing products. Inorganic bonded fibre composites have been developed for high performance applications using conventional cement and concrete. The demands for wood based composites along with increasing economic and environmental concerns on conventional wood products necessitate moving beyond the traditional processing methods to more cost-effective and environmentally friendly approaches. In the wake of the twenty-first century, a fast-setting phosphate binder with a low carbon footprint was developed, which can alternatively be utilized in wood composite development. This paper reviews the recent progress in phosphate bonded composite products, based on published literature from the last two decades. A brief background on Portland cement based natural fibre composites is presented. In addition, the mechanism of the formulation of phosphate binders, the effect of aggregates in the materials and the environmental benefits accruable to such materials are discussed.

  • 4.
    van Blokland, Joran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Prediction of bending strength of thermally modified timber using high-resolution scanning of fibre direction2019In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 327-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The market share of thermally modified wood (TMW) has increased in Europe during the past few years as an environmentally friendly and durable building product. However, TMW products of today are not permitted for use in structural applications, because the reduction in strength that is caused by thermal treatment cannot be accounted for. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the bending properties of thermally modified timber (TMT) of Norway spruce, and to explore possibilities to predict the bending properties of TMT. A sample of 100 boards from a 2X-log sawing pattern of 100 logs was thermally modified according to the ThermoWood® process, while the mirror 100 boards served as an unmodified control sample. Two non-destructive methods were employed: (1) a novel method based on scanning of fibre directions to obtain the lowest edgewise bending modulus of elasticity (MOE) along a board, and (2) a conventional excitation method to determine the first axial resonance frequency used to calculate the axial dynamic MOE. Finally, the boards were bent to failure according to European standard EN 408. Despite the fact that bending strength was reduced by 42% due to thermal treatment, the type and location of failure in TMT remained related to the presence of knots. Prediction of bending strength based on local fibre direction and axial dynamic MOE, gave coefficients of determination of 0.51 for the thermally modified boards and 0.69 for the control boards, whereas axial dynamic MOE alone gave 0.46 and 0.57, respectively. These results indicate that although Norway spruce TMT has lower bending strength compared to unmodified timber, predictions of the bending strength can be made with good accuracy.

  • 5.
    Alawode, Abiodun
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Eselem-Bungu, Paul
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, Department of Forest and Wood Science.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Properties and characteristics of novel formaldehyde-free wood adhesives prepared from Irvingia gabonensis and Irvingia wombolu seed kernel extracts2019In: International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives, ISSN 0143-7496, E-ISSN 1879-0127, Vol. 95, article id 102423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is renewed interest in the domestication of Irvingia tree species due to the potential use of various parts of the tree as raw materials for a wide range of applications such as biodiesel production, cosmetics, perfumes, soap, weight-loss supplement etc. The current study investigates the properties of extracts from the seed kernels of two Irvingia species – Irvingia gabonensis (IG) and Irvingia wombolu (IW) as natural wood adhesives. Three extraction methods using various solvent/solute media were compared in terms of yield, composition and mechanical properties. Statistically, the analysis revealed significant differences between the different extraction methods. The adhesion properties of the extracts were tested on wood veneers according to the American Society for Testing and Materials standard (ASTM D – 906-64). The shear strength of the extracts ranged from 0.55 to 1.5 MPa and 0.86 to 1.7 MPa for IG and IW, respectively. The initial decomposition temperature of all Irvingia Kernel extract ranges from 138.3 – 149.11 oC for IG and 129.5 – 145.3 oC for IW. As a result, the hot melt temperature for the adhesive experiments was set around 150 oC. The results indicate that Irvingia kernel extract is a more promising source of non-formaldehyde based adhesives in wood composite production.

  • 6.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Taghiyari, Hamid Reza
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Iran.
    Properties of medium-density fibreboards bonded with dextrin-based wood adhesive2019In: Wood research, ISSN 1336-4561, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on manufacturing of medium density fibreboard (MDF) panels bonded with dextrin-based wood adhesive and crosslinked in situ with various weight ratios of synthetic (e.g., polymeric-methane diphenyl-diisocyanate, pMDI) or bio-based (e.g., glyoxal) crosslinkers. The physical and mechanical properties of the panels were evaluated and compared with those from panels without crosslinker (control). Modulus of rupture (MOR) and internal bond (IB) strength of the MDF panels were considerably increased by increasing the crosslinkers’ content. While, slight improvements were observed in modulus of elasticity (MOE) of the panels as a function of crosslinker type and content. Addition of crosslinkers clearly reduced the thickness swelling (TS) and water absorption (WA) of the panels, whereas, the panels with pMDI showed superior performances than the control and glyoxal added ones within 4 h and 24 h immersion in water. The results indicate the potential of dextrin as wood panel adhesive along with the use of appropriate crosslinkers.

  • 7.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Linnaeus University.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Eceiza, Arantxa
    University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain.
    Thermal stability and water vapor sorption of wheat starch modified with isocyanate functional groups2019In: 7th International Conference on Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers (BIOPOL), 17-19th June 2019, Stockholm, Sweden, KTH , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wheat starch polymer was modified through the unequal reactivity of isocyanate groups in isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) monomer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) confirmed the presence of both urethane and isocyanate functionalities in the modified polymer. Thermal stability and water vapor sorption properties of the modified polymer were evaluated by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and auto-dynamic vapor sorption (AVS) method, respectively. The results indicated that the modified starch polymer showed a better thermal stability (e.g. higher temperature at maximum weight loss) compared to the unmodified one. Water vapor sorption of starch polymer was considerably reduced after modification with IPDI monomer.

  • 8.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Parsland, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Utilization of different tall oils for improving the water resistance of cellulosic fibers2019In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 136, no 13, article id 47303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of the pulping by-products crude tall oil (CTO), distilled tall oil (DTO), andtall oil fatty acid (TOFA) on dynamic water vapor sorption behavior, interfiber strength, and thermal stability of cellulosic paper-sheets.The results were compared against those obtained in cellulose papers treated with the conventional petroleum-derived hydrophobicagent hydrowax and in untreated ones. The tall oil treatments caused strong reduction in equilibrium moisture content of the paper-sheets during adsorption and desorption runs. The same trend was noticed for the hydrowax-treated papers, however, it was lesspronounced than the CTO-treated and DTO-treated samples in the relative humidity range of 75–95%. The sorption hysteresis was con-siderably decreased after the treatments. The ultimate dry-tensile strengths of the paper-sheets were significantly reduced by TOFA andhydrowax treatments, while CTO and DTO showed comparable strength as that of untreated control. The ultimate wet-strengths of thepaper-sheets were improved after the treatments. The thermal stability of the specimens was improved by the tall oil treatments, and thehydrowax-treated samples illustrated lower degradation temperature than the untreated control. The results are promising for the use oftall oils as alternative hydrophobic agents of cellulosicfiber-based products, such as wood panels and paper packaging.

