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  • 101.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Wong, Lung-Hsiang
    Sharples, Mike
    Hwang, Gwo-Jen
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    Ogata, Hiraoki
    Seamless Learning: An International Perspective on Next Generation Technology Enhanced Learning2013In: Handbook of Mobile Learning / [ed] Z. L. Berge & L. Y. Muilenburg, New York:: Routledge, 2013, p. 95-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this chapter we present and discuss the results and reflections based on our recent developments and experiences in Europe and in Asia regarding how novel educational design patterns, mobile technologies and software tools can be combined to enhance learning. We propose and recommend possible directions for the design of future educational activities and technological solutions that can support seamless learning. To the end, we discuss how the notion of seamless learning could be used to tackle some of the challenges our educational systems are facing in connection to the introduction of mobile technologies into classrooms settings, innovative educational practices and sustainability.

  • 102.
    Morshed, Sarwar J.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Daffodil International University, Bangladesh.
    Rana, Juwel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Telenor Grp, Norway.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Open Source Initiatives and Frameworks Addressing Distributed Real-time Data Analytics2016In: 2016 IEEE 30th International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium Workshops (IPDPSW), IEEE, 2016, p. 1481-1484Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuous evolution of digital services, is resulting in the generation of extremely large data sets that are created in almost real time. Exploring new opportunities for improving the quality of these digital services, as well as providing better-personalized experiences to digital users are two major challenges to be addressed. Different methods, tools, and techniques existed today to generate actionable insights from digital services data. Traditionally, big data problems are handled on historical data-sets. However, there is a growing demand on real-time data analytics to offer new services to users and to provide pro-active customers' care, personalized ads, emergency aids, just to give a few examples. Spite of the fact that there are few existing frameworks for real-time analytics, however, utilizing those for solving distributed real-time big data analytical problems stills remains a challenge. Existing real-time data analytics (RTDA) frameworks are not covering all the features that requires for distributed computation in real-time. Therefore, in this paper, we present a qualitative overview and analysis on some of the mostly used existing RTDA frameworks. Specifically, Apache Spark, Apache Flink, Apache Storm, and Apache Samza are covered and discussed in this paper.

  • 103.
    Morshed, Sarwar J.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Rana, Juwel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Telenor Grp, Oslo, Norway..
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Real-Time Data Analytics: An Algorithmic Perspective2016In: DATA MINING AND BIG DATA, DMBD 2016, Springer, 2016, p. 311-320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Massive amount of data sets are continuously generated from a wide variety of digital services and infrastructures. Examples of those are machine/system logs, retail transaction logs, traffic tracing data and diverse social data coming from different social networks and mobile interactions. Currently, the New York stock exchange produces 1 TB data per day, Google processes 700 PB of data per month and Facebook hosts 10 billion photos taking 1 PB of storage just to mention some cases. Turning these streaming data flow into actionable real-time insights is not a trivial task. The usage of data in real-time can change different aspects of the business logic of any corporation including real time decision making, resource optimization, and so on. In this paper, we present an analysis of different aspects related to real-time data analytics from an algorithmic perspective. Thus, one of the goals of this paper is to identify some new problems in this domain and to gain new insights in order to share the outcomes of our efforts and these challenges with the research community working on real-time data analytics algorithms.

  • 104.
    Musliu, Arlind
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Using Web Technologies to adapt Data Visualizations for Mobile Devices: A use case in Eco Visualizations2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Visualizations, web technologies and mobile devices are subjects which are trending nowadays in the world of technology and many research projects are tackling different issues. The originality of the thesis is in the aspect of bringing all these mentioned subjects together and providing findings that will help web designers when implementing visualizations for mobile phones. The thesis explores the use of web technologies for the visualization of complex data for mobile devices, both looking at the technical state of the art and capabilities, and at the difference in information needs for users in a mobile usage context. The first part deals with an in-depth research of the existing projects that deal with similar issues, analyzing the official documentation of the technologies and the community of developers. The other part of the research is focused on providing insights on the required changes for adapting to the needs of mobile device users by doing a usability testing on a specific visualization. The results provide information valuable for adapting visualizations, such as font sizes, color combinations, animation complexity and data simplicity. The use case that is used for feeding the visualizations with data belongs to the domain of eco visualizations, in particular dealing with sustainable food consumption.

  • 105.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, Portugal.
    There is more to come: Anticipating content on interactive public displays through timer animations2016In: PerDis 2016: Proceedings of the 5th ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, ACM Press, 2016, p. 247-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experience a continuously growing number of public displays deployed in a diverse range of settings. Often these displays contain a variety of full-screen content for the audience that is organized by a scheduler application. However, such public display systems often miss to communicate their full set of content and features, neither do they hint schedule information. In this paper, we present and describe a timer control we implemented in our public display applications to communicate schedule and application information to the audience, which allows to manage expectations and anticipation around public displays. We also report initial insights from studies about how this kind of design features supported the audience in engaging with the public displays.

  • 106.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Application features to convey peers' interactions to engage users in a display network2015In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2015, p. 267-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent socio-technological developments have shown growing interest in interactive pervasive computing scenarios supported by public displays. One of the main challenges in the design of public display systems still is to engage users to interact and be motivated to do so. In this work, we describe application features, implemented in our public display system, which aim to convey awareness of local and remote peers' interactions with an educational video installation to engage users to interact. This is facilitated by dynamic pop-up notifications and visualizations of interactions on the display screen. A first deployment and study showed that users found these presentations of peer interactions to be engaging, both with the display system as well as the social context around it.

  • 107.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Evaluating usage patterns and adoption of an interactive video installation on public displays in school contexts2014In: MUM '14 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2014, p. 160-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in supporting learning activities/scenarios that go beyond the traditional classroom context as well as the development of pervasive computing scenarios supported by display installations. In order to explore such interactive scenarios that span video-based learning activities across school contexts, we have developed two web-based functional prototypes of public display applications and performed a field evaluation during an initial test-deployment. The system consists of a public display endpoint providing video content enriched with quizzes related to this content, and a mobile endpoint providing interactivity and user participation. During a three weeks test-deployment at two Swedish schools, the display system was evaluated and important requirements for the next iterations were gathered. This work presents the results of the test-deployment and the users' adoption (usage patterns), and discusses the specialties of introducing such a system into educational environments. The deployment and the corresponding study enabled us to validate in real settings the overall technical approach and to test different perspectives of display usage. The conclusions point to the need to further understand how to promote an integrated view of display utilization in schools.

  • 108.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Increasing user engagement with distributed public displays through the awareness of peer interactions2015In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2015, p. 23-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments have shown a growing interest in interactive pervasive computing scenarios supported by public displays as well as their introduction into educational environments. Still, one of the biggest challenges in the design of public display systems is to engage users to interact and be motivated to do so. In this paper, we report a study exploring the potential effect of the awareness of peers' interactions with an educational video installation and the popularity of the display system on the user engagement. The awareness is facilitated by pop-up notifications and visualizations of interactions on the display screen. We conducted a six day long deployment of our system which included a diary study, during which we altered the display's dynamic behavior in order to test different conditions. The analysis of the diary reports and the progression of the users' interactions showed that the users found the presentations of peer interactions to be engaging, both with the display system as well as the social context around it.

