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  • 151.
    Fröjmark, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Sanctus Nicolaus (Hermanni), episcopus Lincopensis2012Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article, published in a website containing information on literary works written in Latin in the Nordic countries before the Reformation, deals with works produced in view of having Bishop Nicolaus Hermanni (Nils Hermansson) declared a saint of the Catholic Church. Nicolaus Hermanni was Bishop of Linköping Diocese between 1374 and 1391. Works written by Bishop Nicolaus Hermanni during his lifetime are not dealt with in this article.

    The texts discussed in the article are the vita and legenda of Bishop Nicolaus Hermanni, his miracula, his canonization process, and the texts written for his liturgical office (officium).

  • 152.
    Fur, Gunlög
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    De l’étranger á l’ascendant: les perceptions suédoises des Samis á l’èpoque moderne (1630-1740)2012In: Figures du Nord: Scandinavie, Groenland et Sibérie. Perceptions et représentations des espaces septentrionaux du Moyen Âge au XVIIIe siècle / [ed] Éric Schnakenbourg, Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2012, p. 117-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Fur, Gunlög
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
     Gender and Sexuality in Indigenous North America, 1400–1850. Ed. by Sandra Slater and Fay A. Yarbrough. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2011. viii, 202 pp.)2012In: Journal of American History, ISSN 0021-8723, E-ISSN 1945-2314, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 288-289Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Fur, Gunlög
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Om kulturmöten och sammanflätade historier: Gunlög Fur läser Cherie Moraga2010In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 4, p. 62-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Fur, Gunlög
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Om äktenskap och kolonisation2010In: Det politiska äktenskapet: 400 års historia om familj och reproduktion / [ed] Bente Rosenbeck & Hanne Sanders, Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2010, p. 295-329Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Gamberg, Frida
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Snickarglädje: En studie av dekorativa element på Hördas hus2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med uppsatsen är att undersöka snickarglädje i den valda byn Hörda. Genom kvantitativa studier diskuteras hur byns fasaderförändrats över tid samt mer kvalitativa analyser av ett litet antal hus idag. Undersökningar av kataloghus bidrar till en diskussion om hur dagens syn på snickarglädje är vilket även representeras ibyns olika typer av hus. Resultatet av de olika undersökningar som gjorts visar att snickarglädjen har betydelse för byborna. Sedan Funktionalismens genombrott i samhället var länge dekorativa element "förbjudna" på hus men har idag återkommit och återigen smyckkar våra hem. Diskussion förs även om huruvida de ideal snickarglädjens samt Funktionalismens förespråkare skiljer sig åt eller inte. 

  • 157.
    Gill, Frances
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Flute Lines: Experiencing Reconstructions Concerning Music2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study elevates the importance of experience, the senses and tacit knowledge in relation to archaeology with a focus on music. With this I take up a thread drawing on theoretical aspects of Polanyi’s ‘Tacit Dimension’ and ‘Ingold’s Lines’.  I review paradigms in experimental archaeology and music archaeology, and the subject of reconstruction in both.  My case study is of four individuals, whose reconstruction models are connected to artefacts perceived as flutes in the archaeological record and/or notions of prehistoric flutes.  Combining the way in which we learn by understanding others’ experiences through gesture and experience as data, my work examines these ideas in relation to wanting to find out about these flute-making people, and how their work is related to the canon of archaeology to which one might expect that it belongs, and if we can call this a tradition.  What I found was that the praxis is complex and far reaching and stretches into various ontologies through philosophy, religion, emotionalism, intellectualism, symbolism, music, tradition, imagination, experience, sensation and identity, where interrelations of the past, present and future are very evident.  I finally consider archaeology as an art which reveals parallels between archaeology itself and music.  Paradigms in archaeologies in 2013 do not effectively support this praxis of flute making despite contextual experimentation showing welcoming promise for future change.

