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  • 101.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Review of J. Hines (2004) Voices in the past. English Literature and Archaeology2008In: Time & Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, E-ISSN 1751-6978, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 113-116Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of M. Kircher (2012), Wa(h)re Archäologie: Die Medialisierung archäologischen Wissens im Spannungsfeld von Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit Bielefeld: transcript., ISBN 38376203792013In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 580-582Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [review of] Magdalena Crăciun. Material culture and authenticity: fake branded fashion in Europe. vi, 170 pp., bibliogr. London: Bloomsbury, 2013. £22.99 (paper)2015In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, ISSN 1359-0987, E-ISSN 1467-9655, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 483-484Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rezension zu: Stabrey, U. (2017). Archäologische Untersuchungen. Über Temporalität und Dinge (Histoire 98). Bielefeld: transcript. 27 Bilder, 244 S. ISBN 978-3-8376-3586-7.2019In: Archäologische Informationen, ISSN 0341-2873, Vol. 42Article, book review (Refereed)
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  • 105.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rymden och människan: rymdforskning i humaniora, konst och samhällsvetenskap2015Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Rymden och människan riktar sig till dig som tycker att rymdforskning är en av de mest fascinerande verksamheter som människan har företagit sig i vår tid. Rymden och människan handlar om rymden och rymdfarten sedd utifrån olika perspektiv inom humaniora, konst och samhällsvetenskap. Bidragen erbjuder perspektiv som överraskar, kanske utmanar och förhoppningsvis engagerar dig på olika sätt. 

    Med denna tidning firar vi också 5 år som Linnéuniversitetet i Kalmar och Växjö. Fakulteten för konst och humaniora, som är en av fem fakulteter, bidrar genom utbildning, forskning och samverkan till utvecklingen inom en rad olika områden av samhället.

  • 106.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Sculptures in captivity and monkeys on megaliths. Observations in Zoo Archaeology2000In: Public Archaeology, Vol. 1, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Search the Past - Find the Present: Qualities of Archaeology and Heritage in Contemporary Society2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeologists are widely regarded as searching in our present reality for traces of the past. However, in this text the author argues that archaeologists searching for the past will instead find their present. In reviewing the relations between archaeology, heritage and contemporary society, he argues that the remains of the past which archaeology studies are much more than a record of past human realities. Instead, he proposes that archaeological objects and practices can be conceived of as media of social practice. They assist us in negotiating our very own social realities and our understanding of what it means to be human. It is this quality that archaeology and heritage should mainly be concerned about in contemporary society. This perspective can considerably increase the value and significance of the discipline and practice of archaeology in present-day society.

  • 108.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Search the past – find the present: The value of archaeology for present-day society2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeologists are widely regarded as searching in our present reality for traces of the past. However, in this lecture I argue that archaeologists searching for the past will instead find their present. In reviewing the relations between archaeology, heritage and present-day society, I argue that the remains of the past which archaeology studies cannot be seen only as a record of past human realities that were substantially different from our own. Instead, I propose that archaeological objects and practices can be conceived of as media of social practice. They assist us in negotiating our very own social realities and our understanding of what it means to be human. It is this quality that archaeology and heritage should mainly be concerned about in contemporary society. This perspective can considerably increase the value and significance of the discipline and practice of archaeology in present-day society.

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  • 109.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Stories that matter: Presenting archaeological sites and heritage in Botswana2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The short report about the presentation of archaeological sites and heritage in Botswana was prepared after a two-week visit to Botswana, 25 July–7 August 2016. My visit was hosted by the Botswana National Museum, represented by Gaogakwe Phorano, Director, and Phillip Segadika, Head of the Division of Archaeology and Monuments. The visit included brief site visits to Three Chiefs Monument, Ntsweng excavations, Matsieng Footprints, Nyungwe site, Kazungula border crossing, Lesoma Monument, Old Kachikau remains, Kavimba Gateway trees and Savuti rock paintings as well as sightseeing in the Gaborone and Kasane areas. In this report I am not attempting to summarize the historical significance of each site. 

    My report is based on two presentations I gave in Gaborone, in addition to some discussions with specialists I met and impressions gained from the sites I visited. I took part in a seminar “Towards a story-line development– a seminar on the proposed Ntsweng site museum” on the proposed Ntsweng Site Museum held in Molepolole on 29 July 2016. On that occasion I presented a talk entitled “Interpreting our heritage: telling stories that matter”. On 1 August 2016, I gave a second presentation on “Interpreting our heritage: issues of authenticity” at the Botswana National Museum. 

