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  • 101.
    Weissbach, Astrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bechemin, Christian
    French research Institute for the exploitation of the sea (Ifremer), L`Houmeau, France.
    Genauzeau, Sylvie
    French research Institute for the exploitation of the sea (Ifremer), L`Houmeau, France.
    Rudström, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences. Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany.
    Impact of Alexandrium tamarense allelochemicals on DOM dynamics in an estuarine microbial community2012In: Harmful Algae, ISSN 1568-9883, E-ISSN 1878-1470, Vol. 13, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plankton and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) dynamics in fractionated estuarine microbial communities (<150 μm, <60 μm and <20 μm), incubated with allelopathic (lytic) or non allelopathic (non-lytic) Alexandrium tamarense filtrates were investigated over a period of 48 h. Additionally, the amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM) available for bacterial growth in the treatments was measured via bacterial seawater culture experiments immediately and 6 h after addition of A. tamarense filtrates. The lack of effect on DOC concentrations and plankton community composition in lytic treatments indicated that allelochemicals did not inhibit the growth of the microbial community. Nevertheless, bacterial seawater culture experiments provided evidence that lytic filtrate addition provoked the release of bioavailable DOM from the microbial community. Since DOM was only released from the largest seawater fraction, microorganisms >60 μm were probably most sensitive towards allelochemicals.

  • 102.
    Weissbach, Astrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Effect of different salinities on growth and intra- and extracellular toxicity of four strains of the haptophyte Prymnesium parvum2012In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 139-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the effect of brackish (7 PSU) and marine (26 PSU) salinity on physiological parameters and intra- and extracellular toxicity in 4 strains of Prymnesium parvum Carter. The different P. parvum strains were grown in batch cultures in 2 trials under different experimental conditions to test the development of intra- and extracellular toxicity during growth. The response of P. parvum toxicity to salinity was validated using 2 protocols. Intra-specific variations in growth rate, maximal cell density (yield) and cell morphology were controlled by salinity. Extracellular toxicity was higher at 7 PSU in all strains, but no correlation was found between intra- and extracellular toxicity. The variation of extracellular toxicity in response to salinity was much greater than that of intracellular toxicity, which indicates that P. parvum may be producing a variety of substances contributing to its various types of 'toxicity'.

  • 103.
    Weissbach, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hemolytic activity, allelopathy and growth rates of four strains of Prymnesium parvumManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Weissbach, Astrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Rudström, Maria
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Olofsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Bechemin, Christian
    IFREMER, France.
    Icely, John D
    Sagremarisco, Portugal.
    Newton, Alice
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research NIVA.
    Tillmann, Urban
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Germany.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Phytoplankton allelochemical interactions change microbial food web dynamics2011In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 56, p. 899-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of filtrates from an allelopathic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense, onfour microbial food webs that have been manipulated experimentally from natural seawater by modifying theavailability of resources in the form of dissolved organic carbon with additions of peptone, and by altering thegrazing pressure with size fractionation. Bacterial production was generally not affected by allelochemicals, butbacteria showed higher net growth in all food webs when allelochemicals were added, whereas heterotrophicnanoflagellates . 7 mm and ciliates were constrained in all food webs. Allelochemicals had the largest negativeeffects on microbial communities with low grazing pressure. In food webs with high grazing pressure andadditional resources, phytoplankton and small nanoflagellates were positively affected by the addition ofallelochemicals, suggesting that those were interfering with trophic interactions in the microbial communities. Bythe lysis of organisms sensitive towards allelochemicals, resources are made available and grazing pressure oncertain microorganisms is reduced. However, the intensity of these interactions is modulated by both theavailability of resources and the biomass of grazers in the initial food web.

  • 105.
    Weissbach, Astrid
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Tillmann, Urban
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Allelopathic potential of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense on marine microbial communities2010In: Harmful Algae, ISSN 1568-9883, E-ISSN 1878-1470, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impacts of two strains of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, differing in lytic activity, on the abundance and the composition of microbial communities (<150 μm) were studied in North Sea water during spring with Phaeocystis globosa as a dominant species. Cell-free suspensions (supernatant) of exponentially growing lytic and non-lytic Alexandrium culture were added at different concentrations to natural microbial communities under nutrient rich conditions. The non-lytic strain had a positive impact on diatoms whereas the lytic strain suppressed phytoplankton growth in comparison to the control. P. globosa, present as single cells in the initial community, increased in abundance and formed colonies in all treatments. However, total abundance and number of colonies was low with lytic Alexandriumadditions, whereas shape of the colonies, but not abundance of cells, was affected by non-lytic Alexandrium additions. During the 4-day experiment, bacterial abundance was constantly higher with high lytic additions (highest concentration equivalent to 1000 cells ml−1) whereas nanoflagellate abundance in the same treatments was found to be lower at the end of the experiment. Initial bacterial community composition differed significantly among lytic Alexandrium, non-lyticAlexandrium and North Sea water. However, neither bacterial activity nor composition was significantly affected by the supernatants after 96 h. Our results indicated that Alexandrium allelochemicals do not inhibit growth and production of bacteria in seawater collected during spring in the North Sea.

  • 106.
    Wolanski, E
    et al.
    Australian Institute of Marine Science, Australia.
    Newton, A
    Universidade do Algarve, Portugal.
    Rabalais, N
    Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, USA.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Coastal Zone Management2013In: Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences / [ed] Scott A. Elias (editor in chief), Oxford: Elsevier, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a scientific overview of the processes and the impact of environmental degradation of coastal waters due to human activities on the adjoining land. The direct effects range from eutrophication and harmful algal blooms, to hypoxia and anoxia. The indirect effects are more subtle and can also lead to the collapse of the ecosystem as in the case of coral reefs or seagrass meadows. Engineering solutions alone are not available to prevent this degradation that can only be reversed, or prevented, using a basin-wide ecohydrology approach.

  • 107. Wolanski, E
    et al.
    Rabalais, N
    Newton, A
    Legrand, Catherine
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Ecohydrology of coastal waters, boundaries and limitations2008Other (Other academic)
123 101 - 107 of 107
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