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  • 101.
    Lewis, Nicola S.
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, UK.
    Verhagen, Josanne H.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Javakhishvili, Zurab
    Ilia State Univ, Rep of Georgia.
    Russell, Colin A.
    Univ Cambridge, UK.
    Lexmond, Pascal
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Westgeest, Kim B.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Bestebroer, Theo M.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Halpin, Rebecca A.
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Lin, Xudong
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Ransier, Amy
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Fedorova, Nadia B.
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Stockwel, Timothy B.
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Univ Georgia, USA.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala Univ.
    Smith, Gavin
    Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore.
    Bahl, Justin
    Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore ; Univ Texas Houston, USA..
    Wentworth, David E.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fouchier, Ron A. M.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    de Graaf, Miranda
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Influenza A virus evolution and spatio-temporal dynamics in Eurasian wild birds: a phylogenetic and phylogeographical study of whole-genome sequence data2015In: Journal of General Virology, ISSN 0022-1317, E-ISSN 1465-2099, Vol. 96, p. 2050-2060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a natural host reservoir in wild waterbirds and the potential to spread to other host species. Here, we investigated the evolutionary, spatial and temporal dynamics of avian IAVs in Eurasian wild birds. We used whole-genome sequences collected as part of an intensive long-term Eurasian wild bird surveillance study, and combined this genetic data with temporal and spatial information to explore the virus evolutionary dynamics. Frequent reassortment and co-circulating lineages were observed for all eight genomic RNA segments over time. There was no apparent species-specific effect on the diversity of the avian IAVs. There was a spatial and temporal relationship between the Eurasian sequences and significant viral migration of avian lAVs from West Eurasia towards Central Eurasia. The observed viral migration patterns differed between segments. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges faced when analysing these surveillance and sequence data, and the caveats to be borne in mind when drawing conclusions from the apparent results of such analyses.

  • 102. Lindeborg, M.
    et al.
    Barboutis, C.
    Ehrenborg, C.
    Fransson, T.
    Jaenson, T. G. T.
    Lindgren, P. E.
    Lundkvist, Å
    Nyström, F.
    Salaneck, E.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    Migratory birds, ticks, and crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus2012In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 2095-2097Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 103. Munster, V
    et al.
    Baas, C
    Lexmond, Pascal
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Wallensten, Anders
    Fransson, Thord
    Rimmelzwaan, G F
    Beyer, Walter E. P
    Schutten, M
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Osterhaus, A D M E
    Fouchier, R A M
    Spatial, temporal and species variation in prevalence of influenza A viruses in wild migratory birds2007In: PLOS pathogens, Vol. 3, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Muradrasoli, Shaman
    et al.
    Uppsala University ; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Bálint, Adám
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences ; National Veterinary Institute.
    Wahlgren, John
    Karolinska Institutet ; Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control.
    Belák, Sándor
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences ; National Veterinary Institute.
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Uppsala University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Prevalence and phylogeny of coronaviruses in wild birds from the Bering Strait area (Beringia)2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e13640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause mild to severe disease in humans and animals, their host range and environmental spread seem to have been largely underestimated, and they are currently being investigated for their potential medical relevance. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) belongs to gamma-coronaviruses and causes a costly respiratory viral disease in chickens. The role of wild birds in the epidemiology of IBV is poorly understood. In the present study, we examined 1,002 cloacal and faecal samples collected from 26 wild bird species in the Beringia area for the presence of CoVs, and then we performed statistical and phylogenetic analyses. We detected diverse CoVs by RT-PCR in wild birds in the Beringia area. Sequence analysis showed that the detected viruses are gamma-coronaviruses related to IBV. These findings suggest that wild birds are able to carry gamma-coronaviruses asymptomatically. We concluded that CoVs are widespread among wild birds in Beringia, and their geographic spread and frequency is higher than previously realised. Thus, Avian CoV can be efficiently disseminated over large distances and could be a genetic reservoir for future emerging pathogenic CoVs. Considering the great animal health and economic impact of IBV as well as the recent emergence of novel coronaviruses such as SARS-coronavirus, it is important to investigate the role of wildlife reservoirs in CoV infection biology and epidemiology.

