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  • 151.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    James, Edward
    Popular Culture: Portrayal of Archaeology in archaeology in Science Fiction2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 652-653Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Karlsson, Håkan
    Philosophy and Archaeological Practice. Perspectives for the 21st century2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kono, Toshiyuki
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Forum on Nara +20: An Introduction2015In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short introduction we put the Nara +20 document into historical context within the evolution of global heritage management. In particular, we describe the relationship between the Nara and the Nara +20 documents. We also provide a short summary of the main challenges offered by the Nara +20 document for further debate and engagement in the heritage sector.

  • 154.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lawler, Andrew
    Bangor University, UK.
    Dzino, Danijel
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Buljevic, Sasha
    University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    -, Irna
    Discussion2017In: Peculiar Artifacts in Bosnia & Herzegovina: an imaginary exhibition / [ed] Thomas Nolf, Gent: Art Paper Editions , 2017, p. 131-140Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 155.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Moser, Simon
    Finns svaret på kärnbränsleförvaring att hitta i arkeologin?: Intervju, P1, Vetenskapsradio, 9 Sept 20132013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kan arkeologi hjälpa oss med den viktiga frågan om hur vi ska slutförvara kärnbränsle? Kan isländska sagor berätta för oss om hur vi bättre kan ta hand om vår miljö? Vetenskapsradion Forum special handlar idag om humaniora och miljö och vi tittar närmare på några av de projekt som just nu pågår i Sverige.

  • 156.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Myrup Kristensen, Troels
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Heritage erasure: rethinking 'protection' and 'preservation'2015In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 313-317Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Myrup Kristensen, TroelsAarhus University, Denmark.
    International Journal of Heritage Studies, Vol 21, Iss 4, 2015: Special Issue, Heritage Erasure2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Ortman, Oscar
    Endangerment and Conservation Ethos in Natural and Cultural Heritage: The Case of Zoos and Archaeological Sites2008In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 74-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and Time Travel2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time travel is a characteristically contemporary way of approaching the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-oriented and critical approaches to the past. Our discussion covers some of the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling including the benefits of methodical anachronism. The deliberate use of anachronism is an important method in understanding ourselves and the nature of knowledge gained about the past. We also discuss whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfillment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way of bringing the past back to life in the present.

  • 160.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Arkeologi i tv. Intervju med Mikael Hylin, producent för programserien Utgrävarna2009In: Arkeologi och samhälle / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Kristina Jennbert, Cornelius Holtorf, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia , 2009, p. 29-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Lund University.
    The Archaeology of Time Travel: An Introduction2010In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 15-16, p. 27-30Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction to a special section containing papers presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Malta, September 2008

  • 162.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Time Travel to the Present: Interview with Erika Andersson Cederholm2017In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 257-270Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Erika Andersson Cederholm is Associate Professor in sociology at the Department of Service Management and Service Studies, Lund University. Her research interests embrace the intersection between culture, economy and social interactions, including service encounters and experiences in tourism and hospitality contexts. Her recent research focusses on the commodification and organisation of intimacy and emotions in hospitality contexts, lifestyle enterprising in the rural experience economy, and the boundary work between economic and non-economic life spheres in various service contexts.

  • 163.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology's repertoire of questions, procedures, methodologies and terminologies, its material manifestations (protected sites, public museums, archives) and its popular appeals are rooted in modernity. Contemporary archaeologies marry archaeology in the modern world with the archaeology of the modern world. Their strengths lie in a stimulating mix of interdisciplinary practices across academic, public sector and professional contexts. This book brings together a wide variety of original case-studies, from contemporary theme parks to the bases of Antarctica expeditions, from a rocket engine test site in Australia to Swedish automobile history, from tiger enclosures to the ‘privatisation of experience’, and from a Nevada peace camp to a stretch of gutter in Bristol.

  • 164.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Introduction: Fragments from a Conversation about Contemporary Archaeologies2011In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, 2, p. 9-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Introduction: Fragments from a Conversation about Contemporary Archaeologies2009In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009, p. 9-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Raxworthy, Robyn
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Can heritage be thriving in an age of extinction?: Reading Chris D Thomas (2017), Inheritors of the Earth. How Nature is Thriving in an Age of Extinction. Allen Lane2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chris Thomas investigates the human inheritance on planet Earth. Intriguingly, his argument is that nature will be thriving in an age of extinction. Thomas does not, however, deny that levels of extinction are high in our age and that there is a strong need for conservation. But for Thomas, besides losses and threats of loss, there are also gains and further opportunities for gains. As a result of human behaviour, many new animal and plant species are, and will be coming into existence.

  • 168.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rosendahl, Lisa
    Konversation mellan Lisa Rosendahl och Cornelius Holtorf: [ Conversation between Lisa Rosendahl and Cornelius Holtorf ]2017In: Glas är massa i rörelse: [ Glass is Moving Mass ] / [ed] Eva Arnqvist, Johanna Gustafsson Fürst, Ingela Johansson, Åsa Jungnelius, Caroline Mårtensson, Malin Pettersson Öberg, Axel Andersson, Konstfrämjandet , 2017, p. 255-257Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 169.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ett hundra tusen år fram och bakåt i tiden: arkeologi möter kärnbränsleförvaring2015In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, Vol. 1, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 170.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    GRASCA – Linnéuniversitetets nya forskarskola i uppdragsarkeologi2015In: Gjallarhornet, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage Futures and the Future of Heritage2013In: Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen / [ed] Sophie Bergerbrant, Serena Sabatini, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2013, p. 739-746Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we take stock of how cultural heritage and the future are interconnected, from a largely archaeological perspective. We indicate which future trends can be identified that heritage sector strategies will need to adjust to. We also discuss some specialcategories of cultural heritage that in all likelihood will be of the distant future, whether we like it or not. We review how the heritage sector has failed to give sufficient attention to future issues and argue that this short-coming should be remedied as soon as possible. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the heritage sector lacks a thorough engagement with questions concerning the future benefits of cultural heritage and thus concerning the appropriateness of present-day practices and policies in heritage management.