  • 109.
    Müller, Maximilian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Inst Univ Lisboa, Portugal.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Shared Interactive Music Experiences in Public Spaces: User Engagement and Motivations2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Conference on Interactive Surfaces and Spaces, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 287-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development and distribution of interactive pervasive computing systems, especially those incorporating digital public displays, facilitate a variety of new interactive scenarios in shared public spaces where people gather and spend time to enjoy a social experience. Integrating novel interaction mechanisms related to the sharing and listening of music with digital displays is a good example of the potential of using current technologies to enhance physical and social spaces. This paper explores the design and impact of shared situated interactive systems, combining public display installations with a collaborative music player. To explore the design space of these systems, we conducted two studies involving the deployment of a particular system at different venues. The analysis of our results allowed us to identify specific (group) interactions and events, which were fostered by the system under consideration. Based on these outcomes, we propose a set of features that should foster further engagement with such systems and promote new ways of social interaction.

  • 110.
    Nake, Isabella
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    A System to Visualize Quantified Self Data Using Avatars2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, it is becoming more common for people to use applications or devices that keep track of their activities, such as fitness activities, places they visit, the music they listen to, and pictures they take. These data are used by the services for various purposes, but usually there are limitations for the users to explore or interact with them. This project investigates a new approach of visualizing such Quantified Self data, in a meaningful and enjoyable way that gives the users insights into their data.

    This thesis discusses the feasibility of creating a system that allows users to connect the activity tracking applications they already use, analyse the amount of activities, and then present the resulting information. The visualization of the information is done with an avatar that maps the different activities the user is engaged with, along with the activity levels, as graphical features.

    Within the scope of this work, several user studies were conducted and a system prototype was implemented to explore how to build, using web technologies, such a system that aggregates and analyses personal activity data, and also to determine what kind of data should and can be collected, to provide meaningful information to the users. Furthermore, it was investigated how a possible design for the avatar could look like, to be clearly understood by the users.

  • 111.
    Nake, Isabella
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Visualizing Quantified Self Data Using Avatars2016In: ACHI 2016: The Ninth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions / [ed] Alma Leora Culén, Leslie Miller, Irini Giannopulu, and Birgit Gersbeck-Schierholz, International Academy, Research and Industry Association (IARIA), 2016, p. 57-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, it is becoming more common for people to use applications or devices that keep track of their activities, such as fitness activities, places they visited, the music they listen to, and pictures they took. These data are used by the services for various purposes, but usually there are limitations for the users to explore or interact with them. Our project investigates a new approach of visualizing such Quantified Self data, in a meaningful and enjoyable way that gives the users insights into their data. The paper discusses the feasibility of creating a service that allows users to connect the activity tracking applications they already use, analyse the amount of activities, and then presents them the resulting information. The visualization of the information is proposed as an avatar that maps the different activities the user is engaged with, along with the activity levels, as graphical features. Within the scope of this work, several user studies were conducted and a system prototype was implemented to explore how to build, using web technologies, such a system that aggregates and analyses personal activity data, and also to determine what kind of data should and can be collected, to provide meaningful information to the users. Furthermore, it was investigated how a possible design for the avatar could look like, to be clearly understood by the users.

  • 112.
    Nilsson, Erica
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Gränssnittsdesign för videocentrerad online-rådgivning: Utformad efter frågeställarens och rådgivarens olika användarroller2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following essay is a design study which has developed a design proposal for a online-counseling service by information from literature, earlier analysis, interviews and personas which is suited for the user roles, questioner and advisor by their subject skills and by knowledge of the web service. The aim with the study was to investigate who the interfaces would be designed to accomplish the goals that the respective user role have when using the service. The design proposal is a part of a larger project where patients, diagnosed with cancer have had the opportunity to borrow an iPad which will work as a source of communication when there are no ordinary visits. The part where this work is involved in is a web service where patients have the opportunity to watch pre-recorded videos about the medication and may discuss potential questions with a nurse. The users have the opportunity to use a videotool as a mean of communication, which has been in the center of the design because it can be used to ease the communication between users. The video information which is attached from the existing videos can clarify the users messages. The advisor is in need for an interface with a sufficient amount of functions to clarify the information who is sent to the questioner. In the design proposal it has been made by a larger number of steps for the video function. The design proposal for the questioner's interface has been tested individually with five different participants through a prototype implemented with HTML5, Css and Javascript. The users integrated with the prototype and later answered some questions through an interview. The result showed that it is important to avoid a complicated interface with a large number of functions for the questioner. Furthermore, a simple interface design with clear descriptions and visualization for the clickable element is necessary. If the questioner is irritated and spend a lot of time on learning how the service works he or she may choose not to use the web service.

  • 113.
    Noori, Sheak Rashed Haider
    et al.
    Daffodil International University, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Md. Kamrul
    Daffodil International University, Bangladesh.
    Rana, Juwel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology. Telenor Grp, Oslo, Norway.
    Key Indicators for Data Sharing - In Relation with Digital Services2016In: DATA MINING AND BIG DATA, DMBD 2016, Springer, 2016, p. 353-363Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid growth of data intensive digital services are creating potential risks of violating consumer centric data privacy. Protection of data privacy is becoming one of the key challenges for most of the big data business entities. Due to thank of big data, recommendation and personalization are becoming very popular in digital space. However it is hard to find a well-defined boundary which illustrates privacy threat to consumers' in relation with improving already opted-in communication services. In this paper, we initiated identifying key indicators for consumer configured privacy policy in relation with personalized services taking into consideration that "Privacy is a tool for balancing personalization". We survey user attitudes towards privacy and personalization and discovered key indicators for configuring privacy policy by analyzing survey data about privacy concern and data sharing attitude of the consumers. We found that consumers did not want to stop using social media based communication services due to privacy risks. Moreover, consumers have attitude of sharing their data, provided that appropriate personalization features are in place.

