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  • 151.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, Sven
    Risk of Fires in Storage with Baled Waste Fuels2001In: Eurowaste Proceedings Sardinia 01, The 8th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Sardinia, Italy, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Paulsson, Bertil
    Waste Management in the Baltic Sea Region2000In: ISWA World Congress 2000. ISWA in press, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Exercise in Waste Management and Recovery1998Report (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Landfill mining - space saving, material recovery and energy use1997In: Proceedings of the Seminar on Waste Management and the Environment pp. 339-355, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Landfill mining-space saving, material recovery and energy use1998In: Proceedings of the Ecological Symposium, Gdansk, Poland, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Vukoviæ, Mladen
    Water and wastewater management in Sweden2000In: Associación Interamericana de Ingeniería Sanitaria y Ambiental-AIDIS XXII Congreso Centroamericano de Ingenieria Sanitária, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mathiasson, Lennart
    Bergström, Staffan
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Svensson, Britt-Marie
    Analytical methodology for evaluation of the effects of different leachate treatment methods2001In: University of Kalmar Proceedings of ECO-TECH'01, 26-28 November 2001, Kalmar, Sweden, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Department of Technology.
    Nammari, Diauddin R.
    University of Kalmar, Department of Technology.
    Nimmermark, Sven
    Univ Agr Sci, Dept Agr Biosyst & Technol, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Marques, Marcia
    Univ Estado Rio De Janeiro, Dept Environm Engn, BR-20559900 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Mutavchi, Viacheslav (published under the name Moutavtchi, Viatcheslav)
    University of Kalmar, Department of Technology.
    Baled MSW and associated problem, in the context of fire hazard2002In: Recovering Energy from Waste: Various Aspects / [ed] Grover, V.I., Grover, V.K., and Hogland, W., Science Publishers Inc., 2002, p. 223-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nammari, Diauddin R
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Sandstedt, K
    Stenis, Jan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Branden i CemMiljös Avfallslager i Ålborg - Det brinner!2006In: RVF-NYTT, Vol. 5, p. 31-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, S.
    Assessment of Waste Masses in Old Landfills in Sweden1998In: Proceeding of the 2nd International Youth Environmental Forum ECOBALTICA´98, St. Petersburg, Russia, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, S.
    Composting by the vertical composting reactor - a preliminary study of the ICD-composting reactor1998Report (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, S.
    Heavy metals in the sludge from Hässleholm municipal waste water treatment plant1998Report (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, S.
    Berg, S.
    Anderberg, H.
    Rening av Process- och avloppsvatten med TTM-Produkters Preclean- Försstudie1999Report (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Nimmermark, S.
    Larsson, L.
    Bladh, H.
    Excavation at the landfills Måsalycke and Gladsaxe- landfill mining and modern archeology1998Report (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Pohl, Eva
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    The resurrection of used thermoplastics to minimize the lifecycle environmental impact of building materials2001In: Cleaner Production Proceedings 7th Roundtable on Cleaner Production, Sustainable Production and Consumption Systems-Cooperation for Change, Lund, 2-4 May, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    R. Dinesh, Mandhar
    Water Budget for a Landfill in Sweden2004In: Book of Abstracts of the 5th Youth Environmental Forum ECOBALTICA, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Shepeleva, Antonina
    Andersson, Håkan
    Application of the cost-benefit analysis to landfilling: practical aspects2004In: Proceedings of Waste 2004 Conference, 28-30 September 2004, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Shepeleva, Antonina
    Andersson, Håkan
    Practical aspects of application of the cost-benefit analysis to landfilling2004In: Proceedings of APLAS Kitakyushu 2004, the 3rd Asian Pacific Landfill Symposium, October 27-29, 2004, Kitakyushu, Japan, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Stenis, Jan
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Assessment and system analysis of industrial waste management1999In: Waste Management, Vol. 20, p. 537-543Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Stenis, Jan
    The Economics of Waste Management: Applying the Equality Principle.2008In: WASTEconomics: Turning waste liabilities into assets / [ed] Yeoh, J. And Tang, K., (eds),, Middlesex University Press , 2008, p. 33-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Svensson, Henric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Forest, Audrey
    Ecole Nationale du Génie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement, France.
    Geoffre, Marion
    Sawdust for Treatment of Stormwater . Test on Synthetic Stormwater Contaminated with Heave Metals.
    Sawdust for Treatment of Stormwater . Test on Synthetic Stormwater Contaminated with Heave Metals2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Leachate Treatment in Sweden and some other Parts of the World – An overview of research activities2000In: Proceedings of the Seminar on Local Treatment of Leachate – Characterisation, Experineces and Future (Seminarium om lakvattenrening: Lokal rening av lakvatten – karakterisering, erfarenheter , framtiden), Kristianstad, Sweden, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Alm, Erling
    Lindén, Anders
    Dahl, Hans
    Warme, Roland
    Local Treatment of Leachate from MSW Landfills Using Soil Plant-System1999In: University of Kalmar Kalmar ECO-TECH'99, Kalmar, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mathiasson, Lennart
    Water Budget for a landfill Leachate Treatment System2003In: CISA, Proceedings Sardinia 2003, Ninth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium CD + Book of Abstracts, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Thörneby, Lars
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mathiasson, Lennart
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Water Budgets as a Tool for Landfill Owners and Decision Makers2003In: Kalmar University, Proceedings Kalmar Eco-tech´03, Kalmar, p.83, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Visvanathan, A
    MARQUES, MARCIA
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Manandhar, D R
    Landfill in Asia – Improving sanitation of landfill sites2006In: The waste management world, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Hogland, William
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Vysniauskaite-Karlaviciene, V
    Proceedings of Kalmar Eco-Tech’ 01- Leachate and Waste Water Treatment with High-Tech and Natural Systems. The 3rd Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation Between Companies/Institutions in the Nordic Countries and the Countries in the Baltic Sea Region2002Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Alriksson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Fires at storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables2013In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 937-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, the European Union has enforced the diversion of organic wastes and recyclables to waste management companies operating incineration plants, composting plants and recycling units instead of landfills. The temporary storage sites have been established as a buffer against fluctuations in energy demand throughout the year. Materials also need to be stored at temporary storage sites before recovery and recycling. However, regulations governing waste fuel storage and handling have not yet been developed, and, as a result, companies have engaged in risky practices that have resulted in a high number of fire incidents. In this study, a questionnaire survey was distributed to 249 of the 400 members of Avfall Sverige (Swedish Waste Management Association), which represents the waste management of 95% of the Swedish population. Information regarding 122 storage facilities owned by 69 companies was obtained; these facilities were responsible for the storage of 47% of the total treated waste (incineration + digestion + composting) in 2010 in Sweden. To identify factors related to fire frequency, the questionnaire covered the amounts of material handled and burnt per year, financial losses due to fires, storage duration, storage method and types of waste. The results show that 217 fire incidents corresponded to 170 kilotonnes of material burnt and cumulative losses of 49 million SEK (€4.3 million). Fire frequency and amount of material burnt per fire was found to be dependent upon type of management group (waste operator). Moreover, a correlation was found between fire frequency and material recycled during past years. Further investigations of financial aspects and externalities of fire incidents are recommended.