  • 158.
    Gjörloff, Per M.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Terrible Turk: Anti-Ottoman Representations in the 19th Century Swedish Rural Press2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Islamophobia has been pack and parcel in the Western civilisation from the days of Charlemagne via the Crusades and the rise of Orientalism, as opposed to Occidentalism, to the modern day reporting of Islamic terrorist threat. The images have, however, not always been in negative perspective, as one might perceive today. Emperor Napoleon had in fact a great admiration for the Ottoman Empire and founded the study subject of Orientalism. Many were fascinated by the degree of civilisation and the exoticism of the Ottomans, especially the sexual virtues (or lack thereof) were of particular interest of the travellers into the Ottoman Empire and the defamation from the clergy who did not visit the Middle East. This image quickly came to change by the mid 19th century when clashes between the British Empire and the Ottomans were increasingly common, especially in India who were part of the British Empire with a large Muslim population whose loyalties were with the Sultan of Istamboul.

     

    Sweden in the 19th century had no extraordinary dealings with the Ottoman Empire other than normal affairs of state. Instead, the dealing were a hundred years earlier when Charles XII sought refuge in Ottoman city of Bender whilst evading a pursuing Russian army.

     

    We will use a theoretical framework with the foundation in Mary Douglas’ definition of dirt and Edward Saïd’s orientalism as well as modern Islamic frame theory as published by professor Stig-Arne Nohstedt of Örebro University and professor Jesper Strömbäck och University of Mid Sweden.

     

    Research questions

    The broader aim of this cross-disciplinary paper is, through the use of both theories used by media studies scholars as well as traditional historians to explore how the Swedish people represented Muslims through the eyes of the rural press in the 19th century. In particular, which frames were used depicting the Ottomans and did the coverage of the Ottoman Empire change during the 19th century?

     

    Methodology

    Textual analysis on historical material has been the subject of much debate during the latter part of the 19th century and onwards. Classical historicism states that a present day researcher should aim to understand the historical sources in the light of its context. In other words, we can never understand the anti-muslim publications in the 19th century rural Swedish press unless we understand 19th century rural Sweden itself. This, however, is not the within the scope of this paper. Rather, we will aim to interpret the source material cross-disciplinary in the light of the theoretical framework.

     

    For this thesis, we will be using framing theory as a method of categorising the sample of article. The sample will then be subject of a near-reading, interpreting the images used to represent the Ottoman Empire.

  • 159.
    Gjörloff, Per M.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The Terrible Turk: Anti-Ottoman Representations in the 19th Century Swedish Rural Press2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Islamophobia has been pack and parcel in the Western civilisation from the days of Charlemagne via the Crusades and the rise of Orientalism, as opposed to Occidentalism, to the modern day reporting of Islamic terrorist threat. Many were fascinated by the degree of civilisation and the exoticism of the Ottomans, especially the sexual virtues (or lack thereof) were of particular interest of the travellers into the Ottoman Empire. This image quickly came to change by the mid 19th century when clashes between the British Empire and the Ottomans were increasingly common, especially in India who were part of the British Empire with a large Muslim population whose loyalties were with the Sultan of Istanbul.

     

    We have used a theoretical framework with the foundation in Edward Saïd’s orientalism as well as modern Islamic frame theory as published by Deepar Kumar, Ruth Wodak and J.R. Martins.

     

    The broader aim of this thesis is, through the use of both theories used by media studies scholars as well as traditional historians to explore how the Swedish people viewed Muslims through the eyes of the rural press in the 19th century. In particular, which frames were used depicting the Ottomans and did the coverage of the Ottoman Empire change during the 19th century?

