lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12345 151 - 200 of 204
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bauer, AlexanderDíaz-Andreu, MargaritaWaterton, EmmaSilberman (Editor-in-chief), Neil A.
    The Oxford Companion to Archaeology2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bolin, Annalisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Corona crisis, UNESCO and the future: Do we need a new world heritage?2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 153.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University.
    Archaeology and the Present2018In: The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences / [ed] Sandra L. López Varela, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018, p. 68-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is not only the disinterested study of the human past and its remains but also a way of making a positive impact on present society. Archaeology tells a variety of powerful stories about past and present and offers suggestive metaphors to contemporary society; archaeological methods and approaches can be applied to learn more about contemporary society and to trigger in people existential thoughts and emotions; archaeological expertise can be applied to help solve challenges in contemporary society. It is important for future generations of archaeologists to be aware of these dimensions and to explore and apply them critically in professional practice.

  • 154.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Fagan, Brian
    Popular Culture, Portrayal of Archaeology in: Overview2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 649-650Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Fairclough, Graham
    The New Heritage and re-shapings of the past2013In: Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity / [ed] A. González-Ruibal, London and New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Gazin-Schwartz, Amy
    Archaeology and Folklore1999Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Hilton, Jacob
    Learning about the past from the Bosnian pyramids?2012In: Arqueologia Publica, ISSN 2171-6315, Vol. 2, p. 44-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 158.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and the Future2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Cham: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future has seldom been an object of archaeological study even though there are some very profound and deep-reaching links between past, present, and future. At the same time, archaeologists work to preserve places, environments, and associated values and knowledge for future generations. But although it is not far-fetched to claim that the future will differ from what we are used to in the present, in managing archaeological heritage, most assumptions about the future do not build on an understanding of how the future will be different from today. We argue in this paper that archaeologists should not only promote historical consciousness but also future consciousness.

  • 159.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and the future: Managing nuclear waste as a living heritage2015In: Radioactive Waste Management and Constructing Memory for Future Generations: Proceedings of the International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France, OECD Publishing, 2015, p. 97-101Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is the study of the past and its remains in the present. It is relevant to the long-term preservation of records, knowledge and memory, e.g. regarding final repositories of nuclear waste, in two ways. Firstly, future archaeology may promise the recovery of lost information, knowledge and meaning of remains of the past. Secondly, present-day archaeology can offer lessons about how future societies will make sense of remains of the past.

    Archaeology is always situated in a larger social and cultural context and the information, knowledge and meaning it generates is necessarily of its own present. Archaeological knowledge reflects contemporary perceptions of past and future; these perceptions change over time. Indeed, we cannot assume that in the future there will be any archaeology at all. We think, therefore, that future societies will want, and need, to make their own decisions about sites associated with nuclear waste, based on their own perceptions of past and future. To facilitate this process in the long term we need to engage each present, keeping safe options open.

    In this text we elaborate on these issues from our perspective as archaeologists.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 160.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Communicating with future generations: what are the benefits of preserving for future generations? Nuclear power and beyond2014In: The European Journal of Post-Classical Archaeologies, ISSN 2039-7895, Vol. 4, p. 315-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1977, the first fast breeder nuclear reactor in the world to provide electricity to a national grid was shut down for the last time. The Dounreay Dome on the North coast of Scotland, near Thurso, Caithness, was completed in 1958 and its silhouette later became an emblem of the Atomic Age. As the decommission of the entire site proceeds, incorporating even other defunct nuclear reactors and associated facilities, the question arose whether the Dome can and should be preserved as cultural heritage for the benefit of future generations. Using the example of the legacy of the nuclear power station at Dounreay, this paper discusses the question what it means to preserve something for the benefit of future generations.

  • 161.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Contemporary Heritage and the Future2015In: The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Heritage Research / [ed] Emma Waterton, Steve Watson, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 509-523Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of the future are pertinent in order to make the best decisions in present society. They are, however, full of difficulties, as the future is an empirical field which does not exist (Slaughter, 1996; Bell, 1997; Mogensen, 2006). Both pertinence and difficulties apply also to studying the future in relation to human culture. The main challenge lies in the circumstance that cultural heritage of the future cannot in itself be empirically investigated and described, since it is in part dependent on decisions that have not yet been made. Studying heritage futures is thus about considering what we know about cultural heritage in the context of prognoses and visions of what will come. Yet how do we do that? The American anthropologist Samuel Gerald Collins contributed to an interesting discussion on how anthropology and anthropologists have previously embraced the future and how they might now be embracing it. He emphasized that an important approach is to vouchsafe the possibility that future ways in which people will think and act may be very different from today, and, in doing so, to open up a space (or a spacetime) for critical reflection on the present (Collins, 2008, p. 8). This approach is a useful programmatic declaration for engaging with the future in disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, history and heritage studies.