  • 110.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Changing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Society2011In: Museum International, ISSN 1350-0775, E-ISSN 1468-0033, Vol. 63, no 1-2, p. 8-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly diverse and multi-cultural societies in Europe make it necessary for the heritage sector to reconsider some of its most fundamental assumptions. Familiar notions of heritage that relate to national pasts and aim at reinforcing the citizens’ common collective identity are unsustainable when significant parts of the population have immigrated over the past few decades, as is the case in many parts of contemporary Europe and indeed elsewhere. National heritage is no longer able to unite increasingly diverse populations. This paper briefly reviews alternative roles heritage might play in European societies.

  • 111.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Colours of the Past2012In: From Archaeology to Archaeologies: The ‘Other’ Past / [ed] Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw, Eleni Stefanou, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012, p. 102-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea for this volume emerged from critical self-reflection about diverse archaeological practices in a session presented at the 13th European Association of Archaeologists Annual Meeting (Zadar, Croatia, 2007), in particular the conflicting relationship between the ‘mainstream’ and the ‘alternative’. The field of so-called ‘fringe’ or ‘alternative’ archaeology is vast and multifaceted, ranging from pseudoarchaeology, ‘bad’ archaeology practices, conspiracy theories and claims about lost civilizations to extraterrestrial cultures, (neo)shamanism, religious and/or nationalist demands. All these agendas have in common the fact that, through their differentiated readings and appropriations of the past, they create solidarities amongst their supporters. Contents: From archaeology to archaeologies: themes, challenges and borders of the ‘other’ past (Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw, Eleni Stefanou); 2) An insider‘s view of an alternative archaeology (Michael Cremo); 3) Performance, participation and pyramids: addressing meaning and method behind alternative archaeology in Visoko, Bosnia (Tera Pruitt); 4) Marginal and mainstream. Religion, politics and identity in the contemporary us, as seen through the lens of the Kennewick Man / The Ancient One (Liv Nilsson Stutz); 5) A clash of ideologies: Zimbabwean archaeology at the fringe (Paul Hubbard, Robert S. Burrett); 6) Academic constructs about the past and early education as (dis)entangled components of identity formation processes (Anna Zalewska); 7) Archaeology as allegory: the representations of archaeology in children’s literature in Brazil (Marcia Bezerra); 8) A look in the mirror and the perspective of others on the portrayal of archaeology in the mass media (Diane Scherlzler); 9) ‘Looting’ unveiled, archaeology revealed: case studies from western Greece (Ioanna Antoniadou); 10) Visual collision? prehistoric rock art and graffiti in an Armenian landscape (Fay Stevens); 11) The colours of the past (Cornelius Holtorf).

  • 112.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Cunning Means of Domination2008In: Archaeologies, ISSN 1555-8622, E-ISSN 1935-3987, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 190-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion started on the WAC listserv when I objected on 8 April 2007 to a short message sent by Claire Smith on the previous day. She had been announcing that her colleague “Heather Burke and [are] putting together a list of important non-Anglo archaeologists” and was asking whether “anyone has any recommendations” for that list and, if so, whether they would email her off list. I objected strongly. This paper explains why. In doing so I am describing the degree of complexity language use has acquired in the contemporary world with old linguistic maps quickly become obsolete. To insist that English is simply the lingua franca of academic discourse is to ignore that complexity. The wide use of English as an academic lingua franca means in practice that there are very strong asymmetries not only in individual archaeologists’ abilities to express themselves competently and confidently in that language but also in what is considered appropriate or possible to express. For a language is not simply a random code with which anything might be said to anybody. Language, and the conventions that govern how a given language is to be applied, influences to a large extent even what is a sensible thing to say in a given context. Language use in archaeology is not about translating the same archaeology into different languages but about translating between different archaeologies and associated cultural practices including languages. The only sensible way forward is for WAC to promote among its members the learning of more languages—which is something the vast majority of “non-Anglo” archaeologists already knows and accepts as a fact of life. We do not need lists of “non-Anglo” archaeologists that are considered worth reading about in English, but more archaeologists being able to appreciate the work of colleagues in its original language. In conclusion I urge exclusively Anglophone archaeologists to please stop finding excuses for learning foreign languages.