  • 114.
    Nordmark, Susanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Influencing Everyday Teacher Practices by Applying Mobile Digital Storytelling as a Seamless Learning Approach2015In: The Mobile Learning Voyage - From Small Ripples to Massive Open Waters: 14th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, mLearn 2015, Venice, Italy, October 17-24, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Tom H. Brown & Herman J. van der Merwe, Cham Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2015, , p. 16p. 256-272Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes our on-going efforts aiming at refining and validating a Mobile Seamless Learning (MSL) approach supported by mobile Digital Storytelling (mDS). Considering learning factors of locality, formality and time, as well as elements of designs for learning and technical development, we have chosen six dimensions of the MSL framework (Wong and Looi 2011) to support our work. Guided by the principles of co-design (Spikol et al. 2009) and design-based research (Design-Based Research Collective, 2003; Ejersbo et al. 2008), we collaborated with 4 teachers and 54 pupils, devoting an extensive amount of time to design, develop and enact the phases of our proposed mDS workflow supported by mobile and web technologies. Beyond the mobile application developed for mDS, we have developed and integrated web solutions that support the overall learning experience, and tools that allow teachers to orchestrate the activities. The mDS web serve as a platform for continued work over time, such as reflecting, remixing, and reusing the digital content generated during the activities. The web platform provides means for teachers to search, watch, group, and assess the pupils’ mDS outcomes, and therefore serves as the interconnecting glue between all the learning activities involved in the mDS workflow. This study reports on the activities conducted in four classrooms in the spring of 2015, working with the five phases of the mDS approach. The outcomes of our efforts reinforced the importance of an active involvement by teachers to adopt and incorporate innovative technology enhanced learning (TEL) activities and solutions into their everyday educational practices, but most importantly on the need for schools to acquire self-governance on how to make use of their learning technologies.

  • 115.
    Nordmark, Susanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Promoting Sustainable Innovation in Technology Enhanced Learning: A Teacher & Pupil Study Using Mobile Digital Storytelling (mDS)2014In: Proceedings of the 14th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies - ICALT 2014, IEEE Press, 2014, p. 194-198Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents our current efforts towards finalizing a complete workflow for mobile digital storytelling (mDS) supporting the concept of mobile seamless learning (MSL) in educational settings. Our purpose with the present study was twofold: to initiate the incorporation of complementary software solutions concordant with the mDS workflow proposed in this paper, and to try to consolidate the sustainability of technology enhanced learning efforts like these by encouraging the participating teachers to implement ideas, inspiration and routines from the mDS workflow into their everyday educational practices. However, even though the study outcomes from the pupil activity were rewarding for all stakeholders, exposing intensified motivational boost and dedication among the pupils, we still recognize a challenge in how to motivate and inspire teachers to dare launch and implement future similar efforts on their own. 

  • 116.
    Nordmark, Susanna
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Tell Your Story About History: A Mobile Seamless Learning Approach to Support Mobile Digital Storytelling (mDS)2015In: Seamless Learning in the Age of Mobile Connectivity / [ed] Wong, Lung-Hsiang, Milrad, Marcelo, Specht, Marcus, Singapore: Springer, 2015, p. 353-376Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes our efforts toward finalizing an all-embracing workflow for a mobile seamless learning approach supporting mobile digital storytelling (mDS) for educational purposes. Considering the factors of locality, formality and time as well as the design of the activity and assignments, we have chosen five dimensions of the mobile seamless learning framework to guide our work. In addition to the main mobile application used for mDS, we have also developed and integrated complementary software solutions well in line with the mDS framework, which support the overall learning experience. Here, we present our main three main pilot studies which have provided us with outcomes and insights on technical and methodological requirements, as well as on the importance of an active teacher involvement in order to introduce and implement ideas, inspiration and routines from the mDS workflow into everyday educational practices. Applying the principles of codesign and design-based research (DBR) we have collaborated closely with involved teachers and other stakeholders, devoting an extensive amount of time to introduce the five phases of the mDS workflow and the different technologies. The primary remainder of the challenges for concluding the mDS workflow will be to further refine all software components involved and to fully integrate them into one single social computing platform in which the chosen MSL dimensions and the learning activities in the different phases act as the interconnecting glue. This platform will also serve as a repository and a sharing option for all procedures related to mDS and the mDS activity outcomes.

  • 117.
    Olsson, Eric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    History Hunt: Raising User’s Curiosity towards Places of Historical Value using Narrative-driven, Location-based Augmented Reality2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today our society is greatly built on modern technologies. In most parts of the world itis a social standard to have access to a smartphone and the Internet. Being able to keepin touch with others, consuming information, or being entertained independent of placeand time are assumed standards. From an entertainment perspective, the interactivemedium has changed in the modern society, the gaming community is still growing, andfor many it is a daily routine to play some sort of game, either on the computer, tablet orsmartphone. However, new ways to engage the user in fun activities are still beingexplored. At the same time, the consumption of media and use of digital technologiesraises concerns towards health issues and time spend outside in the nature, according tocritics. Pokemon Go, a smartphone application released in 2016, presented a possiblesolution to this problem, encouraging users to go outside and catch Pokemons due to thelocation-based nature of the application. The need to physically move to certain placesin order to catch a certain Pokemon facilitated not just people’s exercise, but also socialaspects as one would likely meet other players trying to catch Pokemons. While this is astep in the right direction, I strongly believe that this technological advancement couldalso be used for other entertaining and beneficial needs to people.

    This thesis investigates an approach of using similar technologies compared to thoseused in Pokemon Go, combined with narrative elements and a linear task system, inorder to create an experience with the purpose to engage users with local places ofhistorical value. By using geolocation-based technology, the application guides the userto places of historical value, while augmented reality (AR) elements are used to raisethe user’s interest, and further engage them in an interactive way. The developedapplication allows the user to solve tasks, which require interaction and exploration withthe real world environment in order to gain the necessary information, related to thehistorical value of the place, to solve the task. To provide a more meaningful scenario,all this is accompanied with a complete narrative. Design and concept have beenevaluated by four experts within explorative discussions, which lead to the laterimplementation of a digital prototype. This prototype was then tested and evaluated,providing practical feedback and insights. The user interaction study, conducted withnine participants around the Linnéparken area in Växjö, suggests that the users overallfelt engaged interacting with the application and the real world environment. They alsoseemed to have developed a better understanding about the local history by gaining newinsights about the information and areas presented to them. Users also stated that duringprevious visits to the area they had not payed attention to the statues and otherinformation signs, thus resulting in a new experience visiting the area facilitated throughthe use of the developed application. The users were positive about exploring even morepoints of interest in the future if presented this way, indicating their acceptance towardsthe developed application. Some users also stated that the narrative elements made theexperience interesting and motivating. While both application design and concept wereunderstandable, the applied navigation system would need further improvements,although all users were successfully able to navigate to the real world points of interest.The AR-features seemed to increase the user’s enjoyment, while being useful at thesame time, as the AR-markers provided necessary clues considering where to findanswers to the presented questions as well as a sense of progression with the narrative.

  • 118.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Müller, Maximilian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Lencastre, José Alberto
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Casal, João
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    José, Rui
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Promoting secondary school learners' curiosity towards science through digital public displays2013In: Proceedings of International Conference on Making Sense of Converging Media, AcademicMindTrek '13 / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, Heljä Franssila, Janne Paavilainen, Hannu Kärkkäinen, ACM Press, 2013, no 470, p. 204-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the understanding of how digital public displays can be utilized in schools taking into consideration educational goals. This work is part of a currently on-going research project that aims to promote students' curiosity in science and technology through creative film-making, collaborative editing activities, and content sharing. In order to explore the design space concerning digital public displays for schools' contexts, six workshops with secondary school teachers in two different countries were conducted to elicit sensitivities towards possible features and interaction techniques as well as inquire about expectations and technology adoption. Our findings suggest that teachers are receptive to the technology and were able to generate scenarios that take advantage of the possibilities offered by digital public displays to stimulate learning processes. However, there are several crucial elements regarding management and control of content that need to be carefully crafted/designed in order to accommodate each schools' organizational issues.

