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  • 101.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Globalization challenges for knowledge organization systems (KOSs)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102. Golub, Koraljka
    Knowledge organization systems2011Other (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Potential and Challenges of Subject Access in Libraries Today on the Example of Swedish Libraries2016In: The international information & library review, ISSN 1057-2317, E-ISSN 1095-9297, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 204-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The “Advances in Library Data and Access” column examines technological advances internal and external to libraries. The focus is on how library data is created and used. The strength of the column is its broad, international focus, and contributors are encouraged to explore issues and recent advances in information technology relevant to their geographical region, as well as the larger, global audience. Interested authors are invited to submit proposals and articles to the column editor at moulaisonhe@missouri.edu. Please include “IILR Submission” in the subject line of the e-mail.

    Ensuring quality subject access in information services is one of the major tasks in libraries and related information institutions. An exploratory study of Swedish library catalogs indicates that subject access is not addressed systematically, that in new digital collections knowledge organization systems are applied to a limited degree, and in integrated library and commercial databases the mappings between the different knowledge organization systems do not exist. Possibilities are suggested to help alleviate these issues, such as social tagging and automated subject indexing; how to best implement them calls for further research.

  • 104.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Pristupi automatskoj predmetnoj klasifikaciji tekstualnih Web-stranica2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Project methodology in subject-based knowledge organization: experiences from the UK2014In: Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) Proceedings, 2014, Vol. 13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management may involve a wide variety of methodologies depending on numerous factors such as sponsors, scope, stakeholders etc. This particular workshop will draw on experience from three research projects in the area of subject-based knowledge organization, all with the same funder (JISC – Joint Information Systems Committee) but different scopes and deliverables, stakeholders, time frame and international project teams. It will discuss various components of project management such as planning, catering for the funder/stakeholder needs and requirements, communication, delivering on time etc. This will include writing project documentation such as proposals, progress and final reports as well as project-specific deliverables. The workshop will draw on theories of project management as applied to the three specific research projects. While the projects are in the same broad subject area of knowledge organization, it aims to demonstrate general research-project methodology.

  • 106.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [ Review of ] Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić : Digital Libraries for Cultural Heritage : Development, Outcomes, and Challenges from European Perspectives2018In: Vjesnik Bibliotekara Hrvatske, ISSN 0507-1925, E-ISSN 1334-6938Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    (Semi)-automated subject indexing of Swedish resources: Evaluating (a combination of) cataloguers', end users' and automated index terms in retrieval2016In: International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2016 (DC-2016): Special session : University Metadata and Retrieval : The Death of the Library Catalog?, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Some Thoughts on Preserving Functions of Library Catalogs in Networked Environments2016In: Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 1931-6550, E-ISSN 1550-8366, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 23-25Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Classification and subject indexing systems have long been the mainstay of established information providers to deliver content precisely on topic. Logical semantic hierarchies and rich interconnections of related terms and synonyms enable accurate retrieval and browsing of similar resources and ideally should be available in online environments. But the cost of features may not be sustainable with massively growing resources. Efforts to merge databases and map disparate subject terminology require considerable human intervention. A possible solution combines controlled and uncontrolled terms from three sources: authoritative professional indexing, automated term suggestion and uncontrolled keywords proposed by authors or end users’ social tags. Research is required to investigate the effectiveness, cost and applicability of combining controlled and uncontrolled terms for information retrieval.

  • 109.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Subject Access in Swedish Discovery Services2018In: Knowledge organization, ISSN 0943-7444, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 297-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While support for subject searching has been traditionally advocated for in library catalogs, often in the form of a catalog objective to find everything that a library has on a certain topic, research has shown that subject access has not been satisfactory. Many existing online catalogs and discovery services do not seem to make good use of the intellectual effort invested into assigning controlled subject index terms and classes. For example, few support hierarchical browsing of classification schemes and other controlled vocabularies with hierarchical structures, few provide end-user-friendly options to choose a more specific concept to increase precision, a broader concept or related concepts to increase recall, to disambiguate homonyms, or to find which term is best used to name a concept. Optimum subject access in library catalogs and discovery services is analyzed from the perspective of earlier research as well as contemporary conceptual models and cataloguing codes. Eighteen proposed features of what this should entail in practice are drawn. In an exploratory qualitative study, the three most common discovery services used in Swedish academic libraries are analyzed against these features. In line with previous research, subject access in contemporary interfaces is demonstrated to less than optimal. This is in spite of the fact that individual collections have been indexed with controlled vocabularies and a significant number of controlled vocabularies have been mapped to each other and are available in interoperable standards. Strategic action is proposed to build research-informed (inter)national standards and guidelines.

  • 110.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Subject access to information: an interdisciplinary approach2014 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the research of experts from the fields of computing and library science, this ground-breaking work will show you how to combine two very different approaches to classification to create more effective, user-friendly information-retrieval systems.

    A much-needed analysis of the intersection of information organization and technology, this interdisciplinary work encompasses both current and potential methods of organizing information by subject. It examines traditional approaches as they are used in the online environment and explores computer science approaches, such as ontologies and automated tools for subject information organization. Entries review the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches, showcase their applications today, and project what those applications may be in the future.Content ranges from background on the importance of information organization in general to the importance of information organization by subject in particular. Traditional and modern knowledge-organization systems are covered, as are technological standards, selected topics in automated tools, and interdisciplinary research and cooperation. By tackling varied approaches, the work provides you with an appreciation of the tools—and an understanding of common aims.