  • 172.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Långtidsförvaring av kärnavfall: Från samtidsarkeologi till framtidsarkeologi2016In: Primitive tider, ISSN 1501-0430, Vol. 18, p. 285-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All countries that manage nuclear waste will need to store it for a long time. When all the reactors in Sweden have been taken out of use there will be around 12,000 tonnes of highly radioactive waste. For the future safety of humans and nature, the plan is to store the waste for 100,000 years in tunnels drilled 500 metres under ground. Once the waste is in place and the nal repositories are closed, society will be faced with the task of nding ways to keep knowledge of these places alive for a very long time to come. The task is unique. Never before has anyone created information and knowledge intended for someone thousands of years into the future. Between 2012 and 2015 we have worked with the project “One hundred thousand years back and forth – archaeology meets radioactive waste”. We have studied how one can think about past, present and future and about the resources that are needed if we are to be able to envisage a future extending over thousands of years. From a theoretical discussion on the concept of future consciousness, we argue that nal repositories for nuclear waste must be built in a exible manner to be able to work in different ways in relation to many different futures. Storage of radioactive waste embraces noticeable aspects of materiality, and relevant planning and decision-making processes can bene t from archaeological expertise. Long-time nal repositories of nuclear waste also pose challenges to contemporary archaeology. Various ways to conceptualize futures are part of our contemporary society. This has not been studied to any great extent within the eld archaeology of the contemporary world. It is likely that we will hear more in time to come about future consciousness in contemporary archaeology, then in the form of future archaeology. 

  • 173.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Nuclear waste as cultural heritage of the future: 143612014In: WM2014 Proceedings, WM Symposia , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is accustomed to dealing with long term perspectives and to manage human legacies, the cultural heritage. Cultural heritage management and nuclear waste management share concerns with the permanent preservation of material items, long-term memory keeping, and knowledge transfer to future generations. Nuclear waste can be considered as a very particular kind of future cultural heritage. In this paper, we explore the affinities and differences between cultural heritage and nuclear waste through a discussion of the existing divergences of future consciousness in both realms. We argue that making nuclear waste management a question of heritage may contribute to making the inadvertent exposure of future human beings to radioactivity less likely. At the same time, it might contribute to appreciating nuclear waste not only as a threat but also a resource for future generations, thus allowing for perceptions, valuations and uses of this heritage in futures that will radically differ from today.

  • 174.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Talking people – from community to popular archaeologies2006In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 11-12, p. 79-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Flinders University, Australia.
    May, Sarah
    University College London, UK.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    No future in archaeological heritage management?2017In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 639-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the future is mentioned frequently in overarching aims and visions, and it is a major drive in the daily work of archaeological heritage managers and indeed heritage professionals more generally, it remains unclear precisely how an overall commitment to the future can best inform specific heritage practices. It seems that most archaeologists and other heritage professionals cannot easily express how they conceive of the future they work for, and how their work will impact on that future. The future tends to remain implicit in daily practice which operates in a continuing, rolling present. The authors argue that this needs to change because present-day heritage management may be much less beneficial for the future than we commonly expect.

  • 176. Larkin, Jamie
    et al.
    Clark, Kate
    Baxter, Ian
    Bewley, Robert
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Public Archaeology response to ‘The future care of our nation’s heritage’ debate2013In: Public Archaeology, ISSN 1465-5187, E-ISSN 1753-5530, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 200-210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Petersson, Bodil
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, CorneliusLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practised time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. The papers in this book explore various types and methods of time travel and seek to prove that time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

  • 178. Petersson, Bodil
    et al.
    Jennbert, KristinaHoltorf, CorneliusUniversity of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Arkeologi och samhälle2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 179. Petersson, Bodil
    et al.
    Jennbert, Kristina
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Introduktion: arkeologi och samhälle2009In: Arkeologi och samhälle / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Kristina Jennbert, Cornelius Holtorf, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia , 2009, p. 7-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Ståhl, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Tham, Mathilda
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Towards a Post-Anthropocentric Speculative Archaeology (through Design): 2017In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As disciplines and practices archaeology and design stand in an interesting relationship to one another. Whereas it is the business of designers to construct material and, at times, immaterial universes that can sustain life (or, as we shall see, destroy life), it is the business of archaeologists, in the traditional sense of the word, to look at the remnants of those universes and the traces of those who populated them in order to understand the past and the ways in which it resonates in the present and in our conception of our possible futures.

    This leads us to pose the following question: If an intimate relationship can be located at the interstitial space between archaeology and design, what might happen if we were to construct transversal lines between and across these disciplines, and what concepts would be required for us to do so?

    Drawing upon the concept of the Anthropocene – a concept opening up to precisely such transdisciplinary and transversal approaches – this article explores the notion of a post-anthropocentric speculative archaeology interweaving a theoretical line of thought and a performative, fictive trajectory.

1234 151 - 180 of 180
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