  • 119.
    Otero, Nuno
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Müller, Maximilian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring video-based interactions around digital public displays to foster curiosity about science in schools2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this poster, we describe our initial steps towards understanding how digital public displays in schools can be utilized in order to foster students' curiosity towards scientific topics. More specically, this present work is part of an on-going research project (JuxtaLearn) that aims at provoking students' curiosity in science and technology through creative lmmaking and editing activities. In order to explore the design space concerning digital public displays for schools' contexts we conducted some initial workshops with science teachers in order to elicit their sensitivities towards possible features and interaction techniques, as well as to inquire about expectations and technology adoption.

  • 120.
    Otteryd, Christine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Studie av webbtillgänglighet för de med läs- och skrivsvårigheter: Analys av universitets och högskolors webbplatser2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to evaluate how well Swedish university websites is accessible for users with dyslexia. Websites that is not accessible leaves out a large group of people. The purpose of this study is to find solutions and give recommendations for improvement, to make sure the university websites is accessible for all persons. The analysis in the study is based on W3C WAI guidelines about accessibility and is concentrated to users with dyslexia. Methods used in the study are a qualitative method where the guidelines were compared with the university websites. Also a couple of persons have tested and handed out their opinions about the same websites. The result after analyzing the websites shows that the websites lack web accessibility, both in bigger and minor parts. A solution to the web accessibility problem is the recommendations, which was produced after the analysis. The conclusion of the study is that a university website can be accessible with the help of the recommendations.

  • 121.
    Pargman, Teresa Cerratto
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Taking an instrumental genesis lens: New insights into collaborative mobile learning2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we argue that in order to gain a deeper understanding of collaborative mobile learning in schools, it is important to know not only how mobile devices affect collaborative learning but also how collaborative learning emerges and is mediated by these devices. We develop our argument by applying the instrumental genesis theory and the collective instrumented activities and situations model for the analysis of learners' collaborative learning in the tablet-mediated classroom. This analysis is grounded in data collected in four elementary Swedish schools (ie, from fourth to eighth grade). From the data, we considered the learners' conversation in English as a foreign language, inquiry-based learning in the natural sciences classroom and game-based learning in the arithmetic classroom. On the one hand, the scrutiny of these specific activities led us to distinguish the pragmatic, epistemic, and reflexive instrumental mediations that have already been theorized in the instrumental genesis theory. On the other hand, they helped us to identify two additional ones, which we call emotional and spatial. Based on these findings, we claim that collaboration in the tablet-mediated classroom is a complex activity that emerges from a variety of instrumental mediations that configure contemporary collaborative mobile learning.

  • 122.
    Pettersson, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Kommunikationsforum för egenvård: En undersökning i hur en diabetikers behov av egenvård kan tillgodoses via sociala media2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that is classified as one of today's major diseases. Diabetes means that the blood sugar level is too high as the body’s ability to take care of~sugar is no longer functional. People with diabetes are therefore in need of exerting control over their blood sugar levels through self-care without the influence of health services.

    Social media in fields such as entertainment and education are used on a daily basis, but there is also a need for people to acquire information, support and counseling in health. The aim of this thesis is to explore the possibility of helping people to find communication partners being in similar situations and having the same conditions via health-related social media. Furthermore, the aim is to identify problems that arise when people share their health information on social media and creating an Internet service that proposes a possible solution for these problems. By applying theory of diabetic subjects, communication and social media as well as qualitative interviews and surveys a prototype was created which was then evaluated through user tests by diabetics. The prototype makes it possible to search for users in a similar situation through demographic data and data from diabetic self-care. The results give an insight into alternative ways of designing social media in health for users who share data with each other.

  • 123.
    Pettersson, Oskar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Understanding Software Ecosystems for Technology-Enhanced Learning: a Case Study2013In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Computers in Education 2013 / [ed] Lung-Hsiang Wong, Chen-Chung Liu, Tsukasa Hirashima, Pudjo Sumedi, Muhammad Lukman, Indonesia: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2013, p. 457-462Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in schools promises up-to-date, interactive and collaborative learning content, However, this has proved difficult to fulfill as the requirements from students and teachers combined with devices in a variety of contexts are expensive to meet. Software reuse is a proven way to decrease development time, and thus promises a way to decrease these costs of ICT. This paper explores the characteristics of a software ecosystem approach to cater for the new digital school and presents a reference model for ecosystems developed for the domain of technology-enhanced learning (TEL).

  • 124.
    Polishuk, Natali
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Implementing social media data in algorithms for estimating crowdedness in tourist's attractions2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 125.
    Prieto Santos, Luis
    et al.
    EPFL, Switzerland .
    Dimitriadis, Yannis
    Universidad de Valladolid, Spain.
    Herrer, Andreas
    TU Clausthal, Germany .
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Miguel, Nussbaum
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    Slotta, James
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    The Orchestrated Collaborative Classroom: Designing and Making Sense of Heterogeneous Ecologies of Teaching and Learning Resources2015In: CSCL 2015 Proceedings: Exploring the Material Conditions of LearningThe Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015 / [ed] Lindwall, O., Häkkinen, P., Koschman, T. Tchounikine, P. & Ludvigsen, S. (Eds.), Gothenburg, Sweden: International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2015, Vol. 2, p. 880-884Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical face-to-face classroom still represents the core educational setting in which everyday CSCL practice takes place. However, current classrooms are not limited anymore to books, blackboards and other physical artifacts: laptops, tablets, digital whiteboards, wikis, shared applications and simulations have also become part of this learning landscape. These last ones add new layers of complexity to the everyday educational practicesand the dynamics of the classroom. CSCL researchers have traditionally proposed standalone systems or innovations, focusing their evaluation on the effects and management of a single system/intervention. However, everyday classroom activities involve multiple subject matters, different pedagogical approaches as well as a variety of technologies. The assumption that our innovation is alone no longer holds. The multiplicity and heterogeneity of resources (digital and legacy) pose a unique set of opportunities and challenges for the CSCL research community, which are bound to become stronger as time goes by. This collaborative workshop brought together technology designers, researchers and practitioners, in an attempt to match CSCL technologies to the pedagogical needs and contextual constraints of practitioners, identify a set of guidelines to design and connect existing CSCL systems with each other and with legacy classroom resources, and help teachers and students to make sense of these heterogeneous learning ecologies.