    Features

    • Provides an interdisciplinary overview of current and potential approaches to organizing information by subject
    • Covers both pure computer science and pure library science topics in easy-to-understand language accessible to audiences from both disciplines
    • Reviews technological standards for representation, storage, and retrieval of varied knowledge-organization systems and their constituent elements
    • Suggests a collaborative approach that will reduce duplicate efforts and make it easier to find solutions to practical problems
  • 111.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Filozofski fakultet u Zagrebu, Department of Information Science.
    Subject retrieval in web-based library catalogs2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has been motivated by past research, problems and realizations that online library catalog users frequently perform subject searches – using keywords, subject headings and descriptors – and these searches have yielded unsatisfactory results. Web-based catalogs or WebPACs (Web-based Online Public Access Catalogs), belonging to the so-called third generation of online catalogs and providing a wide variety of search options, remain largely underutilized despite the continuous advancement of information retrieval systems. Users still encounter a number of problems, such as those related to translating their concepts to the language of the catalog’s system and cross-references prepared to this purpose. Subject access in online library catalogs can be provided through different access points. To that purpose natural and controlled indexing and retrieval languages are used, and each among them has its advantages and downsides. Natural language indexing is performed by the computer, in which process words from defined fields are automatically extracted. Controlled indexing languages are those in which selection of terms to be assigned to documents is manually performed. These are, for example, classification systems, subject heading languages and thesauri. During the 1970s, a consensus was reached that the best retrieval results are gained when using both types of indexing languages simultaneously. Apart from indexing languages, it is necessary to take into account user search behavior; and while designing user interface one has to allow for the users’ skills and knowledge - ensuring instruction, help and feedback information at every step of the retrieval process. The aim of the research was to determine the variety and quality of subject access to information in WebPACs of British university libraries, including searching by words or classification marks, natural and controlled languages, browsing options, and forming simple and complex queries in order to conclude about existing advancements, offered models and employed methods and compare them to WebPACs of Croatian university libraries.

  • 112.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Lunds universitet, Sweden.
    Subject-based information organization: KnowLib´s findings2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tehnološki standardi u sustavima za organizaciju znanja: [ Technological standards in knowledge organization systems ]2016In: Predmetna obrada : pogled unaprijed, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Making of an iSchool2018In: Information today, ISSN 8755-6286, E-ISSN 2169-0340, Vol. 35, no 4Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Lunds universitet.
    The role of different thesauri terms in automated subject classification of text2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to explore to what degree different types of terms in engineering information (Ei) thesaurus and classification scheme influence automated subject classification performance. Preferred terms, their synonyms, broader, narrower, related terms, and captions are examined in combination with a stemmer and a stop-word list. The algorithm comprises string-to-string matching between words in the documents to be classified and words in term lists derived from the Ei thesaurus and classification scheme. The data collection for evaluation consists of some 35000 scientific paper abstracts from the compendex database. A subset of the Ei thesaurus and classification scheme is used, comprising 92 classes at up to five hierarchical levels from general engineering. The results show that preferred terms perform best, whereas captions perform worst. Stemming in most cases shows performance improvement, whereas the stop-word list does not have a significant impact.

  • 116.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ahlström, Ida
    Linnaeus University, The University Library.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Subject metadata for humanities journal articles: Indexing consistency between a local repository and an external bibliographic database2019In: Presented at DCMI 2019: Metadata Innovation. Seoul, South Korea - September 23rd-26th, 2019, Dublin Core Metadata Initiative , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ardö, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Importance of HTML structural elements and metadata in automated subject classification2005In: Research and advanced technology for digital libraries / [ed] Andreas Rauber, Stavros Christodoulakis, A Min Tjoa, Springer, 2005, p. 368-378Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to determine how significance indicators assigned to different Web page elements (internal metadata, title, headings, and main text) influence automated classification. The data collection that was used comprised 1000 Web pages in engineering, to which Engineering Information classes had been manually assigned. The significance indicators were derived using several different methods: (total and partial) precision and recall, semantic distance and multiple regression. It was shown that for best results all the elements have to be included in the classification process. The exact way of combining the significance indicators turned out not to be overly important: using the F1 measure, the best combination of significance indicators yielded no more than 3% higher performance results than the baseline.

  • 118.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ardö, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Mladenic, Dunja
    Grobelnik, Marko
    Comparing and combining two approaches to automated subject classification of text2006In: Research and advanced technology for digital libraries / [ed] Julio Gonzalo, Constantino Thanos, M. Felisa Verdej and Rafael C. Carrasco, Springer, 2006, p. 467-470Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A machine-learning and a string-matching approach to automated subject classification of text were compared, as to their performance, advantages and downsides. The former approach was based on an SVM algorithm, while the latter comprised string-matching between a controlled vocabulary and words in the text to be classified. Data collection consisted of a subset from Compendex, classified into six different classes. It was shown that SVM on average outperforms the string-matching approach: our hypothesis that SVM yields better recall and string-matching better precision was confirmed only on one of the classes. The two approaches being complementary, we investigated different combinations of the two based on combining their vocabularies. The results have shown that the original approaches, i.e. machine-learning approach without using background knowledge from the controlled vocabulary, and string-matching approach based on controlled vocabulary, outperform approaches in which combinations of automatically and manually obtained terms were used. Reasons for these results need further investigation, including a larger data collection and combining the two using predictions.