  • 105. Niskanen, Taina
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Korkeala, Hannu
    VirF positive Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica found in migratory birds in Sweden2003In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 69, p. 4670-4675Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Olsen, Björn
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Munster, V
    Wallensten, Anders
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Osterhaus, A D M E
    Fouchier, R A M
    Global patterns of influenza A virus in wild birds2006In: Science, Vol. 312, p. 384-388Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 107. Ottosson, Ulf
    et al.
    Bensch, Staffan
    Olsson, Urban
    Svensson, Lars
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Differentiation and phylogeny of the olivaceous warbler Hippolais pallida species complex2005In: Journal of Ornithology, Vol. 146, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108. Ottosson, Ulf
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Two cases of Common Whitethroats Sylvia communis having extra wing feathers among the secondaries2003In: Ringing & Migration, Vol. 21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 109. Ottosson, Ulf
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hjort, Christian
    McGregor, Ross
    Garden Warbler Sylvia borin migration in sub-Saharan West Africa: phenology and body mass change2005In: IBIS, Vol. 147, p. 750-757Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 110. Peréz Tris, Javier
    et al.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Hellgren, Olof
    Krizanauskiene, Asta
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bensch, Staffan
    What are malaria parasites?2005In: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 21, p. 209-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 111. Peréz Tris, Javier
    et al.
    Hellgren, Olof
    Krizanauskiene, Asta
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Secondi, Jean
    Bonneaud, Camille
    Fjeldså, J
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Bensch, Staffan
    Within-host speciation of malaria parasites2007In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Safi, Kamran
    et al.
    Max Plank Institute for Ornithology, Germany;University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Kranstauber, Bart
    Max Plank Institute for Ornithology, Germany;University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Weinzierl, Rolf
    Griffin, Larry
    Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, UK .
    Rees, Eileen
    Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, UK .
    Cabot, David
    Environmental Consultancy Services, Ireland.
    Cruz, Sebastian
    Max Plank Institute for Ornithology, Germany;University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Proaño, Carolina
    Max Plank Institute for Ornithology, Germany;University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Takekawa, John
    U.S. Geological Survey, USA .
    Newman, Scott
    Emergency Center for Transboundary Animal Diseases, Italy .
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kays, Roland
    North Carolina State University, USA;North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA .
    Wikelski, Martin
    Max Plank Institute for Ornithology, Germany;University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Bohrer, Gil
    Ohio State University, USA.
    Flying with the wind: scale dependency of speed and direction measurements in modelling wind support in avian flight2013In: Movement Ecology, ISSN 2051-3933, Vol. 1, p. Article ID: 4-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Understanding how environmental conditions, especially wind, influence birds' flight speeds is a prerequisite for understanding many important aspects of bird flight, including optimal migration strategies, navigation, and compensation for wind drift. Recent developments in tracking technology and the increased availability of data on large-scale weather patterns have made it possible to use path annotation to link the location of animals to environmental conditions such as wind speed and direction. However, there are various measures available for describing not only wind conditions but also the bird's flight direction and ground speed, and it is unclear which is best for determining the amount of wind support (the length of the wind vector in a bird’s flight direction) and the influence of cross-winds (the length of the wind vector perpendicular to a bird’s direction) throughout a bird's journey.

    Results

    We compared relationships between cross-wind, wind support and bird movements, using path annotation derived from two different global weather reanalysis datasets and three different measures of direction and speed calculation for 288 individuals of nine bird species. Wind was a strong predictor of bird ground speed, explaining 10-66% of the variance, depending on species. Models using data from different weather sources gave qualitatively similar results; however, determining flight direction and speed from successive locations, even at short (15 min intervals), was inferior to using instantaneous GPS-based measures of speed and direction. Use of successive location data significantly underestimated the birds' ground and airspeed, and also resulted in mistaken associations between cross-winds, wind support, and their interactive effects, in relation to the birds' onward flight.

    Conclusions

    Wind has strong effects on bird flight, and combining GPS technology with path annotation of weather variables allows us to quantify these effects for understanding flight behaviour. The potentially strong influence of scaling effects must be considered and implemented in developing sampling regimes and data analysis.      