  • 113.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The future of electronic scholarship2004In: Internet Archaeology, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Heritage of Heritage2012In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 153-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preservationist paradigm of heritage and the contemporary heritage discourse can best be understood as firmly situated in a specific historical and cultural context of European—and by extension global—civilization of the past few centuries. Contemporary heritage policies and practices are a result of a particular historical trajectory that will keep evolving in the future, and future heritage may not resemble past and present heritage at all. In this paper, I reflect on what the concept of cultural heritage, the conservation ethos, and heritage-related artifacts and technologies are able to reveal about our own time. Given the current significance of heritage, the obsession in our age with preservation, and the inevitable historical transitoriness of both, the question emerges whether it would be worth trying to preserve the heritage of heritage for the future. Rather than remembering the past, future generations may want to remember remembering the past.

  • 115.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Heritage of Rupture: [ Review of Patina: A Profane Archaeology. Shannon Lee Dawdy, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL, 2016 & Constructing Destruction: Heritage Narratives in the Tsunami City. Trinidad Rico, Routledge, New York, NY, 2016 ]2017In: Historical Archaeology, ISSN 0440-9213, E-ISSN 2328-1103, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 302-304Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 116.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Life-history Approach to Monuments: An Obituary?2008In: Gropar & monument. En vänbok till Dag Widholm / [ed] Joakim Goldhahn, Kalmar: Kalmar Studies in Archaeology, 4 , 2008, p. 411-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The life-history of megaliths in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (Germany)1998In: World Archaeology, Vol. 30, p. 23-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The need and potential for an archaeology orientated towards the present2013In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 12-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question ‘Can an archaeologist be a public intellectual?’ appears to express both an unfulfilled desire and a secret hope of an entire professional corps to count among them at least a few public intellectuals. I suggest that the state of the discipline of archaeology makes it harder, compared with other disciplines, for its professional representatives to address present-day issues and relate to public debates. I also suggest that maybe the most significant effect of the fact that society’s public intellectuals generally do not have degrees in archaeology is that participants in public debates and policy makers are unaware of how various applications of archaeology and cultural heritage can benefit contemporary society. This potential will therefore have to be realized in different ways.

  • 119.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Need for Applied Archaeology in Europe2019In: Global Social Archaeologies: Making a Difference in a World of Strangers / [ed] Koji Mizoguchi, Claire E. Smith, Routledge, 2019, p. 240-242Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Past as Carnival: Review of "Die Stämme von Köln", Anja Dreschke (dir.) 2010.2012In: Time and Mind, ISSN 1751-696X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 195-202Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Past as Played and Lived Reality2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 122.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The past in our lives: two archaeological novels. Review of R. Martin, The Sorrow of Archaeology, and J. Hildebrandt, Fördömd2006In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 9, no 2/3, p. 287-290Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    The Past is Now: An interview with Anders Högberg2008In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Anders Högberg is a Swedish archaeologist whose research offers an original perspective on prehistoric flint technology but he has also been directing some innovative projects in archaeological teaching and learning. In this interview I am exploring some of the ideas that have been guiding his work in both realms. Although part of the interview is about work conducted in the past, equal weight is given to new opportunities and developments that affect the future of archaeology. Anders Högberg's ideas cannot be said to be typical or representative for any larger community, but he is operating in very specific historic circumstances that are shared to a greater or lesser extent by many other archaeologists living and working today. This interview documents the particular views on material culture, public archaeology, and the field of archaeology more generally that were held by one European archaeologist in 2008.

  • 124.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Past People Want: Heritage for the Majority?2013In: Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on the Practice of Archaeology / [ed] Geoffrey Scarre and Robin Coningham, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, p. 63-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Presence of Pastness: Themed Environments and Beyond2010In: Staging the Past.: Themed Environments in Transcultural Perspective / [ed] Judith Schlehe, Michiko Uike-Bormann, Carolyn Oesterle and Wolfgang Hochbruck, Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2010, p. 23-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Sounds of Former Silence2020In: The Archaeology of Sound, Acoustics and Music: Studies in Honour of Cajsa S. Lund / [ed] Gjermund Kolltveit, Riitta Rainio, Berlin: Ekho verlag, 2020, p. 11-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Archaeology of Sound, Acoustics and Music, which is the topic and indeed the title of the present volume, is of great significance to both Archaeology and Heritage Studies in at least two major ways. Firstly, sound, acoustics and music are part of our intangible heritage. Secondly, the goal of archaeology has always been understanding living people of the past and not just the sherds and ruins they left behind.