  • 179.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
    Alriksson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Sultana, Norin
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Perception of fire-risk at temporary storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables2014In: International Journal of Environment and Waste Management, ISSN 1478-9876, E-ISSN 1478-9868, no 2, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of fires at municipal solid waste (MSW) storage sites is of great concern because such fires not only result in material losses worth millions of Euros annually but also have deleterious effects on both human health and the environment. Keeping in view that management decisions addressing risk of fires cannot be divorced from human psychology regarding safety, a questionnaire survey was designed for which 187 respondents gave a response rate of 33%. Survey results showed that three types of biases; optimism, attribution and availability bias, prevail among managers of waste management companies. Furthermore, biased respondents had experienced higher frequency of fire incidents and preferred low cost risk averting technologies. It is concluded that there is a need to acknowledge the existence of biases and to improve the decision making skills of managers with the help of risk awareness programmes and implementation of government steering tools to reduce risk of spontaneous fires.

  • 180.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Göransson, Görgen
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Characterization of municipal solid waste temporary storage sites: Risks posed to surrounding areas as a consequence of fire incidents2013In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 2296-2306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study temporary storage sites of municipal solid waste were characterized based on their potential social, health and environmental impacts as a consequence of spontaneous fires, by employing Boolean as well as weighted-linear-combination approaches in connection with various fuzzy set functions of population density around the storage sites. Sweden was used as the case study and data from 105 storage sites were analysed; of these, 38 were identified to be posing high risk for downwind residing population. Furthermore, during the past 10 years, the fire frequency and the average population residing within a radius of 1, 2, and 3 km were found to be comparatively higher for storage sites owned by private ompanies than for those owned by municipalities. The study provided first-cut information of poorly sited temporary storage sites and can help in formalizing the comprehensive risk analysis in the future.

