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  • 201.
    Sotsenko, Alisa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Adaptation of Legacy Codes to Context-Aware Composition using Aspect-Oriented Programming for Data Representation Conversion2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

        Different computation problem domains such as sorting, matrix multiplication, etc. usually require different data representations and algorithms variants implementations in order to be adapted and re-designed to context-aware composition (CAC). Context-aware composition is a technique for the design of applications that can adapt its behavior according to changes in the program. We considered two application domains: matrix multiplication and graph algorithms (DFS algorithm in particular). The main problem in the implementation of the representation mechanisms applied in these problem domains is time spent on the data representation conversion that in the end should not influence the application performance.  

         This thesis work presents a flexible aspect-based architecture that includes the data structure representation adaptation in order to reduce implementation efforts required for adaptation different application domains.

         Although, manual approach has small overhead 4-10% for different problems compared to the AOP-based approach, experiments show that the manual adaptation to CAC requires on average three times more programming effort in terms of lines of code than AOP-based approach. Moreover, the AOP-based approach showed the average speed-up over baseline algorithms that use standard data structures of 2.1.

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    MasterThesis
  • 202.
    Stafford, Judith A.
    et al.
    Tufts University, USA.
    Wolf, AlexanderL.
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Caporuscio, Mauro
    Università dell’Aquila, Italy.
    The Application of Dependence Analysis to Software Architecture Descriptions2003In: Formal Methods for Software Architectures / [ed] Bernardo, Marco; Inverardi, Paola, Springer, 2003, Vol. 2804, p. 52-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the focus of software design shifts increasingly toward the architectural level, so too are its analysis techniques. Dependence analysis is one such technique that shows promise at this level. In this paper we briefly describe and illustrate the application of dependence analysis to architectural descriptions of software systems.

  • 203.
    Steczko, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Analysis of companies’ experience with cross-platform development compared to native development for mobile devices2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are a handful of different platforms for mobile phones. Writing an application natively for each mobile operating system is time consuming and expensive. This situation has created a need for using cross-platform frameworks, that allow programmers to create an application once and run it on all platforms. The problem is that it is not certain whether cross-platform apps can fully replace native ones, or if by using cross-platform tools some desired qualities are lost. Investigating this issue would allow to find out which one of these two application development methods is better, or in which situation it is better to choose one over the other. Such knowledge would allow to decrease development time and costs. Companies that create mobile applications on a daily basis have expertise in this area. Thus, thirteen interviews were done with thirteen distinct businesses in order to research this problem. The results showed that native development produces higher quality applications, but there are some situations where it might be better to use cross-platform frameworks. 

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  • 204.
    Steghöfer, Jan-Philipp
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden;University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knauss, Eric
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden;University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alégroth, Emil
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden;University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hammouda, Imed
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden;University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Burden, Håkan
    Viktoria Swedish ICT, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Teaching Agile: addressing the conflict between project delivery and application of Agile methods2016In: Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Software Engineering Companion, ACM Publications, 2016, p. 303-312Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the changes we have made in teaching agile methodologies, practices, and principles in four courses in order to address a specific dilemma: students need to apply agile methods in order to learn them, but when complementing our courses with applied content, we face the problem that students perceive the learning and application of agile methods as less important than delivering a finished product at the end of the course. This causes students to not apply theoretical process knowledge and therefore to not develop necessary skills associated with working with defined processes in the industry. Concretely, we report on our experience with teaching Scrum with Lego, removing formal grading requirements on the delivered product, emphasising process application in post-mortem reports, and organisational changes to support the process during supervision. These changes are analysed in the context of student satisfaction, teacher observations, and achievements of learning outcomes. We also provide an overview of the lessons learnt to help guide the design of courses on agile methodologies.

  • 205.
    Sun, Ang
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Comparison of Java Persistence Layer Technologies2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As data and data structures grown more complex in computing, the task of storing and accessing such data efficiently also becomes more complex. Object-oriented programming languages such as Java have popularized the practice of using class-based objects and created the challenge of persisting these complex objects to storage systems such as databases which only store simple scalar values. This paper seeks to explore and compare a selected num-ber of popular persistence solutions for the Java language in their use and per-formance. This is done through researching, implementing and performance testing the chosen candidates. Through these steps we have found that while more abstracted solutions provided easier implementation and usage, these positives come with the disadvantages of generally slower performance. We also discovered that while many persistence frameworks provide features that minimize the amount of code required for implementation, they suffer from performance issues such as the N+1 query issue if not configured or utilized correctly.

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    fulltext
  • 206.
    Syromiatnikov, Artem
    et al.
    Tele2, ProposalsFactory.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    A Journey Through the Land of Model-View-* Design Patterns2014In: 2014 IEEE/IFIP Conference on Software Architecture (WICSA), IEEE, 2014, p. 21-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every software program that interacts with a user requires a user interface. Model-View-Controller (MVC) is a common design pattern to integrate a user interface with the application domain logic. MVC separates the representation of the application domain (Model) from the display of the application's state (View) and user interaction control (Controller). However, studying the literature reveals that a variety of other related patterns exists, which we denote with Model-View- (MV) design patterns. This paper discusses existing MV patterns classified in three main families: Model-View-Controller (MVC), Model-View-View Model (MVVM), and Model-View-Presenter (MVP). We take a practitioners' point of viewand emphasize the essentials of each family as well as the differences. The study shows that the selection of patterns should take into account the use cases and quality requirements at hand, and chosen technology. We illustrate the selection of a pattern with an example of our practice. The study results aim to bring more clarity in the variety of MV design patterns and help practitioners to make better grounded decisions when selecting patterns.