  • 126.
    Real Delgado, Yeray
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. La Laguna University (ULL).
    Exploring the potential of mobile technology and NFC for creating music collaboratively2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, mobile devices offer a wide variety of features and sensor capabilitiesthat can be applied into everyday problems. This is being used by the commu-nity in order to provide more intuitive tools that facilitate users to tackle theseproblems. In this thesis, I present my work which aims at providing an afford-able, non-intrusive, easy to use and intuitive tool that enables users withoutany musical background to create music collaboratively and enjoy this activityby using NFC enabled mobile devices and NFC tags. I introduce the "Rela-tive Position Awareness" which is utilized to allow users to create a music piecebased on the relative position of the devices. To do that, I implement a proto-type that includes Near Field Communication (NFC) and study whether NFCis a suitable technology for supporting the positioning awareness system. Inaddition, I also study the interactions that occur while users are collaborativelycreating music pieces. I run several user studies that indicate my prototype issuitable for supporting music creation collaborative activities, that NFC pro-vides a high level of accuracy when it comes to support the relative positioningsystem and that the prototype fosters social interaction among the users. Partof the results from this research effort have been presented in Fifth Workshopon Ubiquitous Music (V UbiMus) and can be found in Exploring the potentialof mobile technology for creating music collaboratively [1]

  • 127.
    Real-Delgado, Yeray
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring the potential of mobile technology for creating music collaboratively2014In: Proceedings of V Workshop on Ubiquitous Music, Publishing and art , 2014, p. 15-16Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Reski, Nico
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Change your Perspective: Exploration of a 3D Network created with Open Data in an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment using a Head-mounted Display and Vision-based Motion Controls2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Year after year, technologies are evolving in an incredible rapid pace, becoming faster, more complex, more accurate and more immersive. Looking back just a decade, especially interaction technologies have made a major leap. Just two years ago in 2013, after being researched for quite some time, the hype around virtual reality (VR) arouse renewed enthusiasm, finally reaching mainstream attention as the so called head-mounted displays (HMD), devices worn on the head  to grant a visual peek into the virtual world, gain more and more acceptance with the end-user. Currently, humans interact with computers in a very counter-intuitive two dimensional way. The ability to experience digital content in the humans most natural manner, by simply looking around and perceiving information from their surroundings, has the potential to be a major game changer in how we perceive and eventually interact with digital information. However, this confronts designers and developers with new challenges of how to apply these exciting technologies, supporting interaction mechanisms to naturally explore digital information in the virtual world, ultimately overcoming real world boundaries. Within the virtual world, the only limit is our imagination.

    This thesis investigates an approach of how to naturally interact and explore information based on open data within an immersive virtual reality environment using a head-mounted display and vision-based motion controls. For this purpose, an immersive VR application visualizing information as a network of European capital cities has been implemented, offering interaction through gesture input. The application lays a major focus on the exploration of the generated network and the consumption of the displayed information. While the conducted user interaction study with eleven participants investigated their acceptance of the developed prototype, estimating their workload and examining their explorative behaviour, the additional dialog with five experts in the form of explorative discussions provided further feedback towards the prototype’s design and concept. The results indicate the participants’ enthusiasm and excitement towards the novelty and intuitiveness of exploring information in a less traditional way than before, while challenging them with the applied interface and interaction design in a positive manner. The design and concept were also accepted through the experts, valuing the idea and implementation. They provided constructive feedback towards the visualization of the information as well as emphasising and encouraging to be even bolder, making more usage of the available 3D environment. Finally, the thesis discusses these findings and proposes recommendations for future work.

  • 129.
    Reski, Nico
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Alissandrakis, Aris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Change Your Perspective: Exploration of a 3D Network Created from Open Data in an Immersive Virtual Reality Environment2016In: ACHI 2016: The Ninth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions / [ed] Alma Leora Culén, Leslie Miller, Irini Giannopulu, Birgit Gersbeck-Schierholz, International Academy, Research and Industry Association (IARIA), 2016, p. 403-410Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates an approach of how to naturally interact and explore information (based on open data) within an immersive virtual reality environment (VRE) using a head-mounted display and vision-based motion controls. We present the results of a user interaction study that investigated the acceptance of the developed prototype, estimated the workload as well as examined the participants' behavior. Additional discussions with experts provided further feedback towards the prototype's overall design and concept. The results indicate that the participants were enthusiastic regarding the novelty and intuitiveness of exploring information in a VRE, as well as were challenged (in a positive manner) with the applied interface and interaction design. The presented concept and design were well received by the experts, who valued the idea and implementation and encouraged to be even bolder, making more use of the available 3D environment.

  • 130.
    Reski, Nico
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Nordmark, Susanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring New Interaction Mechanisms to Support Information Sharing and Collaboration Using Large Multi-touch Displays in the Context of Digital Storytelling2014In: Proceedings of the 14th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies IEEE - ICALT2014, IEEE Press, 2014, p. 176-180Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide range of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) have been used to support teaching and to enhance the learning process in the last decades. With the latest introduction of large interactive tabletops, multi-touch interaction is taken to the next level since large displays allow and invite not just one but multiple users to interact and collaborate at the same time. The latest presents designers and developers with new challenges in terms of interaction possibilities to promote active collaboration and information sharing. This paper evaluates the use of novel Tangible User Interface (TUI) approaches for the design of an interactive tabletop application conceived to support co-located collaborative learning in the particular context of Digital Storytelling (DS). We present the results of a user interaction study, which considers the users' subjective reaction and acceptance for these User Interface (UI) paradigms, as well as their level of collaboration and communication while working together. The results of the study indicated that the users adapted working in a close collaboration using the provided multi-touch functionalities very quickly. Furthermore, users appreciated the possibility to closely discussing, conversing and exchanging information with their peers through simultaneous interactions on the multi-touch display.

  • 131.
    Reznik-Lavi, Noga
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Promoting Class Interactionsupported by Personal ResponseSystems2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction is an important and essential aspect of the educational learning processes, since it can be used in a wide range of educational settings, in diverse ways (Anderson, 2002). Personal response system technologies (PRS), also known as Clickers, facilitates interactivity with an audience, enabling participants to instantly respond to posed questions and provides a representation of the collected data. The implementation of such systems in real pedagogical settings enables teachers to obtain interactions within big classes while preserving the lesson’s flow (Martyn, 2007).SMS-HIT is a PRS based on mobile devices enabling student interactions via SMS or web, designed and developed in order to support learning and assessment activities in real educational or training situations (Kohen-Vacs, Ronen, & Bar-Ness, 2012). The users create and manage various activities in different topics and pedagogical goals. Types of interactivities offered by this system include voting by selection, free text and submission of quantitative data.A Design based research was conducted in order to evaluate different capabilities that SMS-HIT enables; this study aims to develop additional types of interactions to be added to the system, in order to promote the use of class interaction supported by PRS. During each of the three research iterations, the users’ usage, needs and suggestions have been investigated. According to the findings suitable additions were developed using .NET, combined with JQuery, HTML and CSS.The additional capabilities that have been developed, engage in a new ability of SMS-HIT - sequences activities: creating and managing sequences activities, presenting them and allowing audience to respond to them using mobile devices – one activity after the other.As a result of improving the system, users enjoy new and effective capabilities that were developed to meet these needs. In practice, the use of the SMS-HIT has become wider as more users create varied activities which contains diverse pedagogies.