  • 113.
    Sandelin, Lisa Labbe
    et al.
    Uppsala University ; Kalmar County Hospital.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Larsson, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wilhelmsson, Peter
    Linköping University.
    Salaneck, Erik
    Uppsala University.
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in Ticks from Migrating Birds in Sweden2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e0133250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (CNM; family Anaplasmataceae) was recently recognized as a potential tick-borne human pathogen. The presence of CNM in mammals, in host-seeking Ixodes ticks and in ticks attached to mammals and birds has been reported recently. We investigated the presence of CNM in ornithophagous ticks from migrating birds. A total of 1,150 ticks (582 nymphs, 548 larvae, 18 undetermined ticks and two adult females) collected from 5,365 birds captured in south-eastern Sweden was screened for CNM by molecular methods. The birds represented 65 different species, of which 35 species were infested with one or more ticks. Based on a combination of morphological and molecular species identification, the majority of the ticks were identified as Ixodes ricinus. Samples were initially screened by real-time PCR targeting the CNM 16S rRNA gene, and confirmed by a second real-time PCR targeting the groEL gene. For positive samples, a 1260 base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Based upon bacterial gene sequence identification, 2.1% (24/1150) of the analysed samples were CNM-positive. Twenty-two out of 24 CNM-positive ticks were molecularly identified as I. ricinus nymphs, and the remaining two were identified as I. ricinus based on morphology. The overall CNM prevalence in I. ricinus nymphs was 4.2%. None of the 548 tested larvae was positive. CNM-positive ticks were collected from 10 different bird species. The highest CNM-prevalences were recorded in nymphs collected from common redpoll (Carduelis flammea, 3/7), thrush nightingale (Luscinia luscinia, 2/29) and dunnock (Prunella modularis, 1/17). The 16S rRNA sequences obtained in this study were all identical to each other and to three previously reported European strains, two of which were obtained from humans. It is concluded that ornithophagous ticks may be infected with CNM and that birds most likely can disperse CNM-infected ticks over large geographical areas.

  • 114.
    Stedt, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Kalmar County Hospital.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    McMahon, Barry J
    Uppsala University.
    Hasan, Badrul
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Olsen, Björn
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Drobni, Mirva
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli from gulls in nine European countries2014In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4, article id 21565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of antibiotic resistant faecal indicator bacteria from humans and food production animals has increased over the last decades. In Europe, resistance levels in Escherichia coli from these sources show a south-to-north gradient, with more widespread resistance in the Mediterranean region compared to northern Europe. Recent studies show that resistance levels can be high also in wildlife, but it is unknown to what extent resistance levels in nature conform to the patterns observed in human-associated bacteria.

    METHODS: To test this, we collected 3,158 faecal samples from breeding gulls (Larus sp.) from nine European countries and tested 2,210 randomly isolated E. coli for resistance against 10 antibiotics commonly used in human and veterinary medicine.

    RESULTS: Overall, 31.5% of the gull E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥1 antibiotic, but with considerable variation between countries: highest levels of isolates resistant to ≥1 antibiotic were observed in Spain (61.2%) and lowest levels in Denmark (8.3%). For each tested antibiotic, the Iberian countries were either the countries with the highest levels or in the upper range in between-country comparisons, while northern countries generally had a lower proportion of resistant E. coli isolates, thereby resembling the gradient of resistance seen in human and food animal sources.

    CONCLUSION: We propose that gulls may serve as a sentinel of environmental levels of antibiotic resistant E. coli to complement studies of human-associated microbiota.

  • 115.
    Stedt, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Kalmar County Hospital;Uppsala University.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    McMahon, Barry J.
    University College Dublin, UK.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University.
    Drobni, Mirva
    Uppsala University;Östersund Hospital.
    Carriage of CTX-M type extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in gulls across Europe2015In: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, ISSN 0044-605X, Vol. 57, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), a group of enzymes conferring resistance to third generation cephalosporins have rapidly increased in Enterobacteriacae and pose a major challenge to human health care. Resistant isolates are common in domestic animals and clinical settings, but prevalence and genotype distribution varies on a geographical scale. Although ESBL genes are frequently detected in bacteria isolated from wildlife samples, ESBL dissemination of resistant bacteria to the environment is largely unknown. To address this, we used three closely related gull species as a model system and collected more than 3000 faecal samples during breeding times in nine European countries. Samples were screened for ESBL-producing bacteria, which were characterized to the level of ESBL genotype groups (SHV, TEM), or specific genotypes (CTX-M). Results: ESBL-producing bacteria were frequently detected in gulls (906 of 3158 samples, 28.7 %), with significant variation in prevalence rates between countries. Highest levels were found in Spain (74.8 %), The Netherlands (37.8 %) and England (27.1 %). Denmark and Poland represented the other extreme with no, or very few positive samples. Genotyping of CTX-M isolates identified 13 different variants, with bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(CTX-M-14) as the most frequently detected. In samples from England, Spain and Portugal, blaCTX-M-14 dominated, while in the rest of the sampled countries blaCTX-M-1 (except Sweden where bla(CTX-M-15) was dominant) was the most frequently detected genotype, a pattern similar to what is known from studies of human materials. Conclusions: CTX-M type ESBLs are common in the faecal microbiota from gulls across Europe. The gull ESBL genotype distribution was in large similar to published datasets from human and food-production animals in Europe. The data suggests that the environmental dissemination of ESBL is high from anthropogenic sources, and widespread occurrence of resistant bacteria in common migratory bird species utilizing urban and agricultural areas suggests that antibiotic resistance genes may also be spread through birds.