  • 207.
    Tahir, Muhammad
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Rasheed, Mobashir Ahmad
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    iPhone & Android Client For Mobile Webshop Framework2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphone and wireless network made cell phone a latest channel for trade, helping in shopping independent of time and place. Sellers are already doing online business and it is accessible to PC users but after visible growth of mobile users, they wants to extend business accessibility to mobile users but websites or web applications for PC users are not user friendly for mobile users. It is expensive and cumbersome to customize for mobile. So it is mandatory to develop an application for Smartphone which is cost effective, user friendly and efficient. Unavailability of this application can result in loss of potential customer to sellers and resources to end users.In this thesis our task is to present a framework that provides Smartphone application for Webshop. The application will be built in accordance with Webshop that will offer the end user the facility to achieve same behavior as experienced on Webshop instead of troubling through using with small mobile screen. This will result in facilitation to both customer and seller.

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    iPhone & Android Client For Mobile Webshop Framework
  • 208.
    Tao, Bo
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Jiang, Xiaoming
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering.
    Framework for Flexible Connectors with Java Reflection Proxies2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the results of a master level thesis project that analyzes and designs about the issue “Framework for Flexible Connectors with Java Reflection Proxies”. In this project, there are two main issues; first one is about finding a way to implement the function of a connector. And the other one is to build a framework for flexible connectors.

    By studying on Java’s dynamic proxy, we find we can use it to implement the function of a connector. When building a connector chain, we use an important Java technique--Java Reflection API.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 209.
    Tasim, Taner
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    A general framework for scraping newspaper websites2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Data streaming nowadays is one of the most used approaches used by websites and applications to supply the end user with the latest articles and news. As a lot of news websites and companies are founded every day, such data centers must be flexible and it must be easy to introduce a new website to keep track of. The main goal of this project is to investigate two frameworks where implementing a robot for given website should take some acceptable amount of time. It is really challenging task, first of all it aims optimizing of a framework which means to put less efforts on something and have the same result and one another thing is that it will be used by professors and students at the end so quality and robustness play big role here. In order to overcome this challenge two different types of news websites were investigated and through this process the approximately time to implement a single robot was extracted. Having in mind the time spent to implement a single robot, the new frameworks were implemented with the goal to spend less time to implement a new web robot. The results are two general frameworks for two different types of websites, where implementing a robot does not take so much efforts and time. The implementation time of a new robot was reduced from 18 hours to approximately 4 hours.

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  • 210. Telea, Alexandru
    et al.
    Kerren, AndreasLinnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.Marcus, Andrian
    Proceedings of the 1st IEEE Working Conference on Software Visualization (VISSOFT '13)2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 211. Tofan, Dan
    et al.
    Galster, Matthias
    Avgeriou, Paris
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Software engineering researchers’ attitudes on case studies and experiments: an exploratory survey2011In: IET Seminar Digests: Evaluation Assessment in Software Engineering, Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2011, p. 91-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 212.
    Toll, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Visualizing programming session timelines2018In: Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Visual Information Communication and Interaction, ACM Publications, 2018, p. 106-107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning programming with tutor tools has grown in popularity. These tools present programming assignments and provide feedback in the form of test-cases and compilation errors. Our timeline visualization of data from one such tool allows us to tell a story about what files were accessed and for how long, in what order files were edited, grown or shrunk, what errors the student ran into, and how those errors were addressed. This can be done without a need to read and replay the entire programming session. In sum, the tool has been used to visualize logs from students that tried to solve programming assignments and we find interesting stories that can help us improve how we address new assignments.

  • 213.
    Tonella, Paolo
    et al.
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy.
    Susi, Angelo
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy.
    Palma, Francis
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy.
    Interactive requirements prioritization using a genetic algorithm2013In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 173-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context

    The order in which requirements are implemented affects the delivery of value to the end-user, but it also depends on technical constraints and resource availability. The outcome of requirements prioritization is a total ordering of requirements that best accommodates the various kinds of constraints and priorities. During requirements prioritization, some decisions on the relative importance of requirements or the feasibility of a given implementation order must necessarily resort to a human (e.g., the requirements analyst), possessing the involved knowledge.

    Objective

    In this paper, we propose an Interactive Genetic Algorithm (IGA) that includes incremental knowledge acquisition and combines it with the existing constraints, such as dependencies and priorities. We also assess the performance of the proposed algorithm.

    Method

    The validation of IGA was conducted on a real case study, by comparing the proposed algorithm with the state of the art, interactive prioritization technique Incomplete Analytic Hierarchy Process (IAHP).