  • 160.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bipolära skaparkrafter i Paleolitikum?: En recension av Whitley, David S. 2009. Cave paintings and the human spirit. The origin of crativity and belief. New York: Prometheus Books2010In: Adoranten, Vol. 2009, p. 3-7Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bronsålderns hällbilder i Tjust2012In: Tjustbygden: årsbok 2012, Västervik: Tjustbygdens kulturhistoriska förening , 2012, p. 35-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Emplacement and the hau of rock art2010In: Changing pictures – rock art Traditions and Visions in Northern Europe / [ed] Goldhahn, Joakim, Fuglestvedt, Ingrid & Jones, Andy, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2010, p. 106-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Förlorad, funnen och försvunnen: en notis om den alltjämt saknade häll nr 1 från Bredarör på Kivik2009In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 169-176Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses one of the famous slabs from the Bredarör Bronze Age cairn at Kivik in Scania. Many researchers believe it is lost. The slab depicts two axes, two spearheads, a conic teature and a ship, all arranged in an almost heraldic way. An unpublished excavation report by Gustaf Hallström and renewed examination of histoncal sources show that Nils Henrik Sjöborg found fragments of the slab in 1814. Then it was put back in its original place in the cairn's central cist Some time between 1814 and 1849 it was removed, and lost again.

  • 164.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Halländska hundöron2011In: Utskrift, ISSN 1102-7290, no 12, p. 45-57Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 165.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Handlare Holm på Kivik och Riksantikvarie Curman i Stockholm:: Några tankar om institutionaliseringen av kulturminnesvården under första delen av 1900-talet2012In: Att återupptäcka det glömda :: aktuell forskning om forntidens förflutna i Norden / [ed] NIcklasson, Påvel och Petersson, Bodil, Lund: Lunds universitet. Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia , 2012, p. 257-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Merchant Holm in Kivik and State Antiquarian Curman in Stockholm – On the institutionalization of the cultural heritage sector during the first half of the twentieth century. In recent years, several thought-provoking studies have been published on the history of archaeology and the coming of a cultural heritage sector. A central figure in these studies is Sigurd Curman, who also was the State Antiquarian in Sweden between 1923 and 1946. Common to these studies is a fairly normative historiography celebrating Curman’s life achievement. In my ongoing research about Bredarör in Kivik, I have also encountered Curman and his life project, not least since this monument was one of the first that he restored and made accessible to the knowledge-hungry public in the early 1930s. The inauguration of the restored monument in 1933, with Crown Prince Gustav Adolf as the most distinguished guest, is without doubt one of Curman’s most important milestones. Some 3,000–4,000 people witnessed the event. Curman was celebrated for his great success. The picture that emerges in archives and collections of letters, however, tells a partly different story about the beginnings of the cultural heritage sector in Sweden, where hitherto anonymous actors on the periphery, such as the local merchant Anders N. Holm of Kivik, played important roles. Holm’s commitment to this particular monument exhibits both similarities and dissimilarities to Curman’s vision of a modern culture heritage sector, as highlighted in this article. 

