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  • 151.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Att sätta arkivet i rörelse: Barbara Hammer2019In: Walden. Tidskrift för filmkritik, ISSN 2002-2891, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Between Remembering and Forgetting: The Archive and Cultural Memory2018In: Archiving the Unarchivable – Das Unarchivierbare archivieren: 22.–24.11.2018, Kassel: Documenta Archiv , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the ‘archival turn’ the digitization of archival collections has been regarded as an important means of countering forgetting, especially in view of analog film stock and videotapes slowly decaying. But has digitization become a hollow promise? Can long-term preservation really be granted? The initial optimism has been challenged by the increasing number of data cemeteries, too. These are due to short-lived digitization projects, which are lacking sustainable planning. And to add, archival storage alone does not automatically contribute to cultural memory. Instead, archival holdings need to be circulated again, preferably in various media environments, in order to feed into our constantly changing, dynamic cultural memory. This keynote address will explore the relation between memory and forgetting in the archive. Advocating for sustainable archival projects, it will discuss the impact of materiality (e.g. paper, videotapes and digital data). Looking at media specificity involves the question of what gets lost in media transformation, for example in video documentations of performance art or expanded cinema. Situating itself within recent trends in cultural memory studies, the talk will outline the challenges and possibilities of today’s archival practice. Drawing on a number of case studies from the documenta archive as well as other heritage institutions, it will present ways of curating access to digitized collections. Different modes of access allow for a re-circulation of the archive, thus providing ways of constructing cultural heritage and memory.

  • 153.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Beyond Boundaries I: Im Gespräch mit Monika Treut2018In: Queer Cinema / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Simon Dickel, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2018, p. 125-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Beyond Boundaries II: Im Gespräch mit Angelina Maccarone2018In: Queer Cinema / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Simon Dickel, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2018, p. 189-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Södertörn University.
    Conceptualising essay film research: canon formations between transnational film studies and "strategic auteurism"2015In: World Cinema and the Essay Film, Reading, 30 april-2 maj 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While publications on the essay film have hitherto focussed on white male filmmaking, thereby perpetuating Romanticism’s patriarchal, logocentric myth of the (male) genius, essay film research needs to broaden its scope to include female directors and/or directors-of-colour. Inclusive gestures alone, however, cannot challenge dominant canon constructions and their inherent dominance of the ‘usual suspects’, such as Resnais, Marker, Godard, or Farocki. Conceptualisations of World cinema (Chaudhuri 2005, Durovicova/Newman 2010, Nagib/Perriam/Dudrah 2012) and European cinema through a transnational perspective (Elsaesser 2005, Bergfelder 2005) can add new dimensions to essay film research, denouncing auteurism as one of the major points of reference for global film practice. However, a director's status as an auteur is still crucial for his or her critical reception, and as a result, for canon formation and its repercussions on film historiography. Conceptualising a film as an essay film can liberate it from a reductive critical reception as an expression of a minoritarian position. Using the example of John Akomfrah, my paper develops the concept of 'strategic auteurism', examining boththe self-fashioning of a filmmaker and his/her conceptualisation by curators and film scholars alike.

  • 156.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Countering Amnesia and Forgetting: Reworking Cultural Memory around the Victims of Right-Wing Violence2017In: Doing Memory and Right-Wing Violence in Mediated Public Spheres: Workshop : 15.–16.10.2017, Fürstensaal, Schloss Hohentübingen, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Creating heritage and memory: digital film archives as sites of knowledge production2017In: From Dust to Dawn : Archival Studies After the Archival Turn: Uppsala 15–17 November 2017, Uppsala University, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situated at the intersection of archivology, film studies and memory studies, my paper offers critical perspectives on the archive as a site of knowledge production. It investigates the construction of audiovisual heritage in digital film archives, based on my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (VR, 2016–2018). Drawing on theorizations of the archive by Foucault and Derrida, I regard the archive as an agent in its own right. In order to challenge the ongoing tendencies in film studies to focus on the preservation of film stock, my talk will foreground the role of the archivist as a curator. In my paper I will examine the use of metadata for the creation of a polyvocal cultural memory.

  • 158.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating Access: Digital Archives, Heritage and Diversity2016In: The NECS 2016 Conference in/between : cultures of connectivity: 10th Annual NECS Conference July 26-30, 2016, Potsdam, Germany, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Curating Access to Audiovisual Heritage: Cultural Memory and Diversity in European Film Archives2017In: Image [&] Narrative, ISSN 1780-678X, E-ISSN 1780-678X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 97-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archives, just like museums or libraries, are agents which contribute to the creation of our cultural memory. Inextricably linked to the notion of cultural heritage, they highlight some narratives, while sidelining or excluding others. Therefore it is important to critically reflect on the question “whose heritage” (Stuart Hall) is created in the process of archiving. This article looks at the politics of creating access to audiovisual heritage in European film archives via online video streaming opportunities. Examining audiovisual archives as agents in the construction of transnational memories, my research aims to provide new ways of reflecting on diversity practices in archival selection. As case study, this article examines the archival politics of the national film archives in Sweden, especially the way archivists are curating the site Filmarkivet.se.