  • 162.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Unesco.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kulturarvssektorn är dåligt förberedd för framtiden2018In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 163.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Nuclear waste as future culture heritage2014In: ICOMOS Sweden Nyhetsbrev, no 1, p. 3p. 32-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 164.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Contemporary Archaeology of Nuclear Waste: Communicating with the Future2016In: Arkæologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 35, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future will differ from what we are used to in the present. Yet in archaeology, the heritage sector and the nuclear waste sector, most assumptions do not build on an understanding of how the future will be different from today. Instead, planning is made as if key aspects of heritage and nuclear waste will not change significantly in the future at all. The present authors are both archaeologists with an interest in applying our academic expertise to challenges in contemporary and future society (Holtorf and Högberg, 2015a). Between 2012 and 2014 we worked on an interdisciplinary research project entitled One hundred thousand years back and forth. Archaeology meets radioactive waste. Based on results from this project, we suggest here that archaeologists and other professionals working in the heritage sector, as well as their institutions, should start thinking in more depth about the future. We suggest that heritage specialists should not only promote historical consciousness but also future consciousness. Both these forms of consciousness are essential for the ability to appreciate the interconnections between past, present and future. 

  • 165.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Zukunftsbilder in erhaltungsstrategien2014In: Diachrone zugänglichkeit als prozess: kulturelle überlieferung in systematischer sicht / [ed] M. Hollmann and A. Schüller-Zwierlein, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, 1, p. 197-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In diesem Beitrag argumentieren wir, dass Langzeitzugänglichkeit von Informationen maßgeblich von den Zukunftsbildern geprägt wird, die in konkreten Erhaltungsstrategien ihren Ausdruck finden.  Wie wir uns heute die Zukunft vorstellen, beeinflusst auf welche Weise wir etwas bewahren. Die künftige Vergangenheit hängt somit von der gegenwärtigen Zukunft ab. Die Beispiele, die diese These in unserem Artikel entwickeln und illustrieren sollen, haben alle einen Bezug zu dem österreichischen Ort Hallstatt im Salzkammergut. Dadurch wird deutlich, wie an einem einzigen Platz unterschiedliche Zukunftsbilder zusammenspielen und in konkreten Erhaltungsstrategien zu unterschiedlicher Langzeitzugänglichkeit führen.

    Wir diskutieren in diesem Beitrag drei unterschiedliche Zukunftsbilder. Sie gehen aus von einer sich fortsetzenden Kontinuität, einem kontrollierbaren Wandel beziehungsweise einem früher oder später kommenden Kontinuitätsbruch. Obwohl man vielleicht erwarten könnte, dass Erhaltungsstrategien und auf ihnen beruhende Langzeitzugänglichkeit von Information desto verlässlicher sein werden, je weniger man davon ausgeht, dass die Dinge bleiben wie sie sind, und je mehr man mit Veränderung rechnet, wird unsere Diskussion zeigen, dass dies nicht unbedingt so ist. 

  • 166.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lindskog, Daniel
    Arch Out Loud: Designing a Surface Marker for a Geological Repository of Nuclear Waste for the Benefit of Our Children2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 167.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    James, Edward
    Popular Culture: Portrayal of Archaeology in archaeology in Science Fiction2012In: The Oxford Companion to Archaeology / [ed] Neil A. Silberman (Editor-in-chief), Cornelius Holtorf, Alexander Bauer, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, 2, p. 652-653Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Karlsson, Håkan
    Philosophy and Archaeological Practice. Perspectives for the 21st century2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kealy, LoughlinKono, Toshiyuki
    A contemporary provocation : reconstructions as tools of future-making: Selected papers from the ICOMOS University Forum Workshop on Authenticity and Reconstructions, Paris, 13 – 15 March 20172018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The papers in this first collection derive from The ICOMOS University Forum Workshop “A contemporary provocation: reconstructions as tools of future-making” held 13–15 March 2017 at ICOMOS International Headquarters in Paris, France. The meeting constituted a pilot project of the new ICOMOS University Forum to stimulate dialogues between academics at Universities and heritage practitioners.

  • 170.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Kono, Toshiyuki
    Kyushu University, Japan.
    Forum on Nara +20: An Introduction2015In: Heritage & Society, ISSN 2159-032X, E-ISSN 2159-0338, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short introduction we put the Nara +20 document into historical context within the evolution of global heritage management. In particular, we describe the relationship between the Nara and the Nara +20 documents. We also provide a short summary of the main challenges offered by the Nara +20 document for further debate and engagement in the heritage sector.