  • 181.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Building smart cities: security against risk for spontaneous fires at temporary storage sites of waste fuels and recyclables2013In: CPEXPO community protection, 2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Now a days there is high emphasis on the reuse and recycling of waste which reflects that waste management industry is flourishing all over the word. The environmental and economic benefits connected with increased recycling and reuse of materials is usually considered as paradigm of sustainability societies. However, in past few years, an increased risk of spontaneous fires at temporary storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables have been observed which lead to a shift in this paradigm (Ibrahim et al, 2013, Li et al, 2006, Fu et al, 2006). According to an estimate, such spontaneous fires have cost more than 49 million SEK during year 2000 to 2010 to Swedish waste industry (Ibrahim et al, 2013). In past unavailability of data regarding environmental damages and associated social costs of such fires lead to underestimation of hazards posed by such fires. However now there is a growing concern that waste management and recycling industry can pose serious threats to our cities and fire incidents can involve serious social, health and economic implications.

    Previous research has showed that conventional invasive techniques (gas detectors, thermocouples) are proven to be insufficient to provide protection against risk for spontaneous fires. There is vast opportunity to do research and to investigate the use of non-invasive techniques (Infra-red Cameras) and advanced invasive techniques (Optical fibre cables) to generate early warning signals and continuous monitoring of temporary storage of waste. In our on-going research project regarding monitoring of real waste heaps using IR Thermal cameras, the preliminary data have provided us the opportunity to quantify the uncertainties associated with use of IR thermal cameras. In future we are intended to investigate different aspects regarding the use of IR cameras, such as; angle of orientation of IR camera in reference to heap, separation distance between IR camera and the surface of waste heaps and quantifying the potential of IR camera to detect hot spots inside the waste heaps. In future it is expected that there will be a growing market for such non-invasive probes that can protect our cities from the noxious emissions release from temporary storage sites of waste fuels and recyclables.

  • 182.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Organizing preliminary storage sites of organic material, waste fuels and recyclables and their separating distance from populated areas2014In: Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, ISSN 1438-4957, E-ISSN 1611-8227, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 270-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European Union directives have urged member countries to enhance the recycling and separation of waste fractions, and this has increased the number of temporary storage sites of recyclables and waste fuels. Spontaneous fires at temporary storage sites have become common and pose social/health/environmental risks. Storage sites should be sited sufficiently far from populated regions, so that the concentration of released pollutants from open fires falls below the critical air quality index before the plume reach the downwind population. In this study, the open-burn/ open-detonation model developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency was employed, and 540 simulations were performed for nine scenarios of open burning of household waste to estimate suitable sizes of storage heaps and adequate distances between storage sites and populated regions. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis was performed for 1,080 additional simulations to determine the effects of variations in the burn rate, storage dimension and volume of the waste heap on the model output. The resulting chart can be directly employed by waste operators/ environmental agencies to organize storage sites to minimize externalities due to open fires. Furthermore, using ArcGIS software, first-cut information of the total Swedish population facing the risk of hazards due to spontaneous fires was provided.

  • 183.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Risk of Fires in Temporary Storages of Organic Materials and Waste Fuels: Lessons Learn in Past, Present and Future Perspectives2013In: 8th International Technical Conference on Solid Waste (Jornadas Técnicas Internacionais de Resíduos - JTIR): Waste Management for Resource Sustainability, July 16 – 18, 2013, Lisbon Portugal., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of spontaneous fires at temporary storages of organic material waste fuels and recyclables have been observed worldwide. This increase in number of fire incidents is due to increased demands for recovery and recycling of materials and growth in number of temporary storage sites. In past fire incidents have been observed in all types of storages (loose dumps, hard compact and bales). It is concluded that in order to reduce the risk of spontaneous fires there is need to re-consider the economic, political, behavioural and technical factors. Furthermore, in a situation when there is always a risk of spontaneous fires, early detection and early suppression can limit the losses from fires. Three stake holders, government by introducing strong steering tools, waste management companies by developing safety culture and society by source separation can help in reducing the risk of spontaneous fires and help in achieving the dream of sustainable society.