  • 160.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Hamburgs universitet, Germany ; Södertörns högskola.
    Dagmar Brunow läser Laura Mulvey: Mulvey reloaded - den manliga blicken och feministiskt filmskapande2013In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 4, p. 64-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Das Archiv als Akteur: Videoarchive und die Mediatisierung des kulturellen Gedächtnisses2015In: Geschichte(n), Repräsentationen, Fiktionen – Medienarchive als Gedächtnis- und Erinnerungsorte Filmarchiv Austria, Wien, 7-8 maj 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Angesichts des archival turns in der Kunst (Enwezor 2008), des insbesondere im Kunstkontext ausgebrochenen “Archive Fevers” (Derrida 1995) und der regen Debatte um den Einfluss der Digitalisierung auf das Medium Film – und damit auch auf Bewahrung, Restaurierung, Distribution und Kuratieren von Film sowie seine Vorführung (Bohn 2013, Fossati 2009, Cherchi Usai et al 2008) vermag es zu überraschen, wie wenig die kulturwissenschaftliche Gedächtnisforschung sich bislang der Frage nach dem Archiv gewidmet hat. So wurde der Archivbegriff bislang vornehmlich in Bezug auf schriftliche, textbasierte Formen thematisiert (Assmann 1999), und nur in wenigen Fällen in Hinblick auf audiovisuelle Medien (VanDijck 2007, von Keitz/Weber 2012). In den Filmwissenschaften wurde die Arbeit von Filmarchiven vor allem unter dem Aspekt der Bewahrung, Restaurierung und Digitalisierung von Film untersucht (Frick 2011, Fossati 2009, Cherchi Usai et al 2008), weniger jedoch, wie es jüngst die Medienarchäologie vorschlägt, als eigener Akteur, dessen Entscheidungen – Metadaten, kuratorische Entscheidungen – angesichts von Auswahlprozessen einer kritischen Analyse zu unterziehen sind (Ernst 2007, Parikka 2012).

    Mein Vortrag plädiert zum einen für eine (Wieder-)Einführung des Archivbegriffs in die Gedächtnisforschung und dafür, die Materialität und diskursive Verfasstheit des Archivs zusammenzudenken. Insofern ist die im Zuge der Rezeption von Derridas „Archive Fever“ vorgenommene Zweiteilung von dem Archiv (als diskursivem Konstrukt) und den Archiven (als konkrete Archive) eher heuristisch zu verstehen, hat doch die Medienspezifik des “Archivs” komplexe Auswirkungen auf das kulturelle Gedächtnis. Daher richtet mein Beitrag die Aufmerksamkeit auf die Verschränkung von Materialität und Diskursivität bei Medienarchiven. Am Beispiel der Medienspezifik und diskursiven Verfasstheit von kulturellem Gedächtnis auf Video werden die Wechselbeziehungen und Verschränkungen von Medialität und Diskurs veranschaulicht. Meine These lautet, dass die Arbeit europäischer Videokollektive eine wichtige Quelle für die Medien- und Geschichtswissenschaften gleichermaßen bedeutet, dass aber viele dieser Quellen aufgrund der prekären Materiallage der Videobänder im Verschwinden begriffen sind. Untersucht wird dies am Beispiel der Archivpraxis dreier Hamburger Film- und Videokollektive (Medienpädagogikzentrum, Bildwechsel und die thede), die in den 1970er bzw. 1980er Jahren ihre Arbeit aufgenommen haben und bis heute existieren. Der Beitrag, der ein völlig vergessenes Stück Mediengeschichte in den Fokus der Betrachtung rückt, zeigt einmal mehr die Notwendigkeit einer medienspezifischen Betrachtungsweise für die kulturwissenschaftliche Gedächtnisforschung wie für die Archivtheorie gleichermaßen.