  • 132.
    Rühmann, Lisa M
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Otero, Nuno
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Oakley, Ian
    Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea.
    A Tangible Tool for Visual Impaired Users to Learn Geometry2016In: Proceedings of the TEI’16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, ACM Press, 2016, p. 577-583Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how an Android application used in combination with a tangible appcessory can facilitate learning for visually impaired students of geometry. This paper presents the status of this ongoing project. It describes the application, the physical appcessory as well as early stage user studies. The application enables visually impaired users to explore simple geometric forms displayed on a tablet through sound and vibrotactile feedback. A deformable physical appcessory that can be manipulated to adopt these forms and its shape sensed by the tablet adds an additional tactile layer to the application and experience. Three user engagements with visually impaired serve as early validations of our project and ideas and provide feedback that directs design and development of future work. Current avenues for the future work will include additional interaction modes in the application, e.g. the ability to digitize real world forms, and improving the robustness of the tangible appcessory.

  • 133.
    Rühmann, Lisa Marie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    ITG - Tangible Geometry for the Visually Impaired: Exploring the potential of extending tablet functionality with appcessories2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how an Android application that is used in combination with tangible appcessories is capable of facilitating a learning experience for visually impaired students within the specific domain of geometry. This study’s approach illustrates how using an application in combination with a physical appcessory can provide information concerning geometry to the visually impaired. An application, called Invisible Tangible Geometry (ITG), was programmed using Android in conjunction with a 3D printed model. This thesis describes the application, the physical appcessory, as well as early stage user studies. The application enables visually impaired users to explore simple geometric forms displayed on a tablet through sound and vibrotactile feedback. A physical appcessory, that can be manipulated to adopt several forms and is dynamic, is used in addition. Its shape is sensed by the tablet adds an additional tactile layer to the application and experience.

    Within the thesis a methodological framework, as well as a user-centered design approach was applied. An expert interview and three user engagements with visually impaired individuals serve as early validations of the project and ideas and provide feedback that directs design and development of future work. Current avenues for the future work will include additional interaction modes in the application. For example, the ability to digitize real world forms, and improving the robustness of the tangible appcessory.

    The plan, for future development, is to establish an autonomous functioning application that enables the visually impaired to be able to explore, participate and interact with geometry smoothly and without the need of aid from others. The correlation of application and appcessory will allow for anything between a quick glance, through feeling the model, and gaining detailed information, by using the application. The application enhances provided information through the use of a model and enriched digital feedback.

  • 134.
    Salov, Aleksandar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Towards automated learning from software development issues: Analyzing open source project repositories using natural language processing and machine learning techniques2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents an in-depth investigation on the subject of how natural language processing and machine learning techniques can be utilized in order to perform a comprehensive analysis of programming issues found in different open source project repositories hosted on GitHub. The research is focused on examining issues gathered from a number of JavaScript repositories based on their user generated textual description. The primary goal of the study is to explore how natural language processing and machine learning methods can facilitate the process of identifying and categorizing distinct issue types. Furthermore, the research goes one step further and investigates how these same techniques can support users in searching for potential solutions to these issues.

    For this purpose, an initial proof-of-concept implementation is developed, which collects over 30 000 JavaScript issues from over 100 GitHub repositories. Then, the system extracts the titles of the issues, cleans and processes the data, before supplying it to an unsupervised clustering model which tries to uncover any discernible similarities and patterns within the examined dataset. What is more, the main system is supplemented by a dedicated web application prototype, which enables users to utilize the underlying machine learning model in order to find solutions to their programming related issues.

    Furthermore, the developed implementation is meticulously evaluated through a number of measures. First of all, the trained clustering model is assessed by two independent groups of external reviewers - one group of fellow researchers and another group of practitioners in the software industry, so as to determine whether the resulting categories contain distinct types of issues. Moreover, in order to find out if the system can facilitate the search for issue solutions, the web application prototype is tested in a series of user sessions with participants who are not only representative of the main target group which can benefit most from such a system, but who also have a mixture of both practical and theoretical backgrounds.

    The results of this research demonstrate that the proposed solution can effectively categorize issues according to their type, solely based on the user generated free-text title. This provides strong evidence that natural language processing and machine learning techniques can be utilized for analyzing issues and automating the overall learning process. However, the study was unable to conclusively determine whether these same methods can aid the search for issue solutions. Nevertheless, the thesis provides a detailed account of how this problem was addressed and can therefore serve as the basis for future research.

  • 135.
    Schmidt, Julia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    GEOVIB: An Application to SupportVisually Impaired and Blind Children inFollowing Geometry Lectures2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Inclusive education has increased in popularity over the last two decades. Inclusiveclassrooms consist of children from diverse backgrounds and with variousimpairments, with special educational needs. Children with special educationalneeds in vision require assistive tools to access visual information. Topics thatmake strong use of such information, e.g. geometry, can therefore be challengingfor children with visual impairments or blindness (VIB) as well as their teachers.Assistive tools like video magniers and physical objects in the shape ofgeometric gures are used to aid VIB in learning basic geometry. Researchershave investigated tools and applications to aid VIB in learning geometry byusing haptic or auditory feedback as well as combinations of these. However,the tools are often not created with considering the classroom environment. Tounderstand the situation and challenges of these two stakeholders (VIBs andtheir teachers) better, a preliminary questionnaire was conducted. Five participantsof each of the two groups lled out the questionnaires. A concept for anAndroid tablet application to convey pre-existing geometric shapes and theirannotations to VIB, using sound feedback and sonication was created andpartly developed in two incremental implementation phases. The shapes arerecreated on the tablet using elements like circles and paths and then enhancedwith sound feedback to guide VIB to the various elements. With an iterativedesign, the two prototype increments were evaluated. The rst evaluation wasan usability study. Using seven blindfolded, young adult participants, feedbackwas gathered on dierent combinations between sound, tactile, and vibrationfeedback, as well as the general usability of the application for an validation ofthe approach. Each participants was presented the dierent approaches in anotherorder. For each approach, they were asked to explore three basic geometricshapes and then, without blindfold, draw these shapes. The time for applicationinteraction was measured and overall observation notes were taken. After eachapproach a short questionnaire was given to the participant. Another longerquestionnaire was conducted after all approaches were tested. It was foundthat sound feedback alone is not sucient in precisely conveying the geometricshapes to the users. However, combined with tactile objects to mark positionsof vertices on the screen the result improved signicantly and this approach wasfavored by the participants. The usability of the application is good but hasroom for improvement. A study was conducted with two teachers as expertslater on with the second prototype version. Two teachers with several yearsof experience teaching geometry to VIB in inclusive settings were interviewedconcerning the expected usability of the application for VIB and in the classroom,as well as general challenges and possibilities of including the applicationinto geometry lectures. As the teachers were located in Germany, they weresent a video demonstrating the application. One interview was conducted overemail while the other was conducted over Skype. The only challenges identiedare the media anity of teachers and the reliability of technology. VIB are notexpected to face challenges in utilizing the application and teachers could havemore freedom in the geometric shapes they present to their class.