  • 166.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    In the wake of a vouager: feet, boats, and death rituals in the North European Bronze Age2012In: Image, memory and monumentality: archaeological engagemnts with the material / [ed] Andrew Meirion Jones, Joshua Pollard, Michael J Allen and Julie Gardiner, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2012, p. 218-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although this volume is a tribute to Richard Bradley, its strength lies in the range and depth ofpapers that provide new information, ideas, and interpretations on many familiar archaeologicalthemes. This volume takes, as its basis, the archaeological themes that Richard has developedthrough his career and has been divided into several sections that, broadly speaking, follow thechronological development of his many fields of interest and are sub-titled with reference to six ofhis major books (Social Foundations of Prehistoric Britain, An Archaeology of Natural Places, ThePassage of Arms, Ritual and Domestic Life, Image and Audience, and Altering the Earth). Thepapers are, therefore, grouped in meaningful sections, giving the contents a real coherence.The ‘social foundations of prehistoric Britain’ are laid in contributions by Mike ParkerPearson on Neolithic Stonehenge and by Colin Richards and Julian Thomas on the Stonehengelandscape before Stonehenge, both derived from the recent Stonehenge Riverside project which hasadded many more possible layers of interpretation to this complex landscape; and by discussion ofsmall Neolithic monuments along the Upper Thames valley by Gill Hey, and, in the north ofcountry, of henges and their socio-economic setting in north Yorkshire by Jan Harding. Eachexamines a combination of old and new data to present a discourse between social and monumentallandscapes. Martin Green presents some new and unusual burials from Cranborne Chase, the sceneof one of Richard Bradley’s first extensive prehistoric landscape studies. These papers arecomplemented by Barrett’s insightful examination of the economic archaeology of the Bronze Ageto Iron Age transition in Britain, and Andrew Fleming’s comments on landscape archaeology andthe concept, use, and mis-use of the very term ‘landscape’.The ‘archaeology of natural places’ is examined by two papers addressing the nature ofNeolithic woodlands. Bell and Noble discuss the ecologies of these woodlands and of ecologicaltransformations, while Allen and Gardiner examine the concept of the extent of Neolithic woodlandand our assumption that the aim of prehistoric communities was to undertake activities thatremoved them so as to exploit resources and place monuments in an open landscape. They contendthat, perhaps, it was the fact that they were still within woodland that was important.The section on the ‘passage of arms’ comprises a group of very different papers. Härkebegins it with a discussion of ‘conquest ideology’ which is defined as an attitude of mind and a setof related practices which explain and justify current social and political conditions with a real orimagined conquest in the past. He considers whether the existence and expression of a conquestmyth or ideology can really be identified by purely archaeological means, largely throughexamination of historical accounts of Anglo-Saxon England and possible interpretations of theadoption of warrior graves and re-use of prehistoric barrows. Woodward and Needham discuss thespecifics of the few but exceptional artefacts of an Early Bronze Age individual buried at Wilsford,Wiltshire. Gosden marries landscape and artefacts in an eloquent and imaginative approach throughthe identification of two different cycles of change in the British Bronze Age and Iron Age relatingto the creation of farmed landscapes and the re-emergence of ‘ordinary’ metalwork in moreelaborate and decorative forms after their disappearance in the Early Iron Age. Cleal turns to thePrehistoric Society Research Paper 5transverse arrowheads of the Neolithic to provide a discourse on the timing and nature of their introduction which was related to a sphere of interaction around the coastal areas of the English Channel and southern North Sea that was maintained through the middle centuries of the 4th millennium cal BC. Edmunds looks at the recent biography of axes, the ‘meaning’ they still seem to impart thousands of years after their manufacture, and the symbolic referents they have for modern collectors, museum curators and chance-finders alike. Sheridan takes us back to the well-trodden Kilmartin Glen providing an incisive chronological narrative of this evocative and complex monumental landscape between the early 4th and early 1st millennium BC and places it within the broader narrative of developments elsewhere in western Scotland and beyond.Ian Hodder opens the batting in ‘Ritual and domestic life’ on the theme of history-making in the Early Neolithic settlement of Çatalhöyük revealing how the process of memory construction can be seen in varied material projects, including house building, burial and the retrieval of skulls and sculptures. He argues that social organisation at the site was based around ‘history houses’ made up of groups of houses centred on a central house in which the dead were preferentially buried and ritual and symbolic markers were amassed, leading to long term social stability. This resonates with Whittle’s contribution which examines the relationship between longhouses and graves of the Linearbandkeramik. He argues that house and cemetery grave were often interchangeable images: the grave, or grave and body, perhaps being seen as a house while the house could have been conceptualised as a body. Howard Williams extends the theme of memory and concepts of death with a discussion ofmemorialisation of the dead in contemporary Sweden, showing how memory groves create a sense of nostalgia and primordial antiquity and how ashes are used to create different bonds between the living and the dead in association with contrasting material cultures, monumentalities, and landscapes.In ‘image and audience’ an international group of leading authorities from Britain, Scandinavia and South Africa take various approaches to the interpretation of rock art and its context. Goldhahn challenges conventional distinctions between the rare rock art images found in closed burial contexts and the more common finds of rock art on outcrops in the landscape in northern Europe, arguing that the interpretation of rock art’s significance must be based on manifold criteria, such as its iconography, its structure, its relationship to other prehistoric remains, and its setting in the landscape. Kaul, also discussing Scandinavian rock art, further challenges recent interpretations and illustrates how ship images could reflect occasional visits of travelers or long distance contacts or expeditions. Lewis-Williams draws parallels between Richard Bradley’s work on rock art in Scandinavia and his own on southern African San rock art showing how, in both regions, people believed in a three-tiered cosmos that provided a framework for belief and ritual, and that the rock art in each was concerned with transcosmological travel. Fábregas Valcarce and Rodríguez-Rellán review the interpretation of Galician rock art as an open or hardly-restricted phenomenon, drawing attention to physical constraints that existed on its observation and addressing several controversial issues surrounding the dating of Galician rock art and its precise relationship with the domestic sphere. Such academic debates are also reflected upon by Bacelar Alves,who examines how the research legacy, paradigms of mainstream archaeology and modern science, have shaped current knowledge of rock art in Galicia and north-west Portugal. Beckensall examines recent advances in rock art studies in Britain, reviewing its interpretation, recording, excavation, and theoretical concerns, as well as conservation issues. Finally in this section Peter SkoglundPrehistoric Society Research Paper 5considers the relationship between people and trees as depicted in Scandinavian Bronze Age rock art and suggests that these images depict manipulated deciduous trees which are not a true-to-life description of people’s interactions with trees, but rather ones of rituals where the collection of leaves was a substantial element.The final section ‘altering the earth’ begins with David Yates’ examination of the possible cosmological orientations of Bronze Age field systems which may have been laid out to marry the earth with the sky, while Chris Evans invites us to evaluate the interpretational framework applied to under-rated excavation data at more than the site and incident level – developer-funded archaeology may have facilitated more recording – but has it fragmented the record? The volume concludes with Aaron Watson’s striking pictorial narrative describing four different sites and the different techniques and methods used in their archaeological examination and landscape interpretation.