  • 162.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Decolonizing audiovisual heritage in Europe: Migrant and diasporic lives in national film archives2018In: Global Challenges 2018 : Borders, Populism and the Postcolonial Condition - An international conference on critical theory, postcoloniality, migration and populism: Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden, 14-16 June 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We cannot speak of the past without the archive, Stuart Hall famously stated. The archive, now a buzzword in the arts and humanities, cannot be conceptualised without taking power relations into account (Foucault, Derrida, Stoler). In his keynote “Whose Heritage” (1999), Hall points at the hegemonic whiteness and at the interests of the middle class invested in the creation of heritage and memory in the UK. In recent years, many heritage institutions in Europe have started to emphasize the (albeit problematic) notion of “diversity” as a fundamental requirement for their work. However, when it comes to the impact of digitisation on audiovisual heritage, a post-colonial perspective is still missing. This paper, which is part of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images” (financed by the Swedish Research Council, 2016-18), looks at the ways national film archives in the UK and Sweden try to face the challenges involved in carving out a discursive space for migrant and diasporic memories. Arguing that it is not enough to merely “insert” these memories into the hegemonic narrative, it will discuss ways of decentering the audiovisual heritage of the nation. My paper will look at archival approaches to avoiding essentialism and dealing with the politics of representation in film images into which a colonial gaze is already inscribed. How can the colonial gaze be foregrounded (or subverted) when creating access to film collections through online curation? This paper argues for the need of the archivists to take a self-reflexive stand which highlights the role of the archive as an agent in its own right.

  • 163.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Södertörn University.
    Den rörliga bildens kulturarv: Minne, arkiv och videoband2016In: Minne, medier och materialitet / [ed] Johan Hegardt, Trond Lundemo, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, 1, p. 57-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Denken als Aktivismus: Stuart Hall zwischen Popkultur und Politik2015In: Stuart Hall: Aktivismus, Pop und Politik / [ed] Dagmar Brunow, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2015, p. 11-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Digitale Dokumentarfilmarchive als Wissensressource für die Zivilgesellschaft2018In: „Dokumentarische Praktiken in medialer Transformation. Historische Entwicklungen und aktuelle Perspektiven“: 6.-7. Juli 2018, Universität Hamburg, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    'Doing Archive': Archival Practice as an Epistemological Toolkit2015In: The Ethos of History – Time, Memory and Representation, Sigtuna, 10-12 Sept 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Elin Wägner och filmen2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När seklet var ungt skrev feministen och författaren Elin Wägner filmmanus, mest efter egna förlagor men också originalmanus. Bland annat till Anna Hofman-Uddgren, den första svenska kvinna som gav sig i kast med filmmediet. Dagmar Brunow berättar om Wägners engagemang i den nyfödda filmkonsten.

  • 168.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Elin Wägners Åsa-Hanna på film: från manusarbete till biografvisning2018In: Elin Wägner: Åsa-Hanna 100 år / [ed] Marianne Enge Swartz, Lammhult: Elin Wägner-sällskapet , 2018, p. 15-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    En filmskatt bärgas2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan den rörliga bildens kulturarv bli mera öppet för mångfald? Hur kan vi lyfta fram berättelser om människor som sällan syns på bioduken? Vems kulturarv och vilka är det som skapar det? Hur kan vi som medborgare vara aktivt delaktiga i denna process?

  • 170.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    From the safe space into cyberspace?: The ambivalence of lesbian visibility in film archives2019In: The Lesbian Lives Conference 2019: The Politics of (In)Visibility. Centre for Transforming Sexuality and Gender & The School of Media, University of Brighton, 15th - 16th March 2019, Brighton: University of Brighton , 2019, p. 6-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visibility has long been an important goal in European lesbian activism and an important means of political empowerment. Yet, visibility can also bring about an increased vulnerability for marginalized groups, especially in times of hate speech and an increasing political backlash. Moreover, we need to ask: whose visibility is recognized by whom, and on what grounds? In my paper I look at the ways both national and grassroot film archives recognize lesbian lives through collection and selection policies, through the use of metadata and via the curation of online access. Presenting case studies from the Swedish and British Film Institutes, from the Hamburg-based archive bildwechsel as well as the Lesbian Home Movie Project in Maine, this paper discusses the ambivalence of lesbian visibility after (amateur) film footage has left the safe space of the archive to be widely circulated online. The paper looks at legal and ethical challenges archivists are facing when dealing with nudity, lesbian affection and other representations which challenge hegemonic heteronormative scopic regimes. How can an ethically conducted archival practice be guaranteed? How can archives avoid making lesbian lives invisible again? This paper presents some of the results of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council 2016-2018).