  • 116.
    Stedt, Johan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    Drobni, Mirva
    Divergent, and Locally High, Levels of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in European Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) Conform to Patterns of Human Clinical Antibiotic Usage2011In: EcoHealth, ISSN 1612-9202, E-ISSN 1612-9210, Vol. 7, no Supplement 1, p. S98-S98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117. Svanberg, Staffan
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Population fluctuations and timing of spring migration of the Scandinavian Bluethroat Luscinia svecica svecica at Ottenby Bird Observatory, Sweden, 1955-20082011In: Ornis Svecica, ISSN 1102-6812, Vol. 21, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 54 years (1955–2008) of consecutive trappingdata from Ottenby Bird Observatory on the islandof Öland, SE Sweden, was used to analyze the springpassage of the Scandinavian subspecies of the BluethroatLuscinia svecica svecica. The aim was to investigatetrends in the numbers of Bluethroat passing this site andto provide statistics related to the phenology of migration.Trapping of Bluethroats at Ottenby may be seen asan index of population numbers in the recruitment area,especially for the latest decades when trapping conditionshave been standardized. The number of trapped individualswas stable both in the long and short term, butmedian spring passage has become significantly earlierover the study period. The spring migration of the speciesshowed clear age and sex related differences in timing.Male Bluethroats preceded females with about threedays, and adult birds preceded juveniles of both sexes.Finally, the local weather during the peak passage significantlyaffected the number of trapped individuals, withthe largest number trapped in days with head winds fromthe northwest sector.

  • 118.
    Tolf, Conny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rodrigues, David
    Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra, Portugal.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Wille, Michelle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Figueiredo, Maria Ester
    Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra, Portugal.
    Jankowska-Hjortaas, Monika
    Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Norway.
    Germundsson, Anna
    Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Norway.
    Duby, Pierre-Yves
    Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra, Portugal.
    Lebarbenchon, Camille
    Universite de La Reunion, France.
    Gauthier-Clerc, Michel
    Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat, France.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Birds and viruses at a crossroad: surveillance of influenza a virus in portuguese waterfowl2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 11, article id e49002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, extensive amounts of data have become available regarding influenza A virus (IAV) in wild birds in northern Europe, while information from southern Europe is more limited. Here, we present an IAV surveillance study conducted in western Portugal 2008-2009, analyzing 1653 samples from six different species of waterfowl, with the majority of samples taken from Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Overall 4.4% of sampled birds were infected. The sampling results revealed a significant temporal variation in the IAV prevalence, including a pronounced peak among predominantly young birds in June, indicating that IAV circulate within breeding populations in the wetlands of western Portugal. The H10N7 and H9N2 subtypes were predominant among isolated viruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase sequences of H10N7, H9N2 and H11N3 virus showed that sequences from Portugal were closely related to viral sequences from Central Europe as well as to IAVs isolated in the southern parts of Africa, reflecting Portugal's position on the European-African bird migratory flyway. This study highlights the importance of Portugal as a migratory crossroad for IAV, connecting breeding stationary waterfowl with birds migrating between continents which enable transmission and spread of IAV.

  • 119.
    Tolf, Conny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wille, Michelle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Gunnarsson, Gunnar
    Kristianstad University.
    Grosbois, Vladimir
    Centre de coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), France.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Lund University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala University.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kristianstad University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Individual Variation in Influenza A Virus Infection Histories and Long-Term Immune Responses in Mallards2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e61201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild dabbling ducks (genus Anas) are the main reservoir for influenza A virus (IAV) in the Northern Hemisphere. Current understanding of disease dynamics and epidemiology in this virus-host system has primarily been based on population-level surveillance studies and infection experiments conducted in laboratory settings. Using a combined experimental-natural approach with wild-strain captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), we monitored individual IAV infection histories and immunological responses of 10 birds over the course of 15 months. This is the first detailed study to track natural IAV infection histories over several seasons amongst the same individuals growing from juvenile to adults. The general trends in the infection histories of the monitored birds reflected seasonal variation in prevalence at the population level. However, within the study group there were significant differences between individuals in infection frequency as well as in short and long term anti-IAV antibody response. Further observations included individual variation in the number of infecting virus subtypes, and a strong tendency for long-lasting hemagglutinin-related homosubtypic immunity. Specifically, all infections in the second autumn, except one, were of different subtypes compared to the first autumn. The variation among birds concerning these epidemiologically important traits illustrates the necessity for IAV studies to move from the level of populations to examine individuals in order to further our understanding of IAV disease and epidemiology.