  • 167.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Lasse Bengtsson In Memoriam. Hans mål var att dokumentera alla hällbilder i Bohuslän.2019In: Populär Arkeologi, Vol. 2019, no 3, p. 37-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 168.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Lofta 309 – en arkeologisk undersökning av ett av Sveriges största skålgropsblock2010Book (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    New insights into the rock art of Anbangbang Gallery, Kakadu National Park2020In: Journal of field archaeology, ISSN 0093-4690, E-ISSN 2042-4582, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 120-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a recent study of the Anbangbang Gallery in the Burrungkuy(Nourlangie) site complex of Kakadu National Park, Australia. Using new technologies alongsideestablished methods for rock art documentation, we discuss the complexity and uniqueness ofAnbangbang Gallery as an icon of Australian rock art. We have taken a comprehensive approach toour investigations, deliberately linking new technologies and scientific analysis with otherarchaeological and anthropological research methods. In particular, using evidence from a detailedsite recording, oral histories, and pXRF analysis, we explore aspects of the site chronology, thenature of painting activity, and the retouching and repainting of earlier imagery. The findings forceus to rethink the existing interpretative narrative for Anbangbang Gallery, the motivations behindpreviously held beliefs relating to recent rock art, and the implications this has had for ongoingconservation work in the region.

  • 170.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ny bok om svensk arkeologis första världskändis: Evert Baudou, Oscar Montelius – om tidens återkomst och kulturens vandringar. Stockholm: Atlantis Förlag 2012. 416 sidor. ISBN 978 9 173535 3972012In: HumaNetten, ISSN 1403-2279, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 50-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    On war and the memory of war:: the Middle Bronze Age burial from Hvidegarden on Zealand in Denmark revisited2012In: N-TAG TEN. Proceedings from 10th Nordic-Tag conference at Stiklestad, Norway 2009 / [ed] Berge, Ragnhild, Jasinsko, Marek E & Sognnes, Kalle, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2012, p. 237-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses various memory practices and how they may have been manifested in a particular context, the famous burial from Hvidegård on Zealand in Denmark. The theoretical perspective is inspired by Jan Assmann’s thoughts about cultural memory. Assmann suggests that our memory comes in various forms, which are presented and analyzed here in relation to the Hvidegård burial. The article contains a new analysis of the content of the fascinating belt-purse from Hvidegård and an analysis of the cremated bones from this burial. A conclusion from these analyses could be that different kinds of memory practice are always interwoven. This might create both problems and opportunities for an interpretative archaeology.