  • 9.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Lankveld, Chiel
    Accsys Group.
    Acoustic properties of acetylated wood under different humid conditions and its relevance for musical instruments2018In: Proceedings of the 9th European Conference on Wood Modification 2018, Arnhem, The Netherlands / [ed] Jos Creemers, Thomas Houben, Bôke Tjeerdsma, Holger Militz and Brigitte Junge, The Netherlands: Practicum , 2018, p. 236-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In musical instrument making, less expensive wood species and materials with good characteristics and acoustical properties can provide potentials to find alternatives to the traditional exotic wood species used today. Modified wood could be such a choice if shows similar sound characteristics to wood coming from endangered and expensive tropical species with problematic commercial availability. In musical instruments, the overall functionality depends on the contribution of wood to different material performance indexes like sound radiation coefficient (R), characteristic impedance (z) and acoustic conversion efficiency (ACE). In this study, the performance indexes were measured for acetylated beech, maple and radiata pine and compared with these obtained for the reference wood materials maple, mahogany, alder and ash. A non-destructive free-free flexural vibration test method was used at constant temperature (20oC) but in different humid conditions- dry (35% RH), standard (65% RH) and wet (85% RH). Dimensional changes in the different humid conditions were also taken in account. Acetylated wood showed lower EMC with higher dimensional stability at each humidity level as compared with the reference wood materials. These properties are considered important factors for making quality musical instruments. Based on the acoustical properties, acetylated wood materials, especially radiata pine, showed good potential for use for musical instruments where specific characteristics of sound are required. However, the other types of acetylated wood can also be used for specific musical instruments.

  • 10.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Acoustic properties of modified wood under different humid conditions and their relevance for musical instruments2018In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682X, Vol. 140, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In musical instrument making, there is a strong need to find alternatives to the traditional endangered and expensive tropical wood species used today. The present study examined whether different commercial and experimental modified wood materials have the necessary acoustic qualities under different humid conditions (dry, standard and wet) to contribute to the use of raw materials for wooden musical instruments. The materials were thermally-modified wood (ash, aspen and birch), acetylated wood (beech, maple and radiata pine), melamine- and phenol formaldehyde-treated beech and furfurylated Scots pine (Kebony Scots pine). Investigations involved physical (density ρ, Equilibrium moisture content EMC, volumetric shrinkage) and dynamic elastic testing by a free-free flexural vibration method to determine various acoustic characteristics: specific dynamic modulus (MOEdyn/ρ), damping coefficient (tanδ), speed of sound (c), specific acoustic impedance (z), sound radiation coefficient (R) and acoustic conversion efficiency (ACE). The modified materials and especially acetylated wood showed low EMC values and high dimensional stability at each humidity level, which are considered important factors for making quality musical instruments. Based on the obtained value ranges of all acoustical properties, the different modified wood materials could find uses in musical instruments where specific characteristics of sound are required. Furthermore, most of the modified materials showed an excellent acoustic performance in the three humid conditions based on a high ACE and low tanδ. Furfurylated Scots pine and phenol formaldehyde-treated beech showed an inferior acoustic quality with the lowest ACE and the highest tanδ, which is a less favourable combination for most of the musical instruments.

  • 11.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, C
    Georg-August-University Gottingen, Germany.
    Analysis of the vapour sorption behaviour of wood modified with thermosetting resins with Hailwood-Horrobin and Excess Surface Work models2018In: 29th International Conference on Wood Science and Technology, ICWST 2018: Implementation of Wood Science in Woodworking Sector - Proceedings / [ed] Spanic N.,Zupcic I., University of Zagreb , 2018, p. 87-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood modification is a well-known technology to enhance the dimensional stability of wood and the resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation. Impregnation modification of wood with thermosetting resins, such as melamine formaldehyde (MF) or phenol formaldehyde (PF), alters the material properties of wood through formation of a three-dimensional network within the cell wall. This work investigates the vapour sorption behaviour of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) micro-veneers modified with MF and PF resins by means of Hailwood-Horrobin (H-H) and excess surface work (ESW) models. The analysed sorption data indicated that the available sorption sites were increased in the modified samples compared to the unmodified controls due to an increase of the monolayer sorption. However, modification resulted in a considerable reduction of the multilayer sorption. This could be attributed to the formation of a rigid, three-dimensional corset within the cell wall formed by auto-polymerization reactions of resin monomers and oligomers, which is known to reduce the cell wall swell-ability upon water absorption.

  • 12.
    van Blokland, Joran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Bending properties and strain fields around knots in thermally modified timber2018In: / [ed] Jos Creemers, Thomas Houben, Bôke Tjeerdsma, Holger Militz and Brigitte Junge, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-two (32) boards of Norway spruce with cross-sectional dimensions of 145×45 mm2 were first tested non-destructively in a four-point static bending test, were then thermally modified according to the ThermoWood® process, and were finally tested destructively in the mentioned test set up. For one of these boards, the 2D strain fields occurring due to pure bending were recorded, both before and after thermal modification, over the surface of a knotty part of the board using a non-contact optical deformation measurement system. The objectives were to get more insight into the static bending behaviour of thermally modified timber (TMT), specifically with regard to the local and global modulus of elasticity (MOE) and their respective relationship to bending strength, and the strain development around a cluster of knots. The bending strength was significantly reduced by thermal treatment, whereas the effect on the MOEs was limited. Linear regression analyses demonstrated that bending strength of TMT can be predicted by employing stiffness as indicating property. Strain field measurements showed that at the examined levels of loading the quantity and distribution of strains in a knotty area were not influenced by thermal modification. It was therefore suggested that the influence of thermal modification on global stiffness, as well as on local stiffness around knots, is limited.

  • 13.
    Jiang, Wen
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Tomppo, Laura
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Pakarinen, Timo
    Karelia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Sirviö, Juho A.
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Liimatainen, Henrikki
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Haapala, Antti
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Effect of Cellulose Nanofibrils on the Bond Strength of Polyvinyl Acetate and Starch Adhesives for Wood2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 2283-2292Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose is a competitive reinforcement material for usein biocomposite structures and fibrous products. In this study, adhesive mixtures of dicarboxylic acid cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were dispersed into commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) and starch adhesives, whichwere applied to Norway spruce (Picea abies) to assess their performance in wood joining. Single-lap joints were prepared and tested with PVAc mixtures with0 to 0.64 wt% CNFand starch glue mixtures containing 0 to 1.07 wt% CNF. CNF suspensionshaving three concentrations(0.64, 0.96,and 1.28%)were compared. The results showed that the optimum amount of CNF, 0.48% suspensions, added to PVAc increased the average lap joint strength (EN 205:2003) by 74.5% when compared to control specimens with pure PVAc. Correspondingly, 0.96% CNF suspensions also enhanced the strength of starch adhesive by 34.5%. Lower and higher CNF concentrations showed clearly inferior performance. (PDF) Effect of Cellulose Nanofibrils on the Bond Strength of Polyvinyl Acetate and Starch Adhesives for Wood

  • 14.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Georg-August-University, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University, Germany.
    Effects of acid pre-treatments on the swelling and vapor sorption of thermally modified Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 331-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scots pine sapwood samples were pre-treated with a Lewis acid (AlCl3) and a combination of Lewis and protonic acids (AlCl3 and H2SO4), and were subsequently exposed to respective temperatures of 180 °C and 120 °C for establishing a comparable mass loss with those impregnated with demineralized water and solely thermally modified at 220 °C. Water impregnated samples dried at 120 °C also served as controls. The swelling behavior of all wood samples was examined with respect to maximum swelling in water, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE), shrinkage, and dynamic water vapor sorption at relative humidity ranges of 0% to 95%. The thermal modification at 220 °C diminished swelling and moisture adsorption, and also reduced moisture increment and decrement compared with the unmodified control. However, it was less obvious than both acid pre-treated samples. Excess surface work and Hailwood-Horrobin results calculated from water vapor sorption studies demonstrated that, at comparable mass loss, the available sorption sites were reduced to a greater extent by Lewis acid and combination of Lewis and protonic acids pre-treatment than the sole thermal treatment. This was attributed to more pronounced degradation of polysaccharides, mainly hemicelluloses and amorphous parts of cellulose, and to cross-linking of cell wall polymers due to the acid pre-treatments.