  • 120.
    Tolf, Conny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wille, Michelle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Haidar, Ann-Katrin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Avril, Alexis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Zohari, Siamak
    National Veterinary Institute.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Prevalence of avian paramyxovirus type 1 in Mallards during autumn migration in the western Baltic Sea region2013In: Virology Journal, ISSN 1743-422X, E-ISSN 1743-422X, Vol. 10, article id 285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the causative agent of the Newcastle disease, a severe disease in birds associated with substantial economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Sweden is situated along the Western European waterfowl flyway and applies a non-vaccination policy combined with directives of immediate euthanisation of NDV infected flocks. During the last decades there have been several outbreaks with NDV in poultry in Sweden. However, less is known about the virus prevalence in the wild bird population including waterfowl, a well-established reservoir of avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1), the paramyxovirus serotype that include pathogenic NDV. Methods: The survey constituted of 2332 samples from Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), trapped in the southern part of Sweden during autumn migration in 2010. These samples were screened for APMV-1 by real-time reverse transcription PCR, and viral strains from positive samples were isolated and characterized by sequence analysis of the fusion gene and by phylogenetic analysis. Conclusions: Twenty of these samples were positive for APMV-1, hence a virus prevalence of 0.9% (95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]=0.54%, 1.35%). The highest APMV-1 prevalence was detected in juvenile Mallards sampled in November (n=887, prevalence 1.24% ([95% CI])=0.67%, 2.24%). Sequence analysis and evaluation of phylogenetic relatedness indicated that isolated APMV-1 strains were lentogenic, and phylogenetically most closely related to genotype Ib strains within the clade of class II viruses. The sampling system employed enabled us to follow APMV-1 infections and the shedding of one particular viral strain in one individual bird over several days. Furthermore, combining previous screening results with the APMV-1 detections in this study showed that more than 50% of Mallards that tested positive for APMV-1 RNA were co-infected with influenza A virus.

  • 121.
    van Dijk, Jacintha G. B.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Carleton Univ, Canada.
    Verhagen, Josanne H.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wille, Michelle
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. WHO Collaborating Ctr Reference & Res Influenza, Australia.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Host and virus ecology as determinants of influenza A virus transmission in wild birds2018In: Current Opinion in Virology, ISSN 1879-6257, E-ISSN 1879-6265, Vol. 28, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low pathogenic influenza A virus (LPIAV) prevalence and subtype distribution differs between and across bird taxa. A crucial factor in the epidemiology of these viruses and virus subtypes is the ability to transmit between and within different host taxa and individuals. Successful viral transmission depends on availability of susceptible hosts and exposure of host to virus. Exposure to viruses and susceptibility to virus infection and/or disease are shaped by both host and virus traits. In this review we have identified key host and virus traits that can affect LPIAV transmission, both in terms of exposure and susceptibility. Furthermore we highlight current challenges in assessment of these traits and identify methodological considerations for future studies.

  • 122.
    van Toor, Mariëlle L.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Avril, Alexis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wu, Guohui
    SAS Inst Inc, USA.
    Holan, Scott H.
    Univ Missouri, USA.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    As the Duck Flies-Estimating the Dispersal of Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses by Migrating Mallards2018In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 6, article id 208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many pathogens rely on the mobility of their hosts for dispersal. In order to understand and predict how a disease can rapidly sweep across entire continents, illuminating the contributions of host movements to disease spread is pivotal. While elegant proposals have been made to elucidate the spread of human infectious diseases, the direct observation of long-distance dispersal events of animal pathogens is challenging. Pathogens like avian influenza A viruses, causing only short disease in their animal hosts, have proven exceptionally hard to study. Here, we integrate comprehensive data on population and disease dynamics for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses in one of their main hosts, the mallard, with a novel movement model trained from empirical, high-resolution tracks ofmallardmigrations. This allowed us to simulate individualmallard migrations from a key stopover site in the Baltic Sea for the entire population and link these movements to infection simulations. Using this novel approach, we were able to estimate the dispersal of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses by migrating mallards throughout several autumn migratory seasons and predicted areas that are at risk of importing these viruses. We found that mallards are competent vectors and on average dispersed viruses over distances of 160 km in just 3 h. Surprisingly, our simulations suggest that such dispersal events are rare even throughout the entire autumn migratory season. Our approach directly combines simulated population-level movements with local infection dynamics and offers a potential converging point for movement and disease ecology.