  • 171.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Lawler, Andrew
    Bangor University, UK.
    Dzino, Danijel
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Buljevic, Sasha
    University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    -, Irna
    Discussion2017In: Peculiar Artifacts in Bosnia & Herzegovina: an imaginary exhibition / [ed] Thomas Nolf, Gent: Art Paper Editions , 2017, p. 131-140Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 172.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ma, Qingkai
    Zhejiang University, China.
    Chen, Xian
    Zhejiang A&F University, China.
    Zhang, Yu
    Zhejiang A&F University, China.
    The value of simulated heritage in China2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 173.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Moser, Simon
    Finns svaret på kärnbränsleförvaring att hitta i arkeologin?: Intervju, P1, Vetenskapsradio, 9 Sept 20132013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kan arkeologi hjälpa oss med den viktiga frågan om hur vi ska slutförvara kärnbränsle? Kan isländska sagor berätta för oss om hur vi bättre kan ta hand om vår miljö? Vetenskapsradion Forum special handlar idag om humaniora och miljö och vi tittar närmare på några av de projekt som just nu pågår i Sverige.

    Download (wav)
    audio
  • 174.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Myrup Kristensen, Troels
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Heritage erasure: rethinking 'protection' and 'preservation'2015In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 313-317Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Myrup Kristensen, TroelsAarhus University, Denmark.
    International Journal of Heritage Studies, Vol 21, Iss 4, 2015: Special Issue, Heritage Erasure2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Ortman, Oscar
    Endangerment and Conservation Ethos in Natural and Cultural Heritage: The Case of Zoos and Archaeological Sites2008In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 74-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Pantazatos, AndreasDurham University, UK ; University of Illinois, USA.Scarre, GeoffreyDurham University, UK.
    Cultural heritage, ethics and contemporary migrations2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural Heritage, Ethics and Contemporary Migrations breaks new ground in our understanding of the challenges faced by heritage practitioners and researchers in the contemporary world of mass migration, where people encounter new cultural heritage and relocate their own. It focuses particularly on issues affecting archaeological heritage sites and artefacts, which help determine and maintain social identity, a role problematised when populations are in flux. This diverse and authoritative collection brings together international specialists to discuss socio-political and ethical implications for the management of archaeological heritage in global society.

    With contributions by authors from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, including archaeologists, philosophers, cultural historians and custodians of cultural heritage, the volume explores a rich mix of contrasting, yet complementary, viewpoints and approaches. Among the topics discussed are the relations between culture and identity; the potentialities of museums and monuments to support or subvert a people’s sense of who they are; and how cultural heritage has been used to bring together communities containing people of different origins and traditions, yet without erasing or blurring their distinctive cultural features.

    Cultural Heritage, Ethics and Contemporary Migrations is a crucial text for archaeologists, curators, policymakers and others working in the heritage field, as well as for philosophers, political scientists and other readers interested in the links between immigration and cultural heritage.

  • 178.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and Time Travel2018In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living edition / [ed] Claire Smith, Berlin: Springer, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time travel is a characteristically contemporary way of approaching the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-oriented and critical approaches to the past. Our discussion covers some of the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling including the benefits of methodical anachronism. The deliberate use of anachronism is an important method in understanding ourselves and the nature of knowledge gained about the past. We also discuss whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfillment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way of bringing the past back to life in the present.

  • 179.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Arkeologi i tv. Intervju med Mikael Hylin, producent för programserien Utgrävarna2009In: Arkeologi och samhälle / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Kristina Jennbert, Cornelius Holtorf, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia , 2009, p. 29-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Lund University.
    The Archaeology of Time Travel: An Introduction2010In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 15-16, p. 27-30Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction to a special section containing papers presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Malta, September 2008

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 181.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Petersson, Bodil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Time Travel to the Present: Interview with Erika Andersson Cederholm2017In: The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century / [ed] Bodil Petersson, Cornelius Holtorf, Archaeopress, 2017, p. 257-270Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Erika Andersson Cederholm is Associate Professor in sociology at the Department of Service Management and Service Studies, Lund University. Her research interests embrace the intersection between culture, economy and social interactions, including service encounters and experiences in tourism and hospitality contexts. Her recent research focusses on the commodification and organisation of intimacy and emotions in hospitality contexts, lifestyle enterprising in the rural experience economy, and the boundary work between economic and non-economic life spheres in various service contexts.