  • 171.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Fröhliche Körper im Kino: Eine Flanerie2015In: Die Körper des Kinos: Für eine fröhliche Filmwissenschaft / [ed] Christian Hüls, Natalie Lettenewitsch, Anke Zechner, Frankfurt/Main: Stroemfeld Verlag, 2015, 1, p. 13-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Interview mit Ken Loach2018In: Film-Konzepte, ISSN 1861-9622, Vol. 49, p. 94-100Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Hamburg University, Germany.
    Kollektive Videopraxis als Wissenserzeugung: Digitalisierung und Archivpolitik im Zeichen des Urheberrechtes2014In: Gesellschaft für Medienwissenschaften (GfM) Jahrestagung 2014: Medien / Recht. Philipps-Universität, Marburg, 2-4 oktober 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    LGBT+ heritage, digital memories and film archives2019In: Presented at OUTing the Past 2019 Festival Conference. LGBT+ Solidarity: Past and Present: 29 – 31 March 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast, Belfast: Ulster University , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    LGBT-Activism in Audiovisual Archives: Curating Access and Reclaiming Visibility2018In: Outing the Past 2018: 16th - 18th March, Liverpool, John Moores University, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation has allowed film archives to circulate footage on a nation-wide or even global scale, for instance via online exhibition. Yet, what happens if the queer “archive of feeling” (Cvetkovich) is entering the (heteronormative) public sphere? This paper sets out to discuss the ambivalences of queer visibility in relation to archival practice and access politics. Drawing on an understanding of the archive as an agent in its own right and on the practice of archiving as a performative act, this paper will outline the challenges involved when curating access to archival footage dealing with LGBT-activism. In my current research project “The Cultural Memory of Moving Images” (2016-18) I look at the politics of archives as heritage institutions and their practice of creating polyvocal memories by creating online access to digitized collections. While visibility has been a political goal for LGBT-struggle in the West, the question of archival visibility and its ambivalences need to be further explored. Merging conceptualisations of the archive as an instrument of power (Foucault, Derrida) and a site of both materiality (Steadman) and affect (Cvetkovich), I will examine queer archival practice (Halberstam, Muñoz, Danbolt, Stone/Cantrell) in national film archives as well as 'minor' archives, such as the Lesbian Home Movie Project (Maine) or the feminist video archive bildwechsel (Hamburg). I argue that it is not enough to merely preserve, restore and digitize archival film footage, but archivists need to (re-)contextualise its queer potential through metadata, curatorial practices and oral history interviews.

  • 176.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Manchester’s post-punk heritage: mobilising and contesting transcultural memory in the context of urban regeneration2019In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 9-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban memories are remediated and mobilised by different - and often conflicting - stakeholders, representing the heritage industry, municipal city branding campaigns or anti-gentrification struggles. Post-punk ‘retromania’ (Reynolds 2011) coincided with the culture-led regeneration of former industrial cities in the Northwest of England, relaunching the cities as creative clusters (Cohen 2007, Bottà 2009, Roberts & Cohen 2014, Roberts 2014). Drawing on my case study of the memory cultures evolving around Manchester‘s post-punk era (Brunow 2015), this article shows how narratives and images travel through urban space. Looking at contemporary politics of city branding, it examines the power relations involved in adapting (white homosocial) post-punk memories into the self-fashioning of Manchester as a creative city. Situated at the interface of memory studies and film studies, this article offers an anti-essentialist approach to the notion of ‘transcultural memory’. Examining the power relations involved in the construction of audiovisual memories, this article argues that subcultural or popular memories are not emancipatory per se, but can easily tie into neoliberal politics. Moreover, there has been a tendency to sideline or overlook feminist and queer as well as Black and Asian British contributions to post-punk culture. Only partially have such marginalised narratives been observed so far, for instance in Carol Morley’s documentary The Alcohol Years (2000) or by the Manchester Digital Music Archive. The article illustrates how different stakeholders invest in subcultural histories, sustaining or contesting hegemonic power relations within memory culture. While being remediated within various transmedia contexts, Manchester’s postpunk memories have been sanitised, fabricating consensus instead of celebrating difference.

  • 177.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Mediated Memories of Migration and the National Visual Archive: Fatih Akin‘s Wir haben vergessen zurückzukehren2014In: The Autobiographical Turn in Germanophone Documentary and Experimental Film / [ed] Robin Curtis, Angelica Fenner, Rochester: Camden House, 2014, p. 173-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Memories of migration in European film archives2017In: Book of Abstracts: Panels 1-80, Memory Studies Association , 2017, article id Panel 77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are contributing to the self-fashioning of a nation, but can also have an active part in creating shared memories of a European past. By creating a sense of (un)belonging, heritage practice can include or exclude minorities from the „imagined community“ of the nation. While attempts have been made to include migrant experiences into museums and exhibitions, film archives have to face the challenge of dealing with archival footage in which migrant experiences are framed through a perspective which shows migration as a problem for society rather than an asset. How do film archives work to overcome these challenges? How do they navigate between the national and transnational, between regional and global memories? Drawing on current examples of creating online access for digitized audiovisual heritage, this paper looks at the work by the British Film Institute and the Swedish Film Institute as well as at the content aggregator Europeana. It will examine the politics of curating and the use of metadata for the creation of a common European heritage. Overall, this paper sets out to rethink the relation between memory and the digital archive in the creation of polyvocal narratives of the past. 