  • 15.
    Hemmilä, Venla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Zabka, Michal
    IKEA Sweden.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Evaluation of dynamic microchamber as a quick factory formaldehyde emission control method for industrial particleboards2018In: Advances in Materials Science and Engineering, ISSN 1687-8434, E-ISSN 1687-8442, article id 4582383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common formaldehyde control method for wood panels in Europe, the perforator method, measures formaldehyde content, while most of the legal requirements in the world are based on emissions. Chamber methods typically used for emission measurements require too much time to reach steady state for factory quality control. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether emission values of particleboards measured one day after production would be usable for quality control purposes. The correlation between 1-day and 7-day emission values was determined using a dynamic microchamber (DMC). Three industrial board types that differed in density and emission levels were used for the evaluation. The online emission measuring equipment Aero-laser AL4021 connected to the 1 m3 chamber was used to gain further information on the emission reduction behaviour of the different board types. Only the two particleboard types with higher densities showed good correlation between the 1-day and 7-day emissions. The overall results suggested that 1-day emission values can be used for factory quality control purposes; however, if the initial 1-day values are above the permitted level, extensive evaluation for each individual board type needs to be performed

  • 16.
    van Blokland, Joran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Källander, Björn
    Swedish Wood, Sweden.
    Evaluation of non-destructive test methods to predict bending properties of thermally modified timber2018In: 2018 World Conference on Timber Engineering (WCTE), August 20-23, 2018, Seoul, Republic of Korea, World Conference on Timber Engineering (WCTE) , 2018, p. 8-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermally modified wood is available through a number of manufacturers in Europe on today’s market for interior and exterior building products. Thermal modification of wood allows for improvement of dimensional stability and durability, but a considerable decrease in strength properties occurs. Despite this loss in strength, thermally modified wood shows potential to be further exploited in structures exposed to loading. For such applications, accurate prediction of its static bending behaviour is essential. This paper studies the applicability of two different non-destructive test (NDT) techniques in estimating the bending properties of thermally modified timber (TMT). The study was done on 100 Norway spruce logs. One hundred (100) boards (i.e. one from each log) were thermally modified and the mirrored 100 boards were used as controls. After modification, resonance-based and time-of-flight measurements of axial wave velocity were carried out. Subsequently, all 200 boards were bent to failure following European standard EN408. This study shows that although TMT has a lower bending strength than unmodified timber, predictions of bending strength and stiffness using the NDT techniques are possible and with sufficient accuracy. The resonance-based method gave better predictions of the bending properties of TMT in respect to time-of-flight method.

  • 17.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Group of Forest Products2018In: Presented at Symposium "Perspectives in Renewables", 4-5 June 2018, BOKU Vienna, Austria, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Altgen, Michael
    et al.
    Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Willems, Wim
    FirmoLin Technol BV, Netherlands.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Rautkari, Lauri
    Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Hydroxyl accessibility and dimensional changes of Scots pine sapwood affected by alterations in the cell wall ultrastructure during heattreatment2018In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 152, p. 244-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a complex link between the water sorption behavior and the presence of accessible hydroxyl groups in the wood cell wall, which can be altered by heat-treatment (HT). This study analyses the effect of changes in the cell wall ultrastructure caused by two HT techniques on the hydroxyl accessibility, water vapor sorption and dimensional changes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood. HT of wood in pressurized hot water at 120-170 °C was applied to cause the preferential bond cleavage, whereas HT of wood in oven-dry state in superheated steam at 180-240 °C was performed to create additional covalent cross-links within the cell wall matrix. Removal of cell wall polymers by HT and water leaching reduced the oven-dry dimensions of wood and enhanced the cellulose aggregation during drying. Cellulose aggregation restricted the cell wall shrinkage in circumferential direction, resulting in inhomogeneous shrinkage of the cell wall with only little changes in lumen volume by HT. Cellulose aggregation also reduced the water-saturated dimensions, but a decrease in swelling was only achieved when additional cross-links were formed by HT in dry state. Additional cross-links in the cell wall matrix also resulted in an additional reduction in water sorption at 25 °C and 93% RH. However, this was not caused by a further reduction in the hydroxyl accessibility. Instead, cross-linking was shown to reduce the amount of accessible OH groups that are simultaneously active in sorption, which was explained based on the concept of sorption of water dimers at hydroxyl group pairs at high RH levels.

  • 19.
    Jiang, Wen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Kumar, Anuj
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Liquefaction of lignocellulosic materials and its applications in wood adhesives — A review2018In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 124, p. 325-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liquefaction, a useful method of turning whole biomass into liquids, provides advantages for energy andpolymers and finds applications in many sectors. This paper reviews the different liquefaction technologies andrecent advances in the development of sustainable wood adhesives. Current liquefaction technologies includehydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and moderate acid-catalyzed liquefaction (MACL). HTL produces bio-oils asprimary products, and solid residues and gases as by-products. MACL depends on the solvent types used, whichare grouped to polyhydric alcohols and phenols. Bio-polyols from alcohol liquefaction, phenolated biomass fromphenol liquefaction and phenolic compounds rich-HTL bio-oils have been used in the production of liquefiedbiomass-based adhesives, which have shown competitive properties but face challenges for industrial uses. Yet, abetter understanding of reaction pathways and optimization of the liquefaction processes is needed.

  • 20.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Echart, Arantzazu Santamaria
    University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Gabilondo, Nagore
    University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain.
    Eceiza, Arantxa
    University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain.
    Modification of Pea Starch and Dextrin Polymers with Isocyanate Functional Groups2018In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pea starch and dextrin polymers were modified through the unequal reactivity of isocyanate groups in isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) monomer. The presence of both urethane and isocyanate functionalities in starch and dextrin after modification were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR). The degree of substitution (DS) was calculated using elemental analysis data and showed higher DS values in modified dextrin than modified starch. The onsets of thermal degradation and temperatures at maximum mass losses were improved after modification of both starch and dextrin polymers compared to unmodified ones. Glass transition temperatures (Tg) of modified starch and dextrin were lower than unmodified control ones, and this was more pronounced in modified dextrin at a high molar ratio. Dynamic water vapor sorption of starch and dextrin polymers indicated a slight reduction in moisture sorption of modified starch, but considerably lower moisture sorption in modified dextrin as compared to that of unmodified ones.