  • 119.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Dagobert, Soergel
    University of Buffalo, USA.
    Buchanan, George
    City University, UK.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Lykke, Marianne
    University of Aalborg, Denmark.
    Hiom, Debra
    University of Bristol, UK.
    A framework for evaluating automatic indexing or classification in the context of retrieval2016In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2330-1635, E-ISSN 2330-1643, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tools for automatic subject assignment help deal with scale and sustainability in creating and enriching metadata, establishing more connections across and between resources and enhancing consistency. While some software vendors and experimental researchers claim the tools can replace manual subject indexing, hard scientific evidence of their performance in operating information environments is scarce. A major reason for this is that research is usually conducted in laboratory conditions, excluding the complexities of real-life systems and situations. The paper reviews and discusses issues with existing evaluation approaches such as problems of aboutness and relevance assessments, implying the need to use more than a single “gold standard” method when evaluating indexing and retrieval and proposes a comprehensive evaluation framework. The framework is informed by a systematic review of the literature on indexing, classification and approaches: evaluating indexing quality directly through assessment by an evaluator or through comparison with a gold standard; evaluating the quality of computer-assisted indexing directly in the context of an indexing workflow, and evaluating indexing quality indirectly through analyzing retrieval performance.

  • 120.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Lund University.
    Automatic classification using DDC on the Swedish Union Catalogue2018In: Proceedings of the 18th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS 2018) Workshop, Porto, Portugal, September 13, 2018 / [ed] Philipp Mayr, Douglas Tudhope, Joseph Busch, Koraljka Golub, Marjorie Hlava & Marcia Zeng, CEUR-WS.org , 2018, p. 4-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more and more digital collections of various information re- sources becoming available, also increasing is the challenge of assigning subject index terms and classes from quality knowledge organization systems. While the ultimate purpose is to understand the value of automatically produced Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) classes for Swedish digital collections, the paper aims to evaluate the performance of two machine learning algorithms for Swe- dish catalogue records from the Swedish union catalogue (LIBRIS). The algo- rithms are tested on the top three hierarchical levels of the DDC. Based on a data set of 143,838 records, evaluation shows that Support Vector Machine with linear kernel outperforms Multinomial Naïve Bayes algorithm. Also, using keywords or combining titles and keywords gives better results than using only titles as input. The class imbalance where many DDC classes only have few records greatly affects classification performance: 81.37% accuracy on the training set is achieved when at least 1,000 records per class are available, and 66.13% when few records on which to train are available. Proposed future research involves an exploration of the intellectual effort put into creating the DDC to further improve the algorithm performance as commonly applied in string matching, and to test the best approach on new digital collections that do not have DDC assigned.

  • 121.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Automatic classification Using DDC on the Swedish Union Catalogue2019In: European DDC Users Group, EDUG, Annual Meeting 9-10 May 2019: National Library of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hagelbäck, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ardö, Anders
    Automatic subject classification of Swedish DDC: Impact of tuning and training data set2019In: 19th European NKOS Workshop, 23rd TPDL: Oslo, 12 September 2019, Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services/Structures, NKOS , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation builds on the NKOS 2018 presentation of automatically produced Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) classes for Swedish union catalogue (LIBRIS). Based on a dataset of 143,838 records, Support Vector Machine with linear kernel outperforms Multinomial Naïve Bayes algorithm. Impact of features shows that using keywords or combining titles and keywords gives better results than using only titles as input. Stemming only marginally improves the results. Removed stop-words reduced accuracy in most cases, while removing less frequent words increased it marginally. Word embeddings combined with different types of neural networks (Simple linear network, Standard neural network, 1D convolutional neural network, Recurrent neural network) produced worse results than Naïve Bayes /Support Vector Machine, but reach close results. The greatest impact is produced by the number of training examples: 81.37% accuracy on the training set is achieved when at least 1,000 records per class are available, and 66.13% when few records on which to train are available.

  • 123. Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Hamon, Thierry
    Ardö, Anders
    Automated classification of textual documents based on a controlled vocabulary in engineering2007In: Knowledge organization, ISSN 0943-7444, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 247-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated subject classification has been a challenging research issue for many years now, receiving particular attention in the past decade due to rapid increase of digital documents. The most frequent approach to automated classification is machine learning. It, however, requires training documents and performs well on new documents only if these are similar enough to the former. We explore a string-matching algorithm based on a controlled vocabulary, which does not require training documents--instead it reuses the intellectual work put into creating the controlled vocabulary. Terms from the Engineering Information thesaurus and classification scheme were matched against title and abstract of engineering papers from the Compendex database. Simple string-matching was enhanced by several methods such as term weighting schemes and cut-offs, exclusion of certain terms, and enrichment of the controlled vocabulary with automatically extracted terms. The best results are 76% recall when the controlled vocabulary is enriched with new terms, and 79% precision when certain terms are excluded. Precision of individual classes is up to 98%. These results are comparable to state-of-the-art machine-learning algorithms.