  • 123.
    van Toor, Mariëlle L.
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany ; University of Konstanz, Germany.
    Hedenström, Anders
    Lund University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fiedler, Wolfgang
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany.
    Holland, Richard A.
    Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Thorup, Kasper
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wikelski, Martin
    Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany.
    Flexibility of Continental Navigation and Migration in European Mallards2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, article id e72629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ontogeny of continent-wide navigation mechanisms of the individual organism, despite being crucial for the understanding of animal movement and migration, is still poorly understood. Several previous studies, mainly conducted on passerines, indicate that inexperienced, juvenile birds may not generally correct for displacement during fall migration. Waterbirds such as the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos, Linnaeus 1758) are more flexible in their migration behavior than most migratory songbirds, but previous experiments with waterbirds have not yet allowed clear conclusions about their navigation abilities. Here we tested whether immature mallard ducks correct for latitudinal displacement during fall migration within Europe. During two consecutive fall migration periods, we caught immature females on a stopover site in southeast Sweden, and translocated a group of them ca. 1,000 km to southern Germany. We followed the movements of the ducks via satellite GPS-tracking and observed their migration decisions during the fall and consecutive spring migration. The control animals released in Ottenby behaved as expected from banding recoveries: they continued migration during the winter and in spring returned to the population's breeding grounds in the Baltics and Northwest Russia. Contrary to the control animals, the translocated mallards did not continue migration and stayed at Lake Constance. In spring, three types of movement tactics could be observed: 61.5% of the ducks (16 of 26) stayed around Lake Constance, 27% (7 of 26) migrated in a northerly direction towards Sweden and 11.5% of the individuals (3 of 26) headed east for ca. 1,000 km and then north. We suggest that young female mallards flexibly adjust their migration tactics and develop a navigational map that allows them to return to their natal breeding area.

  • 124. Wahlgren, J.
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sahlin, S.
    Haemig, Paul
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Fouchier, RAM
    Osterhaus, ADME
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bonnedahl, J.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pisareva, M.
    Grudinin, M.
    Kiselev, O.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Falk, KI
    Lundkvist, Å.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Gene segment reassortment between American and Eurasian lineages of avian influenza virus from waterfowl in the Beringia Area2008In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 783-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since prehistoric times, the Bering Strait area (Beringia) has served as an avenue of dispersal between the Old and the New Worlds. On a field expedition to this area, we collected fecal samples from dabbling ducks, geese, shorebirds, and gulls on the Chukchi Peninsula, Siberia, and Pt. Barrow, Alaska, and characterized the subtypes of avian influenza virus present in them. Four of 202 samples (2%) from Alaska were positive for influenza A virus RNA in two independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening assays, while all shorebird samples from the Chukchi Peninsula were negative. Subtypes H3N8 and H6N1 were recorded once, while subtype H8N4 was found in two samples. Full-length sequences were obtained from the three unique isolates, and phylogenetic analysis with representative sequences for the Eurasian and North American lineages of influenza A virus showed that one HA gene clustered with the Eurasian rather than the North American lineage. However, the closest relative to this sequence was a North American isolate from Delaware described in 2002, indicating that a H6 spillover from Asia has established itself in North America.

  • 125.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Lund University.
    Axelsson Olsson, Diana
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Lund University.
    Griekspoor, Petra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Jansson, Lena
    University of Gothenburg.
    Teneberg, Susanne
    University of Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Lovisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Ellström, Patrik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Campylobacter jejuni colonization in wild birds: Results from an infection experiment2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e9082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Campylobacter jejuni is a common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in most parts of the world. The bacterium has a broad host range and has been isolated from many animals and environments. To investigate shedding patterns and putative effects on an avian host, we developed a colonization model in which a wild bird species, the European Robin Erithacus rubecula, was inoculated orally with C. jejuni from either a human patient or from another wild bird species, the Song Thrush Turdus philomelos. These two isolates were genetically distinct from each other and provoked very different host responses. The Song Thrush isolate colonized all challenged birds and colonization lasted 6.8 days on average. Birds infected with this isolate also showed a transient but significant decrease in body mass. The human isolate did not colonize the birds and could be detected only in the feces of the birds shortly after inoculation. European Robins infected with the wild bird isolate generated a specific antibody response to C. jejuni membrane proteins from the avian isolate, which also was cross-reactive to membrane proteins of the human isolate. In contrast, European Robins infected with the human isolate did not mount a significant response to bacterial membrane proteins from either of the two isolates. The difference in colonization ability could indicate host adaptations.