  • 136.
    Shields, Christopher
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    2D vs 3D in a touch-free hand gesture based interface: An exploration of how 2D and 3D visual aids affect a user’s ability to learn a new interface2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    3D is a popular topic as an increasing amount of media and technology begin to support 3D interaction.  With the rise of interest in 3D interaction, the question of why there is a demand and desire for 3D over 2D interaction becomes relevant. This thesis compares the differences between a 3D heads up display and a 2D heads up display for a touch free gesture based virtual keyboard.  The gesture interface used in the tests is a way of communicating with a system using gestures of the hands tracked by a motion sensor.  This thesis tested 16 users where half of the users used a 2D version of a heads up display and the other half used a 3D version of a heads up display.  Both user groups were tested with identical conditions and in an identical environment.  Raw statistical data was gathered from a logging mechanism in the interface and qualitative data was gathered from questionnaires and observation notes.  The results from the experiment showed that the 2D and 3D heads up display gave very similar results. However, results also showed slightly better qualitative results from the 3D heads up display observation and questionnaire data.  The conclusion indicated no clear advantage for the 2D version or the 3D version.  The discussion shows that many other factors in the design process and selection of users, play a large role in the comparison of 2D vs 3D visualizations.  Factors such as age and familiarity with different levels of technology are indicated to be contributing factors when comparing 2D vs 3D.  The results and discussion hope to provide a starting point for future comparison research in the field of 2D compared to 3D visualization.

  • 137.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. Malmö University.
    Gil de la Iglesia, Didac
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Designing a didactical situation with mobile and web technologies2015In: 9th Congress of European Research in Mathematics Education (CERME 9), 4-5 February, 2015, Prague, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have designed, implemented and evaluated a didactical situation where 27 students in grade 4 created large triangular constructions in an outdoor environment by involving a customized GPS-based mobile application. The students’ strategies for construction were reflected upon during a teacher-led discussion involving web technologies and aiming at the formulation of principles for construction. The effective communication of underpinning theories and possible learning objectives, in combination with user-friendly mobile and web technologies, served to scaffold the teacher’s successful orchestration of a logos-oriented mathematical discourse.

  • 138.
    Sollervall, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Designing with mobile technologies for enabling transitions across mathematical contexts2015In: Mobile learning and mathematics: foundations, design, and case studies / [ed] Helen Crompton and John Traxler, Routledge, 2015, p. 71-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    A Rich Context Model: Design and Implementation2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest developments of mobile devices include a variety of hardware features that allow for more rich data collection and services. Numerous sensors, Internet connectivity, low energy Bluetooth connectivity to other devices (e.g., smart watches, activity tracker, health data monitoring devices) are just some examples of hardware that helps to provide additional information that can be beneficially used for many application domains. Among others, they could be utilized in mobile learning scenarios (for data collection in science education, field trips), in mobile health scenarios (for health data collection and monitoring the health state of patients, changes in health conditions and/or detection of emergency situations), and in personalized recommender systems. This information captures the current context situation of the user that could help to make mobile applications more personalized and deliver a better user experience. Moreover, the context related information collected by the mobile device and the different applications can be enriched by using additional external information sources (e.g., Web Service APIs), which help to describe the user’s context situation in more details.

    The main challenge in context modeling is the lack of generalization at the core of the model, as most of the existing context models depend on particular application domains or scenarios. We tackle this challenge by conceptualizing and designing a rich generic context model. In this thesis, we present the state of the art of recent approaches used for context modeling and introduce a rich context model as an approach for modeling context in a domain-independent way. Additionally, we investigate whether context information can enhance existing mobile applications by making them sensible to the user’s current situation. We demonstrate the reusability and flexibility of the rich context model in a several case studies. The main contributions of this thesis are: (1) an overview of recent, existing research in context modeling for different application domains; (2) a theoretical foundation of the proposed approach for modeling context in a domain-independent way; (3) several case studies in different mobile application domains.

  • 140.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Exploring Different Use Cases for a Rich Context Model for Mobile Applications2015In: Proceedings of Doctoral Symposium of the 9th International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context (CONTEXT 2015) / [ed] Peter Werner Eklund & Rebekeh Wegener, 2015, Vol. 1537, p. 23-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Substantial research in the field of context modeling has explored aspects related to the use of contextualization in various mobile scenarios. The current context of a mobile user has been often limited to his/her current position, neglecting the possibilities offered by modern mobile devices of providing a much richer representation of the current user’s context. This research aims to improve the usability of users’ context in the mobile software development process. Therefore, this paper presents the proposal of a rich context model (RCM) as general approach for context modeling to explore the context of the users in different application domains.

  • 141.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    University of Applied Sciences, Ruhr West Bottrop, Germany.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    About the Contextualization of Learning Objects in Mobile Learning Settings2013In: QScience Proceedings: Vol. 2013, 12th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (mLearn 2013), Qatar: QScience.com , 2013, p. 67-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many efforts have been undertaken in order to design and deploy learning activities that make use ofmodern mobile devices, like smartphones and tablet PC’s. Hence, new possibilities for supporting these so-called mobilelearning scenarios have risen. One of the major benefits of these kinds of learning scenarios is the possibility of a learnerto have access to learning content independent of time and place and therefore, enabling learners to learn in very differentsituations. In order to support learning across different settings, this paper discusses an approach that allows identifying abest fitting format of a Learning Object (LO) with respect to the current situation of the learner. This approach allows todelivering learning content in a format that may suit the current context of the learner and therefore, it enables seamlesslearning.

  • 142.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology. University of Applied Sciences Ruhr Wes, Germany.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Implementing and Validating a Mobile Learning Scenario Using Contextualized Learning Objects2014In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Computers in Education ICCE 2014: November 30, 2014 - December 4, 2014, Nara, Japan, Japan: Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2014, p. 522-527Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Substantial research in the field of mobile learning has explored aspects related to contextualized learning scenarios. Nevertheless, the current context of a mobile learner has been often limited to his/her current position, neglecting the possibilities offered by modern mobile devices of providing a much richer representation of the current learner´s context. In this paper, we show that a detailed contextualization of the learner may provide benefits in mobile learning scenarios. In order to validate this claim, we implemented a mobile learning scenario based on an approach that allows for a very rich and detailed contextualization of the mobile learner. The scenario that we implemented allowed exchange students to be guided at Linnaeus University in Växjö, Sweden in order to get familiar with the campus and prominent institutions on it. We carried out a study including two groups; one that performed learning activities with contextualization support and one other without it. The results of our evaluation showed significantly better results for the contextualized approach, especially with respect to the acceptance of the Perceived Ease of Use.