  • 179.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Metadata and the Polyvocality of Memory: Knowledge Production in Digital Film Archives2016In: The Politics of Film Archival Practice: Stockholm 16-18 Nov, 2016, 2016, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is situated at the intersection of archivology, film studies and memory studies. Drawing on theorizations of the archive by Foucault and Derrida and leaving behind notions of the archive as a neutral storage, this paper regards the archive as an agent in its own right. As opposed to current tendencies in film studies to focus on issues of preservation and digitization of film stock, my paper highlights the role of the archivist as a curator. In foregrounding the modes of selection and exhibition, it analyses the use of metadata in the process of creating online content.

    „Metadating the image“ (Manovich) is an act of power which regulates access to the archive. On the one hand, it might run the risk of reducing the multiple meaning of images and sounds to a few concepts, attributed by the archivist(s). Moreover, the choice of terminology can contribute to 'othering' individuals whose histories are often sidelined and marginalised. Therefore, archival practice needs to reflected upon, e.g. by taking a self-reflexive stand. On the other hand, metadata could entail a utopian potential: they could be a means of intervention into hegemonic power structures and could actively contribute to creating a polyvocal memory. This paper presents my current research project on archival practice in digital film archives (“The Cultural Heritage of Moving Images”, VR, 2016-2018). Examining the use of metadata within video-sharing websites of the British Film Institute (BFI) and the Swedish Film Institute (SFI), my talk offers critical perspectives on the construction of audiovisual heritage and cultural memory.

  • 180.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Mobile cinema as an archive in motion: A Wall is a Screen and urban memories2018In: NECSUS : European Journal of Media Studies, E-ISSN 2213-0217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Naming, shaming, framing: Ambivalence of queer visibility in audiovisual archives.2018In: The Power of Vulnerability: Mobilizing Affect in Feminist, Queer and Anti-racist Media Cultures.  / [ed] Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä & Ingrid Ryberg, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Postpunk Manchester als homosozialer Nostalgietummelplatz: Retromania in Zeiten neoliberaler Stadtpolitik2017In: testcard #25: Kritik / [ed] Roger Behrens, Jonas Engelmann, Frank Apunkt Schneider, Anna Seidel, Jana Sotzko, Holger Adam, Johannes Ullmaier, Mainz: Ventil Verlag , 2017, 25, p. 112-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Preserving queer cultural heritage: How to present lesbian home movies and video productions in audiovisual archives2017In: Lesbian Lives Conference 2017 : Lesbian Love/s: Book of Abstracts : University of Brighton, 24–25 February 2017, 2017, p. 47-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work of lesbian archives is a labour of love and a memory work dedicated to the preservation of traces of lesbian lives. This paper looks at the ethics and politics of archiving lesbian video productions and home movies.  The situation is urgent: the videos and films are decaying and therefore in need of immediate restoration. Digitisation is increasingly being used to preserve the film footage. Digitisation, however, also offers the possibility of widely disseminating the films, for example online, either on the archives' own websites or via video sharing websites, such as YouTube or Vimeo. Yet, what happens if personal memories enter the (heteronormative) public sphere? What are the ethics of making lesbian heritage accessible?  Drawing on the works of the Lesbian Home Movie Projekt in Maine and of bildwechsel in Hamburg, a feminist archive for women visual artists, this paper outlines two different archival strategies of preserving lesbian audiovisual heritage.

  • 184.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Queer Cinema2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 185.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Queering the archive: Amateur films and LGBT+ memory2019In: Making the invisible visible: Reclaiming women’s agency in Swedish film history and beyond / [ed] Ingrid Stigsdotter, Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 97-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Radio Archiving Practice: Remediating Sonic Memories2015In: Radio Archives in European Community Media, Halle (Saale), juni 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Recognizing ethnic and social minorities in audiovisual archives in Europe: archival challenges, community ethics and inclusive heritage2018In: POEM Opening Conference: Participatory Memory Practices : Connectivities, Empowerment, and Recognition of Cultural Heritages in Mediatized Memory Ecologies. 13.-14.12.2018. Museum der Arbeit, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions, such as museums, galleries or archives, have been increasingly attempting to acknowledge ethnic and social minorities (Steorn 2012; Sandell & Nightingale 2012; Axelsson & Åkerö 2016; National Trust 2017). They are some of the stakeholders in the process of heritage construction during which different interest groups negotiate political recognition (Smith, 2007). Attempts to counter previous the marginalization of lives and histories in collection and exhibition practice have coincided with diversity politics and the digital turn. Curating access to digitised collections still implies a number of challenges for official heritage institutions. Most prominently discussed are technological and legal issues, such as the interoperability of metadata and legal aspects, such as national property rights legislation. Less observed are today’s national directives and regulations for diversity politics with their quest for an inclusive heritage. Situated at the interface of film studies and memory studies, my paper will look at archiving as a ‘memory work’, intended to create future engagements with the past. Memory is understood as constantly in flux, as dynamic, transnational and transcultural (Rigney 2009, 2012 Erll 2011, 2014), as entangled, multidirectional (Rothberg 2009), always situated and pervaded by power relations (Radstone/Hodgkin 2010) and as mediated (Brunow 2015).