  • 182.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology's repertoire of questions, procedures, methodologies and terminologies, its material manifestations (protected sites, public museums, archives) and its popular appeals are rooted in modernity. Contemporary archaeologies marry archaeology in the modern world with the archaeology of the modern world. Their strengths lie in a stimulating mix of interdisciplinary practices across academic, public sector and professional contexts. This book brings together a wide variety of original case-studies, from contemporary theme parks to the bases of Antarctica expeditions, from a rocket engine test site in Australia to Swedish automobile history, from tiger enclosures to the ‘privatisation of experience’, and from a Nevada peace camp to a stretch of gutter in Bristol.

  • 183.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Introduction: Fragments from a Conversation about Contemporary Archaeologies2011In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, 2, p. 9-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Piccini, Angela
    Introduction: Fragments from a Conversation about Contemporary Archaeologies2009In: Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now / [ed] Cornelius Holtorf and Angela Piccini, Frankfurt/M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009, p. 9-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 186.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Raxworthy, Robyn
    University of Exeter, UK.
    Can heritage be thriving in an age of extinction?: Reading Chris D Thomas (2017), Inheritors of the Earth. How Nature is Thriving in an Age of Extinction. Allen Lane2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chris Thomas investigates the human inheritance on planet Earth. Intriguingly, his argument is that nature will be thriving in an age of extinction. Thomas does not, however, deny that levels of extinction are high in our age and that there is a strong need for conservation. But for Thomas, besides losses and threats of loss, there are also gains and further opportunities for gains. As a result of human behaviour, many new animal and plant species are, and will be coming into existence.

  • 187.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rosendahl, Lisa
    Konversation mellan Lisa Rosendahl och Cornelius Holtorf: [ Conversation between Lisa Rosendahl and Cornelius Holtorf ]2017In: Glas är massa i rörelse: [ Glass is Moving Mass ] / [ed] Eva Arnqvist, Johanna Gustafsson Fürst, Ingela Johansson, Åsa Jungnelius, Caroline Mårtensson, Malin Pettersson Öberg, Axel Andersson, Konstfrämjandet , 2017, p. 255-257Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 188.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rydén, Helena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities.
    Progress report: UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures: Period: 09/2017 – 08/20182018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Launched in 1992, the UNESCO Chair Programme addresses pressing challenges in society. The chairs serve as thinktanks and bridgebuilders between human communities, civil society, academia, and policy-making, generating innovation through research, informing policy decisions and establishing new teaching initiatives. In 2017 Linnaeus University was awarded a UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures.This is one of eight UNESCO Chairs in Sweden and the only one in the area of culture.

    The Chair is dedicated to developing professional strategies concerning the role of heritage in shaping the future. We ask questions such as: how does specific heritage of various kinds contribute to improving future society? What heritage needs to be preserved for the benefit of future generations? When will these future generations live and what can we know about people's needs and desires in that future? How can different domains of heritage learn from each other regarding practices of future-making?

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    Front page
  • 189.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Rydén, Helena
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities.
    Progress report: UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures: Period: 09/2018 – 08/20192019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Over its first two years, the UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures at Linnaeus University has been engaging in an extensive programme of national and international collaboration in research and training. We presented our work and agenda on many occasions in Sweden and around the world. We established contacts to various programmes and activities in UNESCO, to the Swedish Delegation to UNESCO, the Swedish UNESCO Commission, and began collaboration with other UNESCO Chairs in Sweden and internationally. Over the past year we co-organized two large events in Stockholm and in Amsterdam. In this report, we document the progress made by the entire team over our second year of activities.

    Background

    Heritage futures are concerned with the roles of heritage in managing the relations between present and future societies, e.g. through anticipation and planning. Our work is dedicated to developing professional strategies that can enhance how heritage shapes the future. We ask questions such as: Which future do we preserve the heritage for? Which heritage will benefit future generations most? How can we build capacity in future thinking (futures literacy) among heritage professionals worldwide?