  • 126.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    Robin Erithacus rubecula found in juvenile plumage on spring migration2001In: Ornis Svecica, Vol. 11, p. 265-266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bensch, Staffan
    Kiboi, Sam
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Cross-species infection of blood parasites between resident and migratory songbirds in Africa2002In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 11, p. 1545-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Broman, Tina
    Carlsson, Inger
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Achterberg, René P
    Wagenaar, Jaap A
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni, C. lari and C. coli. in different ecological guilds and taxa of migrating birds2002In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 68, p. 5911-5917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Griekspoor, Petra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Ecology and Host Association in Campylobacter in Wild Birds2014In: Campylobacter Ecology and Evolution / [ed] Sheppard, S., Norfolk: Caister Academic Press, 2014, p. 265-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following review aims to summarize the present knowledge on Campylobacter jejuni and other Campylobacter-species in wild birds. The question of whether campylobacters present in wildlife, especially those found in wild birds, play a role in the epidemiology of human campylobacteriosis has been around for more than 30 years (Kapperud and Rosef, 1983; Smibert, 1969). This review will summarize what is currently known and point to the gaps in understanding of these organisms and their interplay with hosts and the environment. Here the focus will mainly be on C. jejuni, as this species has received most attention, but data for Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter lari will also be discussed.