    The insight that memories are always mediated still needs further theorization, especially in terms of the production and circulation of images and narratives. My current research looks at the remediation of archival footage as an intervention into our audiovisual memory, which I have defined as the images circulating in a specific society at a given historical moment. My research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image”, financed by the Swedish Research Council, look at the practices of recognition in national and grass-root film archives.

    Drawing on the findings of my current research project “The Cultural Memory of the Moving Image” (Swedish Research Council 2016-2018 I will look at the works of audiovisual archives and their politics of recognizing diversity when curating access to digitized collections. In my research project I have been examining access strategies to digitised collections in national film archives in Sweden and the UK, as well as in community archives in Europe and the US. It analyses how film archives in Sweden and the UK, following their diversity policies, address and mobilise notions of ‘queer’, ‘Black’, ‘roma’ or ‘sami’, recognising and making visible marginalised lives and histories and how they negotiate the risks of increased visibility. In this approach, the archive is positioned as an object of analysis, shifting the focus on the archive as a site of knowledge retrieval to a site of knowledge production (Foucault, 1972; Stoler, 2002). Instead of examining how minorities as a priori identities are included in the archives, I suggest studying the processes of regulation according to which different lifestyles and experiences become ‘acknowledgeable’ (Schaffer, 2008; Thomas et al., 2017).

    Archival practices enacting recognition and regulation include the choice of metadata, the modes of selection for public screenings and online exhibition and the curation and contextualisation of online content. The case studies will be the BFI Player, the online portal of the British Film Institute, and the Swedish website Filmarkivet.se, which has created access to some of the digitised collections from the Swedish National Film Archives, administered by the Swedish Film Institute (SFI) and the Royal Library (KB). I argue that collaborations between official film archives and community archives with their participatory memory work are highly necessary. Drawing on case studies regarding the recognition of ethnic minorities as well as LGBTQ-lives I will give an overview over possible modes of collaborations setting out to rework hegemonic scopic regimes, attempting to walk the fine line between surveillance and empowerment.

  • 188.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Remediating Archival Content2016In: Presented at Symposium 'Rhetoric of the Past'. Koninklijk Nederlands Historisch Genootschap (KNHG), Den Haag, 22 sept. 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Remediating transcultural memories of postpunk Manchester: homosocial nostalgia and contemporary city branding2015In: Atrocity Exhibition. A two day symposium on Joy Division. University of Limerick, 25 – 26 November 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remediating transcultural memories of postpunk Manchester: homosocial nostalgia and contemporary city brandingThis paper offers a memory studies perspective on the remediation of cultural memories around Joy Division and their legacy. Drawing on my research which situates itself at the interface of memory studies and film studies, I will introduce the notion of 'transcultural memory' (Erll 2011) into the study of postpunk memories and their adaptations. In the former industrial cities of the Northwest of England, especially in Liverpool and Manchester, the heritage of popular music has contributed to relaunching the cities as creative clusters. This paper critically examines the highly gendered remediation of popular music heritage and the appropriation and reworking of postpunk memories into an official narrative. I argue that remediation creates certain nodal points around which a number of narratives of the past are constructed.  Alongside with, for example, Factory Records and The Hacienda, Joy Division is one of the nodal points of the current memory boom around postpunk Manchester. These nodal points (or chronotopes in the Bakhtinian sense) are perpetuated by the ongoing remediation. At the same time remediation both opens and closes discursive spaces for different subject positions. This process in turns has repercussions on canon formation: it highlights some bands (especially Joy Division), while side-lining others (for instance The Fall or The Durutti Column). Moreover, remediation constructs mnemonic spaces which are predominantly heteronormative and male-oriented – all the more surprising since Manchester has been a traditional stronghold for LGBT-culture for decades. Therefore, the formation of Manchester's cultural memory is a highly gendered process. In most of the ’memory works’ around 1980s Manchester the dominant narrative is defined by a homosocial (Sedgwick) and patriarchal perspective, which is white and heteronormative and in which feminist, queer or Black voices are excluded.