    Results

    The proposed method outperforms IAHP in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and robustness to decision maker errors.

    Conclusion

    IGA produces a good approximation of the reference requirements ranking, requiring an acceptable manual effort and tolerating a reasonable human error rate.

  • 214.
    Tonella, Paolo
    et al.
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy.
    Susi, Angelo
    Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Italy.
    Palma, Francis
    University of Trento, Italy.
    Using Interactive GA for Requirements Prioritization2010In: SSBSE '10: Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Search Based Software Engineering, ACM Press, 2010, p. 57-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The order in which requirements are implemented in a system affects the value delivered to the final users in the successive releases of the system. Requirements prioritization aims at ranking the requirements so as to trade off user priorities and implementation constraints, such as technical dependencies among requirements and necessarily limited resources allocated to the project. Requirement analysts possess relevant knowledge about the relative importance of requirements. We use an Interactive Genetic Algorithm to produce a requirement ordering which complies with the existing priorities, satisfies the technical constraints and takes into account the relative preferences elicited from the user. On a real case study, we show that this approach improves non interactive optimization, ignoring the elicited preferences, and that it can handle a number of requirements which is otherwise problematic for state of the art techniques.

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  • 215.
    Ulan, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Multi-criteria Ranking Based on Joint Distributions: A Tool to Support Decision Making2019In: Perspectives in Business Informatics Research.BIR 2019: 18th International Conference on Business Informatics Research / [ed] Pańkowska M., Sandkuhl K, Springer, 2019, p. 74-88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound assessment and ranking of alternatives are fundamental to effective decision making. Creating an overall ranking is not trivial if there are multiple criteria, and none of the alternatives is the best according to all criteria. To address this challenge, we propose an approach that aggregates criteria scores based on their joint (probability) distribution and obtains the ranking as a weighted product of these scores. We evaluate our approach in a real-world use case based on a funding allocation problem and compare it with the traditional weighted sum aggregation model. The results show that the approaches assign similar ranks, while our approach is more interpretable and sensitive.

  • 216.
    Ulan, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Hönel, Sebastian
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Martins, Rafael Messias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Kerren, Andreas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Quality Models Inside Out: Interactive Visualization of Software Metrics by Means of Joint Probabilities2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Sixth IEEE Working Conference on Software Visualization, (VISSOFT), Madrid, Spain, 2018 / [ed] J. Ángel Velázquez Iturbide, Jaime Urquiza Fuentes, Andreas Kerren, and Mircea F. Lungu, IEEE, 2018, p. 65-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing software quality, in general, is hard; each metric has a different interpretation, scale, range of values, or measurement method. Combining these metrics automatically is especially difficult, because they measure different aspects of software quality, and creating a single global final quality score limits the evaluation of the specific quality aspects and trade-offs that exist when looking at different metrics. We present a way to visualize multiple aspects of software quality. In general, software quality can be decomposed hierarchically into characteristics, which can be assessed by various direct and indirect metrics. These characteristics are then combined and aggregated to assess the quality of the software system as a whole. We introduce an approach for quality assessment based on joint distributions of metrics values. Visualizations of these distributions allow users to explore and compare the quality metrics of software systems and their artifacts, and to detect patterns, correlations, and anomalies. Furthermore, it is possible to identify common properties and flaws, as our visualization approach provides rich interactions for visual queries to the quality models’ multivariate data. We evaluate our approach in two use cases based on: 30 real-world technical documentation projects with 20,000 XML documents, and an open source project written in Java with 1000 classes. Our results show that the proposed approach allows an analyst to detect possible causes of bad or good quality.

  • 217.
    Ulan, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Wingkvist, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Introducing Quality Models Based On Joint Probabilities: Introducing Quality Models Based On Joint Probabilities2018In: ICSE '18 Proceedings of the 40th International Conference on Software Engineering: Companion Proceeedings, IEEE, 2018, p. 216-217Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multi-dimensional goals can be formalized in so-called quality models. Often, each dimension is assessed with a set of metrics that are not comparable; they come with different units, scale types, and distributions of values. Aggregating the metrics to a single quality score in an ad-hoc manner cannot be expected to provide a reliable basis for decision making. Therefore, aggregation needs to be mathematically well-defined and interpretable. We present such a way of defining quality models based on joint probabilities. We exemplify our approach using a quality model with 30 standard metrics assessing technical documentation quality and study ca. 20,000 real-world files. We study the effect of several tests on the independence and results show that metrics are, in general, not independent. Finally, we exemplify our suggested definition of quality models in this domain.