  • 21.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Montecuccoli, Zeno
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Barbu, Marius
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Phosphate bonded wood composite products from invasive Acacia trees occurring on the Cape Coastal plains of South Africa2018In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 437-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The feasibility of manufacturing phosphatebonded wood composite board products from four locallyoccurring invasive acacia tree species (Acacia cyclops, A.saligna, A. mearnsii and A. longifolia) was studied usinga formulated magnesium oxide (MgO) and monopotassiumphosphate (KH2PO4) binder system. The optimizationfor the manufacturing process was studied using a centralcomposite statistical design, whereupon the following factorswere considered, i.e. KH2PO4:MgO ratio, the fly ashcontent as partial replacement for the binder and the woodcontent as a ratio of wood to the total inorganic content.A fitted response surface plot was used to show the effectof the main factors and their interactions on the measuredboard properties. A response surface model was developedto predict the parameters leading to the best board properties.All physical properties evaluated met or exceededthe minimum requirements for low density particleboards.The results showed that the variables considered have significanteffects on the physical properties of the boards.The optimum composite manufacturing process for makingdurable products within the scope of the studied specieswas found to be a KH2PO4/MgO ratio of 1.66, an ashcontent of 2.7% and a wood/inorganic ratio of 0.96 for theselected wood species.

  • 22.
    Kumar, Anuj
    et al.
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland;Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Ryparovà, Pavla
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kasal, Bohumil
    Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Hajek, Petr
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Resistance of bamboo scrimber against white-rot and brown-rot fungi2018In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bamboo scrimber is one of the most emerging structural materials for future building applications andit possesses properties comparable to other natural wood-based engineered materials such as glulam,laminated veneer lumber and cross-laminated timber. The goal of this work was to study the decayresistance of bamboo scrimber against white-rot (Trametes versicolor) and brown-rot fungi (Serpulalacrymans). Bamboo scrimber samples were incubated in petri dishes with the wood-decaying fungiand the weight loss after 12 weeks was measured. The surface morphology of fungal-degradedbamboo scrimber was evaluated using optical microscopy. Based on the percentage weight loss,bamboo scrimber could be classified as highly resistant against bio-deterioration by white andbrown-rot fungi.

  • 23.
    Kumar, Anuj
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Richter, Jan
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Tywoniak, Jan
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Hajek, Petr
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Šegedin, Urban
    University of Ljublijana, Slovenia.
    Marko, Petrič
    University of Ljublijana, Slovenia.
    Surface modification of Norway spruce wood by octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) nanosol by dipping and water vapour diffusion properties of the OTS-modified wood2018In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 45-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research deals with a simple dipping method to insert octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) into cell walls of spruce wood and to deposit OTS layers on its inner and outer surfaces. Distribution and chemical interactions of OTS with wood polymers has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The OTS/n-hexane solution penetrated into wood via capillary forces through ray tracheids and bordered pits and was deposited as OTS organic-inorganic layers on wood cell walls. The hypothesis is supported by the results, according to which the OTS molecules are hydrolysed by the wood moisture and by free OH groups of the cell wall components. The hydrolysed OTS molecules react with the OH groups and elevate the hydrophobicity of wood.

  • 24.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    The effect of chemical treatments of natural fibres on the properties of phosphate‑bonded composite products2018In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 653-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphate-bonded composites are an emerging class of building materials produced from natural fibres and phosphate based cement pastes. They are durable and possess mechanical properties similar to those of Portland cement. However, the moisture absorption of natural fibre can lead to swelling which may result in the reduction in the mechanical strength properties and eventually negatively affect the long-term performance and dimensional stability of the products. This study was aimed at the modification of some properties of selected biomaterial residues in order to enhance the final properties of the phosphate-bonded composite product. Three different treatments were evaluated viz. 1% caustic alkali, 1% acetic anhydride and hot water on natural fibres derived from slash pine, black wattle and bagasse. The effect of the treatment on the fibres was evaluated via HPLC, SEM and FTIR. Further, the performance of the treated fibres was evaluated in composite panels bonded with magnesium phosphate (MgPO4) and calcium phosphate (CaPO4) cement pastes against the controls. The manufactured panels were tested for flexural properties and dimensional stability. In the MgPO4-bonded panels, the MOR increased from 0.55 MPa for untreated bagasse panels to 0.79 MPa for alkalised panels. Similarly, the MOE increased from 150.04 MPa for untreated bagasse panels to 175.65 MPa for alkalised panels. In untreated MgPO4-bonded panels, the mean density was 0.76, 078 and 0.75 g/cm3, while in alkalised panels, the mean density was 0.81, 0.81 and 0.81 g/cm3 for wattle, pine and bagasse panels, respectively. In the bagasse panels, the water absorption was 54.61% for untreated, 48.74% for hot water extracted, 42.21% for acetylated and 36.44% for alkalised MgPO4-bonded panels. This represents a percentage improvement of 11, 23 and 33%, respectively. Alkali-treated fibres had the best effect overall for all measured properties.

  • 25.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Utilisation of renewable biomass and waste materials in furniture and construction composites2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Wood variation and properties for industrial use2018In: Presented at FRAS workshop “Varierat skogsbruk  - hur påverkar olika skötselstrategier framtidens träprodukter?", 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Calcium phosphate bonded wood and fiber composite panels: production and optimization of panel properties2017In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 71, no 9, p. 725-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of phosphate bonded composites with properties comparable with those of current Portland cement bonded products has been investigated. More precisely, the focus of the study was the optimization of calcium phosphate cements in combination with wood processing residues slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) planer shavings, Black wattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild.) residues, Blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.) residues, hemp (Cannabis Sativa L.) hurds and dried crushed sugarcane bagasse (Saccharum officinarum L.) as well as pulp mill sludge and waste paper. A central composite design (CCD) for the response surface methodology (RSM) was applied for selection of the proper parameters. Mechanical tests were conducted on the composite products and the effect of the processing variables was evaluated based on the Pareto analysis of variance. The density of the wood-based panels ranged from 0.68 to 1.21 g cm−3, that of the agricultural fibers from 0.59 to 1.15 g cm−3 and that of the paper pulp panels from 0.81 to 1.21 g cm−3. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) data of the panels ranged from 1.63 to 4.92 MPa for wood, from 0.37 to 3.28 MPa for agricultural fibers and from 0.65 to 3.87 MPa for paper-pulp-based fibers. The physical properties of the composite products met the requirements for Portland-cement-bonded particleboards (EN 634-2, 2007).