  • 130.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Rhönnstad, Patrik
    Habitat preferences and population trends in the Barred Warbler Sylvia nisoria in the Ottenby area, south-east Sweden2004In: Ornis Svecica, Vol. 14, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Östman, Örjan
    Bensch, Staffan
    A new nested PCR method very efficient in detecting Plasmodium and Haemoproteus infections from avian blood2004In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 191-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hellgren, Olof
    Bensch, Staffan
    A new PCR assay for simultaneous studies of Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium and Haemoproteus from avian blood2004In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 90, p. 191-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hjort, Christian
    Andersson, Arne
    Autumn migration of some passerines on the island of Capri, southwestern Italy2006In: Ornis Svecica, Vol. 16, p. 42-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lindström, Åke
    Migration and morphometrics of the Broad-billed Sandpiper Limicola falcinellus at Ottenby, southern Sweden, 1950- 20002001In: Ornis Fennica, Vol. 78, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Falk, Kerstin
    Garpmo, Ulf
    Bergström, Sven
    Lindegren, Gunnel
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Mejlon, Hans
    Fransson, Thord
    Haemig, Paul D
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Migrating Birds and Tick-borne Encephalitis Virus (TBEV)2007In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 13, p. 1215-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Falk, Kerstin I.
    Garpmo, Ulf
    Bergström, Sven
    Lindegren, Gunnel
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Mejlon, Hans
    Fransson, Thord
    Haemig, Paul
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Migrating birds and tickborne encephalitis virus2007In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1215-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mevius, D
    Veldman, K
    Broman, Tina
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from wild birds in Sweden2005In: Applied and environmental microbiology, Vol. 71 (5), p. 2438-2441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    TBE-virus funnet hos flyttande fästingar2007In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 104Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 139.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    On, Stephen L W
    Ottvall, Richard
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Harrington, Clare S
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Avian Reservoirs and Zoonotic Potential of the Emerging Human Pathogen Helicobacter Canadensis2003In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 69, p. 7523-7526Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    On, Stephen
    Ottvall, Richard
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Species diversity of campylobacteria in a wild bird community in Sweden2007In: Journal of Applied Microbiology, ISSN 1364-5072, E-ISSN 1365-2672, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 424-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Moult strategies in the Common Whitethroat Sylvia c. communis in northern Nigeria2002In: IBIS, Vol. 144, p. E11-E18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    The accuracy of field sex determination in the Common Whitethroat Sylvia c. communis2000In: Ornis Svecica, Vol. 10, p. 67-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Haas, Fredrik
    Morphometrical data from 30 bird species on spring migration in northern Tunisia2004In: Ornis Svecica, Vol. 14, no 129-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144. Wallensten, Anders
    et al.
    Munster, V
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Brytting, M
    Elmberg, J
    Fouchier, R A M
    Fransson, Thord
    Haemig, Paul D
    Karlsson, Malin
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Osterhaus, A D M E
    Stervander, M
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Surveillance of Influenza A Virus in Migratory Waterfowl in Northern Europe2007In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 404-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 145. Wallensten, Anders
    et al.
    Munster, V
    Osterhaus, A D M E
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    Broman, Tina
    Fouchier, R A M
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mounting evidence for the presence of influenza A virus in the avifauna of the Antarctic region2006In: Antarctic science, Vol. 18 (3), p. 353-356Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 146. Wallensten, Anders
    et al.
    Munster, Vincent J.
    Latorre Margalef, Neus
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Brytting, Mia
    Elmberg, Johan
    Fouchier, Ron A.M.
    Fransson, Thord
    Haemig, Paul
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Malin
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.
    Stervander, Martin
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Surveillance of the Influenza A virus in migratory waterfowl in Northern Europe2007In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 13, p. 404-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 147. Wallensten, Anders
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Björn
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Fågelinfluensan, hönan, människan och den förmodade döden2007In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 104, p. 2240-2243Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 148. Westerdahl, Helena
    et al.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hansson, Bengt
    Hasselquist, Dennis
    von Schantz, Torbjörn
    Bensch, Staffan
    Associations between malaria and MHC genes in a migratory songbird2005In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Vol. 272, p. 1511-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Wille, Michelle
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Avril, Alexis
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. CIRAD, F-34398 Montpellier, France.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Schager, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Larsson, Sara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Borg, Olivia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala Univ.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Temporal dynamics, diversity, and interplay in three components of the virodiversity of a Mallard population: Influenza A virus, avian paramyxovirus and avian coronavirus2015In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 29, p. 129-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple infections, or simultaneous infection of a host with multiple parasites, are the rule rather than the exception. Interactions between co-occurring pathogens in a population may be mutualistic, competitive or facilitative. For some pathogen combinations, these interrelated effects will have epidemiological consequences; however this is as yet poorly incorporated into practical disease ecology. For example, screening of Mallards for influenza A viruses (IAV) have repeatedly revealed high prevalence and large subtype diversity in the Northern Hemisphere. Other studies have identified avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1) and coronaviruses (CoVs) in Mallards, but without making inferences on the larger viral assemblage. In this study we followed 144 wild Mallards across an autumn season in a natural stopover site and constructed infection histories of IAV, APMV-1 and CoV. There was a high prevalence of IAV, comprising of 27 subtype combinations, while APMV-1 had a comparatively low prevalence (with a peak of 2%) and limited strain variation, similar to previous findings. Avian CoVs were common, with prevalence up to 12%, and sequence analysis identified different putative genetic lineages. An investigation of the dynamics of co-infections revealed a synergistic effect between CoV and IAV, whereby Coy prevalence was higher given that the birds were co-infected with IAV. There were no interactive effects between IAV and APMV-1. Disease dynamics are the result of an interplay between parasites, host immune responses, and resources; and is imperative that we begin to include all factors to better understand infectious disease risk. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 150.
    Wille, Michelle
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Peter Doherty Inst Infect & Immun, Australia.
    Latorre-Margalef, Neus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Lund University.
    Tolf, Conny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Halpin, Rebecca
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Wentworth, David
    J Craig Venter Inst, USA.
    Fouchier, Ron A. M.
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Raghwani, Jayna
    Univ Oxford, UK.
    Pybus, Oliver G.
    Univ Oxford, UK.
    Olsen, Bjorn
    Uppsala University.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Where do all the subtypes go?: Temporal dynamics of H8-H12 influenza A viruses in waterfowl2018In: Virus Evolution, E-ISSN 2057-1577, Vol. 4, no 2, article id vey025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is ubiquitous in waterfowl. In the northern hemisphere IAV prevalence is highest during the autumn and coincides with a peak in viral subtype diversity. Although haemagglutinin subtypes H1-H12 are associated with waterfowl hosts, subtypes H8-H12 are detected very infrequently. To better understand the role of waterfowl in the maintenance of these rare subtypes, we sequenced H8-H12 viruses isolated from Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) from 2002 to 2009. These rare viruses exhibited varying ecological and phylodynamic features. The Eurasian clades of H8 and H12 phylogenies were dominated by waterfowl sequences; mostly viruses sequenced in this study. H11, once believed to be a subtype that infected charadriiformes (shorebirds), exhibited patterns more typical of common virus subtypes. Finally, subtypes H9 and H10, which have maintained lineages in poultry, showed markedly different patterns: H10 was associated with all possible NA subtypes and this drove HA lineage diversity within years. Rare viruses belonging to subtypes H8-H12 were highly reassorted, indicating that these rare subtypes are part of the broader IAV pool. Our results suggest that waterfowl play a role in the maintenance of these rare subtypes, but we recommend additional sampling of non-traditional hosts to better understand the reservoirs of these rare viruses.

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