  • 124.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    (Big) Data in Library and Information Science: A Brief Overview of Some Important Problem Areas2017In: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 1098-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries hold a long history of a multidimensional focus on collecting, storing, organizing, preserving and providing access to information resources for various types of users. Data is nothing new to Library and Information Science (LIS) and Big Data presents a quantitative expansion of an already well-known object of study. Scholarly communication, data sharing and data curation are three areas related to data in LIS and are discussed in this paper in the light of current developments as well as from the perspective of attaining the research area relevance in the discipline over time. Big Data, new technologies and networked research environments will continue to increase both in numbers and size. LIS is rapidly developing tools to meet the opportunities arising - through educational initiatives and the development of new research areas such as data curation and altmetrics. Since social and political demands for open data grow, these issues are pressing.

  • 125.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Big data in Library and Information Science: from scientific communication and metadata to cultural sciences2015In: Big data: från hype till handling, Linnaeus University, 4 December 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Welcome and introduction: To workshop and participants2016In: 16th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop at the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2016 (DC-2016), 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    LNU as a Unique iSchool2016Other (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, JoacimLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.Seldén, LarsLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology: Special Issue : iSchools Around the World2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Seldén, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Cult of the "I": Organizational symbolism and curricula in three Scandinavian iSchools with comparisons to three American2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 48-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum content in relation to these intentions. By doing so, a picture will be given of the international expansion of the iSchool concept in terms of organisational symbolism and practical educational content. In order to underline the approaches of the Scandinavian schools, comparisons are made to three American iSchools.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is framed through theory on organisational symbolism and the intentions of the iSchool movement as formulated in its vision statements. Empirically, the study consists of two parts: close readings of three documents outlining the considerations of three Scandinavian LIS schools before applying for the iSchool status, and statistical analysis of 427 syllabi from master level courses at three Scandinavian and three American iSchools.

    Findings

    All three Scandinavian schools, analysed, have recently become iSchools, and though some differences are visible, it is hard to distinguish anything in their syllabi as carriers of what can be described as an iSchool identity. In considering iSchool identity, it instead benefits on a symbolic level that are most prominent, such as branding, social visibility and the possible attraction of new student groups. The traditionally strong relation to national library sectors are emphasised as important to maintain, specifically in Norway and Sweden.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study is done on iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with empirical comparison to three American schools. These comparisons face the challenge of meeting the educational system and programme structure of each individual country. Despite this, findings prove possible to use as ground for conclusions, although empirical generalisations concerning, for instance, other countries must be made with caution.

    Practical implications

    This study highlights the practical challenges met in international expansion of the iSchool movement, both on a practical and symbolic level. Both the iSchool Caucus and individual schools considering becoming iSchools may use these findings as a point of reference in development and decision making.

    Originality/value

    This is an original piece of research from which the results may contribute to the international development of the iSchool movement, and extend the theoretical understanding of the iSchool movement as an educational and organisational construct.

  • 130.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Soergel, Dagobert
    University of Buffalo, USA.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Managing classification in libraries: a methodological outline for evaluating automatic subject indexing and classification in Swedish library catalogues2015In: Classification & authority control: expanding resource discovery - proceedings of the International UDC Seminar 2015, 29-30 october, Lisbon, Portugal / [ed] Aida Slavic, Maria Inês Cordeiro, Würtzburg: Ergon-Verlag, 2015, p. 163-174Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Herault, Romain Christian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Lundman, Madeleine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Increasing visibility of culture through online information services: The case of Småland2019In: Presented at iConference 2019: Inform, include, inspire. March 31 - April 3, Maryland, USA, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural events are of increasing importance as value creators in our society. They can serve to promote the attractiveness of a region, to increase social interactions and the quality of life and, not the least, to boost local economies. Today, a comprehensive and up-to-date online overview of cultural events in Småland, a region in southeastern Sweden, is missing mainly due the fact that information is distributed across different actors, communication channels and different media (e.g. individual organizers, commercial vendors, community calendars, newspapers calendars).

    The ultimate purpose of our research is to significantly increase access to information and awareness of cultural attractiveness in Småland using innovative web technologies, both for its inhabitants as well as tourists. Reporting on the first stage of the project, this paper focuses on the exploration of requirements to design a mobile application and a website.

    First guidelines for the design of web and mobile interfaces have been in existence since the early 2000s (Weiss, 2003) and have been updated accordingly to reflect the evolution of technology and the evolution of web and mobile applications. In order to get users to use the application or website, they need to be simple, easy to understand, and present meaningful information to the user (Rubino et al., 2014).

    Functionalities for a cultural event app and/or website include those referring to general ones pertinent to any user-friendly app and specific ones related to information on cultural events. General major functionalities identified in the literature include:

    • Clear and concise way of displaying the content (Boiano et al., 2012);

    • Interactive and quick responding interfaces (ibid.);

    • An interface which is easy to understand with few controls (Gena et al., 2013);

    • The ability to share information, write reviews and connect, which in turn will make the application more visible for the general public (ibid.); and,

    • Utilising user-generated content (ratings, tags, comments, and so on) as a source of information about a user, and for adaptation and recommendation purposes (ibid.).