  • 184.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Appel, Glenn
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Lönnermark, Anders
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Persson, Henry
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Combustion Characteristics of Municipal Solid Waste Bales2015In: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combustion behaviour of municipal solid waste bales is a rarely studied topic hitherto. However, there is dire need to devote research on the topic because baling as a storage methodology is getting popular among waste management companies and fire episodes in such storage sites can have devastating economic, environmental and social implications. In this study, thickness of low density polyethylene (LDPE) plastic sheets (12 layers, 6 layers and no layer) and type of ignition source (pilot ignition, thermal radiation) were investigated to see their effect on combustion behaviour of bales. In total eleven tests with a single bale in each test were performed. It has been found that the bales not wrapped with LDPE plastic sheets may pose higher hazards for adjacently stored material to catch fire as the value of maximum heat release rate observed for them was higher than those wrapped with LDPE plastic sheets. Furthermore, it has been found that LDPE plastic wrapping do not contribute significantly to the combustion of bales when exposed only to thermal radiation from an adjacent fire. However, it plays a significant role in ignition of bales in case exposed to a pilot flame ignition source. Molten LDPE plastic trapped between the adjacently stored bales was found to be another important factor influencing the combustion of bales.

  • 185.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Elmberg, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Lönnermark, Anders
    SP, Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, Sweden.
    Persson, Henry
    SP, Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, Sweden.
    Fires due to selfignition in (MSWS) municipal solid waste storages2010In: Proceedings Linnaeus Eco-Tech' 10 :: international conference on natural sciences and technologies for waste and wastewater treatment remediation emissions related to climate environmental and economic effects, Kalmar: Linnaeus University, School of Natural Sciences , 2010, p. 734-744Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 186.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Elmberg, Elizabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Lönnermark, Anders
    SP, Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, Sweden.
    Persson, Henry
    SP, Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, Sweden.
    Namari, D. R.
    Storage Techniques for Municipal Solid Waste, Frequency of Fires, and Their Related Emissions2010In: Proceedings of Venice 2010 - The Third International Symposium on Energy from Biomass and Waste, Venice, Italy, 8-11 November, 2010, Venice, Italy: CISA, Environmental Sanitary Engineering Center , 2010, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to gather the missing information regarding storage techniques (i.e., loose compact, hard compact, cylindrical bales, rectangular bales) and self-ignition in storage sites for organic recyclable and solid-waste fuels from a life-cycle perspective. There is a need to compile and analyze information regarding self-ignition events because there is a lack of such studies. Its importance is evident from the fact that millions of euros are lost every year in Sweden because of spontaneous fires. These fires cause loss of valuable material and injuries to people, and they are also associated with intense environmental pollution, in particular in the form of smoke and water pollution. This study is based on a questionnaire survey among the members of the Swedish waste management association (Avfall Sverige), whose members service 95% of the Swedish population. The response to the survey was 60%. A total of 96 major surface fires have been reported in the past 10 years at storage sites. 74% of these 96 fire incidents were due to self-ignition, 11% were due to known causes other than self-ignition and 15% were due to unknown reasons. In reference to the type of storage, 50% of these 96 fire incidents took place at sites that store both household and industrial waste, 20% at sites that store only industrial waste, and 30% at sites that store household, industrial, and agricultural waste. Regarding the most frequent cause of fire at any storage site, 33% of respondents relate the fire incidents with extreme hot weather conditions, 8% of respondents report that fire incidents at their storage site are mostly an aftereffect of rainfall, 13% relate the fire incidents with cold weather in December, and 46% of respondents experienced the fire incidents throughout the whole year. Furthermore, detailed statistics were collected regarding different storage techniques followed for municipal solid waste (MSW) in relation to contents and final destination processing plant. It was found that loose compact storage is the most popular way of storing MSW, followed by cylindrical bales. Based on data covering the last 10 years, the average annual amount of emissions of dioxins is (upper/lower bound) TCDD 0.03/0.12 g, PAH 0.98/3.7 tons, PCB 1.66/6.31 g, Hg 16.51/62.59 g, and VOC 18/68 tons from MSW storage fires in Sweden. Estimated emissions of dioxins from fires in waste storage sites correspond to emissions from the incineration of about 0.017 million tons of waste (Avfall Sverige data for 2008). In total, Sweden incinerated 0.35 million tons per annum during the period studied.

  • 187.
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Rupar-Gadd, Katarina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Wiman, Bo L.B.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mitigating the emissions released from spontaneous fires at biomass storages: A footstep towards sustainability2015In: 23rd European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, Vienna, Austria, 1-4 June 2015, 2015, Vol. 23, p. 1550-1557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fires at the  material storages sites of manucipal and industrial sectors are a major environmental risk and have increased significantly. Toxic emissions released from such open fires have severe environmental and health consequences. Considering that it is not possible to install any unit operation to control the emissions released from such open fires, the possibilities to employ natural vegetation to act as a sink for aerosol particles released from open fires was investigated. A series of tests was conducted in a controlled wind tunnel environment. Smoke was generated in a smoke-aerosol generator and measurements of smoke concentrations upwind and downwind of “green filter packs” (vegetation filters) were made. Measurements involved laser-based particle counters, two-stage Nuclepore filter systems, and Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) techniques followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The main objective of the work was to illustrate ways to design experiments that can assist in the study of vegetation as “pollution screens”. Our observations and findings imply that several refinements to the experimental design will be needed, including with respect to methods for assessing the distribution of particle number and mass as a function of particle size.

  • 188.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Characterization and toxicity of hazardous wastes from an old Swedish glasswork dumpIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 34 old glasswork sites in the southeastern part of Sweden pose a permanent threat to human and environmental health due to the presence of toxic metals in open dumps with glass waste. The possibility of leaching of metals from different fractions of the disposed waste needed to be assessed. In the present investigation, leachate from fine fraction (soil plus glass particles < 2 mm) was characterized as following: pH (7.3), TOC (< 2%), organic content (4.4%), moisture content (9.7), COD (163 mg/kg) and trace elements content, being the values in accordance to the Swedish guidelines for landfilling of inert materials. However, very high metals content was found in the fine fraction as well as in all colors of the glass fraction (≥ 2 mm), whose values were compatible to hazardous waste landfill class. Tests with Lepidium sativum growing in the fine fraction as substrate revealed chronic toxicity expressed as inhibition of root biomass growth in 11 out of 15 samples. Additionally, leachate from fine fractions posed acute toxicity to genetically modified E. coli (Toxi-Chromotest). This study highlights the importance of combining physicochemical characterization with toxicity tests for both solid waste and leachate obtained from different waste fractions for proper hazardousness assessment supporting decision making on remediation demands.

  • 189.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Augustsson, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Marques, Marcia
    Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Physicochemical and toxicological characterization of hazardous wastes from an oldglasswork dump at southeastern part of Sweden2019In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 237, article id 124568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 34 old glasswork sites in the southeastern part of Sweden pose a permanent threat to human and environmental health due to the presence of toxic trace elements in open dumps with glass waste. The possibility of leaching of trace elements from different fractions of the disposed waste needed to be assessed. In the present investigation, leachate from a mixture of soil and waste glass of particle sizes of less than 2mm (given the name fine fraction) was characterized by analyzing the pH (7.3), total organic content (TOC<2%), organic matter content (4.4%), moisture content (9.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 163mg/kg) and trace elements content, being the values in accordance to the Swedish guidelines for landfilling of inert materials. However, very high trace elements content was found in the fine fraction as well as in all colors of waste glass, whose values were compatible to hazardous waste landfill class. Tests with Lepidium sativum growing in the fine fraction as substrate revealed chronic toxicity expressed as inhibition of root biomass growth in 11 out of 15 samples. Additionally, leachate from fine fractions posed acute toxicity to genetically modified E. coli (Toxi-Chromotest). This study highlights the importance of combining physicochemical characterization with toxicity tests for both solid waste and leachate obtained from different waste fractions for proper hazardousness assessment supporting decision making on remediation demands.

  • 190.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Chemical extraction of trace elements from hazardous fine fraction at an old glasswork dump2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 195, p. 825-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Old glassworks siteshave been always associated with contamination by different trace elements likePb, Cd, As, Zn and others. The mixture of soil and waste glass of particlesizes <2mmat one of the oldest Swedish glassworks (the Pukeberg) was studiedby analyzing the trace elements content, organic content (3.6%) and pH (7.4).The results showed hazardous concentrations of Pb (1525 mg/kg), Ba (1312mg/kg), Sb (128 mg/kg), Cd (36 mg/kg), As (118 mg/kg), Zn (1154mg/kg) and Co(263 mg/kg) exceeded the Swedish guidelines of contaminated soil. Batchchemical extraction by the chelating agents EDTA, DTPA and the biodegradableNTA were performed to study the effect of chelating agent concentration and mixingtime on the extraction efficiencies by following a Box-Wilson design ofexperiments. The results displayed good extraction efficiencies (less than 41%)of Pb, Cd, As and Zn by the EDTA, DTPA and NTA, which seemed depends on thetype of chelator. In addition, high correlation between the extraction efficiencies,the chelators concentration and mixing time was found based on the statisticaland experimental results.

  • 191.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Reduction-melting extraction of trace elements from hazardous waste glass from an old glasswork’s dump in the southeastern part of Sweden2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 34, p. 26341-26349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the southeastern part of Sweden, old art and crystal waste glass has been identified as a hazardous waste due to high weight concentrations of Pb (32.398%), Cd (0.085%) and As (1.976%). The reduction-melting technique was used to investigate the extraction of these trace elements from powder waste glass of particle size <1 mm. Following a factorial design technique, the experimental results of the reduction-melting method showed that 99.9% of Pb, 100% of Cd and 99% of As could be extracted. For a batch of 10 g powder waste glass, the found experimental and theoretical optimum operating conditions were 1100 oC of melting temperature, 5 g of Na2CO3, 2 g of carbon and 120 min of melting time. The reduction-melting method displayed promising results which might help in recycling the extracted trace elements and glass compared to the current used solution of landfilling as hazardous wastes. 

  • 192.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Waste glass in the production of cement and concrete – A review2014In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1767-1775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cement and glass industries are facing a lot of challenges due to the high greenhouse gases emissions, the intensive use of energy and the intensive use of the earth’s natural resources. The current situation of discarding waste glass to landfills is also not offering an environmental friendly management for the waste glass, due to the nonbiodegradable form of the waste glass. However, the chemical composition and the pozzolanic properties of waste glass are encouraging for the use of this waste in the cement and concrete industries and to provide an environmental friendly solution for the glass and cement industries. This paper reviews the different uses of waste glass in cement and concrete and the effect of the glass properties on the performance and durability of the produce cement and concrete.

  • 193.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Charlotte, Marchand
    University of Montréal, Canada.
    Hogland, Marika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mait, Kriipsalu
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Anders, Kihl
    Ragn-Sells AB, Sollentuna.
    Characterisation of excavated fine fraction and waste composition from a Swedish landfill2016In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1292-1299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research studies the characterisation and the physico-chemical properties of an excavated fine fraction (<10 mm) from a Swedish landfill, the Högbytorp. The results showed that the fine fraction represents 38% by mass of the total excavated wastes and it contains mainly soil-type materials and minerals. Higher concentrations of zinc, copper, barium and chromium were found with concentrations higher than the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for contaminated soil. The found moisture and organic contents of the fine fraction were 23.5% and 16.6%, respectively. The analysed calorific value (1.7 MJ kg-1), the potential of CH4 (4.74 m3 t-1 dry matter) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) (5.6%) were low and offer low potential of energy. Sieving the fine fraction further showed that 80% was smaller than 2 mm. The fine represents a major fraction at any landfill (40%–70%), therefore, characterising the properties of this fraction is essential to find the potential of reusing/recycling or safely redisposing.

  • 194.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Pehme, Kaur-Mikk
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, Marika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Denafas, Gintaras
    Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Composition of waste at an early EU-landfill of Torma in Estonia2017In: Iranica Journal of Energy and Environment / Iranian Journal of Energy and Environment, ISSN 2079-2115, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 113-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landfills represent a continuous environmental threat due to the emission of different greenhouse gases, which are mainly responsible for the climate changes, and the contaminated leachate that affects the surface and ground water recipients. The circular economy approach appeared as a useful solution to reduce the depletion of the Earth’s natural resources and the environmental risk effects by considering all of the lost resources like wastes including the landfills as potential secondary resources. It is well known that characterizing the composition of landfill waste is an essential step in specifying the recycling methods. In the current research the waste composition at one of the first EU regulations-compliant sanitary landfills (the Torma landfill in Estonia) was studied. The results showed that the fine fraction (<20 mm) represented 53% of the total excavated waste materials while the waste to energy fraction (plastics, woods etc.) was the highest within the coarse fraction (>20 mm). The present work emphasized that mining landfills can be a good solution either for extracting primary raw materials like metals, as a source for recovering energy, or for acquiring landfill space.