  • 28.
    Cristina, Simón
    et al.
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Francisco, García Fernández
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Luis, García Esteban
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Paloma, de Palacios
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Carsten, Mai
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Comparison of the saturated salt and dynamic vapor sorption methods in obtaining the sorption properties of Pinus pinea L.2017In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 919-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several methods are available for obtaining the sorption isotherms of wood. Among these, the saturated salt and dynamic vapor sorption methods are the most frequently used  ones. For the first time, the hygroscopic response of wood obtained using these two methods is compared. This is done by determining the 35 and 50°C adsorption isotherms of juvenile and mature wood of Pinus pinea L. The hygroscopic behavior of the two types of wood is different, as the mature wood has a higher moisture content than the juvenile wood in the isotherms studied. Comparison of the static saturated salt method and dynamic vapor sorption shows few significant differences between the equilibrium moisture content obtained by each method during the adsorption process, both in a point by point comparison and in the comparison of quadratic polynomial forms of the Guggenheim Anderson-de Boer model. Moreover, in both methods the point of relative humidity from which multilayer sorption predominates over monolayer sorption is similar.

  • 29.
    Taghiyari, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Iran.
    Elyasi, Abdollah
    University of Tehran, Iran.
    Doost-Hoseini, Kazem
    University of Tehran, Iran.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Georg August University Gottingen, Germany.
    Correlation between gas and liquid permeability with noise reduction coefficient in insulation boards made from sugar cane bagasse2017In: Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science, ISSN 1310-0351, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 674-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific gas and liquid permeability, as well as noise reduction coefficients, in insulating boards made of sugar-cane bagasse were studied here. Urea-formaldehyde (UF) and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) were used to produce homogeneous as well as three-layered insulating boards with three densities of 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 g/cm3. The obtained results indicated that MUF slightly decreased gas and liquid permeability, but it did not significantly affect the noise reduction coefficients. Gas and liquid permeability were considerably affected by the density of the boards, due to the compression between the bagasse particles and less spaces and voids to let the fluids to pass through. However, noise reduction coefficients were significantly affected both by the density, as well as the board-type. More compression between the particles and the consequent less space between the bagasse particles entangled the waves; further more, the sudden change between the layers in the three-layered boards formed a barrier towards transmission of waves.

  • 30.
    Hemmilä, Venla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Luleå university of technology.
    Kumar, Anuj
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Development of sustainable bio-adhesives for engineered wood panels – A review2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 61, p. 38604-38630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in both formaldehyde legislations and voluntary requirements (e.g. Germany RAL) are currently the driving factors behind research on alternatives to amino-based adhesives; moreover, consumer interest in healthy and sustainable products is increasing in bio-based adhesives. Sources of formaldehyde emissions in wood-based panels as well as different emission test methods have been discussed, and the main focus of this review is on the research conducted on sustainable bio-based adhesive systems for wood panels. Lignin, tannin, protein, and starch have been evaluated as both raw materials and adhesive alternatives to existing amino-based thermosetting adhesives. Adhesion improving modifications of these bio-based raw materials as well as the available and experimental crosslinkers have also been taken into account.

  • 31.
    Funk, Monika
    et al.
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Wimmer, Rupert
    Universität für Bodenkultur Vienna, Austria.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Diotomaceous earth as an inorganic additive to reduce formaldehyde emmissions from particleboards2017In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presented research is about the use of a new type of a functional inorganic additive in particleboards, for the purpose of reducing free formaldehyde releases. One-layered particleboards were prepared in the laboratory by mixing industrial wood particles and urea-formaldehyde resin. Natural, abundantly and cheaply available nano-mesoporous diatomaceous earth (DE) was used, without and in combination with urea as a scavenger. Silica quartz sand was also added as a nonporous analogy. Particleboards were pressed at two press factors (9 and 15 s/mm). Formaldehyde release was determined using the rapid 3-hour-flask method (DIN EN 717-3). As a result, DE additions insignificantly reduced bending properties of particleboards. Internal bonding was in part significantly lowered. The particleboard produced with 3% urea loaded on 5% DE prior to application almost halved (–45%) the formaldehyde release. Formaldehyde release was on the average 17% lower when pressed at 15 s/mm instead of 9 s/mm. By loading urea onto the nano-mesoporous structure of DE, an improved scavenging function of urea could be shown.

  • 32.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Holstein, Nonna
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Mai, Carsten
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Dynamic vapour sorption and water-related properties of thermally modified Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood pre-treated with proton acid2017In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 138, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of proton acid pre-treatment and subsequent thermal modification at relatively low temperatures (up to 180 °C) on wood with respect to dimensional stability and water vapour sorption properties. The effects are compared to those of solely thermally-modified wood at higher temperatures (up to 250 °C). Scots pine sapwood (P. sylvestris L.) was impregnated with a proton acid or demineralised water, and subsequently, thermally modified to various mass losses (ML). Acid pre-treatment and thermal modification improved the dimensional stability and reduced the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) until certain ML. Excess surface work (ESW) obtained from vapour sorption studies indicated that, at comparable ML, the acid pre-treatment reduced the available sorption sites as compared to sole thermal treatment. Samples pre-treated with acid also showed stronger decreasing courses of EMC- and ESW-ratios than sole thermally modified ones. This was attributed to degradation of amorphous wood polymers and a stiffer matrix due to cross-linking of the cell wall polymers as a consequence of acid pre-treatment. Electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis indicated that acid pre-treatment did not enhance the concentration of phenoxy radicals, whereas thermally modified wood showed a considerably higher concentration of phenoxy radicals, suggesting that high radical density cannot be used as an indicator for high matrix stiffness.

  • 33.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology. Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Hemmilä, Venla
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Effect of Bio-Based Additives on Physico-Mechanical Properties of Medium Density Fibreboards2017In: 28th ICWST, International Conference on Wood Science and Technology: Implementation of Wood Science in Woodworking Sector, Proceedings. Zagreb, 7th - 8th of December 2017 / [ed] Ivica Zupcic, Vjekoslav Zivkovic, Josip Miklecic, Zagreb: University of Zagreb, Faculty of Forestry , 2017, p. 153-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimensional stability of wood-based panels is generally improved with application of suitable additives. Most of these additives, such as paraffin wax, are petroleum-based and with relatively high cost, and therefore, it is desirable to develop low-cost and effective substitutes from renewable resources. This work studied the potential of using a renewable water-repellent additive, such as tall oil fatty acid, for lab-scale manufacturing of medium density fibreboards (MDF). Tall oil fatty acid (TOFA) was used at 1 and 3% w/w of urea formaldehyde (UF) resin. MDF panels with similar concentrations of paraffin wax (wax) and panels without adding a water-repellent agent were served as controls. It was assessed the dimensional stability of the panels in terms of thickness swelling and water uptake after 4 and 24h immersion in water, and their mechanical performance in terms of modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and internal bonding. Results showed no obvious differences in the strength behaviour of the panels by addition of water-repellent agents. Dimensional stability, however, considerably improved by addition of TOFA, but it was still inferior when compared to that provided by wax.   