    Our methodological approach involved three major steps. First, an interview with cultural events providers, using contemporary art as a use case, was conducted in order to identify initial needs and requirements for building the two types of interfaces. The interviews were conducted with two representatives of a governmental institution promoting contemporary art in the region, called Nya Småland (in English New Småland, http://www.nyasmaland.se/9/). After the first round of interviews, initial mock-ups of the interfaces were built, followed by another round of interviews to gain insights and feedback on those designs. Themes in the interviews focused on requirements, functionalities, cultural event providers in the different regions and user groups. The interviewees said that it is generally important to make contemporary art galleries and their activities visible to a wider audience through a good-quality app and a web site. It is often hard to reach the public with cultural events; one reason could be lack of money for advertising. The information gathered from the interviews was then used when creating a new round of refined mock-ups.

    In conclusion, the interviewees consider a quality app and a website for cultural events on contemporary art an important way in which to increase visibility of cultural events in the region and beyond. In addition, preserving information about past events for future uses is considered important, especially for journalists, politicians and journalists. Future research efforts will focus on developing an interactive prototype and gain feedback from content providers and a range of potential end user groups.

  • 132.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Jelušić, Srećko
    Radovanlija-Mileusnić, Snježana
    Pavelić, Damir
    Eksperimentalna primjena zapisa Dublin Core, ONIX i UNIMARC u elektronickim knjizarama u Hrvatskoj: Experimental application of Dublin Core, ONIX and UNIMARC metadata at Croatian online bookshops2002Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Possibilities of using Dublin Core, ONIX and UNIMARC bibliographic records in Croatian online bookshops" describes a research conducted in the period from October 2001 to October 2002, based on the application of three different record formats for printed monographs (Dublin Core, ONIX and UNIMARC)in cooperation with online bookshops in Croatia that wanted to participate. The aim of the researsch was to determine to which extent do different record formats comply with software packages of Croatian online bookshops, as well as what can be recommended to publishers willing to create records (by themselves or with a help from librarians) for the future. The long-term aim was to start metadata creation that will be compatible with a variety of online bookshops and that will enable a better accessibility of print and electronic publications of heritage institutions that also publish.

  • 133.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath, United Kingdom.
    Jones, Catherine
    Lykke Nielsen, Marianne
    Matthews, Brian
    Moon, Jim
    Tudhope, Douglas
    Enhanced Tagging for Discovery (EnTag): final report2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The EnTag project explored the combination and comparison of controlled and folksonomy approaches to semantic interoperability in the context of repositories and digital collections. The aim was to investigate the effect on indexing and retrieval when using only social tagging versus when using social tagging in combination with a knowledge organization system. Two different contexts were explored: tagging by readers (Intute) and tagging by authors (Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)). The major development was that of Intute.

    For each of these a separate demonstrator was developed, one operating on data extracted from Intute (Intute 2008), and the other operating over STFC’s repository (STFC ePublication Archive 2008) in which tagging was conducted by authors submitting papers to the repository. A user study was conducted for each demonstrator, which allowed a general comparison of a repository versus digital collection context, a different knowledge organization system, interface and user community.

    Three major methods to collect user data were log analysis, questionnaires, and interviews. The evaluation of the Intute demonstrator involved comparing basic and advanced system for indexing and retrieval implications. The test setting comprised 28 students in political science and 60 documents covering 4 topics of relevance for the students. Dewey Decimal Classification was used. The STFC study involved 10 authors depositors. The ACM Computing Classification Scheme was used.

    The results of the Intute study showed the importance of controlled vocabulary suggestions (to produce ideas of tags to use, to ensure consistency and retrieval, to make it easier to find focus for the tagging, etc.) Furthermore, the value and usefulness of the suggestions proved to be very dependent on the quality of the suggestions. The suggestions must be user-oriented as regards to level of specificity, perspective and currency. Most tags were added by typing them directly in, as common in social tagging applications; of the other features used, the most frequent one was DDC suggestions, and another tagger’s cloud. That the participants appreciated the suggestions was also seen from their comments. Both simple tagging and enhanced tagging provided additional entry points (for retrieval) beyond the original indexing. There was some evidence that vocabulary-based suggestions, in particular, provided additional access points beyond the literal text. Most participants claimed that they would be willing to use similar tools in real life.

    The results of the STFC study show that there is a general pervading sentiment amongst the depositors that choosing terms from a controlled vocabulary was a “good thing” and in fact better than own terms. The participants could overall see the point of the adding terms for information retrieval purposes, and could see the advantages of consistency of retrieval if the terms used were from an authoritative source. Most claimed that they would be willing to use a tool similar to the one provided, albeit with some reservations and suggestions about the interface. ACM classification was however not seen as good enough for the purposes of this group.

    In conclusion, we recommend that social tagging be allowed in the JISC context (e.g., repositories), enhanced with suggestions from a controlled vocabulary. More findings are needed so it is important to further analyze, experiment and pilot test tools derivative from both Intute and STFC demonstrators. It was shown that further developments and improvements are needed in the following major aspects: automated suggestions, controlled suggestions, tag input features such as auto-complete and spelling checking, controlled vocabulary presentation, other controlled vocabularies and the user interface. Detailed recommendations are discussed in Deliverable 5.1: Recommendations briefing paper.

  • 134.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsen, Birger
    Different approaches to automated classification: is there an exchange of ideas?2005In: Proceedings of ISSI 2005 – the 10th International Conference of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics, Stockholm, Sweden, July 24-28, 2005, Volume 1. / [ed] Peter Ingwersen and Birger Larsen, Stockholm: Karolinska University Press , 2005, p. 270-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated classification of text has been studied by three major research communities, machine learning, information retrieval, and library science, each taking a different approach. The paper aims to study to what a degree the three communities explore others’ ideas, methods, findings. To that purpose we studied direct links (do authors from one community cite authors from another) and indirect links (using bibliographic coupling). Although the study is based on a small sample of 148 papers, the results indicate that the three communities do not exchange ideas to a great extent.

  • 135.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Zagreb .
    Lazić, Nikolaj
    University of Zagreb .
    Accessibility of public library Web sites2002Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to constraints in various browsers and multimedia players people can experience difficulty using the World Wide Web. This is particularly true for people with disabilities who use assistive technologies that can be even more restricted in accessing Web content. This can have greater consequences, such as inaccessible education and lack of access to information in general. Also, access to Web content is sometimes more critical for people with disabilities who can make use of particular digital media only because they are print-disabled. Finally, Web sites created accessible are more usable to non-disabled users as they are more easily navigable and can be used by non-graphical desktop browsers. Particularly affected people with disabilities are visually impaired (blind, short or long sighted, colour blind, tunnel vision sufferers), dyslexic, and people with motor disabilities who are not able to use a mouse. One of disabilities that are most likely to affect Web access is visual impairment. Visually impaired users have difficulties with pages having images without alternative text, especially if images are used as links (as are in image maps). Other common problems are: using structural elements for page layout (using heading mark-ups for making things written in bigger or different type-face), non-described multimedia (no alternative text for sounds and videos), non-existent alternative for finding pages by browsers unable to render frames and scripting languages, non-described tables, poor colour contrast and badly chosen colours for colour blind users. As libraries are intended to provide equal access to information for all, our intention was to determine to what extent Croatian public libraries really ensure access to content provided on their Web pages. To that purpose, W3C’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 have been used to compare the sites with the recommended guidelines. Libraries should provide accessible Web sites, as well as promote Web content accessibility in the community.

  • 136.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Lazić, Nikolaj
    Pristupačnost mrežnih stranica hrvatskih narodnih knjižnica: Accessibility of Croatian public library Web sites2002In: Edupoint, ISSN 1333-5987, Vol. 2, no 8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of the emerging global information infrastructure, designing web content for all involves necessarily people with special needs and disabilities. The World Wide Web Consortium proposes guidelines and techniques to help web designers create web pages accessible to people with a variety of disabilities and thus ensure more equal access for all. However, following the guidelines would also help anybody searching through the World Wide Web. The intention is not to discourage usage of non-text formats, but to make such content more widely accessible. A research has been conducted in order to determine to what extent Croatian public library web sites conform to the guidelines.

  • 137.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lundman, Madeleine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Herault, Romain Christian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Increasing visibility of culture through online information services: The case of Småland2019In: BOBCATSSS 2019: The 27th symposium, 22-24 January 2019, Osijek, Croatia, Tampere: European Association for Library and Information Education and Research , 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural events are of increasing importance as value creators in our society. They can serve to promote the attractiveness of a region, to increase social interactions and the quality of life and, not the least, to boost local economies. The ultimate purpose of our research is to significantly increase awareness of cultural attractiveness in Småland using innovative web technologies, both for its inhabitants as well as tourists. Reporting on the first stage of the project, this paper focuses on the exploration of requirements to design a mobile application and a website of cultural events in the region with contemporary art as a use case. 

    Our methodological approach involved three major steps. First, interviews with cultural event providers, with focus on contemporary art, were conducted in order to identify initial needs and requirements for building the two types of interfaces.The interviews were conducted with two representatives of a governmental institution promoting contemporary art in the region, called Nya Småland (in English New Småland, http://www.nyasmaland.se/9/). After the first round of interviews, initial mock-ups of the interfaces were built, followed by another round of interviews to gain insights and feedback on those designs. Themes in the interviews addressed requirements and functionalities, both from perspectives of cultural event providers as well as those of user groups. The interviewees agreed that it is generally important to make contemporary art galleries and their activities visible to a wider audience through a good-quality app and a web site. It is often hard to reach the public with cultural events; one reason could be lack of money for advertising. 

    In conclusion, the interviewees consider a quality app and a website for cultural events on contemporary art an important way in which to increase visibility of cultural events in the region and beyond. In addition, preserving information about past events for future uses is considered important, especially for journalists and politicians. Future research efforts will focus on developing an interactive prototype and acquiring feedback from content providers and a range of potential end user groups.

  • 138.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Lykke, Marianne
    Automated classification of Web pages in hierarchical browsing2009In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 6, no 65, p. 901-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate whether it is meaningful to use the Engineering Index (Ei) classification scheme for browsing, and then, if proven useful, to investigate the performance of an automated classificationalgorithm based on the Ei classification scheme.

    Design/methodology/approach - A user study was conducted in which users solved four controlled searching tasks. The users browsed the Ei classification scheme in order to examine the suitability of the classification systems for browsing. The classification algorithm was evaluated by the users who judged the correctness of the automatically assigned classes.

    Findings - The study showed that the Ei classification scheme is suited for browsing. Automatically assigned classes were on average partly correct, with some classes working better than others. Success of browsing showed to be correlated and dependent on classification correctness.

    Research limitations/implications - Further research should address problems of disparate evaluations of one and the same web page. Additional reasons behind browsing failures in the Ei classification scheme also need further investigation.

    Practical implications - Improvements for browsing were identified: describing class captions and/or listing their subclasses from start; allowing for searching for words from class captions with synonym search (easily provided for Ei since the classes are mapped to thesauri terms); when searching for class captions, returning the hierarchical tree expanded around the class in which caption the search term is found. The need for improvements of classification schemes was also indicated.

    Originality/value - A User-based evaluation of automated subject classification in the context of browsing has not been conducted before; hence the study also presents new findings concerning methodology.

  • 139.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath .
    Lykke, Marianne
    University of Aalbo.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wale.
    Enhancing social tagging with automated keywords from the Dewey Decimal Classification2014In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 801-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To explore the potential of applying the Dewey Decimal Classification as an established knowledge organisation system for enhancing social tagging, with the ultimate purpose of improving subject indexing and information retrieval. Design/methodology/approach Over 11,000 Intute metadata records in politics were used. 28 politics students were each given 4 tasks, in which a total of 60 resources were tagged in two different configurations, one with uncontrolled social tags only and another with uncontrolled social tags as well as suggestions from a controlled vocabulary. The controlled vocabulary was Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) comprising also mappings from the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). Findings The results demonstrate the importance of controlled vocabulary suggestions for indexing and retrieval: to help produce ideas of which tags to use, to make it easier to find focus for the tagging, to ensure consistency and to increase the number of access points in retrieval. The value and usefulness of the suggestions proved to be dependent on the quality of the suggestions, both as to conceptual relevance to the user and as to appropriateness of the terminology. Originality/value No research has investigated the enhancement of social tagging with suggestions from the Dewey Decimal Classification, an established knowledge organisation system, in a user trial, comparing social tagging only and social tagging enhanced with the suggestions. This paper is a final reflection on all aspects of the study.

  • 140.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath, United Kingdom .
    Lykke Nielsen, Marianne
    Royal School of Library and Information Science, Denmark .
    Moon, Jim
    University of Glamorgan, United Kingdom.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan, United Kingdom.
    Enhancing social tagging with a knowledge organization system2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 141. Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Matovina, Jagoda
    Portali arhiva, knjižnica, muzeja: radionica2002In: 5. seminar Arhivi, knjižnice, muzeji : mogućnosti suradnje u okruženju globalne informacijske infrastrukture : zbornik radova, Zagreb: Hrvatsko knižničarsko društvo , 2002, p. 244-252Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath, UK.
    Moon, Jim
    University of Glamorgan, UK.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan, UK.
    Jones, Catherine
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK.
    Matthews, Brian
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK.
    Puzon, Bartomiej
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK.
    Lykke Nielsen, Marianne
    Royal School of Library and Information Science, Denmark.
    EnTag: Enhancing Social Tagging for Discovery2009In: JCDL '09 Proceedings of the 9th ACM/IEEE-CS joint conference on Digital libraries, ACM Press, 2009, p. 163-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EnTag (Enhanced Tagging for Discovery) project investigated the effect on indexing and retrieval when using only social tagging versus when using social tagging in combination with suggestions from a controlled vocabulary. Two different contexts were explored: tagging by readers of a digital collection and tagging by authors in an institutional repository; also two different controlled vocabularies were examined, Dewey Decimal Classification and ACM Computing Classification Scheme. For each context a separate demonstrator was developed and a user study conducted. The results showed the importance of controlled vocabulary suggestions for both indexing and retrieval: to help produce ideas of tags to use, to make it easier to find focus for the tagging, as well as to ensure consistency and increase the number of access points in retrieval. The value and usefulness of the suggestions proved to be dependent on the quality of the suggestions, both in terms of conceptual relevance to the user and in appropriateness of the terminology. The participants themselves could also see the advantages of controlled vocabulary terms for retrieval if the terms used were from an authoritative source.

  • 143.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    The University of Bath.
    Muller, Henk
    The University of Bath.
    Tonkin, Emma
    The University of Bath.
    Technologies for metadata extraction2014In: Handbook of Metadata, Semantics and Ontologies, World Scientific, 2014, p. 487-522Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 144. Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Ravnic, Robert
    Resource Description Format - RDF2002In: 5. seminar Arhivi, knjižnice, muzeji : mogućnosti suradnje u okruženju globalne informacijske infrastrukture : zbornik radova, Zagreb: Hrvatsko knižničarsko društvo , 2002, p. 90-99Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 145.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Schmiede, Rudi
    Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Recent applications of Knowledge Organization Systems: introduction to a special issue2019In: International Journal on Digital Libraries, ISSN 1432-5012, E-ISSN 1432-1300, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 205-207Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath, UK.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan, UK.
    Delivering a Terminology Registry2008In: Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) 2008, Dubrovnik and Mljet, Croatia, June 2-7, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for vocabularies such as ontologies, classification schemes and thesauri for information discovery and the Semantic Web has been well recognized and established. Due to a large number of different vocabularies, related services, and a variety of potential applications and contexts, the need has appeared for terminology registries.