  • 218.
    Van Der Donckt, Jeroen
    et al.
    Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Iftikhar, M. Usman
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Buttar, Sarpreet Singh
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). sb223ce@student.lnu.se.
    Effective Decision Making in Self-adaptive Systems Using Cost-Benefit Analysis at Runtime and Online Learning of Adaptation Spaces2019In: Evaluation of Novel Approaches to Software Engineering: 13th International Conference, ENASE 2018, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, March 23–24, 2018, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Ernesto Damiani, George Spanoudakis & Leszek A. Maciaszek, Springer, 2019, p. 373-403Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-adaptation is an established approach to deal with uncertainties that are difficult to predict before a system is deployed. A self-adaptative system employs a feedback loop that tracks changes and adapts the system accordingly to ensure its quality goals. However, making effective adaptation decisions at runtime is challenging. In this chapter we tackle two problems of effective decision making in self-adaptive systems. First, current research typically focusses on the benefits adaptaton can bring but ignores the cost of adaptation, which may invalidate the expected benefits. To tackle this problem, we introduce CB@R (Cost-Benefit analysis @ Runtime), a novel model-based approach for runtime decision-making in self-adaptive systems that handles both the benefits and costs of adaptation as first-class citizens in decision making. Second, we look into the adaptation space of self-adaptive systems, i.e. the set of adaption options to select from. For systems with a large number of adaptation options, analyzing the entire adaptation space is often not feasible given the time and resources constraints at hand. To tackle this problem, we present a machine learning approach that integrates learning with the feedback loop to select a subset of the adaption options that are valid in the current situation. We evaluate CB@R and the learning approach for a real world deployed Internet of Things (IoT) application.

  • 219. van der Duim, Louwarnoud
    et al.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering. Datalogi.
    Sinnema, Marco
    Good Practices for Educational Software Engineering Projects2007In: 29th International Conference on Software Engineering, 2007. (ICSE 2007). 29th International Conference on, IEEE Computer Society , 2007, p. 698-707Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent publications indicate the importance of software engineering in the computer science curriculum. In this paper, we present the final part of software engineering education at University of Groningen in the Netherlands and Växjö University in Sweden, where student teams perform an industrial software development project. It furthermore presents the main educational problems encountered in such real-life projects and explains how this international course addresses these problems. The main contribution of this paper is a set of seven good practices for project based software engineering education.

  • 220. Van Dyke Parunak, H.
    et al.
    Weyns, Danny
    Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems: Special Issue on Environments for Multiagent Systems2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Vergori, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Tamburri, Damian A
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Perez-Palacin, Diego
    Univeristy of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Mirandola, Raffaela
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    DevOps Performance Engineering: A Quasi-Ethnographical Study2017In: Proceedings of the 8th ACM/SPEC on International Conference on Performance Engineering Companion, New York, USA: ACM Press, 2017, p. 127-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DevOps is a software engineering strategy to reduce software changes' rollout times by adopting any set of tactics that reduce friction in software lifecycles and their organisational variables, for example: coordination, communication, product evolution, deployment, operation, continuous architecting, continuous integration and more. Going DevOps is increasingly demanding that software engineering disciplines which were typically product-oriented such as software performance engineering to rethink their typical comfort zone, enlarging their scope from product, to process or even further to ecosystem and organisational levels of abstraction. This article makes an attempt at understanding what are the dimensions in DevOps organisational scenarios that can be addressed with a performance engineering lens. To do this, we performed a quasi-ethnographical study featuring a real-life industrial DevOps scenario. Discussing our results we conclude that many synergies exist between DevOps and performance engineering each with peculiarities, limitations and challenges - more research is needed to offer a full-spectrum performance-engineering support for DevOps practitioners.

  • 222.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    An Open Architecture Approach for the Design and Development of Web and Mobile Software2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid evolution of web and mobile technologies as well as open standards are important ingredients for developing open software applications. HTML5, affordable electronics, and connectivity costs are some of the trends that drive the web towards an open platform and lead to an increased use of distributed applications. Proprietary software technologies have been extensively deployed throughout multiple platforms, including desktop, web, and mobile systems. Such systems are closed in many cases. Thus, it is rather difficult to expand existing and create additional features for them. Web and mobile software development is fragmented with the existence of multiple browsers and mobile operating systems, that comply differently with web standards. The evolution of web and mobile technologies, coupled with the changes in the deployment environments in which they operate, has resulted in complex requirements that are challenging to satisfy. Additionally, the largest part of the development lifecycle is related to the need to constantly change/modify these software systems within a short-time period. The fact that these systems evolve over time makes it difficult to meet the changing requirements.

    In this thesis, we offer a novel open architecture approach in the area of web and mobile software design and development when dealing with heterogeneous device environments, together with constantly evolving and dynamic requirements. This approach is grounded on our experiences gained during the last four years of project work regarding the development of a web and mobile software system to support mobile inquiry learning. This case served as a testbed for experimentation with heterogeneous device environments. After five development iterations, our software solution is considered robust, flexible, and expandable as a platform. Among others, this was validated with being tested with more than 500 users. The open architecture approach is also grounded on a literature survey of state of the art projects and definitions related to this concept. The outcomes of this thesis show that an open architecture approach is characterized by flexibility, customizability, and extensibility, which are instantiated into a set of properties. The importance of stressing these three characteristics and their properties in the open architecture approach is based on the identified needs of using open source components, using open data standards, and reducing development time. The research efforts in this thesis resulted in a refined definition of an open architecture approach as well as the initial and refined models that are contextualized within the field of web and mobile software. 