  • 195.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Lundström, JelenaLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.Svensson, VivekaLinnaeus University, The University Library.Hogland, WilliamLinnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    PROCEEDINGS of the International Conference LINNAEUS ECO-TECH 2018, Book of Abstracts2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mutafela, Richard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Smålands glassworks: a review of the recently published studies2018In: LinnaeusEco-Tech 2018, 19–21 November 2018, Kalmar, Sweden: Abstract book / [ed] Yahya Jani, Jelena Lundström, Viveka Svensson, William Hogland, Kalmar: Linnaeus university , 2018, p. 151-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The historical contamination of Smålands glass industry by hazardous concentrations of different trace elements (such as Pb, As, Zn, Cd and others) is a fact that has been approved by many researchers. These studies covered the situation of the glassworks contamination from different angles. However, the recommended solution by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency is landfilling. Dumping these masses means, on the first hand, losing huge amounts of the Earth natural resources as wastes and, on the second hand, losing any future opportunity of recycling or reusing due to mixing these masses with other hazardous wastes generated by different sectors. In this paper, we are trying to review and highlight the results obtained by some of the already published studies in this field to identify the gap and challenges of recycling or reusing options.

  • 197.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Mutafela, Richard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Ferrans, Laura
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Ling, Gao
    Beihua University, People's Republic of China.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Phytoremediation as a promising method for the treatment of contaminated sediments2019In: Iranian Journal of Energy and Environment, ISSN 2079-2115, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dredging activities are necessary to maintain the navigation depth of harbors and channels. Additionally,dredging can prevent the loss of water bodies. A large amount of extracted sediments is produced around theworld. Removed material is widely disposed at open seas or landfills. Much of the dredged material is pollutedand is classified as unsuitable for open-sea disposal. In Sweden, many dredging activities are taking placenowadays like that in Oskarshamn harbor, Inre harbor Norrköping municipality and Malmfjärden bay inKalmar. In this review, the potential of phytoremediation as a treatment method is discussed with focus onsuggested methods for reusing the treated sediments. Recycling or reusing of dredged and treated sedimentswill preserve Earth natural resources as well as reduce diffusion of contaminants to the environment.

  • 198.
    Jani, Yahya
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Pehme, Kaur-Mikk
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Bucinskas, A.
    Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Kriipsalu, Mait
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia.
    Burlakovs, Juris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Speciation of Cu, Zn and Cr in Excavated Fine Fraction of Waste at two Landfills2018In: Iranica Journal of Energy and Environment (IJEE), ISSN 2079-2115, E-ISSN 2079-2123, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 86-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining landfills and open dumpsites is associated with (40-70% by mass) fine fraction of particle sizes less than 20 or 10 mm. Soil and trace elements of considerable concentrations typically dominate the composition of this fraction. In the present paper, a modified three steps sequential extraction procedure was used to fractionate Cu, Zn and Cr in the fine fraction of waste sampled from Högbytorp (Sweden) and Torma (Estonia) landfills. The results showed that the major concentrations of Cu (98.8 and 98.6 wt%) and Cr (98.5% and 98.4 wt %) in fines from Högbytorp and Torma landfills, respectively. These data were found associated to the residual fraction. Noticeable concentrations of Cu and Cr were also found associated within the water -soluble fraction, which could be regarded as a potential risk. The Zn displayed different behavior by distributing in all the sequential extraction fractions in the fine fractions from the two landfills. Specifying the metals content using this method is essential to explore the valorization as well as the potential environmental risks by these fines fractions.

  • 199. Joseph, Kurian
    et al.
    Nasgendran, R
    Thanasekaran, K
    Visvanathan, C
    Hogland, William
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Kathikeyan, O
    Moorthy, N., N.
    Dumpsite Rehabilitation Manual2008Book (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Kaczala, Fabio
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Hogland, William
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Preliminary evaluation of a wastewater pilot treatment system in a wood-based factory: Use of low cost "non-conventional" sorbents2009In: Proceedings of Polish Scientific Conference v.56, Gdansk, Polen, 2009, p. 178-187Conference paper (Other academic)
1234567 151 - 200 of 341
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