  • 190.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Remediating Transcultural Memory: Documentary Filmmaking as Archival Intervention2015Book (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Rethinking Remediation and Reworking the Archive: Transcultural Reappropriations of Documentary Images of Migration2017In: In Search of Transcultural Memory in Europe / [ed] Barbara Törnquist-Plewa, Niklas Bernsand, Marco La Rosa, Lund: Centre for European Studies at Lund University , 2017, p. 39-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. Hamburg University, Germany.
    Rethinking Remediation and Reworking the Archive: Transcultural Reappropriations of Documentary Images of Migration2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arguing that the relation between documentary images and the dynamics of cultural memory needs to be theorized more fully, the article readdresses the concepts of the ‘archive’ and ‘remediation’. The article examines how archival newsreel footage from the now iconic arrival of the Windrush in Britain in 1948 is remediated on YouTube. It suggests that remediations of documentary images can be used to acknowledge the cultural memory of migration, and, more specifically, the legacy of Black immigration and its impact on contemporary Britain. In order to understand the remediation of cultural memory and its inherent power structures, the article argues, we need to analyse its media specificity, its genre, the politics of representation at work, its discursive as well as its industrial context (production, distribution and exhibition).

    The article also discusses the remediation of archival footage as a possible way to rework a colonial and Eurocentric perspective. Critical interrogations into the archive can create alternative and vernacular memories which might offer emancipatory potential instead of stabilizing essentialist notions of belonging. This perspective could allow cultural memory studies to get away from essentializing concepts of cultural or transcultural memory as based on the notions of container cultures.

  • 193.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    [ Review of ] Tanja Thomas, Lina Brink, Elke Grittmann, Kaya de Wolff (Hg.): Anerkennung und Sichtbarkeit. Perspektiven für eine kritische Medienkulturforschung: Bielefeld: Transcript 2017 (Critical Studies in Media and Communication, Bd. 18), 258 S., ISBN 9783837640113, EUR 29,992018In: MEDIENwissenschaft Rezensionen | Reviews, E-ISSN 2196-4270, no 4, p. 386-387Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature. University of Hamburg, Germany.
    [ Review of ] The Nine Muses, directed by John Akomfrah (DVD, 92 minutes): Smoking Dogs Films, United Kingdom, 20102015In: Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International, ISSN 2165-1604, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 218-219Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    [Review of] Joseph Garncarz : Wechselnde Vorlieben. Über die Filmpräferenzen der Europäer 1896-19392016In: Medien & Kommunikationswissenschaft, ISSN 1615-634X, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 408-409Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stuart Hall: Aktivismus, Pop und Politik2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Über Stuart Halls Einfluss auf die deutschsprachige ­Kulturtheorie Was macht Stuart Hall, der im Februar 2014 verstarb, zu einem der meistzitierten Autoren der testcard? ­Dieser Band geht dem Einfluss des britischen Soziologen und Kulturtheoretikers im deutschsprachigen Kontext nach.

    Stuart Hall, diese »Popikone mit Grips«, wie ihn der Regisseur John Akomfrah einmal nannte, gilt als ­wichtigster Vertreter der britischen Cultural Studies. Sein Themengebiet ist breit gefächert und umfasst Untersuchungen zu Jugendkulturen, Rassismus, ­Polizeipraktiken, Identität, Hybridität, ­Multikulturalismus, Thatcherismus, künstlerischen Praktiken, Film und Fotografie, medialen Repräsentationspolitiken und ihrer Rezeption. Mit seiner kritischen Perspektive auf die Mechanismen von Hegemonie und Macht verortet sich Halls Werk an der Schnittstelle von ­Aktivismus und Akademie, Popkultur und Politik.

    Stuart Hall, der die New Left in Großbritannien ebenso geprägt hat wie die Cultural Studies, hat die Grenzen zwischen den Disziplinen gesprengt und wurde vor allem für seine Offenheit, seine Neugier und seine Bereitschaft zum Dialog geschätzt. In teils sehr persönlich gehaltenen Beiträgen berichten deutschsprachige AktivistInnen und KulturtheoretikerInnen von Stuart Halls Inspiration für ihr Denken und ihre Arbeit – auf Stadtforschung, Pop, kritische Theorie, Antirassismus, Kolonialismus, Migration, Hafenstraße, Stilpolitiken und Gentrifizierungskritik. Damit gibt der Band Impulse für die deutschsprachige Hall-Rezeption und zeigt eine Vielzahl von Andockmöglichkeiten seiner Ideen auf. Stuart Hall nannte sein Werk einmal eine »unfinished conversation«. Die Unterhaltung ist noch lange nicht beendet.

    Mit Beiträgen von Tobias Nagl, Nanna Heidenreich, Vassilis Tsianos, Kathrin Wildner, Simon Dickel, Simone Borgstede, Moritz Ege, Janek Niggemann und Benjamin Opratko und einem Grußwort von Bill Schwarz.

    Inhaltsverzeichnis

    Denken als Aktivismus: Stuart Hall zwischen Popkultur und Politik

    Simon Dickel: Omar, Johnny und Ich

    Nanna Heidenreich: Identität eins, Identität zwei, Identität x

    Moritz Ege: Stuart Hall und Stil: vier Annäherungen

    Kathrin Wildner: Stuart Hall und die Stadtforschung. Ein Blick zurück auf die ­Gentrifizierung der Lower East Side in New York

    Vassilis S. Tsianos: »That part of me comes from a ­plantation, when you owned me. You don’t lose that, it ­becomes stronger.« Stuart Hall in ­Hamburg

    Simone Beate Borgstede: Geschichte ist immer offen: Denken und ­kämpfen mit Stuart Hall

    Janek Niggemann?/?Benjamin Opratko: Das Lächeln nicht verlieren! Stuart Hall als sozialistischer ­Intellektueller

    Tobias Nagl: The After-Life of Stuart Hall: Why Hall?

  • 197.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Stuart Hall and Memory Studies2016In: Wrestling with the Angels : Exploring Stuart Hall's Theoretical Legacy: International Conference, 25-27 February 2016, Technische Universität Dortmund, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the vast interdisciplinary field of memory studies and among its most influential voices (such as Maurice Halbwachs, Pierre Nora, Aleida Assmann, Astrid Erll, Michael Rothberg, Bill Schwarz and Susannah Radstone), the name of Stuart Hall has been conspicuously absent. Drawing on my theorizations within the emerging field of media memory studies, my paper argues that Stuart Hall’s ideas provide important insights into the mediation of transnational memories and their mediatisation. Revisiting some of Stuart Hall’s theorisations put forward in texts such as “New Ethnicities”, “Whose Heritage” and “Reconstruction Work”, my paper suggests new ways to reconceptualise notions such as transculturality, remediation and the archive. Overall, I claim that memory studies could profit from Stuart Hall’s valuable theorisations on anti-essentialism, representation and the workings of cultural heritage.

  • 198.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards a Diversity of Cultural Memory: The Chances and Challenges of Digital Memories and Online Film Archives2014In: COST Digital Memories Workshop, Workshop of the COST Action “In search of transcultural memory in Europe (ISTME)”, Central European University, Budapest, 28-30 september 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards an inclusive audiovisual heritage?: The ambivalence of recognizing minorities in Swedish film archives.2018In: 5th Lübeck Film Studies Colloquium: In Dark Waters : Seas, Spies and Social Criticism, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are currently trying to diversify national historiography by including narratives of ethnic and social minorities. This practice coincides with the digital turn which allows museums and (film) archives to remediate parts of their collections onto digital platforms. The recognition of specific groups, however, is not an easy task. Having to deal with government directives, the somewhat problematic legacies of collection policies and cataloguing practices, the lack of metadata as well as legal and ethical issues are but some of the challenges film archives are currently facing. At the same time, practices of recognition and the resulting visibility are ambivalent, as Johanna Schaffer (2008) and Tanja Thomas (et al, 2018) argue.

    This talk will draw on some of the findings of my research project “The Cultural Heritage of the Moving Image” (VR). My paper will outline some of the archival strategies of including ethnic and social minorities into the audiovisual heritage of the nation when curating access to digitized collections. Examining the website “filmarkivet.se”, run by its main content-providers the Swedish Royal Library (KB) and the Swedish Film Institute (SFI), I will look at the politics of recognition at work, will outline its ambivalences, and will suggest ways of how to acknowledge diversity without ending up in closed identity positions.

  • 200.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Film and Literature.
    Towards an inclusive audiovisual heritage?: The ambivalence of recognizing minorities in Swedish film archives2018In: 5th Lübeck Film Studies Colloquium: In Dark Waters : Seas, Spies and Social Criticism, Lübeck: Nordische Filmtage Lübeck , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heritage institutions are currently trying to diversify national historiography by including narratives of ethnic and social minorities. This practice coincides with the digital turn which allows museums and (film) archives to remediate parts of their collections onto digital platforms. The recognition of specific groups, however, is not an easy task. Having to deal with government directives, the somewhat problematic legacies of collection policies and cataloguing practices, the lack of metadata as well as legal and ethical issues are but some of the challenges film archives are currently facing. My paper will outline some of the archival strategies of including ethnic and social minorities into the audiovisual heritage of the nation when curating access to digitized collections. Examining the website “filmarkivet.se”, run by its main content- providers the Swedish Royal Library (KB) and the Swedish Film Institute (SFI), I will look at the politics of recognition at work, outline its ambivalences, and suggest ways of acknowledging diversity without ending up in closed identity positions.

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