  • 172.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Oscar Montelius – on the return of time and the drift of culture.: Review of Evert Baudou, Oscar Montelius – om tidens återkomst och kulturens vandringar. Stockholm: Atlantis Förlag 2012. 416 sidor. ISBN 978 9 173535 397.2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 205-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Recension av Hjalmar Olsson, Kinky Rockcarvings in Sweden. Ord & vision. Solna. 2008. 59s. ISBN 978-91-633-1995-22010In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 240-240Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 174.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Review of Blaze O'Connor, Gabriel Cooney and John Chapman, eds, (Prehistoric Society Research Paper 3, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2009, 191pp., 93 b/w illustr., 8 colour plates, hbk, ISBN 978-1-84217-377-0)2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 251-253Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Rock art for the dead and un-dead: Reflections on the significance of hand stones in Late Bronze Age Scandinavia2010In: Adoranten: aarsskrift foer scandinavian society for prehistoric art, ISSN 0349-8808, Vol. 2009, p. 95-103Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Skeppet som grav, kenotaf och geoglyf:  några tankar om bronsålderns skeppsformade stensättningar och deras betydelse2011In: Forntid längs ostkusten 2: Baknkaholmsseminariet det tredje året, 2010 / [ed] Alexandersson Kenneth, Dahlin Michael, Palm Veronica, Papmehl-Dufay Ludvig & Wikell, Roger, Västervik: Västerviks Museum , 2011, p. 220-263Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Sveriges äldsta och norra Europas näst äldsta hällbildsdokumentationer – en notis om Johannis Haquini Rhezelius antikvariska resa till Öland och Småland 16342011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents some of the earliest rock art

    documentation known from northern Europe.

    Johannes Haquini Rhezelius produced it on an

    antiquarian journey to Öland and Småland in

    1634. Compared with the Norwegian Peder Alfsøn’s

    documentation from seven years previously

    in northern Bohuslän, then a part of Norway,

    there are differences and similarities. Both men

    drew by eye with ink, Alfsøn then embellishing

    his images with watercolours. Neither used any

    scalemeasurements.

    Rhezelius's informants did not seem to preserve

    any pre-Christian ideas about figurative

    rock art. They associated it with legends and stories

    sprung fromaChristian culture;with giants,

    maidens and church-burglars. Folklore associated

    cupmarks with elfs.

  • 178.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Synopsis gällande bronsålderskustens hällbilder2012In: Bronsålderskust: Förstudie 2011-2012,  Västerviks kommun, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum , 2012, , p. 23p. 1-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    «Så godt det lar sig gjøre» –kommenterade krigstidsbrev adresserade till Arthur Nordénfrån norska kollegor 1940–19452019In: Viking, ISSN 0332-608X, Vol. 82, p. 153-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on letters addressed to Arthur Nordén (1891–1965), from his Norwegian colleaguesAnton Willhelm Brøgger (1884–1951) and Sverre Marstrander (1910–1986) during the Nazi occupation ofNorway, which lasted from 9 April 1940 to 8 May 1945. The letters provide unique historical insights intoBrøgger’s and Marstrander’s activities during the war and reveal how they were engaging with Swedisharchaeological colleagues during the Nazi occupation of Norway. While there is no doubt the relationshipbetween archaeology and Nazism during the Second World War is a complex issue, and one that has beenaddressed by a number of researchers (e.g. Nordenborg Myhre 1984, 2002; Hagen 2002), these lettersreflect particular solidarity between Swedish and Norwegian colleagues. They act as aging photographscapturing unique insight into personal experience and agencies. The expressed solidarity in words andactions strengthened existing collegiality and friendships. The letters add to a more nuanced understandingof the history of our discipline.