    For validation of the research, the Goal Question Metric (GQM) approach is adapted and extended with a layer of Tasks/Activities. The data is collected from the project work mentioned above and three follow-up cases. The results show that the benefits of an open architecture approach can be reflected in terms of: achievement of the software system’s long-term goals; reduced development time; and increased satisfaction of the users. These benefits refer to the possibility to easily adapt emerging technologies and address dynamic changes and requirements. The contributions of this thesis are threefold: (1) for researchers, our open architecture approach could be used to analyze a system from a top down perspective; (2) for developers, it could be used as an approach to identify and address the needs for building an open evolvable system from a bottom up perspective; (3) for domain experts in the technology enhanced learning field, it could be used as a sustainability approach through which to integrate new tools and address complex requirements when designing new educational activities.

  • 223.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Mikkonen, Tommi
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Media Technology.
    From Architectural Requirements towards an Open Architecture for Web and Mobile Societal Applications2014In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Inclusive Web Programming - Programming on the Web with Open Data for Societal Applications, ACM Publications, 2014, p. 20-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reflects on our experiences during the last four years regarding the development of a web & mobile application for sustainable environment. After five development cycles our software application has become robust, flexible, and expandable platform. Inspired from this and the needs identified during this process we report our research towards identifying novel architectural approaches that nourish open data and emerging web standards for developing open societal applications. The efforts resulted in an open architecture approach that relies on a set of key characteristics - flexibility, evolvability, customizability, and extensibility. Stressing these characteristics refers to the identified needs of using open standards and reducing development time. The results show that an open architecture approach provides the key ingredients in terms of system integration and data interoperability as well as the ability of the software to grow in terms of new services, devices, and subsystems attached to it, primarily due to the use of open source components and open data standards.

  • 224.
    Vogel, Bahtijar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Kurti, Arianit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Mikkonen, Tommi
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    Towards an Open Architecture Model for Web and Mobile Software: Characteristics and Validity Properties2014In: 2014 IEEE 38th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC) / [ed] Chang, CK; Gao, Y; Hurson, A; Matskin, M; McMillin, B; Okabe, Y; Seceleanu, C; Yoshida, K, IEEE Press, 2014, p. 476-485Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proprietary software solutions are extensively deployed through multiple platforms including desktop, web and mobile devices. Such systems are in many cases closed, thus making it difficult for software developers to expand and create additional features to these systems. Recent research in the field of web and mobile technologies indicates that open systems are more successful than those based on proprietary technologies. In this paper, we investigate and analyze existing research related to the notion of open architectures. We conducted a literature survey of the state of the art projects and definitions related to this concept. Our efforts have resulted in a refined definition of the term followed by a conceptual model of an open architecture contextualized within the field of web and mobile software. The model primarily relies on four key characteristics, namely flexibility, evolvability, customizability and extensibility. Furthermore, we present a validation plan based on the GQM approach that further instantiates these characteristics into a set of properties that can serve as metrics.

  • 225. Vromant, Pieter
    et al.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Malek, Sam
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    On interacting control loops in self-adaptive systems2011In: Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Software Engineering for Adaptive and Self-Managing Systems, ACM Press, 2011, p. 202-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 226.
    Wagnberg, Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Danielsson, Peter
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Internal Dashboard2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project is about creating a Dashboard with suitable data models containing support ticket statistics for the company Sigma IT Consulting. The work flow used by Sigma today is to manually log in to the system to see the support ticket statistics, which can be a tedious and time consuming process. Furthermore, Sigma do not have any monitoring system for checking the health of their web application services. They have a need for an internal Dashboard containing this information with regularly updates. Our solution is to design suitable data models and implement them within a Dashboard application.

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    fulltext
  • 227.
    Wang, Yue
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Web services for a Software Development Platform2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Web service is a sophisticated SOA technology with a lot of infrastructure. In this thesis we will get to understand the core aspects and advance futures of Web services and get a solution based on Sauer-Danfoss’s requirements. The critical requirement include to find appropriate Web services application server, to realize an automatic update process and to get a general overview of Web services technology. The challenges in this thesis is obviously in getting understand Web services architecture and programming in unfamiliar language using chosen Web services framework.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 228. Weyns, D.
    et al.
    Boucké, N.
    Holvoet, T.
    Demarsin, B.
    Dyncnet: A protocol for dynamic task assignment in multiagent systems2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Weyns, Danny
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    A pattern language for multi-agent systems2009In: Software Architecture, 2009 & European Conference on Software Architecture. WICSA/ECSA 2009. Joint Working IEEE/IFIP Conference on, 2009, p. 191-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing architectural support for self-adaptive systems, i.e. systems that are able to autonomously adapt to changes in their operating conditions, is a key challenge for software engineers. Multi-agent systems are a class of decentralized systems that are known for realizing qualities such as adaptability and scalability. In this paper, we present a pattern language for multi-agent systems. The pattern language distills domain-specific architectural knowledge derived from extensive experiences with developing various multi-agent systems. The pattern language, consisting of the five interrelated patterns, supports architects with designing software architectures for a family of self-adaptive systems. We illustrate the patterns for a case study in the domain of automated transportation systems.

  • 230.
    Weyns, Danny
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Architectural design of an automatic guided vehicle (AGV) transportation system with a multi-agent system approach2006In: Proceedings of the Second Sofware Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop / [ed] Robert L. Nord, 2006, p. 13-15Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Weyns, Danny
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Architecture-based design of multi-agent systems2010Book (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Engineering self-adaptive software systems - An organized tour2018In: Proceedings - 2018 IEEE 3rd International Workshops on Foundations and Applications of Self* Systems, FAS*W 2018, IEEE, 2018, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering software that is subject to uncertainties that are difficult to anticipate before deployment is challenging. Self-adaptation extends a software system with an external feedback loop system that monitors the system and adapts its configuration or architecture to ensure that its qualities are met under uncertain operating conditions. In this tutorial, we provide a particular perspective on the evolution of the field of selfadaptation in six waves. These waves put complementary aspects of engineering self-adaptive systems in focus that synergetically have contributed to the current body of knowledge in the field.

  • 233.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Software engineering of self-adaptive systems2019In: Handbook of Software Engineering / [ed] Sungdeok Cha, Richard N. Taylor & Kyochul Kang, Springer, 2019, p. 399-443Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern software systems are expected to operate under uncertain conditions, without interruption. Possible causes of uncertainties include changes in the operational environment, dynamics in the availability of resources, and variations of user goals. The aim of self-adaptation is to let the system collect additional data about the uncertainties during operation. The system uses the additional data to resolve uncertainties, to reason about itself, and based on its goals to reconfigure or adjust itself to satisfy the changing conditions, or if necessary to degrade gracefully. In this chapter, we provide a particular perspective on the evolution of the field of self-adaptation in six waves. These waves put complementary aspects of engineering self-adaptive systems in focus that synergistically have contributed to the current knowledge in the field. From the presented perspective on the field, we outline a number of challenges for future research in self-adaptation, both in a short and long term. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019. All rights are reserved.

  • 234.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Towards an Integrated Approach for Validating Qualities of Self-Adaptive Systems2012In: Proceeding of the 2012 Workshop on Dynamic Analysis, ACM Press, 2012, p. 24-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-adaptation has been widely recognized as an effective approach to deal with the increasing complexity and dynamicity of modern software systems. One major challenge in self-adaptive systems is to provide guarantees about the required runtime qualities, such as performance and reliability. Existing research employs formal methods either to provide guarantees about the design of a self-adaptive systems, or to perform runtime analysis supporting adaptations for particular quality goals. Yet, work products of formalization are not exploited over different phases of the software life cycle. In this position paper, we argue for an integrated formally founded approach to validate the required software qualities of self-adaptive systems. This approach integrates three activities: (1) model checking of the behavior of a self-adaptive system during design, (2) model-based testing of the concrete implementation during development, and (3) runtime diagnosis after system deployment. We illustrate the approach with excerpts of an initial study and discuss for each activity research challenges ahead.

  • 235.
    Weyns, Danny
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Variability: From Software Product Lines to Self-Adaptive Systems2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variability is commonly understood as the ability of a software system or software artifact (e.g., component) to be changed so that it fits a specific context. Variability allows adapting the structure of a software system, its behavior, or underlying processes. These adaptations are enabled through variation points and variants as options that can be selected at these variation points. So far, variability has mainly been studied in the classic software product line domain. However, variability is not limited to product lines or families, but imposes challenges on software development in general. Many other types of today's software systems are built with variability in mind; one prominent type is self-adaptive systems that are capable to adapt autonomously at runtime, another is dynamic software product lines that combines principles from product lines with self-adaptation. In this talk, I summarize the results of an extensive survey we recently performed on the use of variability in software systems in general [1]. Based on our findings, I present dimensions of variability in software engineering. This empirically grounded set of core dimensions provides a step towards an integrated perspective of variability in software systems, spanning across loosely coupled research areas in the software engineering community. To conclude, I outline some interesting opportunities for future research.

  • 236.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Ahmad, Tanvir
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Claims and Evidence for Architecture-Based Self-Adaptation: A Systematic Literature Review2013In: Software Architecture: 7th European Conference, ECSA 2013, Montpellier, France, July 1-5, 2013. Proceedings, Springer, 2013, p. 249-265Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering the upcoming generation of software systems and guaranteeing the required qualities is complex due to the inherent uncertainties at design time, such as new user needs and changing availability of resources. Architecture-based self-adaptation is a promising approach to tackle these challenges. In this approach, a system maintains a model of itself and adapts itself to realize particular quality objectives using a feedback loop. Despite a vast body of work, no systematic study has been performed on the claims associated with architecture-based self-adaptation and the evidence that exists for these claims. As such insight is important for researchers and engineers, we performed a systematic literature review covering 20 leading software engineering conferences and journals in the field, resulting in 121 studies used for data collection. The review shows that self-adaptation is primarily used to improve performance, reliability, and flexibility. The tradeoffs implied by self-adaptation have not received much attention, and evidence is mainly obtained from simple examples. From the study, we derive a number of recommendations for future research in architecturebased self-adaptive systems.

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    fulltext
  • 237.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    CAKE: Codifying Architecture Knowledge Effectively2011In: Proceedings of the 1th International Software Technology Exchange Workshop, Swedsoft , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    2011STEW
  • 238.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    On the Challenges of Self-adaptation in Systems of Systems2013In: Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Software Engineering for Systems-of-Systems, ACM Press, 2013, p. 47-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system of systems (SoS) integrates independently useful systems into a larger system. Examples are integrated surveillance systems and networked smart homes. A SoS offers functions to users that cannot be provided by its individual parts, but emerge as a combination of these. However, providing these functions with a required level of quality is difficult due to inherent uncertainties, such as systems that attach and detach at will and faults that are difficult to predict. Self-adaptation is a well-studied approach that enables a system to reason about itself and adapt to achieve particular quality objectives in the face of uncertainties and change. However, the inherently decentralized nature of SoS raises fundamental challenges to self-adaptation. This paper presents three architectural styles to realize self-adaptation in SoS, discusses key challenges for each style, and outlines starting points that could help to tackle these challenges.

  • 239.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Boucké, Nelis
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Schelfthout, Kurt
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Holvoet, Tom
    Katholieke Universitiet Leuven.
    DynCNET: a protocol for flexible task assignment applied in an AGV transportation system2006In: Proceedings of the 4th European Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems, 2006, Vol. 223, p. 359-370Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper is part of an ongoing effort to study suitable task assignment mechanismsfor decentralized MAS. Our focus is on systems that are characterized by tasks with delayedcommencement. Such a task requires a preceding effort before the agent can start executing the task. Anexample is a robot that first has to move to the location of a task before it can start executing that task.Important quality requirements for assigning tasks with delayed commencement are flexibility (enableagents to adapt task assignment with changing circumstances) and openness (enable agents to take intoaccount other agents that come and go during the process of task assignment).In previous work, we have studied Contract Net (CNET) and a field-based approach for task assignment(FiTA). CNET does not provide the required flexibility and openness. FiTA satisfies the requiredqualities, however, the field-based approach provides an emergent solution for task assignment. It is wellknown that emergent solutions are difficult to engineer and reason about. This raises the question whetherit is not easier to extend CNET to take dynamics and changes into account.This paper presents the DynCNET protocol. DynCNET is an extention of CNET, with “Dyn” referringto support for dynamic task assignment. DynCNET provides flexibility and openness for assigningtasks with delayed commencement. We compare the DynCNET protocol with CNET and FiTA in anAGV transportation system. Our experiences in this real-world setting show that: (1) the performance ofDynCNET and FiTA are similar, while both outperform CNET; (2) extending CNET to deal with delayedcommencement of tasks is not obvious; the complexity to engineer DynCNET is similar to FiTA but muchmore complex than CNET; (3) whereas task assignment with FiTA is an emergent solution, DynCNETexplicitly specifies the interaction among agents allowing engineers to reason on the assignment of tasks.This latter property may be of overriding importance in the selection of an agent-based approach for task assignment in practice.

  • 240.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke Univerisiteit, Leuven.
    Boucké, Nelis
    Schelfthout, Kurt
    Holvoet, Tom
    DynCNET: A Protocol for Flexible Task Assignment in Situated Multiagent Systems2007In: In 1st International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self Organizing Systems, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven.
    Brueckner, Sven A.Demazeau, Yves
    Engineering Environment-Mediated Multi-Agent Systems: International Workshop, EEMMAS 2007, Dresden, Germany, October 5, 2007, Selected Revised and Invited Papers2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Calinescu, Radu
    University of York, UK.
    Tele Assistance: A Self-Adaptive Service-Based System Examplar2015In: Proceedings: 2015 IEEE/ACM 10th International Symposium on Software Engineering for Adaptive and Self-Managing Systems (SEAMS), IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 88-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on adaptive and self-managing systems is hindered by a lack of prototypical applications that researchers could use to evaluate and compare new methods, techniques and tools. To address this limitation, we introduce a reference implementation of a Tele Assistance System (TAS) for research onself-adaptation in the domain of service-based systems. Our TAS exemplar of service-based systemscomes with pre-defined scenarios for comparing the effectiveness of different self-adaptation solutions. Other researchers can easily exploit the underlying service platform, reusable components and development method we devised for TAS to speed up the engineering of additional research exemplars for service-based systems.

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    fulltext
  • 243.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.
    Capilla, Rafael
    Current and emerging topics in software architecture (ECSA 2010 Workshops Summary)2010In: Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Software Architecture: Companion Volume / [ed] Carlos E. Cuesta, ACM Press, 2010, p. 59-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2004 in St. Andrews (Scotland, U.K.), ECSA the European Conference on Software Architecture (formerly EWSA, the European Workshop on Software Architecture) has been considered as an important meeting point for researchers and practitioners on the topic of software architecture. ECSA has matured from a workshop format to a full software engineering conference in the subfield of software architecture.

    This year, ECSA has become more ambitious and expanded its scope and schedule up to four full days. The program includes a series of tutorials, a doctoral mentoring program, and four full-day workshops. New and existing software challenges have led to a variety of trends in software architecture research, which makes the conference and workshops more attractive and promotes the discussion on current and emerging topics.

    Based on the scientific and technical interest of the topics, the innovativeness of workshop topics, and the capacity of the conference workshop program, the workshop co-chairs selected four workshops from the nine submitted proposals. We summarize the aims and goals of each workshop and the contributions accepted for the four workshops:

    • 2nd International Workshop on Software Ecosystems (EcoSys). Piers Campbell, Faheem Ahmed, Jan Bosch, Sliger Jansen.

    • 1st International Workshop on Measurability of Security in Software Architectures (MeSSa). Reijo Savola, Teemu Kranstén, Antti Evesti.

    • 8th Nordic Workshop on Model Driven Software Engineering (NW-MODE). Andrzej Wasowski, Dragos Truscan, Ludwik Kuzniarz.

    • 1st International Workshop on Variability in Software Product Line Architectures (VARI-ARCH). Alexander Helleboogh, Paris Avgeriou, Nelis Boucke, Patryck Heymans.

    The ECSA 2010 Workshop co-chairs would like to thanks all workshop organizers for their effort and enthusiasm to attract submission in different software architecture research topics and make the ECSA 2010 workshops a success.

  • 244.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Caporuscio, Mauro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Andersson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Pllana, Sabri
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM), Department of Computer Science.
    Software Technology for Self-Adaptive Systems2017In: Swedsoft's Software Technology Exchange Workshop, 18-19 oktober, 2017, Stockholm, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science. KU Leuven.
    Caporuscio, Mauro
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Axelsson, Clara
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine and Optometry.
    BoConnect – Reliable Assistive Technologies to Empower Elderly People to Live Independently Longer2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BoConnect was a multi-disciplinary collaborative research project between Linnaeus University and Växjö and Kalmarmunicipalities in Sweden. The project had a budget of 3 MSEK; it stated Jan. 2015 and ended Dec. 2016.The project studied reliable assistive technologies to support elderly people. In contrast to existing work in this areathatis often limited to small-scale technology-driven pilots that are poorly embedded in the social living context, the BoConnect project took a holistic perspective on assistive technologies and put user needs and reliability of the solutions in focus, both from a technological and organizational perspective. This report summarizes the main results of the project.

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    fulltext
  • 246.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). KU Leuven, Austria.
    Ericsson, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM).
    Frejdestedt, Frans
    Ericsson AB.
    Thornadtsson, Johan
    Sigma Technology.
    Hulth, Anna-Karin
    Sigma Technology.
    Applying Self-Adaptation to Automate the Management of Online Documentation of Telecom Systems2018In: 14th International Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE): Munich, Germany, August 20-24, 2018, IEEE, 2018, p. 1375-1380Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering software-intensive systems, such as production systems, is complex as these systems are subject to various types of changes that are often difficult to anticipate before deployment. Tackling this complexity requires joint expertise from different backgrounds. In this paper we focus on the problem of maintaining online technical documentation of telecom systems. In the context of continuous deployment and ever-changing user needs, high quality of the documentation of such products is in a key concern of users. To tackle this problem, different experts worked together equipping the online documentation system with a feedback loop. This feedback loop tracks changes in the system and its context and automatically adapts the documentation accordingly. The results demonstrate that this self-adaptation approach offers a viable solution to tackle the maintainability problem of online documentation of telecom systems.

  • 247.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of computer science and media technology (CM). Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Gamble, Rose
    University of Tulsa, USA.
    Esterle, Lukas
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Message from the Chairs2019In: International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems, SASO, ISSN 1949-3673, E-ISSN 1949-3681, p. VIII-IXArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presents the introductory welcome message from the conference proceedings. May include the conference officers' congratulations to all involved with the conference event and publication of the proceedings record.

  • 248.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke University Leuven.
    Georgeff, Michael
    Monash University.
    Self-adaptation using multiagent systems2010In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Gleizes, Marie- PierrePaul Sabatier University, France.
    Agent-Oriented Software Engineering XI: 11th International Workshop, AOSE 2010, Toronto, Canada, May 10-11, 2010, Revised Selected Papers2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Weyns, Danny
    et al.
    Katholieke University Leuven.
    Helleboogh, Alexander
    Katholieke University Leuven.
    Holvoet, Tom
    Katholieke University Leuven.
    How to get multi-agent systems accepted in industry?2009In: International Journal of Agent-Oriented Software Engineering, ISSN 1746-1375, E-ISSN 1746-1383, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 383-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With many researchers in the Multi-Agent System (MAS) community, we share the opinion that too much of the quality and relevant research in the area of MAS is underrepresented in the development of complex distributed systems in practice today. In our experience, a Babylonic mismatch is a crucial factor in this fact – research on MAS profiles itself as an isolated community and, as such, may create artificial thresholds to convince mainstream software developers of its merits. We argue that integrating the concepts and techniques from agent-based software engineering within mainstream software engineering provides opportunities to amplify the industrial adoption of MAS. To ground this position, we discuss MAS engineering from the perspective of the software engineering area that we are most familiar with: software architecture.

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