  • 127.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The time travellers’ tools of the trade: some trends at Lejre2016In: Re-Enacting the Past: Heritage, Materiality and Performance / [ed] Mads Daugbjerg, Rivka Syd Eisner, Britta Timm Knudsen, Routledge, 2016, p. 102-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The time travellers’ tools of the trade: some trends at Lejre2014In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 20, no 7-8, p. 782-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about how the emphasis of the archaeological open-air museum at Lejre, Denmark, has been shifting from a research institution towards an archaeological theme park. I am discussing how material culture and associated skills and perceptions have been facilitating time-travel experiences at Lejre from 1964 until today. My main focus is on the prehistoric families who each summer have been inhabiting the full-size model of the Iron Age village known as Lethra. In 2011, I conducted participant observation in the village. This paper presents some of my observations and insights. I am also asking what the discernible trends and transformations over time, imply for how we are to understand contemporary forms of living history and related genres. The discussion explores some implications of my study regarding the nature of authenticity and how the past comes to lifeat Lethra. I conclude by exploring some important trends for cultural heritage and heritage tourism in our age that arise from my study.

  • 129.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The timeliness of heritage2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 130.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Zoo as a Realm of Memory2013In: Anthropological Journal on European Cultures, ISSN 1755-2923, E-ISSN 1755-2931, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The zoo is in many respects a place of remembrance. In zoos, one is reminded of one's own childhood, outstanding human and animal figures, various human cultures past and present, the genetic heritage of natural evolution and the origins of humans. Zoo animals, therefore, cannot be readily associated with wildlife in its natural setting alone. Indeed, zoos are not only about animals, as they purport to be; they are also metaphorical places and about memory. Memories are always socially conditioned and never innocent; the same holds for zoos. I ask whether zoos without colonialist and imperialist undertones are even conceivable today and if human communities could be involved in zoo management to a larger extent.

  • 131.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Time for archaeology!: a personal portfolio of fieldwork2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: en vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff och Annika Bünz, Gothenburg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014, 1, p. 51-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 132.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Towards a Chronology of Monuments: Understanding Monumental Time and Cultural Memory1996In: Journal of European Archaeology, Vol. 4, p. 119-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards Nuclear Cultural Studies2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The exhibition Perpetual Uncertainty / Contemporary Art in the Nuclear Anthropocene at Bildmuseet in Umeå, Sweden (2 October 2016 – 16 April 2017), brings together artists from Europe, Japan, the USA and Australia to investigate experiences of nuclear technology, radiation and the complex relationship between knowledge and deep time.

  • 134.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    TV Archaeology is Valuable Storytelling2008In: Near Eastern archaeology (Atlanta, Ga.), ISSN 1094-2076, E-ISSN 2325-5404, Vol. 71, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 135.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures: a presentation of our work 2017-20192019In: 2019 KNUCH UNESCO Chair International Conference: Sustainable Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Hapjeong-ri: Korean National University of Cultural Heritage KNUCH , 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Visions of the twentieth century2009In: Defining Moments: Dramatic Archaeologies of the Twentieth-Century / [ed] John Schofield, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2009, p. 65-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Was hat Archäologie mit mir zu tun?: Eine Archäologie der Zukunft2018In: Archéologie Suisse: Archäologie der Schweiz, ISSN 0255-9005, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 24-29Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Welche Rolle spielt das Kulturerbe in unserer Gesellschaft und wie kann Archäologie zur Bewältigung aktueller und künftiger gesellschaftlicher Herausforderungen beitragen? Wie muss sie sich verändern, um zukunftsfähig und gesellschaftlich relevant zu bleiben? Mit diesen Fragen beschäftigt sich Cornelius Holtorf an der Linnéuniversität (Kalmar/Växjö, Schweden).