  • 143.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology. University of Applied Sciences Ruhr West. Germany.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Supporting Content Contextualization in Web Based Applications on Mobile Devices2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Web Information Systems and Technologies: Aachen, Germany, 8-10 May, 2013 / [ed] Karl-Heinz Krempels, Alexander Stocker, SciTePress, 2013, p. 501-504Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile devices, in the form of smartphones, are endowed with rich capabilities in terms of multimedia, sensors and connectivity. The wide adoption of these devices allows using them across different settings and situations. One area in which mobile devices become more and more prominent is within the field of mobile learning. Here, mobile devices provide rich possibilities for the contextualization of the learner, by using the set of sensors available in the device. On the one hand, the usage of mobile devices enables participation in learning activities independent of time and space. Nevertheless, developing mobile learning applications for the heterogeneity of mobile devices available in the market becomes a challenge. Not only this is a problem related to form factor aspects, but also the large number of different operating systems, platforms and app infrastructures (app stores) are aspects to be considered. In this paper we present our initial efforts with regard to the development of cross-platform mobile applications to support the contextualization of learning content. 

  • 144.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Using a Rich Context Model for a News Recommender System for Mobile Users2014In: UMAP 2014 Extended Proceedings: Posters, Demos, Late-breaking Results and Workshop Proceedings of the 22nd Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation, and Personalization co-located with the 22nd Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation, and Personalization (UMAP2014) Aalborg, Denmark, July 7-11, 2014. / [ed] Iván Cantador, Min Chi, Rosta Farzan, Robert Jäschke, CEUR , 2014, Vol. 1181, p. 13-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommender systems have become an important application domain related to the development of personalized mobile services. Thus, various recommender mechanisms have been developed for filtering and delivering relevant information to mobile users. This paper presents a rich context model to provide the relevant content of news to the current context of mobile users. The proposed rich context model allows not only providing relevant news with respect to the user’s current context but, at the same time, also determines a convenient representation format of news suitable for mobile devices.

  • 145.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Using a Rich Context Model for People-to-People Recommendation2015In: 2015 3rd International Conference on Future Internet of Things and Cloud (FiCloud), 24-26 Aug. 2015, Rome, IEEE, 2015, p. 703-708Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an approach for People- to-People recommendations based on a Rich Context Model (RCM). We consider personal user information as contextual information used for our recommendations. The evaluation of our recommendation approach was performed on a social network of students. The obtained results do show a significant increase in performance while, at the same time, a slight increase in quality in comparison to a manual matching process. The proposed approach is flexible enough to handle different data types of contextual information and easy adaptable to other recommendation domains. 

  • 146.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Rana, Juwel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology. Telenor Grp, Norway.
    Using a Rich Context Model for Real-Time Big Data Analytics in Twitter2016In: 2016 IEEE 4TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FUTURE INTERNET OF THINGS AND CLOUD WORKSHOPS (FICLOUDW), IEEE, 2016, p. 228-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an approach for contextual big data analytics in social networks, particularly in Twitter. The combination of a Rich Context Model (RCM) with machine learning is used in order to improve the quality of the data mining techniques. We propose the algorithm and architecture of our approach for real-time contextual analysis of tweets. The proposed approach can be used to enrich and empower the predictive analytics or to provide relevant context-aware recommendations.

  • 147.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Contextualization of Mobile Learners2015In: Mobile Learning: Trends, Attitudes and Effectiveness / [ed] Mohamed Hamada, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2015, p. 39-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes our current research efforts related to the contextualization of learners in mobile learning activities. Substantial research in the field of mobile learning has explored aspects related to contextualized learning scenarios. However, new ways of interpretation and consideration of contextual information of mobile learners are necessary. This chapter provides an overview regarding the state of the art of innovative approaches for supporting contextualization in mobile learning. Additionally, we provide the description of the design and implementation of a flexible multi-dimensional vector space model to organize and process contextual data together with visualization tools for further analysis and interpretation. We also present a study with outcomes and insights on the usage of the contextualization support for mobile learners. To conlcude, we discuss the benefits of using contextualization models for learners in different use-cases. Moreover, a description is presented in order to illustrate how the proposed contextual model can easily be adapted and reused for different use-cases in mobile learning scenarios and potentially other mobile fields.

  • 148.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Jansen, Marc
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology. University of Applied Sciences Ruhr West, Germany.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Flexible and Contextualized Cloud Applications for Mobile Learning Scenarios2016In: Mobile, Ubiquitous, and Pervasive Learning: Fundaments, Applications, and Trends / [ed] Alejandro Peña-Ayala, Springer Publishing Company, 2016, p. 167-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes our research efforts related to the design of mobile learning (m-learning) applications in cloud-computing (CC) environments. Many cloud-based services can be used/integrated in m-learning scenarios, hence, there is a rich source of applications that could easily be applied to design and deploy those within the context of cloud-based services. Here, we present two cloud-based approaches—a flexible framework for an easy generation and deployment of mobile learning applications for teachers, and a flexible contextualization service to support personalized learning environment for mobile learners. The framework provides a flexible approach that supports teachers in designing mobile applications and automatically deploys those in order to allow teachers to create their own m-learning activities supported by mobile devices. The contextualization service is proposed to improve the content delivery of learning objects (LOs). This service allows adapting the learning content and the mobile user interface (UI) to the current context of the user. Together, this leads to a powerful and flexible framework for the provisioning of potentially ad hoc mobile learning scenarios. We provide a description of the design and implementation of two proposed cloud-based approaches together with scenario examples. Furthermore, we discuss the benefits of using flexible and contextualized cloud applications in mobile learning scenarios. Hereby, we contribute to this growing field of research by exploring new ways for designing and using flexible and contextualized cloud-based applications that support m-learning.

  • 149.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Ehrenberg, Nils
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Cuartielles, David
    Arduino Verkstad, Sweden.
    Zbick, Janosch
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Design Strategies for developing a Visual Platform for Physical Computing with Mobile Tools for Project Documentation and Reflection2015In: Proceedings of the Workshops at the 17th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education AIED 2015, Madrid, Spain, June 22 - 26, 2015 / [ed] Jesus Boticario, Kaisa Muldner, CEUR-WS.org , 2015, p. 57-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster discusses work on the design of a visual-based programming language for physical computing and mobile tools for the learners to actively document and reflect on their projects. These are parts of a European project that is investigating how to generate, analyze, use and provide feedback from analytics derived from hands-on learning activities. Our aim is to raise a discussion about how learning analytics, intelligence, and the role of learners’ documenting their work can provide richer opportunities for supporting learning and teaching.

  • 150.
    Spikol, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pargman, Teresa Cerratto
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Emerging Design: Transforming the STEAM Learning Landscape with the Support of Digital Technologies PREFACE2017In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 34, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other academic)
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