  • 34.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Effect of lignin and hemicelluloses removal on dynamic water vapour sorption behavior of wood2017In: IUFRO Division 5 Conference, 12-14 June, 2017 - Vancouver, British Columbia: Final program, proceedings and abstracts, IUFRO Division 5 Conference , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-related properties of wood are strongly depended on the sorption behavior of its hygroscopic polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. To assess the sorption performance of wood matrix in the absence of hemicelluloses and lignin, micro-veneers of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were hydrolyzed with sulphuric acid and delignified with sodium chlorite and acetic acid, respectively. The dynamic water vapour sorption of the hydrolyzed, delignified and untreated veneers was studied in a dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) apparatus. The moisture adsorption of hydrolyzed veneers was decreased in the relative humidity (RH) range above 60-70 %. Delignified veneers, however, showed obviously higher moisture adsorption at RH above 70%, as compared to untreated controls. Hydrolyzed and untreated veneers exhibited a comparable hysteresis, while delignified veneers showed a considerably lower hysteresis in comparison to them. This explains that, despite the fact that the hydrophilic hemicelluloses influence the moisture sorption of wood, the expand-ability of the cell wall matrix is mainly controlled by lignin.

  • 35.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Morén, Tom
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Sehlstedt-Persson, Margot
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Blom, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Effect of oil impregnation on water repellency, dimensional stability and mold susceptibility of thermally-modified European aspen and downy birch wood2017In: Journal of Wood Science, ISSN 1435-0211, E-ISSN 1611-4663, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conventional chemical wood preservatives have been banned or restricted in some applications due to human and animal toxicity and their adverse impact on the surrounding environment. New, low-environmental-impact wood treatments that still provide effective protection systems are needed to protect wood. Thermal modification of wood could reduce hygroscopicity, improve dimensional stability and enhance resistance to mold attack. The aim of this study was to investigate if these properties enhanced in thermally modified (TM) wood through treatments with oils. In this study, TM European aspen (Populus tremula) and downy birch (Betula pubescens) wood were impregnated with three different types of oil: water-miscible commercial Elit Träskydd (Beckers oil with propiconazole and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate, IPBC), a pine tar formulation and 100% tung oil. The properties of oil-impregnated wood investigated were water repellency, dimensional stability and mold susceptibility. The treated wood, especially with pine tar and tung oil, showed an increase in water repellency and dimensional stability. However, Beckers oil which contains biocides like propiconazole and IPBC showed better protection against mold compared with pine tar and tung oil. To enhance the dimensional stability of the wood, pine tar and tung oil can be used, but these oil treatments did not significantly improve mold resistance rather sometimes enhanced the mold growth, whereas a significant anti-mold effect was observed on Beckers oil treated samples.

  • 36.
    Bastani, Alireza
    et al.
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Militz, Holger
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Effect of open assembly time and equilibrium moisture content on the penetration of polyurethane adhesive into thermally modified wood2017In: The journal of adhesion, ISSN 0021-8464, E-ISSN 1563-518X, Vol. 93, no 7, p. 575-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of wood moisture content and open assembly time on penetration of polyurethane (PU) adhesive into thermally treated Scots pine (195 and 210°C) was investigated according to effective (EP) and maximum penetration (MP) measurements using fluorescence microscopy. For samples treated at 195°C, a higher EP was noted at 8.6% equilibrium moisture content (EMC) after both assembly times (15 and 30 min) while for samples treated at 210°C, increasing wood moisture content resulted in a significant decrease in EP at 12.5% EMC after 15 min assembly time. Extending open assembly time was found to increase the EP of PU adhesive only in the case of samples treated at 195°C and with 8.6% EMC. For samples treated at both treatment temperatures and after shorter open assembly time, the highest MP observed at moderate EMC levels of 8.6 and 8.2% and the lowest at the higher EMC levels of 13.2 and 12.5%.

  • 37.
    Taghiyari, Hamid Reza
    et al.
    Shahid Rajaee University, Iran.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Jahangiri, Asghar
    Rabie, Davood
    Effects of Nano-Wollastonite Impregnation on Fire Properties of Some Thermally-Treated Solid Wood Species2017In: Proceedings IRG Annual Meeting, IRG/WP 17-40771, International research group on wood protection , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of nano-wollastonite (NW) suspension impregnation on the fire-retarding properties of heat-treated solid wood of three species (beech, poplar, fir) were studied. Heat treatment was performed at two temperatures of 180 °C and 200 °C. Impregnation was carried out at a pressure of 3 bars for 30 min. The fire properties included ignition time, glowing time, back-darkening, back-splitting, back-firing, and length and width of the burnt area. Both impregnation with NW and heat-treatment generally improved all fire-retarding properties, although not always to a significant level. As a mineral material, NW acted like a physical shield against fire penetration into the texture of wood specimens, thus improving fire properties. Moreover, the high thermal conductivity coefficient of wollastonite increased the thermal conductivity of wood, therefore preventing the accumulation of heat at the point nearest to a piloted flame and contributing to the improvement of fire properties. The chemical degradation of wood cell components caused by heat-treatment further improved the fire properties. Cluster analysis indicated the significant effect of species on fire properties. Significant R-square values were found amongst fire properties related to the spread of fire on the surface of specimens. The combination of thermal modification and impregnation with NW provides suitable fire properties for solid wood.

  • 38.
    Kumar, Anuj
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Vlach, Tomáš
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Ryparovà, Pavla
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Sever Škapin, Andrijana
    Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Slovenia.
    Kovač, Janez
    Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Hajek, Petr
    Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.
    Petrič, Marko
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Influence of liquefied wood polyol on the physical-mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy based polymer2017In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 64, p. 207-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epoxy resins are mostly produced from petroleum-based bisphenol A and epicholorhydrin. Bisphenol A is synthesized from non-renewable petroleum-based phenol and acetone. Biomass derived epoxy-based polymers (EBPs) are becoming the most promising alternative for petroleum-based counterparts, but still these biomass-based EBPs have inferior properties. In the present work, two types of epoxy resins were prepared with different weight percentages of resin (bisphenol A) and hardener. They were then modified with different weight percentages of liquefied wood from spruce sawdust. The derived EBPs were analysed in terms of tensile strength and tensile modulus, fractured surface morphology, thermal stability, long-term water adsorption and resistance to brown-rot fungus decay. The results revealed that the percentages of hardener and liquefied wood significantly influenced the overall properties of the EBPs.

  • 39.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Phosphate bonded natural fibre composites2017In: Forest Sector Innovations for a Greener Future, June 12-16, 2017, Vancouver, Canada: International Union of Forest Research Organizations , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demands for wood based composites along with increasing economic and environmental concerns on conventional wood products necessitate moving beyond the traditional processing methods to more costeffectiveand environmentally friendly approaches. In the wake of a fast-setting phosphate binder with a low carbon footprint, this study investigates the potential of different waste residues incorporated in formulated magnesium and calcium phosphate binders to produce commercially-viable composite products. The residues include forest waste from alien invasive trees, agricultural processing waste such as bagasse and hemp hurds, and wood-based industrial residues including papermill sludge, waste paper and sawmill waste. A wide range of composite products were produced that met the requirements of Portland cement particleboard (EN 634: 2007). This study presents the result of the process optimization and test conducted to product technical specifications. The development of phosphate bonded natural fibre composites utilizing lignocellulosic residues promises to bring economic potential to developing countries.