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  • 138.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    What Does Not Move Any Hearts – Why Should It Be Saved? The Denkmalpflegediskussion in Germany2007In: International Journal of Cultural Property, ISSN 1465-7317, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 33-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    What future for the life-history approach to prehistoric monuments in the landscape?2015In: Landscape biographies: geographical, historical and archaeological perspectives on the production and transmission of landscapes / [ed] Jan Kolen, Rita Hermans & Hans Renes, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2015, 1, p. 167-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter I discuss theoretical notions such as the meanings of a monument, the historization of time, temporal collage and the landscape’s multi-temporality in relation to studying the biographies of prehistoric monuments in the landscape. In the second part I draw on texts by Jorge Luis Borges to discuss some of the inherent difficulties of this approach. Implied assumptions of a single and unchanging identity over time of prehistoric monuments in the landscape are problematic. I conclude by suggesting that the life-history approach to monuments and the concept of landscape biographies need to be developed further, and ultimately overcome, as new approaches of landscape research emerge.

  • 140.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    What’s wrong with cultural diversity in world archaeology?2017In: Claroscuro, ISSN 1666-1842, Vol. 16, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of cultural diversity in archaeology has led to a diversity of exclusive and sometimes incommensurate archaeologies linked to the cultural heritage associated with specific cultures. This kind of culturaldiversity is based on a problematic ‘culturalism’ which assumes that individuals are determined by their culture and that they can only realise themselves within their respective cultures (Eriksen and Stjernfelt 2009). To avoid such a culturalism that curtails the freedom of individuals to think and live as they wish (rather than in ways predetermined by what some might contend is their culture), I argue that what we need in archaeology is notmore recognition of “cultural diversity” but rather a more inclusive celebration of a diversity of ideas and approaches that can be brought to bear on heritage and benefit various kinds of communities joint by choice while transcending associations with supposedly distinct human cultures and thus not predetermining an individual’s relation to cultural heritage.

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  • 141.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Where is Heritage Heading in the Age of Globalization?: Review of S. Labadi and C. Long, eds (2005) Heritage and Globalisation. London and New York: Routledge.2011In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 270-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Why cultural heritage is not ‘at risk’ (in Syria or anywhere)2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 143.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    World Heritage in Perspective2009In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 196-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    “You call this archaeology?” asks Petersson: Comment on Petersson, Att gräva nuet...2011In: In Situ archaeologica, ISSN 2000-4044, Vol. 11, p. 161-162Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Zeitgeist2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Zoos as heritage2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Zoos as heritage: an archaeological perspective2008In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Über archäologisches Wissen (with a comment by U. Veit and a response by me)2006In: Ethnographisch-Archäologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 47, p. 349-370Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Культурное наследие и современное общество: [Cultural heritage and contemporay society]2012In: Музей, ISSN 2074-9589, no 9, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    文化遗产对社会贡献的变迁: [The Changing Contribution of Cultural Heritage to Society]2011In: 国际博物馆(中文版) (Guoji Bowuguan (Zhongwenban)), ISSN 1674-2753, Vol. 250, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [zh]

    近年来,关于文化遗产的理念在全球范围内都出现了显著变化。然而,至少到20世纪80年代时,各方关注的重点仍然是纪念性建筑,它们被视为文化血脉不言自明的象征物并被妥善保存。之后情况发生了变化。如今,对文化遗产的理解越来越趋向于认为,与文化这一大概念类似,文化遗产必须以特定的方式服务于民众与社会。文化遗产当下的核心价值观更重视遗产古迹的潜在意义与解释,而非其物理存在(Fojut2009)。我会在本文中扩展这一思路,并探讨21世纪里文化遗产如何对社会做出贡献。我将论证两百多年来,文化遗产对社会的作用首次不再是不言而喻的,而是不断变化的。这一论证主要遵循以下两条途径:首先,文化遗产这一概念得以发源、完善并获得特定角色所依赖的社会—文化与政治背景已不复存在。回首追溯,19世纪至20世纪间出现的一些与文化遗产有关的特殊信仰仍历历在目(Lowenthal1996;Beckman1998)。其次,当代社会存在许多必须解决的问题与挑战。过去,文化遗产或与这些无关,但今天它则有发挥作用的潜力。而要使之成为可能,我们需要彻底重新审视的是,文化遗产在当今社会中意味着什么、又能做些什么。

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