  • 180.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    The key chain of archaeology is not stronger than its weakest link2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 2010, no 18, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Törnsfall 107 – hällbilder vid ett röse och ett röse med hällbilder2011Book (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Broström, Sven-Gunnar
    Ihrestam, Kenneth
    Wikell, Roger
    Nyfynd av hällristningar i Halland: Rapport från inventering av hällristningar i Halland tre dagar i maj 20112011Report (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Broström, Sven-Gunnar
    Ihrestam, Kenneth
    Wikell, Roger
    Skålgropsfat, skeppshäll och solvagn – tre spektakulära nyfynd av hällbilder från Tjust vid Smålands norra kust.2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 54-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Carlsson, Tom
    Gruber, Göran
    Breddad syn på det arkeologiska kulturarvet2010In: Östgöta Correspondenten, no feb 2, p. 3-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 185.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Fuglestvedt, Ingrid
    Oslo University.
    Engendering North European rock art: bodies and cosmologies in Stone and Bronze Age imagery2012In: A companion to Rock Art / [ed] McDonald, Jo & Veth, Peter, London: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, p. 237-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores how sex, gender, and embodiment are expressed in North Euro- pean rock art. Contributions that approach rock art with engendered perspectives are described, along with an appraisal of the present state of gendered rock art research. We regard rock art as part of the prevailing cosmologies of Stone and Bronze Age societies in northern Europe, and investigate how sex and gender are significant components of these. 

  • 186.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Fuglestvedt, IngridJones, Andrew
    Changing pictures : rock art Traditions and Visions in Northern Europe2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Fuglestvedt, Ingrid
    Jones, Andrew
    Changing pictures: an introduction2010In: Changing pictures: rock art traditions and visions in Northern Europe / [ed] Goldhahn, Joakim, Fuglestvedt, Ingrid & Jones, Andy, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2010, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Magnusson Staaf, Björn
    Andrén, Anders
    Bolin, Hans
    Burström, Mats
    Cassel, Kerstin
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Jennbert, Kristina
    Karlsson, Håkan
    Kristian, Kristiansen
    Kyhlberg, Ola
    Larsson, Lars
    Förslaget till ändringar i kulturminneslagen håller inte!2011In: DIK Forum, no 5, p. 19-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 189.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Palm, Veronica
    Nömgård, Meg
    Lindström, Tina
    Petersson, Magnus
    Bronsålderskust. Förstudie 2011-2012.2012Report (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Goldhahn, Joakim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Sevara, Christopher
    Image-based Modeling of the Present Past: Building 3D Models of Archaeological Environments from Digital Photographs2011In: Conference Proceedings from Digital Media and its application in Cultural Heritage, Amman, Jordan, 13–15 Mars 2011. / [ed] Al-Qawasmi, Jamal, Alshawabkeh, Yahya & Remondino, Fabio, Amman: CSAAR Press , 2011, p. 251-266Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Gomnam, Loghman
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Porträttering av förorten Tensta2012Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hove some suburban areas image is shown to the public in the media coverage of suburban areas, and this is why I in this paper want to look more closely at the image of Tensta in the news media and how people in Tensta perceive themselves. News media has a very important role in the creation of human worldview. It influences our own identity and affects what a person believes is the difference in us and them. In the post-colonial theory, identity creation is a central role in philosophy, us and them. Based on the above purpose, I formulated an overall main question that this essay should answer. How does the news media perceive Tensta and see how residents perceive Tensta. And what explanations are there in the field of urban geography. I have conducted a quantitative content analysis of newspaper articles. I have selected articles that mention Tensta in the four largest newspapers in the Stockholm region. Then I analyzed the collected material by using of a concept developed by Kristina Boréus the use of word as a mean to discriminate to evaluate the articles. I also used literature like Million program and media: perceptions of people and neighborhoods and Media us and them: media relevant to structural discrimination, Different media worlds: local advertising and local media in Stockholm to compare between the results of my study and theirs. The results show that the news media’s image of Tensta do not match what Tensta residents themselves think. Furthermore the results show that the media has a structure in the reporting of the suburbs of Stockholm. 