  • 40.
    Bastani, Alireza
    et al.
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Militz, Holger
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Shear strength of furfurylated, N-methylol melamine and thermally modified wood bonded with three conventional adhesives2017In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 236-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shear strength of furfurylated, N-methylol melamine (NMM) and thermally modified wood bonded with emulsion polymer isocyanate, polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), and polyurethane (PU) adhesives was examined. Furfurylation and NMM modification of Scots pine had a significant negative effect on the bonding strength with all adhesives irrespective of the treatment intensity. The obtained low-shear strength values were related to the brittle nature of the wood after modifications rather to the failure of the bondline. PVAc showed a better bonding performance with both furfurylated and NMM modified wood while the combination of furfurylated wood and PU gave the highest reduction in bonding strength (47–51%). Shear strength also decreased significantly after thermal modification in both Scots pine (36–56%) and beech (34–48%) with all adhesives. With the exception of thermally modified beech samples bonded with PU, bondline was found to be the weakest link in thermally modified wood as it was revealed by the wood failure surfaces. Bondline thickness and effective penetration of adhesives did not relate to the shear strength of all modified wood materials. The lower shear strength of modified wood could be attributed to other factors, such as the reduced chemical bonding or mechanical interlocking of adhesives, and the reduced strength of brittle modified wood substrate.

  • 41.
    Izekor, David
    et al.
    University of Benin, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    University of Benin, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management.
    Utilization of fuelwood as household energy among residents of Benin metropolis, Edo State, Nigeria2017In: Nigerian Journal of Agriculture, Food and Environment, ISSN 0331-0787, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 174-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study evaluates the utilization of fuelwood as household energy among residents in Benin metropolis. Its utilization andavailability as household energy source as well as reasons for its preference to other household energy sources was assessed.A random sampling technique was used to select 10 communities within the study area namely; Uselu, Siluko, Uwelu, Ogbaarea, Airport road, Ekehuan, Evbotubu, Aduwawa - Urora quarters, Upper sakponba The survey was carried out in theseareas with the aid of a semi-structured questionnaire administered to respondents who utilize and sell fuelwood in thesecommunities. A total of 200 copies of questionnaire were administered. The main variables measured were those of fuel woodconsumption, availability and sources of fuelwood utilization. The results showed that the 50% of the respondents utilizedfuelwood as their source of domestic house hold energy. 51% of the respondents sourced their fuelwood from fuelwoodvendors while 25% source for fuelwood from their local farmland. 60% of the respondents in the study area spent an averageof N200 daily on fuelwood while 52% of the respondents have a weekly expense of above N700 on fuel wood utilization. Theaverage weekly consumption of fuelwood by 50% of the respondents was between 22 – 27 kg. Hevea braziliensis representing33% of fuelwood species was the most abundant fuelwood consumed by residents in the study araea. The results from T-testand Pearson correlation showed that there was a significant difference in the amount of fuelwood consumed in the differentcommunities within the study area. Therefore the quantity of fuelwood consumed is related to the number of persons perhousehold.

  • 42.
    Altgen, Michael
    et al.
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Militz, Holger
    University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Wood defects during industrial-scale production of thermally modified Norway spruce and Scots pine2017In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 14-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigates wood defects, particularly the formation of surface cracks, during the production of thermally modified wood and its exposure to cyclic moisture changes. Boards of Norway spruce and Scots pine originating from different steps within the production of ThermoWood® were collected and wood defects were investigated at macroscopic and microscopic scale. Subsequently, the wood was exposed to capillary wetting cycles to record its sensitivity towards cracking. After the modification process, typical anatomical defects of conventional kiln-drying became more frequent and severe, with the magnitude being to some extent depending on the presence of defects in the raw material. At microscopic scale, damages to ray parenchyma and epithelial cells as well as longitudinal cracks within the cell walls of earlywood tracheids were evident in thermally modified wood. Despite a lower water uptake and higher dimensional stability, thermally modified wood was more sensitive to surface cracking during wetting cycles than unmodified wood, i.e. at the outside face of outer boards (near bark). For limiting surface cracking of thermally modified wood during service life, the use of high-quality raw material, the exposure of the inside face of the boards (near pith) and the application of a surface coating are considered beneficial.

  • 43.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Karastergiou, Sotirios
    Technological Educational Institute of Thessaly, Greece.
    Foti, Dafni
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Filippou, Vasileios
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    ΑΝΑΚΤΗΣΗ ΞΥΛΟΤΕΜΑΧΙΔΙΩΝ ΑΠΟ ΑΠΟΣΥΡΟΜΕΝΕΣ ΜΟΡΙΟΠΛΑΚΕΣ ΜΕ ΥΔΡΟ-ΜΗΧΑΝΙΚΕΣ ΜΕΘΟΔΟΥΣ: [ Chips recovered from waste particleboards by hydro-mechanical methods ]2017In: ΠΡΑȀΤǿȀΑ : 18ου Πανελλήνιου Δασολογικού Συνεδρίου : “Η Ελληνική Δασοπονία μπροστά σε σημαντικές προκλήσεις: αειφορική διαχείριση δασών, δασικοί χάρτες, περιβαλλοντικές τεχνολογίες – δικτύωση και προστασία φυσικού περιβάλλοντος”: & International Workshop : “Information Technology, Sustainable Development, Scientific Network & Nature Protection” : 8-11 Οκτωβρίου 2017, ΕΔΕΣΣΑ ΠΕȁȁΑΣ, Περιοχή Βαρόσι, Hellenic Forestry Society , 2017, p. 349-356Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was studied the recovery of wood chips from waste particleboards by immersion in water at ambient temperature and by mechanical treatment (agitation and impact, waterblasting). Four different categories of waste particleboards were used, with and without coating, after their reduction in smaller pieces with dimensions of about 7 × 8 cm.  The investigated methods were: (I) immersion for 3 days-impregnation with vacuum and pressure-agitation and impact (II) immersion for 7 days-drying-rewetting for 12 hours-agitation and impact (III) immersion for 3 days-waterblasting. The maximum thickness swelling (about 90%) was achieved by immersing the particleboards in the water for 3 days, and therefore the vacuum and pressure impregnation step can be omitted in practice. Recovery of wood chips was significantly higher (51.54%) in the case of successive wetting and drying cycles compared to simple immersion in water (17.32%). Both these methods I and II, involving agitation and impact for recovering wood chips from waste particleboards, are easily applicable at the industry. Method III with waterblasting resulted in complete recovery of wood chips within a very short time, but its application requires more research