    A terminology registry lists, describes, identifies and points to sets of vocabularies available for use in information systems and services. It can cover free and publicly available, fee-based and restricted, or organisation-internal vocabularies. The registry allows discovery of suitable schemes for information or, potentially, use, by exposing rich metadata about them for navigation and retrieval. Terminology registries can hold vocabulary level information only, or comprise the member terms, concepts and relationships as well, and also list services based on terminology such as automatic classification, term expansion, disambiguation, translation, semantic reasoning. Registries should, if used as a digital infrastructure service, make their content available for both comfortable human inspection and for machine-to-machine (m2m) access

    There are several registries in its basic form, i.e., only listing vocabularies, such as freely available HILT’s (HILT) or commercial Taxonomy Warehouse’s (Taxonomy Warehouse). In the United States, National Science Digital Library Metadata Registry (NSDL Registry) started being developed to provide “services to developers and consumers of controlled vocabularies and is one of the first production deployments of the RDF-based Semantic Web Community's Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS)”.

    This study was initiated by UK’s Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and involves two partners, UKOLN, and University of Glamorgan. Its purpose is to analyse issues related to the potential delivery of a terminology registry as a shared infrastructure service within the UK’s further and higher education’s information environment. It will consider how a registry might support development of terminology and other services within the context of a services-oriented environment.

  • 147.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan.
    Terminology Registry Scoping Study (TRSS): final report2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for controlled vocabularies or knowledge organization systems, such as thesauri and classification schemes, for resource discovery and terminology related services has been well recognized and established (see, for example, Lancaster 2003, Svenonius 2000). Due to the large number of available vocabularies, the variety of potential applications and new possibilities offered by standards in digital representation and protocols, the issue of a terminology registry has become highly relevant. Even before the World Wide Web, comprehensive lists of vocabularies were collected. Today a number of related domain, national and international initiatives exist. In 2007 JISC initiated a scoping study which is to analyse issues related to the potential delivery of a terminology registry as a shared infrastructure service within the UK’s further and higher education’s information environment (IE). Although certain existing terminology registries could be of some use to IE, they are not comprehensive but usually domain-specific, and authority and maintenance issues exist. The study’s overall aims are: - To inform the development of shared infrastructure for resource discovery; - To describe the scope and potential use of a terminology registry; - To analyse requirements for services based on a terminology registry; and, - To help stakeholders understand the need for this component of a shared infrastructure. The report is based on a review of related projects and literature, as well as data collected from a number of interviews and questionnaires. It proposes a terminology registry and describes its characteristics and components, underlying standards, architecture and governance.

  • 148. Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    Lykke Nielsen, Marianne
    Moon, Jim
    EnTag: enhanced tagging for discovery2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of Glamorgan.
    Zeng, Marcia Lei
    Kent State University.
    Zumer, Maja
    University of Ljubljana.
    Terminology registries for knowledge organization systems: Functionality, use, and attributes2014In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2330-1635, E-ISSN 2330-1643, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 1901-1916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terminology registries (TRs) are a crucial element of the infrastructure required for resource discovery services, digital libraries, Linked Data, and semantic interoperability generally. They can make the content of knowledge organization systems (KOS) available both for human and machine access. The paper describes the attributes and functionality for a TR, based on a review of published literature, existing TRs, and a survey of experts. A domain model based on user tasks is constructed and a set of core metadata elements for use in TRs is proposed. Ideally, the TR should allow searching as well as browsing for a KOS, matching a user's search while also providing information about existing terminology services, accessible to both humans and machines. The issues surrounding metadata for KOS are also discussed, together with the rationale for different aspects and the importance of a core set of KOS metadata for future machine-based access; a possible core set of metadata elements is proposed. This is dealt with in terms of practical experience and in relation to the Dublin Core Application Profile.

  • 150.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Tyrkkö, Jukka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Jusufi, Ilir
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Ardö, Anders
    Lund University.
    Automatic subject classification for improving retrieval in a Swedish repository2017In: ISKO UK Conference 2017: Knowledge Organization: what's the story?, 11 – 12 September 2017, London, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent adoption of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) in Sweden has ignited discussions about automated subject classification especially for digital collections, which generally seem to lack subject indexing from controlled vocabularies. This is particularly problematic in the context of academic resource retrieval tasks, which require an understanding of discipline-specific terminologies and the narratives behind their internal ontologies. The currently available experimental classification software have not been adequately tested and their usefulness is unproven especially for Swedish language resources. We address these issues by investigating a unifying framework of automatic subject indexing for the DDC, including an analysis of suitable interactive visualisation features for supporting these aims. We will address the disciplinary narratives behind the DDC in selected subject areas and the preliminary results will include an analysis of the data collection and a breakdown of the methodology. Major visualisation possibilities in support of the classification process are also outlined. The project will contribute significantly to Swedish information infrastructure by improving the findability of Swedish research resources by subject searching, one of the most common yet the most challenging types of searching.

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