    The UNESCO Chair Programme addresses pressing challenges in society. The chairs serve as think-tanks and bridge-builders between human communities, civil society, academia, and policy-making, generating innovation through research, informing policy decisions and establishing new teaching initiatives. The UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures at Linnaeus University is one of eight UNESCO Chairs in Sweden and the only one in the area of culture.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    Front page
  • 190.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ett hundra tusen år fram och bakåt i tiden: arkeologi möter kärnbränsleförvaring2015In: LMNT-nytt, ISSN 1402-0041, Vol. 1, p. 24-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 191.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    GRASCA – Linnéuniversitetets nya forskarskola i uppdragsarkeologi2015In: Gjallarhornet, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 192.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Heritage Futures and the Future of Heritage2013In: Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen / [ed] Sophie Bergerbrant, Serena Sabatini, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2013, p. 739-746Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we take stock of how cultural heritage and the future are interconnected, from a largely archaeological perspective. We indicate which future trends can be identified that heritage sector strategies will need to adjust to. We also discuss some specialcategories of cultural heritage that in all likelihood will be of the distant future, whether we like it or not. We review how the heritage sector has failed to give sufficient attention to future issues and argue that this short-coming should be remedied as soon as possible. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the heritage sector lacks a thorough engagement with questions concerning the future benefits of cultural heritage and thus concerning the appropriateness of present-day practices and policies in heritage management.

  • 193.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Långtidsförvaring av kärnavfall: Från samtidsarkeologi till framtidsarkeologi2016In: Primitive tider, ISSN 1501-0430, Vol. 18, p. 285-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All countries that manage nuclear waste will need to store it for a long time. When all the reactors in Sweden have been taken out of use there will be around 12,000 tonnes of highly radioactive waste. For the future safety of humans and nature, the plan is to store the waste for 100,000 years in tunnels drilled 500 metres under ground. Once the waste is in place and the nal repositories are closed, society will be faced with the task of nding ways to keep knowledge of these places alive for a very long time to come. The task is unique. Never before has anyone created information and knowledge intended for someone thousands of years into the future. Between 2012 and 2015 we have worked with the project “One hundred thousand years back and forth – archaeology meets radioactive waste”. We have studied how one can think about past, present and future and about the resources that are needed if we are to be able to envisage a future extending over thousands of years. From a theoretical discussion on the concept of future consciousness, we argue that nal repositories for nuclear waste must be built in a exible manner to be able to work in different ways in relation to many different futures. Storage of radioactive waste embraces noticeable aspects of materiality, and relevant planning and decision-making processes can bene t from archaeological expertise. Long-time nal repositories of nuclear waste also pose challenges to contemporary archaeology. Various ways to conceptualize futures are part of our contemporary society. This has not been studied to any great extent within the eld archaeology of the contemporary world. It is likely that we will hear more in time to come about future consciousness in contemporary archaeology, then in the form of future archaeology. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 194.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Nuclear waste as cultural heritage of the future: 143612014In: WM2014 Proceedings, WM Symposia , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is accustomed to dealing with long term perspectives and to manage human legacies, the cultural heritage. Cultural heritage management and nuclear waste management share concerns with the permanent preservation of material items, long-term memory keeping, and knowledge transfer to future generations. Nuclear waste can be considered as a very particular kind of future cultural heritage. In this paper, we explore the affinities and differences between cultural heritage and nuclear waste through a discussion of the existing divergences of future consciousness in both realms. We argue that making nuclear waste management a question of heritage may contribute to making the inadvertent exposure of future human beings to radioactivity less likely. At the same time, it might contribute to appreciating nuclear waste not only as a threat but also a resource for future generations, thus allowing for perceptions, valuations and uses of this heritage in futures that will radically differ from today.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 195.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Talking people – from community to popular archaeologies2006In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1401-2189, Vol. 11-12, p. 79-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The valuable contributions of archaeology to present and future societies2019In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 93, no 372, p. 1661-1663Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Flinders University, Australia.
    May, Sarah
    University College London, UK.
    Wollentz, Gustav
    Kiel University, Germany.
    No future in archaeological heritage management?2017In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 639-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the future is mentioned frequently in overarching aims and visions, and it is a major drive in the daily work of archaeological heritage managers and indeed heritage professionals more generally, it remains unclear precisely how an overall commitment to the future can best inform specific heritage practices. It seems that most archaeologists and other heritage professionals cannot easily express how they conceive of the future they work for, and how their work will impact on that future. The future tends to remain implicit in daily practice which operates in a continuing, rolling present. The authors argue that this needs to change because present-day heritage management may be much less beneficial for the future than we commonly expect.

  • 198. Larkin, Jamie
    et al.
    Clark, Kate
    Baxter, Ian
    Bewley, Robert
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Public Archaeology response to ‘The future care of our nation’s heritage’ debate2013In: Public Archaeology, ISSN 1465-5187, E-ISSN 1753-5530, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 200-210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 199. Lindskog, Daniel
    et al.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology today2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this little book we show you how archaeologists are working today using new approaches

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 200.
    Petersson, Bodil
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Holtorf, CorneliusLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    The Archaeology of Time Travel: Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practised time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. The papers in this book explore various types and methods of time travel and seek to prove that time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

12345 151 - 200 of 204
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf