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  • 101.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University ; Hamburg University, Germany.
    The language of the complex image: Roy Anderssons's political aesthetics2010In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 83-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from the opening scene of Roy Andersson’s 1991 short Härlig är jorden/World of Glory, the article gives an overview of the director’s political aesthetics outlined in his book Vår tids rädsla för allvar. Through the use of static long shots, stylization and the condensation of time and space Andersson attempts to activate reflection upon existential questions such as solidarity and the individual’s responsibility. In this scene from World of Glory Andersson links these ideas with a critique of Swedish passivity during the Holocaust.

  • 102. Brunow, Dagmar
    Theorising (trans)cultural memory: the possibilities and fallacies of a 'transcultural' approach2012In: Towards a Common Past? Conflicting Memories in Contemporary Europe, Lunds universitet, 14-16 maj 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards a Diversity of Cultural Memory: The Chances and Challenges of Digital Memories and Online Film Archives2014In: COST Digital Memories Workshop, Workshop of the COST Action “In search of transcultural memory in Europe (ISTME)”, Central European University, Budapest, 28-30 september 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards an inclusive audiovisual heritage?: The ambivalence of recognizing minorities in Swedish film archives.2018In: 5th Lübeck Film Studies Colloquium: In Dark Waters : Seas, Spies and Social Criticism, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are currently trying to diversify national historiography by including narratives of ethnic and social minorities. This practice coincides with the digital turn which allows museums and (film) archives to remediate parts of their collections onto digital platforms. The recognition of specific groups, however, is not an easy task. Having to deal with government directives, the somewhat problematic legacies of collection policies and cataloguing practices, the lack of metadata as well as legal and ethical issues are but some of the challenges film archives are currently facing. At the same time, practices of recognition and the resulting visibility are ambivalent, as Johanna Schaffer (2008) and Tanja Thomas (et al, 2018) argue.

    This talk will draw on some of the findings of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (VR). My paper will outline some of the archival strategies of including ethnic and social minorities into the audiovisual heritage of the nation when curating access to digitized collections. Examining the website “filmarkivet.se”, run by its main content-providers the Swedish Royal Library (KB) and the Swedish Film Institute (SFI), I will look at the politics of recognition at work, will outline its ambivalences, and will suggest ways of how to acknowledge diversity without ending up in closed identity positions.

  • 105.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards an inclusive audiovisual heritage?: The ambivalence of recognizing minorities in Swedish film archives2018In: 5th Lübeck Film Studies Colloquium: In Dark Waters : Seas, Spies and Social Criticism, Lübeck: Nordische Filmtage Lübeck , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are currently trying to diversify national historiography by including narratives of ethnic and social minorities. This practice coincides with the digital turn which allows museums and (film) archives to remediate parts of their collections onto digital platforms. The recognition of specific groups, however, is not an easy task. Having to deal with government directives, the somewhat problematic legacies of collection policies and cataloguing practices, the lack of metadata as well as legal and ethical issues are but some of the challenges film archives are currently facing. My paper will outline some of the archival strategies of including ethnic and social minorities into the audiovisual heritage of the nation when curating access to digitized collections. Examining the website “filmarkivet.se”, run by its main content- providers the Swedish Royal Library (KB) and the Swedish Film Institute (SFI), I will look at the politics of recognition at work, outline its ambivalences, and suggest ways of acknowledging diversity without ending up in closed identity positions.

  • 106.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Unqueering Heritage?: The Ambivalence of LGBTQ* Visibility in Audiovisual Archives2017In: Queer Screens Conference 2017: 2nd and 3rd SEPTEMBER 2017, The Institute of the Humanities and The Gendered Subjects Research Group at Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, 2017, p. 27-27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The archive is inextricably linked to the construction of cultural memory and heritage, highlighting some stories, while marginalizing others. For audiovisual archives the situation is urgent: film gauge and video tapes are decaying and in need of immediate restoration. Digitisation, while increasingly being used to preserve the film footage, also offers the possibility of widely disseminating and circulating films, for instance via online exhibition. Yet, what happens if personal memories enter the (heteronormative) public sphere? What are the repercussions of digital archives on the visibility of LGBTQ* lives? How does digitisation impact on the notion of the LGBTQ* grassroot archive as a safe space? This paper sets out to discuss the ambivalences of queer visibility in relation to archival practice and access politics. How can the power structures at work within the representation of LGBTQ* audiovisual heritage be addressed? Merging conceptualisations of the archive as an instrument of power (Foucault, Derrida) and a site of both materiality (Steadman) and affect (Cvetkovich), I will examine queer archival practice (Halberstam, Muñoz, Danbolt, Stone/Cantrell) in national film archives as well as 'minor' archives, such as the Lesbian Home Movie Project (Maine) or the feminist video archive bildwechsel (Hamburg). I argue that access alone does not prevent LGBTQ* histories from being “unqueered” within heteronormative frameworks and narratives. Therefore it is not enough to merely preserve, restore and digitize archival film footage, but  archivists need to (re-)contextualise its queer potential. Metadata, editorial contributions and oral history interviews can provide additional information for contemporary and future audiences, reframing the archival footage as part of LGBTQ* cultural memory. 

  • 107.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Unqueering lesbian heritage?: Curating digital content in audiovisual archives2019In: ALMS Conference Berlin 2019: Queering memory. Archive – Arts – Audiences. 27 – 29 June 2019, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft , 2019, p. 37-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visibility has long been an important goal in European lesbian activism and an important means of political empowerment. Yet, visibility can also bring about an increased vulnerability for marginalized groups, especially in times of hate speech and an increasing political backlash. Moreover, we need to ask: whose visibility is recognized by whom, and on what grounds? In my paper I look at the ways both national and grassroot film archives recognize lesbian lives through collection and selection policies, through the use of metadata and via the curation of online access. Presenting case studies from the Swedish and British Film Institutes, from the Hamburg-based archive bildwechsel as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project in Maine, this paper discusses the ambivalence of lesbian visibility after (amateur) film footage has left the safe space of the archive to be widely circulated online. The paper looks at legal and ethical challenges archivists are facing when dealing with nudity, lesbian affection and other representations which challenge hegemonic heteronormative scopic regimes. How can an ethically conducted archival practice be guaranteed? How can archives avoid making lesbian lives invisible again? This paper presents some of the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council 2016-2018).

  • 108.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Unqueering memory, erasing history?: The challenges of curating access to digitized film archival collections2019In: Rethinking Knowledge Regimes: Solidarities and Contestations. Swedish Secretariat for Gender Research, Gothenburg, 7-9 October 2019, Swedish Secretariat for Gender Research, University of Gothenburg , 2019, p. 139-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are currently trying to diversify national historiography by including narratives of ethnic and social minorities. This practice coincides with the digital turn which allows museums and (film) archives to remediate parts of their collections onto digital platforms. The recognition of specific groups, however, is not an easy task. Having to deal with government directives, the somewhat problematic legacies of collection policies and cataloguing practices, the lack of metadata as well as legal and ethical issues are but some of the challenges film archives are currently facing. At the same time, practices of recognition and the resulting visibility are ambivalent (Schaffer, 2008; Thomas et al 2018). This approach positions the archive into an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault 1972, Stoler 2002). Instead of looking at ways of including LGBT+-lives as based on a priori identities, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’.

    LGBT+ lives in the archive have been defined by neglect, amnesia, or misrepresentations due to criminalization or pathologization. This is why specialized LGBT+ archives are often conceptualized as ‘safe havens’ for the queer community. Archival practice in such grassroot and community archives is often considered to be a labor of love, a practice of caring, an act of solidarity. Digitisation, however, is currently changing archival practice by allowing archival content to circulate online. What happens if footage filmed in separatist spaces or nightclubs leave the safe spaces of the archive and can be accessed worldwide by anyone? My paper looks at the risks and possibilities of today’s archival challenges when curating LGBT+ memories. Drawing on some of the findings from my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council), this paper will examine both the recognition of LGBT+ lives in the Swedish national film archive and in community archives, such as The Lesbian Home Movie Project (Maine) and bildwechsel (Hamburg).

  • 109.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    Watch British: Anglo-asiatischer Kanak Chic erobert den Mainstream. Die BBC-Comedy-Serie Goodness Gracious Me2002In: testcard #11: Humor / [ed] Roger Behrens, Martin Büsser, Tine Plesch, Johannes Ullmaier, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2002, p. 148-155Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 110.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University.
    We Have a Button for Every Job, But We Have No Button to Help Us Cry: G/localising Bollywood in Germany2009In: Glocal Imaginaries: Writing / Migration / Place : Lancaster University 9-12 September 2009 : Conference Abstracts, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hell broke loose when Bollywood megastar Shahrukh Khan arrived at the 2008 Berlin Film Festival. While until then popular Hindi cinema and its star system had gone practically unnoticed in the German mainstream media, SRK's visit to the Berlinale epitomised that Germany, like Israel and the Gulf nations, despite its comparatively small numbers of NRIs, is an expanding market for the Hindi film industry.My aim in this paper is two-fold. First, instead of offering empirical audience research, I would like to emphasise the importance of the industrial context for the reception of film. Therefore, I am going to have a closer look at how distribution and marketing have contributed to changing the reception of Bollywood from being a diasporic cultural practice among NRIs (as well as for instance Turkish and Afghan immigrants) to attracting (female) audiences of the German majority. While reception studies often deal with the function of Bollywood for diasporic audiences, my focus lies thus on the discursive shift from margin to centre.Second, using the city of Hamburg as an example, I would like to complicate the category of “nation” in reception studies. Therefore, I am interested in aspects of how physical spaces like cities shape the reception of cultural products. In what ways have Bollywood films been distributed and circulated in Hamburg? What impact did the shift from community screenings in cinemas to video rentals in Desi stores to DVD consumption have? Does the internet eventually contribute to outweighing localised cultural practice? In short: what are the defining factors that the German reception of Bollywood can no longer be exclusively conceptualised in terms of “where you're from”, but of “what you're at”?

  • 111.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Western2013In: Filmwissenschaftliche Genreanalyse: Eine Einführung / [ed] Markus Kuhn, Irina Scheidgen, Nicola Valeska Weber, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2013, p. 39-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Who has the right to the memory of the city?: Appropriating mediated memories in times of gentrification2017In: Creating the city : Identity, memory and participation: Malmö 9–10 February 2017 : Conference program, 2017, p. 29-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the interface of memory studies and film studies, my research looks at the ways mediated transcultural memories travel through different, often conflicting discursive contexts. How does cultural memory tie in with processes of gentrification? My paper argues that mediated regional and transcultural memories are mobilized by different – and often conflicting – stakeholders, for instance the heritage industries, official politics of city branding or antigentrification struggles. Drawing on my case study of Manchester‘s contemporary politics of city branding, I will outline modes of appropriating cultural memory in times of urban reconstruction. My paper will look at the power relations involved in adapting (white homosocial) postpunk memories into the self- fashioning of Manchester as a creative city. I argue that subcultural or popular memories are not emancipatory per se, but can easily tie into neoliberal politics. This has been possible, among others, because Manchester’s postpunk memory culture has excluded feminist and queer positions as well as the recollections of Black and Asian Britons. In short, while travelling through various transmedia contexts, Manchester's postpunk memories have been streamlined memories in favour of consent instead of celebrating difference.

  • 113.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Hamburg University, Germany.
    Wie ist die Medienwissenschaft der Zukunft und der Utopie?2014In: Zeitschrit für Medienwissenschaft, ISSN 1869-1722, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 13-15Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rethinking the future of media studies.

  • 114.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Dickel, SimonFolkwang University of the Arts, Germany.
    Queer Cinema2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    »Alle fühlten sich den Anfängen einer Neuen Queeren Geschichtsschreibung verpflichtet, die in der Lage sein würde, das Jahrzehnt zu transformieren, voraus­gesetzt, die Tür bliebe lange genug geöffnet.« Mit diesen Worten endet der vor 25 Jahren publizierte Artikel »New Queer Cinema« von B. Ruby Rich, in dem sie den Begriff geprägt und eine neue Perspektive auf queeres Filmschaffen begründet hat. Bis heute sind die popkulturellen und akademischen Diskussionen zum New Queer Cinema von diesem Text beeinflusst – die Tür, die sich 1992 geöffnet hat, steht nach wie vor weit offen und dahinter ist das New Queer Cinema so lebendig wie nie. Mit Serien wie »Transparent« ist es mittlerweile sogar im Mainstream angekommen. »Queer Cinema« von Dagmar Brunow und Simon Dickel enthält die erste deutsche Übersetzung des Textes von B. Ruby Rich und folgt den Entwicklungs­linien queerer Filmwissenschaft von den 1990er-­Jahren bis in die Gegenwart. So bietet der Sammelband einerseits Grundlagentexte und andererseits einen Querschnitt durch die akademischen Auseinandersetzungen mit dem weiten Feld des New Queer Cinema. Beiträge von Filmemacher_innen wie Cheryl Dunye, Jim Hubbard und Barbara Hammer sowie Interviews mit Monika Treut und Angelina Maccarone stehen neben theoretischen Zugängen zu Queer Cinema, die an aktuelle Debatten um queere Zeitlich­keiten, die Bedeutung des Archivs, Medialität oder die Repräsentationspolitiken von Transgender anschließen.

  • 115.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    The Face of AIDS Film Archive and cultural memories of the future: an interview with Staffan Hildebrand2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 131-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University.
    A film of her own: Home movies, the archive and Ingrid Bergman. An interview with Stig Björkman and Dominika Daubenbüchel2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 183-188Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 117.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University.
    Scandinavian cinema 
culture and archival 
practices: Collecting, curating and accessing moving image histories2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 75-78Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 118. Martinson, Moa
    Frauen und Apfelbäume: Roman2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 119.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Retrieving Harry Schein from the archive: An interview with Maud Nycander, Jannike Åhlund and Kersti Grunditz Brennan2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 177-181Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 101 - 119 of 119
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