  • 44.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    et al.
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Foti, Dafni
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    Voulgaridou, Eleni
    Aristotle University, Greece.
    ΠΑΡΑΓΩΓΗ ΚΑΙ ΙΔΙΟΤΗΤΕΣ ΠΕΙΡΑΜΑΤΙΚΩΝ ΠΛΙΝΘΩΝ ΕΣΩΤΕΡΙΚΗΣ ΤΟΙΧΟΠΟΙΙΑΣ ΑΠΟ ΓΥΨΟ ΚΑΙ ΑΝΑΚΥΚΛΟΥΜΕΝΑ ΥΛΙΚΑ ΞΥΛΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΕΛΑΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΟΧΗΜΑΤΩΝ: [ Production and properties of experimental bricks for interior walls from gypsum and recycled materials of wood and rubber ]2017In: ΠΡΑȀΤǿȀΑ : 18ου Πανελλήνιου Δασολογικού Συνεδρίου : “Η Ελληνική Δασοπονία μπροστά σε σημαντικές προκλήσεις: αειφορική διαχείριση δασών, δασικοί χάρτες, περιβαλλοντικές τεχνολογίες – δικτύωση και προστασία φυσικού περιβάλλοντος”: & International Workshop : “Information Technology, Sustainable Development, Scientific Network & Nature Protection” : 8-11 Οκτωβρίου 2017, ΕΔΕΣΣΑ ΠΕȁȁΑΣ, Περιοχή Βαρόσι, Hellenic Forestry Society , 2017, p. 315-323Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Τhe manufacturing and testing of gypsum bonded solid bricks with wood chips from particleboard production residues and rubber and textile fibers from waste tires was investigated. The recovered rubber and wood materials were mixed in gypsum/water solutions for the fabrication of standard solid bricks with six holes by using appropriate molds. After drying, the compressive strength, the thermal conductivity, the air-flow resistance, the sound absorption coefficient and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the bricks were determined. The compressive strength of solid bricks was much greater than that required in interior walls. The bricks showed a better thermal insulation than both the extruded and pressed house bricks but lower than the insulating bricks. Emissions of volatile organic compounds of bricks were at acceptable levels according to regulations for construction products. The sound absorption coefficient of the solid bricks was 0,72 for the frequency of 1 kHz and decreased with increasing frequency. In addition, information on the raw materials and production cost are given.

  • 45.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    A laser drilling technique to improve impregnability of spruce and fir2016In: 3rd BASF Wolman Conference, 14 September 2016, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Bastani, Alireza
    et al.
    George-August University, Germany.
    Militz, Holger
    George-August University, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Rohumaa, Anti
    Alto University School of Chemical Technology, Finland.
    Development of bonding strength of modified birch veneers during adhesive curing2016In: Wood research, ISSN 1336-4561, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the bonding strength development of furfurylated, N-methylolmelamine (NMM) modified and thermally treated birch veneers glued with hot curing phenolformaldehyde (PF) adhesive in different pressing (20, 160 s) and open assembly times (20 s, 10min). For testing, the automated bonding evaluation system ABES was used with 2 N.mm-2applied pressure at 130°C. The bonding strength of both modified and unmodified samplesincreased significantly by prolongation of the pressing time from 20 to 160 s in all cases andfor both open assembly times. A deviation was observed for the samples treated at 220°C andat 20 s open assembly time. With the exception of NMM modified veneers, bonding strengthdid not change significantly by increasing the assembly time in the case of 20 s pressing forboth modified and unmodified samples. At 160 s pressing time, extension of the assembly timedeveloped a better bonding for controls, NMM modified and thermally treated veneers at 180°C.The combination of 10 min assembly time and 160 s pressing time proved as the optimal bondingcondition for controls, NMM modified and thermally treated veneers at 180°C while the highestbonding strength was noted in 20 assembly time and 160 s pressing time for furfurylated veneers.In most of the cases modification affected negatively the bonding performance of the veneers, inparticular for furfurylated and NMM modified samples.

  • 47.
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    et al.
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Mai, Carsten
    Georg-August-University Göttingen, Germany.
    Dynamic vapour sorption of wood and holocellulose modified with thermosetting resins2016In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 165-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micro-veneers of wood and holocellulose (HC) were modified with the thermosetting resins phenol formaldehyde and melamine formaldehyde. The dynamic water vapour sorption of the modified and untreated veneers was studied in a dynamic vapour sorption apparatus to assess the effects of resin modification. The adsorption of wood and HC as well as the desorption of wood was little affected by the modification in the low relative humidity (RH) range but decreased in the RH range above 60–70 %. The desorption isotherm of HC, however, was increased in the RH range of 15–80 % due to modification. Resin modification gradually decreased the EMC ratio of wood and HC and also influenced the moisture increment, equilibrium time and sorption rate in RH range above 50–60 % RH for wood and above 70–80 % RH for HC. HC exhibited a clearly lower hysteresis than wood. Modification of wood slightly reduced hysteresis compared to untreated wood, but modification of HC clearly increased hysteresis about to the same extent as that of wood. This indicates that the stiffening effect of lignin and thermosetting resins reduces the flexibility of the HC matrix, which results in increased hysteresis.

  • 48.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Meincken, Martina
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Tyhoda, Luvuyo
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Effect of bark on the physical and mechanical properties of phosphate bonded wood composites of black wattle (Acacia mearnsii De Wild)2016In: Forest resource and Products: Moving toward a sustainable future, 59th International Convention of the Society of Wood Science and Technology, Curitiba, Brazil, March 6 -10, 2016 / [ed] Susan LeVan-Green, Curitiba, Brazil, 2016, p. 165-173Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Wang, Xiaodong Alice
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björnberg, Jonathan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Hagman, Olle
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Ahmed, Sheikh Ali
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Wan, Hui
    Mississippi State University, USA.
    Niemz, Peter
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
    Effect of Low Temperatures on the Block Shear Strength of Norway Spruce Glulam Joints2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 9638-9648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The block shear strength of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) glulam joints was tested under low temperature. Glulam samples were glued with the three of the most common outdoor structural adhesives. The cold temperatures tested were 20, −20, −30, −40, -50 and −60 °C. Within the temperature test range, the block shear strength of the glulam joints was resistant to the effect of temperature. As the temperature decreased, the joints’ block shear strength did not show any significant change. In most cases, phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF) adhesive yielded the strongest block shear strength, while melamine-formaldehyde (MF) adhesive yielded the weakest block shear strength. Melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) adhesive yielded similar results to those of MF adhesives for all temperatures tested. The block shear strengths of the glulam joints with PRF, MUF and MF adhesives were not sensitive to temperature change. The results indicated that PRF, MUF and MF adhesives are stable for outdoor structural engineered wood construction in cold climate. The results also suggest that the SS-EN 14080 (2013) standard for the block shear method may not be the proper standard for testing differences in shear strength at different temperatures. The EN 302-1 (2011) standard could be more suitable for this purpose.

  • 50.
    Izekor, David
    et al.
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Amiandamhen, Stephen
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Awenagbiku, E
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Effect of taper and sawing methods on log conversion among selected sawmills in Edo State, Nigeria2016In: Nigerian Journal of Forestry, Vol. 46, no 1-2, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of taper and sawing methods on log conversion among selected sawmills in Egor andOvia-North East Local Government Areas of Edo State. Ten representative sawmills and thirty round logs were sampled for eachspecies making a total of 300 logs based on the relative abundance of available timber species were sampled. The diameter of the logs,length and girth at small and large ends were measured before conversion. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Theresults obtained showed that Egor Local Government Area has the highest frequency of the selected species representing 56% of totallogs sampled while Ovia North-East Local Government Area has 44% of total logs sampled. Conversion efficiency varied from 56.49to 76.26%. Factors such as inherent defect in the timber, age of the machine and the severity of the log taper affected conversionefficiency at the sawmills. Lumber recovery efficiency increases with bigger log, short log length and narrower taper. Therefore, logsize, taper and log length have positive relationship on lumber recovery efficiency.

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