  • 192.
    Gonzalez, Edgardo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Dockteater som mediering: En handgjord handling2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 193.
    Grip, Susanna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Fem gymnasielärares syn på livsfrågors didaktiska tillämpning i religionskunskapsämnet2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Min uppsats beskriver hur gymnasielärare i religionskunskap år 2010 kan förhålla sig till livsfrågor i undervisningen och den didaktiska problematiken med livsfrågor i klassrummet.

    Som teoretisk ram har jag tagit upp några olika definitioner av livsfrågor, gjort nedslag i den didaktiska historiken över livsfrågepedagogik, samt visat på de läroplansteoretiska utgångspunkterna för livsfrågor i undervisningen. Mitt perspektiv utgår från grounded theory och utifrån en hermeneutisk förståelsehorisont har jag genomfört kvalitativa intervjuer med fem verksamma religionskunskapslärare under vårterminen 2010.

     

    Informanternas svar visar att livsfrågor kan tolkas på olika sätt vilket påverkar didaktiken. Det framkom även att de omgärdar livfrågedidaktiken med försiktighetsåtgärder vilka kan bero på omsorg om eleven, rädsla, kontrollbehov, praktisk pedagogisk kompetens grundad på erfarenhet, eller bristande kompetens. Livsfrågor introducerades i kursplanen för religionskunskap med intentionen att utgå ifrån elevens intressen och frågor. Men i praktiken kan det bli just de frågor som ligger eleven närmast som anses för känsliga och väljs bort i undervisningen.

  • 194.
    Grügiel, Magdalena
    Linnaeus University. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Tills döden skiljer oss åt: En komparativ studie kring riterna vigsel och bröllop inom Svenska kyrkan och Svenska Asatrosamfundet2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 195.
    Gullichsen, Heléne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Visual arts education according to the art teachers: A Minor Field Study in The Gambia on how art as a school subject is percevied2011Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to try to find out how art as a school subject, according to art teachers, is perceived in The Gambia and how the art syllabus in The Gambia and in Sweden are alike and/or different. This is done through a field study where interviews have been done and theories on art as a notion in West Africa have been searched for in books. Art as a school subject is, according to the people here interviewed, not fully accepted as a way of learning and gaining knowledge in The Gambia, and they feel that art education is not valued and appreciated enough.

  • 196.
    Gunnarsson, Ingemar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Referenshantering med EndNote2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod: från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Maria Henricson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 499-520Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vetenskaplig teori och metod är ett heltäckande stöd genom hela sjuksköterskeutbildningen med fokus på vetenskapliga kunskaper med examensarbetet som mål. Boken kan användas genom hela utbildningen och fungerar som ständig kunskapskälla och uppslagsverk. Boken ger också vägledning inför vetenskaplig granskning, presentation och publicering av det färdiga examensarbetet. Till varje kapitel finns även ett webbmaterial och tillsammans med boken ger verket en större förståelse för forskningsprocessen samt den kliniska relevansen av omvårdnads-och vårdvetenskaplig forskning.

  • 197.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Att projicera det förflutna. Historiebruk och historieförmedling i svensk skolfilm 1970-2000 utifrån de regionala AV-centralerna: av Martin Karlsson2011In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 189-190Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bilden av Sveriges historia. Fyrtio sätt att se på 1900-talet: av Marika Hedin, Åsa Linderborg, Torbjörn Nilsson2005In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 326-327Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Den privata stjärnan2011In: Filmens 1900-tal: en konferens om och kring filmarkivet.se, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Gustafsson, Tommy
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Det var en gång...: God historieskrivning och problematiska könsroller2010In: Sveriges kvinno- och genushistorikers konferens, Göteborg 2-3/12 2010., 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 151 - 200 of 687
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